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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Gov. Sarah Palin, who is being considered for a cabinet position in the Trump administration — is raising alarm over president-elect’s recently announced deal with Carrier, suggesting in an op-ed it could amount to “crony capitalism.”

“When government steps in arbitrarily with individual subsidies, favoring one business over others, it sets inconsistent, unfair, illogical precedent,” Palin wrote in a ‘Young Conservatives’ op-ed. “Republicans oppose this, remember? Instead, we support competition on a level playing field, remember? Because we know special interest crony capitalism is one big fail.”

Trump and Vice President-elect Mike Pence traveled to the Carrier plant in Indianapolis Thursday to tout the company agreeing to keep 1,100 jobs in the city instead of shipping hundreds to Mexico.

Carrier said in a statement the agreement was due in part to the incoming administration’s lobbying as well as state tax incentives. Trump’s transition team has refused to publicly disclose the full details of the deal, but company officials said in a statement Thursday that the state of Indiana, where Pence is governor, offered the company a $7 million package over multiple years, contingent on factors including employment, job retention and capital investment.

Trump, in comments at a rally, put other American companies on notice that they would not be free to relocate their companies outside of the U.S. “without consequences.”

Palin, who ABC News reported Wednesday is under consideration to be Trump’s secretary of veterans affairs, took issue with that principle in her op-ed.

“Foundational to our exceptional nation’s sacred private property rights, a business must have freedom to locate where it wishes,” Palin said. “In a free market, if a business makes a mistake (including a marketing mistake that perhaps Carrier executives made), threatening to move elsewhere claiming efficiency’s sake, then the market’s invisible hand punishes.”

Palin goes so far to point out that such government intervention sets an “illogical precedent” of a corporate welfare system she labels as “a hallmark of corruption. And socialism.”

“However well meaning, burdensome federal government imposition is never the solution. Never. Not in our homes, not in our schools, not in churches, not in businesses,” she added.

“Gotta’ have faith the Trump team knows all this.”

The Trump transition team has defended itself from similar criticisms by conservatives of the deal, with Pence telling the New York Times in an interview Thursday, “The free market has been sorting it out and America’s been losing.”

Palin was a stern defender of Trump throughout the GOP primary and his campaign, but in her op-ed she joins the chorus of skeptics calling for Trump and his team to make full details of the Carrier deal public.

“I’ll be the first to acknowledge concerns over a deal cut by leveraging taxpayer interests to make a manufacturer stay put are unfounded – once terms are made public,” Palin writes.

The Trump team did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

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JOE RAEDLE/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — President-elect Donald Trump spoke with Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen by phone on Friday, according to the Trump transition team, breaking with decades of delicate U.S. policy on China.

The Taiwanese president offered her congratulations and Trump offered the same to her for her election victory this year, according to a Trump team press release. They discussed the “close economic, political, and security ties between Taiwan and the United States,” the Trump transition team said.

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The Washington Monument, one of Washington, D.C.’s most recognizable landmarks and the centerpiece of the National Mall, will remain closed for at least two years as workers modernize the structure’s elevator and construct a permanent screening facility, the National Park Service announced Friday.

The monument has been shuttered since August following three separate closures, including one after a cable broke loose from the bottom of its elevator. Efforts to evaluate necessary repairs occurred at the end of the summer and initially estimated a nine-month time frame to overhaul the elevator. That projection was revised Friday to include additional work, pushing back the reopening of the monument until 2019.

“We’ve added a second component of the project which is [the screening facility,]” said National Park Service spokesman Mike Litterst. “That was already on the agenda, but rather than one after the other, we’re hoping to do it concurrently.”

Completed in 1888, the 555-foot-tall obelisk has undergone a series of repairs in recent decades. A major restoration shrouded the structure in scaffolding from 1998 to 2001 as it underwent a cleaning and added new exhibits. Then, following an earthquake in August 2011, almost two years of work went into repairing cracks and broken stone in the monument.

Renovations to the elevator are expected to cost $2-3 million and will be funded with a donation from businessman David Rubenstein, who is noted for his philanthropy pertaining to historic American landmarks. Since 2012, Rubenstein has pledged almost $50 million to various National Park Service projects, including the earthquake-induced repairs to the Washington Monument and an ongoing restoration of the Lincoln Memorial.

“The monument has become a symbol of our country, and reminds everyone of the towering strengths of our first president. I am honored to help make this symbol safely accessible again to all Americans as soon as practicable,” said Rubenstein in a statement provided by the National Park Service.

Construction on the Washington Monument’s elevator will feature a replacement of the computerized control system and the addition of a “diagnostic system” which will make it easier for NPS employees to recognize and rectify future issues, should they occur. Other upgrades include new doors, ropes, cables and rollers and the installation of landings in the elevator shaft.

A temporary security screening area has existed at the monument since 2001. Funds for the new facility, which are not covered by Rubenstein’s donation, were requested by the National Park Service in its President’s Budget Request for the 2017 fiscal year.

Washington, D.C., Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, who previously criticized the National Park Service over repeated closures of the monument, thanked Rubenstein for his donation and expressed hope that the project would ensure easier access for visitors.

“The much-needed modernization of the monument’s elevator will resolve the chronic problems that have forced repeated shutdowns of the monument, many of which occurred during peak tourist season,” reads a statement from Norton.

However, the continued closure of the monument ensures that it will not be able to receive guests during the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump on Jan. 20. Past inaugurations have drawn over 1 million visitors to Washington, D.C.

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RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/Getty Images(MEDELLIN, Colombia) — As Colombian plane crash survivor Erwin Tumiri heads home to Bolivia, dramatic new video from local police shows the moments after he was pulled from the wreckage.

Clad in a yellow police jacket, Tumiri – one of just six people who survived the plane crash that killed 71 in Medellin on Monday – sobbed in Spanish for “my crew.”

“Calm down, don’t worry, we are here to help you, and your friends also,” a first responder replies in Spanish.

A clearly stunned Tumiri tells the responder his spine and arms hurt, then cries out two names.

“Don’t scream technician, calm down,” the responder says. “Don’t wear yourself down, technician, don’t wear yourself down.”

Shortly after the crash, Tumiri, a flight engineer, reportedly told media outlets that he survived by curling up in the fetal position with a bag between his knees as the jet careened toward the mountainside.

“I put the bags in between my legs to form the fetal position that is recommended in accidents,” he told Fox Sports Argentina in Spanish. “During the situation, many stood up from their seats, and they started to shout.”

He and one other crew member, flight attendant Ximena Suárez, survived, as did four passengers on board: a journalist and three members of the Chapecoense soccer team. The team’s goalie has already had one leg amputated; the other survivors remain hospitalized.

The charter plane, which apparently suffered an electrical failure, ran out of fuel before it slammed into the side of a mountain not far from the airport, authorities said.

A government official confirms to ABC News that the jet was supposed to refuel en route to Medellin. The pilot chose not to, the official said.

The flight’s operator, LAMIA, has had its permits and certifications suspended, the Bolivia Civil Aviation Authority told ABC News.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Wall Street closed mixed Friday after the November jobs report was released.

The Dow fell 21.51 (-0.11 percent) to finish at 19,170.42.

The Nasdaq gained 4.55 (+0.09 percent) to close at 5,255.65, while the S&P 500 finished at 2,191.95, up 0.87 (+0.04 percent) from its open.

Crude oil jumped over 1 percent with prices hitting about $52 a barrel.

Jobs Report: According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor, 178,000 jobs were added last month and the unemployment rate fell to 4.6 percent. The solid numbers will likely reinforce the Federal Reserve’s case to raise interest rates this month, the second time the country has seen a rate hike since the 2008 recession.

Winners and Losers: Shares in Starbucks Corporation sunk 2 percent after CEO Howard Schultz announced he would be stepping down from the company.

Pandora Media Inc’s stock soared 16 percent on a CNBC report that the music streaming company is reportedly looking for a buyer.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The U.S. Department of Labor released a strong jobs report Friday morning. Payrolls expanded by 178,000 jobs in November, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The unemployment rate fell to 4.6 percent — lower than it has been since August 2007.

This is the last Jobs Report of the year and it reinforces what investors already expect: that the Federal Reserve will hike interest rates, for the second time in 10 years when it meets, on Dec. 14.

There were new jobs created in construction, health care and business services, with the economy now creating ample work to absorb all the new entrants into the labor force.

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iStock/Thinkstock(KALISZ, Poland) — A pedestrian in the central Polish city of Kalisz can credit a lamp pole with saving her life.

Surveillance cameras captured the tense moment when a woman narrowly escaped catastrophe. She was walking along a sidewalk next to a building situated at a busy intersection in Kalisz, Poland.

At the same time, a white car was attempting to make a left turn adjacent to the building. Suddenly, a black sedan enters the frame and hits the white car, causing the sedan to careen toward the building, with the pedestrian in its path.

The sedan instead crashes into a lamp post on the sidewalk, just inches away from the woman, bringing the out-of-control vehicle to a stop and saving the pedestrian’s life.

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Yui Mok – WPA Pool/Getty Images(LONDON) — Adult coloring books are a hot craze that has grownups hiding crayons from their kids, and now we’re learning the duchess of Cambridge is yet another convert to the trend.

Prince William revealed the secret pastime of his wife, Kate, to illustrator and author Johanna Basford at an investiture at Buckingham Palace this week. William said Kate likes to color in Secret Garden, Basford’s first coloring book that has sold more than one million copies.

“I’m working on a new book just now and it’s set in a castle, funnily enough, so I will definitely try to remember everything,” Basford told reporters after the ceremony. “I’m sure little snippets of today will feature in the book.”

William awarded Basford the Order of the British Empire for services to art and entrepreneurship.

“I think people are just craving a digital detox,” Basford said of the appeal of adult coloring, or “color therapy” as it is sometimes called.

Kate, 34, received her degree in art history with honors from St. Andrews, where she and William met and fell in love. She is a big supporter of the arts and has made arts education and art therapy for struggling children one of the cornerstones of her charitable work.

Kate is also patron of the National Portrait Gallery.

The duchess met last week with a group of children at London’s Natural History Museum. Kate joined the children as they decorated “dinosaur” eggs.

She revealed that Prince George, her 3-year-old son with William, is obsessed with dinosaurs, particularly the Tyrannosaurus rex because “it’s the noisiest and the scariest.”

William on Wednesday also revealed another of Prince George’s fascinations — planes and trains. William was visiting Derby, where he tried his hand at conducting a train.

William later remarked how Prince George would “love it” and would be excited about seeing his father drive a train.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) — Amid growing concerns about how Donald Trump can distance himself from his vast business enterprise, the president-elect tweeted Friday that “legal documents are being crafted which take me completely out of business operations.” Trump said he will elaborate on his plans at a press conference with his children on Dec. 15.

Ethics experts tell ABC News that merely taking himself out of “operations” — without selling businesses, creating blind trusts and establishing firewalls — would be inadequate to prevent potential ethical conflicts, if not legal ones.

Here are some of Trump’s options for separating from his business interests, from most ethically sound to least, according to experts:

Sell everything and place all proceeds in a blind trust or equivalent.

Trump could sell his entire business empire — that is, his ownership stakes in 564 companies worldwide — and place all proceeds in savings accounts, U.S. treasury bonds, or blind trusts administered by an independent person or group who does not communicate with Trump about business or investments.

Experts say that while this is the most ethical course of action, Trump would likely take a huge financial hit, since he would have to quickly sell off illiquid assets in a “fire sale.” However, some financial pain could be alleviated if the Office of Government Ethics offered him special incentives, like a one-time exemption from paying capital gains tax on those sales.

Keep the company running, but put it in a blind trust.

Alternatively, Trump could place the Trump Organization and all other business interests into a blind trust, which would be managed by an independent party who has no financial ties or business communication with Trump or his family.

Sell some businesses and pass others onto to his children.

A middle ground might be to sell some of his businesses -– perhaps all foreign companies or those located in countries with diplomatic controversies -– to third parties, and then sell or give control of the rest of his company to his children. The money from the sales could go into a blind trust run by an independent person or group.

To separate himself from the business, “he could enact a ‘firewall’ policy that would prohibit him and his White House staff from discussing business matters with anyone running his former businesses and then keep his children out of any formal or informal adviser positions,” said Matthew Sanderson, a Republican lawyer with Caplin & Drysdale.

Also, the Trump Organization should “prohibit all its personnel from making any reference to the Administration in any sales pitches to prevent instances like the meetings that recently occurred at the Trump International Hotel in DC,” added Sanderson.

Pass everything to his children.

In the Jan. 14 Republican primary debate, Trump suggested that his children could run the Trump Organization if he wins. “I would probably have my children run it with my executives and I wouldn’t ever be involved because I wouldn’t care about anything but our country, anything,” he said.

Ethics experts who spoke to ABC News all said that simply passing the business to his children will probably not prevent potential conflicts-of-interest. There is no “blind trust” if his kids tell him anything about his businesses, if he discusses his job with them or gives them any access to his Administration. They could pledge in writing not to communicate about off-limit topics, but “this would be exceedingly difficult to police,” said Paul Rothstein, Georgetown University Law Center.

Do nothing.

While Trump has indicated that he is in the process of distancing himself from his company, he has also said that legally he does not have to.

“The law is totally on my side,” Trump told the New York Times in an interview. “The president can’t have a conflict of interest.”

“He could legally manage his business while in the White House. I don’t think he can do that politically, but he can do that legally,” said Trevor Potter, an attorney and a former Republican Federal Election Commission chairman.

While Trump is correct that as president he is exempt from a conflict-of-interest law that prohibits other federal officials from working on government matters in which they or their family members have a financial stake, he is still subject to bribery laws, nepotism laws and the Emolument Clause of the Constitution which prohibits him from accepting “gifts” from foreign powers.

Still, every ethics expert who spoke to ABC News said that continuing to run his businesses while president — even if potentially legal — would be highly unethical.

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The Ford Motor Company (DEARBORN, Mich.) — Ford is recalling close to 650,000 vehicles in North America over a seat belt issue.

The recall affects certain 2013-2016 Ford Fusion and 2013-2015 Lincoln MKZ sedans. Ford says the seat belt anchor pretensioners in these vehicles need to be insulated.

“In the affected vehicles, increased temperatures generated during deployment of the seat belt anchor pretensioner could cause pretensioner cables to separate, which may inadequately restrain an occupant in a crash, increasing risk of injury,” the automaker explained in a press release.

So far, Ford has been notified of two accidents and two injuries related to this issue.

Customers who are affected by the recall will be able to go to their local Ford dealer, where a coating will be injected into the seat belt anchor pretensioners at no cost.

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