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Samir Hussein/WireImage(VICTORIA, British Columbia) — Prince George and Princess Charlotte made their second appearance of their family’s eight-day tour of Canada Thursday at a children’s party for military families.

The 3-year-old prince and 16-month-old princess could hardly contain their excitement at the party, where Charlotte was seen walking and talking for the first time in public. The toddler exclaimed, “Pop!,” as she hugged a balloon arch on the ground and later called her father, “Dada.” Charlotte also excitedly bounded towards a dog named Moose while she and her big brother, George, played with a bubble squirt gun.

George and Charlotte were accompanied by their parents, Princess Kate and Prince William, at the event held at Government House in Victoria, British Columbia.

George, who seemed a bit subdued next to his boisterous sister, climbed aboard a pony with the help of his parents and hugged his baby sitter while they examined the balloons. When Kate took Charlotte to have a balloon animal made, George, who was playing with a rabbit, quickly ran over saying, “But I want one. Can I have one?”

Charlotte wore a Pepa company blue smocked dress, which retails for $100, and a tiny blue sweater with a tiny blue bow holding back her brown hair. George was in his trademark shorts in maroon with a blue sweater.

Government House has been the family’s main base since arriving in Canada last Saturday. George and Charlotte have stayed there in Victoria with their nanny, Maria Teresa Borallo, while their parents traveled to different cities nearby for engagements.

William and Kate’s whirlwind tour of Canada has seen them dazzle at a diplomatic reception at Government House and travel to Vancouver and Bella Bella, British Columbia. They also traveled to Kelowna, in the beautiful Okanagan Valley, where they met with University of British Columbia students and sampled local delicacies at the “Taste of British Columbia” festival at a local winery.

Charlotte and George stole the show in their only prior appearance in Canada, when the family arrived in Victoria on Saturday. Charlotte, on her first royal tour, was carried down the plane’s steps by her mother, while George, on his second royal tour, walked on his own, holding his parents’ hands and watching the planes and gathered crowd in awe.

The family will depart from Canada on Saturday. They visited the country on behalf of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and at the invitation of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

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iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) — A new video shows parts of Aleppo in ruins, as humanitarian organizations call for an end to the Syrian government’s recent offensive on the eastern part of the city.

In the video, released by the Syrian military, Syrian soldiers are walking around damaged areas and aiming with guns. Buildings in the neighborhood have been reduced to rubble.

Meanwhile, the besieged part of eastern Aleppo is still waiting for humanitarian assistance amid an upsurge of violence. For weeks, the United Nations has had aid loaded on vehicles parked by the Turkish border waiting for a green light to enter the besieged city, where up to 275,000 people are in need of food, water, shelter and medical supplies, according to the U.N.

Initially, 40 aid trucks were ready to enter — but due to increased violence and an attack on an aid convoy, the aid was suspended. Only 20 of the 40 trucks now remain at the border, according to the U.N. The other 20 had to move to make room for other traffic. The aid will instead be distributed in other places inside Syria.

“Obviously, the humanitarian situation inside east Aleppo is going from bad to worse,” David Swanson, spokesman for the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, told ABC News. “The situation even before this recent upsurge in violence was dire with many people lacking access to food, health, shelter and water. Between 250,000 and 275,000 people are now living without proper access to running drinking water. Right now, 20 trucks are standby and ready to enter as soon as the latest round of violence improves.”

Airstrikes intensified after the Syrian military declared an offensive against eastern Aleppo on Sept. 22 — a few days after announcing that a U.S.-Russia-brokered cease-fire had ended.

On Tuesday, a girl was rescued from under the rubble of a destroyed building in east Aleppo’s al-Shaar neighborhood. It took four hours to get her out of the building and she was the only survivor, according to the White Helmets, a group of unarmed, nonpartisan rescue workers in Syria. At least 24 people were killed and 15 wounded, said the White Helmets. Activists said the girl lost 16 members of her family in the attack.

Thursday morning, warplanes dropped bombs on the only bakery in the town of Anadan in the northern countryside of Aleppo. The bakery is now out of service, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. Most of the residents have already left the town due to persistent government airstrikes, the observatory said.

On Wednesday, two major hospitals in east Aleppo were attacked and are now out of service, including the besieged area’s largest trauma and ICU center.

“Let us be clear. Those using ever more destructive weapons know exactly what they are doing. They know they are committing war crimes,” U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said in a speech Wednesday. “Imagine the destruction. People with limbs blown off. Children in terrible pain with no relief. Infected. Suffering. Dying, with nowhere to go and no end in sight. Imagine a slaughterhouse. This is worse. Even a slaughterhouse is more humane. Hospitals, clinics, ambulances and medical staff in Aleppo are under attack around the clock.”

According to Physicians for Human Rights, 95 percent of medical personnel who were in Aleppo before the war have fled, been detained, or were killed. Only some 30 doctors are believed to be left in the rebel-held part of Aleppo.

“Attacking hospitals, aid convoys, and rescue workers is beyond horrific,” said Zaher Sahloul, a doctor and founder of the American Relief Coalition for Syria, a coalition of humanitarian organizations that provide assistance in Syria. “Every day brings new levels of horror for the people of Aleppo. By standing by and letting these attacks continue, it tells us the world has lost its moral compass.”

Activists say that government and Russian forces have used bunker-buster bombs to target people sheltering underground and cluster bombs to maximize the number of injured and killed in Aleppo.

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WABC-TV(NEW YORK) — The mother and brother of New York City bombing suspect Ahmad Rahami spent two nights in an Afghan jail before being released, though they have not been allowed to leave the country, Rahami’s father told ABC News Thursday.

The father, Mohammad Rahami, had said in an interview Tuesday that his wife Rajiba and son Qassim had been pulled off of a flight in Dubai, questioned for 16 hours and then sent against their wishes to Kabul, Afghanistan. The mother and son had been attempting to return to the U.S.

“Why send my son back to Afghanistan? He is a U.S. citizen,” Mohammad Rahami told ABC News then in his first in-depth broadcast interview. “You have any questions? Bring him home. [Don’t] send him to a different country.”

The elder Rahami denied that anyone else in his family had anything to do with his other son Ahmad Rahami’s alleged bombings in New York and New Jersey on Sept. 17, which injured 29 people.

The Rahami family is originally from Afghanistan. Ahmad came to the U.S. in 1995, got his Green Card in 2000 and became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 2011, Mohammad said.

Ahmad has been receiving treatment at a New Jersey hospital since he was shot seven times in a shootout with police two days after the bombings. He has been charged with a litany of crimes connected to the bombings, some other unexploded devices and the gun fight with police.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Jobless claims climbed higher last week, increasing by 3,000, according to the latest figures released Thursday by the Labor Department.

For the week ending Sept. 24, the number of people filing for benefits fell from a revised level of 251,000 the previous week to 254,000, marking the 82nd consecutive week initial jobless claims came in below 300,000. It’s the longest streak since 1970, the Labor Department says.

The Labor Department said there were no “special factors” impacting that week’s figures.

The four-week moving average, however, decreased by 2,250 to 256,250.

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Matthew Eisman/Getty Images for Amazon(NEW YORK) — Actor Kellan Lutz is a classic Hollywood heartthrob. His face has graced the ad campaigns of Abercrombie & Fitch, Levi’s and Calvin Klein, he’s landed leading roles in the Twilight film franchise and The Legend of Hercules, and makes cameos on TV series, including HBO’s The Comeback.

When Lutz is not on set or posting inspirational quotes on Instagram, the North Dakota native spends his time traveling the world and working with philanthropies like PETA, the Royal Family Kids’ Camp and the St. Bernard Project.

On a recent episode of “Real Biz with Rebecca Jarvis,” Lutz shared details about his past — like growing up in a big family — and how he manages to stay on top of his busy Hollywood career.

Here are three things you might not know about Lutz:

1. He is an entrepreneur with multiple patents

For anyone ever caught wearing an unflattering sleeping mask, Lutz has solved your problem with Blackout Bands.

“It’s pretty much a new age sleep mask,” said Lutz. “They’re sunglasses that are completely blacked out.”

His other inventions span the spectrum, from gadgets to games. Partnering with friends and family, Lutz has over 30 patents that he’d like to test out — where else, on the entrepreneurial ABC reality show Shark Tank.

“That’s a huge dream of mine to be in there,” he said. “That’s just always where I envisioned the products.”

2. He was almost a chemical engineer

“I was going to school at Chapman University for chemical engineering, and then you know, doors opened up,” Lutz said. “Modeling turned into commercial work and acting, and I kind of caught the acting bug. I found a passion for myself at the age of 19 and I just followed it.”

And because Lutz never grew up seeking stardom, it doesn’t break his stride if he doesn’t get called back from an audition.

“I don’t get desperate acting because it never was a dream of mine,” he said. “So if I don’t book a role, it wasn’t meant for me.”

3. Having seven siblings might have helped him become a successful actor

Sharing everything with six brothers and one sister can’t be easy, but it did teach Lutz some of the skills that have pushed him to Hollywood stardom.

“We had to fight for our food so I’m very competitive at heart but not with myself,” he shared. “I had a lot of alone time and I took advantage of that by building, drawing, painting, creating and just using my imagination. That’s a big part of what acting is.”

With a family farm in Iowa, Lutz and his siblings grew up working outside and staying active.

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Xinhua/Bao Dandan via Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf has arrived on Capitol Hill to testify in front of the House Financial Services Committee Thursday.

The bank boss was seen in the chamber preparing more than 30 minutes before the scheduled start of the hearing.

This is a developing story. Our preview of Thursday’s hearing is below. Please check back for the latest updates.

Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf will face another round of questioning on Capitol Hill Thursday — this time in a hearing held by the House Financial Services Committee.

Stumpf’s appearance in front of the panel comes a little over a week since he faced blistering questions and a call to resign during a Senate Banking Committee hearing, and as the bank continues to try to stem the sustained criticism it has faced since the alleged wrongdoing was revealed by government regulators on Sept. 8.

Though Stumpf has not resigned, he comes into the hearing on the heels of an announcement that Wells Fargo’s Independent Directors are launching an investigation into allegations that bank employees were opening accounts without customers’ knowledge or permission and that his pay had been frozen.

He will also not receive a bonus, they said, and would forgo receiving some $41 million worth of promised compensation.

The directors also said Carrie Tolstedt, who until July was the head of the division at the heart of the accounts scandal, had left the company and would not be receiving a bonus or severance pay. Her retirement announcement originally had her down to leave at “year’s end.”

ABC News has obtained and reviewed a copy of the remarks that Stumpf has prepared to deliver Thursday before the House panel.

Most notably, the CEO is expected to say that the bank is moving up the date at which it will end its controversial sales goals program. That program, which some regulators have alleged was a driving force behind the employees’ actions, was set to end by Jan. 1, 2017, the bank announced shortly after the scandal erupted.

However, the prepared remarks now say that the bank will end the program on Oct. 1.

Meanwhile, U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez confirmed this week that his agency would be launching “a top-to-bottom review of cases, complaints, or violations concerning Wells Fargo over the last several years.”

The Labor Department announcement follows several lawsuits, including from former employees, customers and shareholders, alleging wrongdoing.

The bank has faced near-constant criticism since Sept. 8, when regulators slapped it with a $185 million fine, saying that employees opened or attempted to open accounts without customers’ authorization.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) said at the time: “According to the bank’s own analysis, employees opened more than two million deposit and credit card accounts that may not have been authorized by consumers.”

Some of those accounts generated over $2 million in fees, according to the CFPB, and some 5,300 employees were fired, according to authorities.

In a statement issued when the fine was announced, the company said, “we regret and take responsibility for any instances where customers may have received a product that they did not request.”

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Pool/Sam Hussein/WireImage(NEW YORK) — Prince William and Princess Kate left their staff in a momentary state of panic Wednesday when they slid across a railroad bridge perched high above the icy waters of Canada’s Lake Bennett.

William and Kate, both 34, made the impromptu visit to the White Pass steam train in Carcross, Yukon, on the fifth day of their royal tour of Canada after learning that William’s grandparents, Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, rode a steam train during one of their visits to Canada.

Photos show William and Kate, wearing boots and a grey cardigan, sidestepping along the tracks above the water, holding onto the train for support. The couple blew the train’s steam whistle before returning to the rest of their day’s engagements.

The train visit was the second time Wednesday that William was touched by a memory of his family in Canada. While in Whitehorse, William was introduced to a 90-year-old man who said he met William’s late mother, Princess Diana, when she visited the area in the 1980s.

“I asked your father if he’d been to Yukon and he said no, and I said we ought to do something about that so I called the governor general and we made arrangements,” the man told William. “Then I got a call saying, ‘They can’t go, the princess is pregnant.’”

“Wow, that must have been me, or Harry,” said a surprised William.

The royal couple also enjoyed a laugh Wednesday when they joined children at the MacBride Museum of Yukon History in Whitehorse for story time on a log bench.

William and Kate both burst out laughing upon learning the book’s main character was named “William the Moose.”

Kate wore a striking Carolina Herrera coat for her day exploring the picturesque towns of Whitehorse and Carcross in the Yukon. The coat marked the third day Kate has worn crimson, in a nod to her Canadian hosts.

William and Kate are spending their time out of the spotlight on their tour of Canada with their children, Prince George, 3, and Princess Charlotte, 16 months. The family managed to secretly visit a local petting zoo Wednesday.

Prince George and Princess Charlotte will have their time in the spotlight Thursday as they join their parents at a children’s party for military families at Government House in Victoria, British Columbia. The party will mark the first time George and Charlotte have appeared at an official royal event since the family’s arrival in Canada last Saturday.

William, Kate, Charlotte and George are scheduled to depart Canada for the U.K. on Saturday.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Nearly half of the states in the U.S. have recently had their voter registration systems targeted by foreign hackers, and four of those systems have successfully been breached, sources tell ABC News.

That amount of targeting and actual infiltration into state election-related systems is significantly larger than the U.S. government has been willing to acknowledge.

Hackers working on behalf of the Russian government are suspected in the onslaught against more than 20 state election systems, according to sources with knowledge of the matter.

“There’s no doubt that some bad actors have been poking around,” FBI Director James Comey told lawmakers Wednesday, without offering any more specifics.

He acknowledged there have been “some attempted intrusions at voter registration databases” since August, when the FBI issued a bulletin to state governments warning that hackers had infiltrated the Illinois State Board of Elections and tried to breach election systems in Arizona.

Testifying before the House Judiciary Committee, Comey said the FBI is trying to figure out “just what mischief is Russia up to in connection with our election.”

He emphasized that voter registration databases -— not the voting system itself — are being targeted by hackers.

“This is very different than the vote system in the United States, which is very, very hard for someone to hack into because it’s so clunky and dispersed,” Comey said, adding that states should be in contact with the Department of Homeland Security and “make sure that their deadbolts are thrown and their locks are on.”

During a separate House hearing on Tuesday, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson said 18 states had reached out to his department seeking assistance in protecting their election systems.

Meanwhile, another top Homeland Security official and the head of the U.S. Election Assistance Commission both said a cyberattack could not change the outcome of the 2016 election.

Dr. Andy Ozment, the assistant secretary for cybersecurity and communications at DHS, told lawmakers on Wednesday that the hackers who broke into the voter registration system in Illinois and targeted a similar system in Arizona appear to have been looking to copy the personal information in those databases and perhaps then sell that information online. The aim was apparently not to affect the election process, he said.

“We have not seen intrusions intended to in any way impact individuals’ votes and actual voting,” Ozment said.

For months, the FBI has been investigating what appear to be coordinated cyberattacks on Democratic organizations — the most damaging so far being the hack of the Democratic National Committee.

Not only did the hack apparently allow cyberoperatives to steal opposition research on Republican nominee Donald Trump, but many suspect it also led to the theft of internal messages that appeared to show efforts by DNC officials to undermine Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders during the primary season.

After those damaging emails were publicly released by WikiLeaks, Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz stepped down as the DNC’s chairwoman. Many suspect Russian hackers are also to blame for these cyberassaults on Democratic organizations.

In late June an “unknown actor scanned a state’s Board of Election website for vulnerabilities” and, after identifying a security gap, exploited the vulnerability to conduct a “data exfiltration,” or unauthorized data transfer, the FBI said in a recent bulletin.

Then in August, hackers used the same vulnerability in an “attempted intrusion activities into another state’s Board of Election system,” the FBI said.

“The prospect of a hostile government actively seeking to undermine our free and fair elections represents one of the gravest threats to our democracy since the Cold War,” Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, , D-Nev., wrote in a recent letter to Comey.

Asked this summer why Russia might be trying to undermine the U.S. political process, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said Russian President Vladimir Putin is “paranoid” about the potential for revolutions in Russia, “and of course they see a U.S. conspiracy behind every bush, and ascribe far more impact than we’re actually guilty of.”

“They believe we’re trying to influence political developments in Russia, we’re trying to affect change, and so their natural response is to retaliate and do unto us as they think we’ve done to them,” he said.

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Shashank Bengali/MCT/MCT via Getty Images(NEW YORK) — The government of Sudan has used chemical weapons in multiple attacks against the country’s own population, in a dramatic escalation of a long-simmering conflict in recent months, according to a human rights group.

As many as 250 people may have died as a result of at least 32 suspected chemical weapons attacks, the most recent of which took place on September 9, Amnesty International said today in a newly-released report.

Amnesty has also gathered satellite imagery that it says confirms 171 damaged or destroyed villages in the last eight months in a remote area of Darfur that is home to rebel groups that oppose the government.

“The scale and brutality of these attacks is hard to put into words,” Tirana Hassan, Amnesty International’s Director of Crisis Research, said in a statement. “The images and videos we have seen in the course of our research are truly shocking; in one a young child is screaming with pain before dying; many photos show young children covered in lesions and blisters. Some were unable to breath and vomiting blood.

“It is hard to exaggerate just how cruel the effects of these chemicals are when they come into contact with the human body.”

Amnesty bases its casualty estimate of up to 250 on scores of interviews it conducted with witnesses of the attacks and friends and family members of the victims.

“When [the bomb] landed there was some flames and then dark smoke,” said a woman in her twenties who was injured by shrapnel. The woman said a toxic cloud immediately followed the initial blast, sickening both her and her baby.

“Immediately it caused vomiting and dizzying,” the woman continued. “My skin is not normal. I still have headaches, even after I took the medicine … The baby is not recovering … he has blisters and wounds.”

The suspected chemical attacks come amid a large-scale military offensive launched in January 2016 by government forces in the remote area of Jebel Marra, against the rebel group, known as Sudan Liberation Army/Abdul Wahid (SLA/AW), Amnesty says. The government accuses the rebels of ambushing military convoys and attacking civilians.

The United Nations has warned that some 80,000 people have fled the Jebel Marra region during the government offensive. Nearly three million people in total remain displaced inside the troubled country. Some 300,000 people have died since civil war first broke out in Sudan in 2003.

“The use of chemical weapons is a war crime,” Hassan said. “The evidence we have gathered is credible and portrays a regime that is intent on directing attacks against the civilian population in Darfur without any fear of international retribution.”

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Xinhua/Bao Dandan via Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf will face another round of questioning on Capitol Hill Thursday — this time in a hearing held by the House Financial Services Committee.

Stumpf’s appearance in front of the panel comes a little over a week since he faced blistering questions and a call to resign during a Senate Banking Committee hearing, and as the bank continues to try to stem the sustained criticism it has faced since the alleged wrongdoing was revealed by government regulators on Sept. 8.

Though Stumpf has not resigned, he comes into the hearing on the heels of an announcement that Wells Fargo’s Independent Directors are launching an investigation into allegations that bank employees were opening accounts without customers’ knowledge or permission and that his pay had been frozen.

He will also not receive a bonus, they said, and would forgo receiving some $41 million worth of promised compensation.

The directors also said Carrie Tolstedt, who until July was the head of the division at the heart of the accounts scandal, had left the company and would not be receiving a bonus or severance pay. Her retirement announcement originally had her down to leave at “year’s end.”

ABC News has obtained and reviewed a copy of the remarks that Stumpf has prepared to deliver today before the House panel.

Most notably, the CEO is expected to say that the bank is moving up the date at which it will end its controversial sales goals program. That program, which some regulators have alleged was a driving force behind the employees’ actions, was set to end by Jan. 1, 2017, the bank announced shortly after the scandal erupted.

However, the prepared remarks now say that the bank will end the program on Oct. 1.

Meanwhile, U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez confirmed this week that his agency would be launching “a top-to-bottom review of cases, complaints, or violations concerning Wells Fargo over the last several years.”

The Labor Department announcement follows several lawsuits, including from former employees, customers and shareholders, alleging wrongdoing.

The bank has faced near-constant criticism since Sept. 8, when regulators slapped it with a $185 million fine, saying that employees opened or attempted to open accounts without customers’ authorization.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) said at the time: “According to the bank’s own analysis, employees opened more than two million deposit and credit card accounts that may not have been authorized by consumers.”

Some of those accounts generated over $2 million in fees, according to the CFPB, and some 5,300 employees were fired, according to authorities.

In a statement issued when the fine was announced, the company said, “we regret and take responsibility for any instances where customers may have received a product that they did not request.”

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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