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Mark Neuling/CNBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Amid tense questioning on Capitol Hill Tuesday morning, Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf was told by Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., that he should resign and face criminal charges amid a scandal over assertions that bank employees opened more than a million accounts with customers’ authorization.

Warren was far from the only senator to criticize the bank chief, with Republicans and Democrats both grilling him for over two hours.

Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., said that Stumpf had achieved something that he hadn’t seen in his 10 years on the committee: unity.

“You have done something that’s never happened and united this committee on a major topic…and not in a good way,” Tester told Stumpf.

The hearing is the most public appearance by the embattled CEO since the scandal erupted earlier this month. A second panel will examine regulators’ actions around the scandal.

On Sept. 8, regulators in Washington and California fined the bank $185 million after they said an internal review found that employees had opened or applied for more than two million bank accounts or credit cards without customers’ knowledge or permission between May 2011 and July 2015. The bank confirmed that it had fired some 5,300 employees over the period in connection to the allegations.

While Democratic Senate Banking Committee members were widely expected to grill Stumpf over the allegations, they were joined by their Republican colleagues in repeatedly calling the activity “fraud.”

Warren Tells CEO to Resign

Unsurprisingly, the fiercest language came from Warren, a consumer advocate who has been critical of the nation’s big banks.

Warren, who at times became impassioned, told Stumpf that he should leave his post and face a criminal investigation.

“You should resign,” she said. “You should give back the money that you gained while this scam was going on and you should be criminally investigated by the DOJ and the SEC.”

A Securities and Exchange Commission spokesman, John Nester, told ABC News that the agency “can neither confirm or deny the existence or nonexistence of investigations” that the agency is conducting. A Wells Fargo spokesperson declined to comment.

Executive Pay

Meanwhile, Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., told Stumpf that he would be engaging in “malpractice” if the bank doesn’t “clawback” money that it had paid to executives during the period that the accounts were being opened without customers’ permission.

The salaries and bonuses of Stumpf and other executives, especially Carrie Tolstedt, the former head of the bank’s community banking division whose retirement was announced in July, have become a focus of scrutiny in recent weeks.

Senators have repeatedly cited a figure contained in a report by Fortune magazine on Sept. 12, which claims that Tolstedt will leave the bank “with $124.6 million in stock, options, and restricted Wells Fargo shares.”

The bank did not immediately return a request for comment on the figure.

The ability to “clawback” the compensation does appear to be a viable option, with Stumpf telling the panel that “the Wells Fargo Board…has the tools to hold senior leadership accountable, including me and Carrie Tolstedt, the former head of our retail banking business.”

Additionally, in a filing with the SEC earlier this year and reviewed by ABC News, the bank said that it had “strong recoupment and clawback policies in place, designed [to] discourage our executives from taking imprudent or excessive risks.”

“I want to be clear on this: I will respect and accept the decision of the Board,” Stumpf told senators Tuesday.

Many senators, however, were incensed when he later deferred to the board if any actions would be taken. Stumpf is the board’s chairman.

Who’s to Blame?

Corker was just one of several Republicans who were critical of Stumpf and Wells Fargo.

Sen. Jerry Moran, a Republican from Kansas, told the CEO that he should stop scapegoating low-level employees for the alleged misconduct.

“I’m not scapegoating, but that is not part of our culture,” Stumpf responded.

Last week, in an interview with The Wall Street Journal, Stumpf reportedly attributed blame for the opening of the accounts on employees.

During the Senate hearing Tuesday, he said that he had been misunderstood during that interview.

Throughout the hearing, he seemed to try and shift blame to the bank’s product sales goals program, which will no longer be in practice beginning Jan. 1, 2017.

He said that “we should have done more sooner to eliminate unethical conduct or incentives that may have unintentionally encouraged that conduct.”

In his opening remarks, Stumpf also took time to thank the “268,000 team members” who work for the bank.

The Senate hearing is the latest development in the scandal that has engulfed the bank in recent weeks.

The allegations originally came to light when the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) fined the bank $100 million — the largest fine the agency has ever handed down, according to the agency’s director. The office of the comptroller of the currency slapped the bank with a $35 million fine, and the county and city of Los Angeles fined it another $50 million.

At the time, the bank said that it regretted and took responsibility for “any instances where customers may have received a product that they did not request.”

The bank has fired some 5,300 over the approximate five-year period in connection to the allegations; however, it sought to downplay the terminations with an official telling ABC News that “the number terminated represents about one percent of this workforce over the five year period.”

Since then, investigations have been opened by the FBI and federal prosecutors in New York and California, as well as the House of Representatives Financial Services Committee, which will hold a hearing of its own. A date for that hearing isn’t yet known.

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File photo. (iStock/Thinkstock)(QUEENSLAND, Australia) — Baby koala Shayne was recently riding on his mother’s back when a car struck them and forever changed the joey’s life, according to the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital, which is now caring for Shayne.

The impact immediately killed the baby koala’s mom and tossed him over 65 feet, the zoo said in a news release on Monday. Shayne was being chased by crows when rescuers found him.

“Poor Shayne was left to fend for himself,” the Australia Zoo said.

Its wildlife hospital director, Dr. Rosie Booth, added that it was “very fortunate” Shane was rescued so quickly. She said in the news release that the joey “wouldn’t have lasted even a day in the wild by himself at his young age.”

Though the 9-month-old joey was not physically injured during the accident, he is still reeling from “the loss of his mum,” Booth added.

The lonely joey was recently caught on video being consoled with a plush toy koala.

Baby Shayne is now getting round-the-clock “constant attention, comfort, and food,” the zoo said.

It added that once the baby koala “is of acceptable weaning age and weight,” he will “learn essential climbing and social skills from other young koalas before being released to the wild.”

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Rosetta Stone(NEW YORK) — When a high school in rural Maine could not find a foreign language instructor, school administrators decided to use the funds to purchase a language-learning computer program instead, the principal told ABC News Tuesday.

“We didn’t want to transfer the kids to another school just for foreign language,” Jessica Ward, principal of Madison Area Memorial High School, told ABC News Tuesday.

Ward said the school put an ad in the paper and got one application for the teaching position, but that person ended up taking another job. Ward said she also contacted local universities and the state’s department of education, who informed her that they were experiencing a shortage of foreign language teachers.

The school had the option of using technology that allows the students to virtually listen in on classes at another school, but Ward said she worried the students would not get the “individualized help that they need.”

The school’s guidance counselor then got the idea to reach out to Rosetta Stone, an interactive computer program for learning foreign languages. She used the allocated budget for hiring a teacher to pay for the Rosetta Stone licenses for students, and to bring in an education technician to oversee the program.

Ward said the school board approved the program, and it has been in place since the beginning of the school year. So far, “the student’s seem to be enjoying it,” she noted.

“They can go at their own pace,” Ward said. They can choose from a myriad of foreign languages instead of just French and Spanish.

“We steered them towards the French and Spanish because we hope to get a teacher back in eventually,” Ward said, but she added that some students still opted to take German, Russian and Japanese.

The State of Maine does not require foreign language classes to graduate high school, according to Ward, but she encourages her students to take language courses in high school because many universities want it.

The students are graded based on their progress by an education technician who has been trained by Rosetta Stone and has access to all of the student’s accounts.

She said that although the program is going well so far, they are still hoping to hire a foreign language teacher.

“I worry that they are missing out a bit on the cultural side,” she acknowledged.

Jay Ketner, the World Languages Specialist for the Maine Department of Education, emphasized that decisions surrounding language curriculum made on the local level, but stressed how important learning a language is for students.

“As Madison’s ultimate goal is to have a teacher for this position, Rosetta Stone provides access for initial exposure to foreign language learning,” Ketner told ABC News.

“Research shows that language learning provides multiple benefits for students that transfer directly to life and work including increased cognitive development, more focused attention, better problem-solving skills when a solution isn’t readily apparent, enhanced resourcefulness when solving problems, better financial-decision making skills as adults, and decreased rates of Alzheimer’s,” Ketner said.

Ketner said schools across the nation are experiencing a shortage of foreign language teachers.

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Matt Dunham – WPA Pool/Getty Images(LONDON) — Prince Harry revealed Tuesday that a sergeant at Sandhurst Military Academy helped him deal with the death of his mother, Princess Diana, in 1997, when Harry was just 12.

The 32-year-old prince said his Colour Sergeant at the military academy in Camberley, England, gave him hope and the “confidence to look forward” in 2005 after losing his mother at such a young age.

“I was at a stage in my life when I was probably lacking a bit in guidance,” Harry told students at the Mackie Academy in Stonehaven Aberdeenshire, Scotland. “I lost my mum when I was very young and suddenly I was surrounded by a huge number of men in the army.”

Harry spoke to a group of students who are training to become mentors. When each person was asked to fill in the blank on a piece of paper with #MyMentor, Harry wrote Colour Sergeant.

“He was someone who teased me at the right moments and gave me the confidence to look forward, to actually have that confidence in yourself to know who you are and to push forward and try to help others,” Harry said of his mentor, whose name was not given.

The students are part of the Diana Award Charity that was set up in Diana’s name to recognize young role models who selflessly devote their lives to help others. The charity is also at the forefront of efforts to prevent bullying cyber bullying and harassment among young people.

The school was the first of three stops for Harry as he spends the day in Scotland meeting with young people. Harry also visited the StreetSport youth program which uses sports and arts projects to keep kids off the streets.

Harry has jumped back into his charity work after recently returning to the U.K. from Africa where he spent the summer working on elephant conservation programs. Later this fall, Harry will depart for the Caribbean on a royal tour representing his grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II.

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Mark Neuling/CNBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf is facing some tough questions at a Senate Banking Committee hearing on Capitol Hill Tuesday morning.

Stumpf, who was asked to testify at the hearing, began by saying that he was “deeply sorry that we failed to fulfill our responsibility to our customers to our team members, and to the American public.”

Senators from both parties have described alleged misconduct at the bank as “fraud” during the proceedings.

On Sept. 8, regulators in Washington and California fined the bank $185 million after an internal review found that employees had opened or applied for more than 2 million bank accounts or credit cards without customers’ knowledge or permission.

This is a developing story, so please check back for updates. In the meantime, ABC News journalists will be live tweeting. You can follow along here:

A Twitter List by callingcaterina

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Chip Somodevilla/WHITE HOUSE POOL (ISP POOL IMAGES)/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images(UNITED NATIONS) — Addressing the United Nations General Assembly Tuesday for his eighth and final time as commander in chief, President Obama recounted the “progress” made during his presidency, on issues including the global financial crisis, international terrorism and re-establishing relations with Cuba.

“This is important work,” Obama stressed. “It has made a real difference in the lives of our people and it could not have happened if we didn’t work together.”

Obama warned against “the same forces of global integration” that have left democracies interdependent, but have also exposed “deep fault lines in existing international order” like gaps between the rich and poor created by capitalism throughout the world.

“The answer cannot be a simple rejection of global integration,” Obama implored. “Instead we must work together to ensure the benefits of such integration are broadly shared.”

Obama demanded democracies of the world “must speak out forcefully” for “freedom and dignity.”

“A world in which one percent of the economy controls the other 99 percent will never be stable,” Obama asserted. “These are the policies I’ve pursued in the United States, and with clear results.”

Previewing the speech in a conference call with reporters Friday, White House national security adviser Ben Rhodes had said the speech would be an opportunity for the president to both “review some of the progress that’s been made over the last eight years,” while also addressing the “great deal of unease about a range of issues” remaining before the international community Tuesday.

“I think the way the president will approach this is trying to apply what we have done that’s worked in the last eight years as a template for how we deal with other crises,” Rhodes told reporters, pointing to the Paris climate agreement and Iran nuclear deal as specific examples of international cooperation that the White House views as successes.

Rhodes sought to make a contrast with 2009, the time of the president’s first address to the U.N., when the global economy was “in a complete free fall” and 180,000 troops were deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“Today, it’s obviously very different,” he said. “The question is what are the approaches that we’re taking to deal with different challenges, and that’s what he’ll lay out in the speech.”

The president’s speech comes as fighting in Syria has resumed after the Syrian military declared Monday an end to the fragile ceasefire deal that was brokered between the United States and Russia just over a week ago, and in the same month that North Korea conducted its second nuclear test of the year.

U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Samantha Power had said the president would address the North Korean threat and need for a coordinated international response.

“Everybody wants to look to the U.S. to solve a range of problems, and we welcome the opportunity to lead, and recognize our indispensability,” Power said. “But I think North Korea is a great example where we have come together as an international community.”

Power specifically pointed to a sanctions resolution passed by the U.N. back in March that, she says, has been effective in impeding the regime’s ability to access important technology, but adding that its ultimate success hangs on “the world’s willingness to enforce this.”

“It’s no secret that the United States is going to enforce that resolution to the T, but for it be effective, as we saw in the case of Iran, all countries need to step forward, and particularly those with significant influence and significant ties with North Korea,” she said.

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Ahmad Hasan/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(LONDON) — Aid to Syria has been suspended following Monday’s attack on a United Nations and Syrian Arab Red Crescent convoy in the countryside of Aleppo.

The convoy was delivering wheat flour, health supplies and other emergency aid to some 75,000 people in Urum al-Kubra in rural Aleppo, according to the U.N. Of the 31 trucks in the convoy, at least 18 were hit. A Syrian Red Crescent warehouse was also destroyed and a health clinic severely damaged, the U.N. said.

Around 20 civilians and one SARC staff member were killed as they were unloading the trucks, according to a joint statement from the Syrian Arab Red Crescent, the International Committee of the Red Cross and the International Federation of Red Cross Red Crescent Societies.

“The convoys that we had hoped to move across the border to Syria as well as aid inside Syria have been temporarily put on hold. As a result, millions of people across Syria run a very real risk of not receiving the assistance they need because of this callous attack,” David Swanson, spokesman for the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, told ABC News.

The U.N. said the attack on the aid convoy could amount to a “war crime.”

“Let me be clear: if this callous attack is found to be a deliberate targeting of humanitarians, it would amount to a war crime. I call for an immediate, impartial and independent investigation into this deadly incident,” Stephen O’Brien, the U.N.’s under-secretary-general for humanitarian affairs and emergency relief coordinator, said in a statement following the attack.

The Red Crescent in Aleppo confirmed in a statement that Omar Barakat, SARC’s director in Urum al-Kubra, was among the killed.

Two U.N. trucks carrying flour and food supplies — enough to feed around 185,000 people for one month — have been parked by the Turkish border, waiting for security assurances in order to make the journey into the besieged East Aleppo. These trucks will remain parked until the U.N. reevaluates the situation on the ground.

On Tuesday, the four besieged towns of Madaya, Zabadani, Foua and Kefraya were supposed to receive humanitarian assistance, but the U.N. has also put these deliveries on hold indefinitely.

After the Syrian military declared the end of the U.S.-Russia-brokered truce Monday night, airstrikes hit several areas in Aleppo.

“We heard from a partner from Aleppo that there were 100 airstrikes in about five hours yesterday,” Misty Buswell, Save the Children’s regional advocacy director for the Middle East, told ABC News. “It’s brutal what is going on right now and there has to be accountability for what happened last night. This is not the first time that we have seen aid being attacked in Syria. This demonstrates the new lows that this conflict has reached. We’re hearing that hospitals are overwhelmed by the number of casualties that are coming in today.”

At least 38 civilians, including one child and three women, were killed by airstrikes in Aleppo and its western and eastern countryside, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. On Tuesday, airstrikes continued and the observatory said that warplanes dropped 27 barrel bombs on different neighborhoods in Aleppo city.

The cease-fire agreement was focused on reducing violence in the war-torn country and delivering humanitarian aid. The agreement had to be met before Russia and the U.S. would work together to fight militant groups ISIS and al-Nusra in Syria.

Following Monday’s attack on the aid convoy, the U.S. Department of State released a statement saying it would now reconsider the prospects of cooperating with Russia.

“The United States is outraged by reports that a humanitarian aid convoy was bombed near Aleppo today,” the statement from Monday read. “For more than a week, we have urged Moscow to fulfill the commitments it made in Geneva to facilitate the unimpeded flow of humanitarian aid to the Syrian people. And for more than a week, the Syrian regime repeatedly denied entry to these UN convoys, preventing them from delivering urgent food, water and medical supplies to desperate Syrian citizens. Only today did the regime finally grant permits for some convoys to proceed. The destination of this convoy was known to the Syrian regime and the Russian federation and yet these aid workers were killed in their attempt to provide relief to the Syrian people. The United States will raise this issue directly with Russia. Given the egregious violation of the Cessation of Hostilities we will reassess the future prospects for cooperation with Russia.”

The Russian Defense Ministry denied conducting the deadly strike on the aid convoy, according to Russian state-run media.

The Aleppo media center on Tuesday posted photos on Twitter of the destroyed aid trucks.

قوافل المساعدات المقدمة من الهلال الأحمر السوري لأهالي #حلب المحاصرة بعد استهدافهم بسلسلة غارات جوية من طائرات النظام.#AleppoAMC pic.twitter.com/ksJfE8gIlC

— مركز حلب الإعلامي (@AleppoAMC) September 20, 2016

Nearly 13.5 million people in Syria are in need of humanitarian assistance, while another 4.8 million have fled their country and 6.1 million are internally displaced, according to this month’s figures from the U.N.’s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) — The first time Phiona Mutesi, 20, saw people playing chess, she thought it was people gambling.

“I’d never seen it in my life and usually in Uganda, it was always, like, families that are rich that had, like, such games. It was very hard to find it in the poor families,” she told ABC News.

When she was 9, her brother led her to the SOM Chess Academy, the place where her life would eventually change. “Having been hungry for almost three days, my brother came and told us about the chess program they always had because he wanted us to go and get something to eat,” she said.

After her father died, Phiona and her family were homeless and living below the poverty line in Katwe. “It’s one of the poorest in Uganda. Katwe is where, like, human waste are dumped. So the life is so hard there, like, getting water is difficult and getting food is difficult,” she said.

According to the World Bank, 19.5 percent of the population lives under the poverty line and UNESCO has estimated that 68 percent of children in Uganda who go to primary school are likely to drop out.

Chess became the avenue that changed Phiona’s life and opened up opportunities for her. It was back in 2005 that then-9-year-old Phiona first set foot at the SOM Chess Academy. That’s where she met her coach and mentor, Robert Katende. He would become an instrumental player in her development over the years as she went from being interested in food to loving the game, “I got interest and I wanted to be focused and he showed me, like, how to play a good game. Then I learned how to defend myself,” she said.

Katende saw her gift and was impressed with her accomplishments in such a quick time. Phiona was able to beat other chess players and that caught his attention. “Just six months down the road and [she was] able to challenge people who have been the program from almost two years,” Katende told ABC News.

Throughout the years, Phiona continue to improve her game. She won the Uganda women’s junior championship in Sudan in 2009 and it was a surreal experience for her, one she says she will always remember. “I’m seeing, like, showers for the first time. I’m seeing, like, flushing toilets for the first time. I had never slept in a bed by myself. I always slept by my brothers on one bed. So it was a different kind of life,” she said.

The win was very important for Phiona and Katende, propelling him to continue working with her. “That is when I became serious and said, ‘Now this is now going beyond what I have ever even thought of.’ So I had to see how best I can really take her now to that even prepare psychologically. And also to see how best she can even improve in her game,” he said.

Phiona went on to compete in several tournaments in Russia, Turkey and Africa, becoming a national pride for Uganda. Her remarkable story captivated many people. “I always, like, sit down. And then I look at that situation. Of all people, why Phiona? I feel like things are just changing in my life,” she said.

One of the most important things she gained from chess was the ability to buy her mom a house. “When we got money in chess, we talked with my coach. We talked about it then and the only best thing we can do is just to buy a house. We bought a piece of land. She was so excited during that time. So I think that’s the best thing I like in chess and I’ve gained in chess right now,” she said.

These days, Phiona has more reasons to celebrate because this week, Disney’s Queen of Katwe is premiering in theaters. Starring Lupita Nyong’o, David Oyelowo, and Madina Nalwanga, Queen of Katwe centers on Phiona’s life.

“It’s a global story. It’s everyone, I feel, can identify with Phiona. You know, wherever you are, you know, there’s people all over the world who are living in conditions in which they feel there is no way out. And something like chess can be introduced to you and it can just spark a hope and an excitement and a confidence to change the circumstances within which you were born,” Nyong’o told ABC News.

Phiona is graduating high school this year and hopes to become a lawyer in the future. “I pray to God just, like, I continue my life, continue to inspire many kids to come in to get to learn like what is life exactly,” she said.

Disney is the parent company of ABC News.

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NYPD(NEW YORK) — The suspect in a spate of bombings that terrorized the New York City metropolitan area this weekend visited a city in Pakistan known for being a hotbed of insurgent activity, a source told ABC News.

The suspect, Ahmad Khan Rahami, was born in 1988 in Afghanistan and is a naturalized U.S. citizen, according to the FBI.

Rahami spent time in Quetta, Pakistan, and Afghanistan during a trip that lasted nearly a year, from April 2013 to March 2014, the source said.

Quetta, a city of about 2 million people, is a known hot spot for insurgents and the reported home of the leadership of the Afghan Taliban.

“If they spent more than a few days, it raises suspicions that while they were there, they will have been recruited by terrorist groups,” national security consultant Richard Clarke said on ABC News’ World News Tonight Monday, referring to Rahami’s travels to the area.

Afghan and U.S. government officials say they believe Quetta has sheltered the Afghan Taliban’s leadership since the U.S. invasion forced them to flee the country in 2002. The Taliban’s central leadership council, believed to be based there, is known as the Quetta Shura.

Officials say leaders there have planned and directed attacks across the border in Afghanistan and coordinated with terrorist groups like al Qaeda.

The area shares a major border crossing that leads to Kandahar in Afghanistan and is reported to be a transit point for extremists travelling in and out of Afghanistan and a hub for illegal trade crossing the porous and largely unsecured border.

Several al Qaeda militants have been killed or captured in the area, and the United States last year destroyed an al Qaeda base across the border in Kandahar province that it referred to as the largest militant training camp discovered in the history of the Afghanistan war.

Quetta also harbors a long-simmering insurgency against the Pakistani government. The city has seen a number of significant violent attacks and bombings, most recently last month when a blast killed more than 70 and injured over 100.

In May of this year, a U.S. airstrike in Baluchistan province killed Taliban leader Mullah Akhtar Muhammad Mansour.

The pentagon said in a 2014 report that as long as Afghan Taliban forces enjoy “sanctuary” in Quetta and in neighboring border areas of western Pakistan, the Afghan insurgency will persist.

Rahami, who was captured Monday after a shootout with police, is being held on charges of attempted murder of a law enforcement officer, second-degree unlawful possession of a weapon and second-degree possession of a weapon for an unlawful purpose.

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Chip Somodevilla/WHITE HOUSE POOL (ISP POOL IMAGES)/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images(NEW YORK) — President Obama is set to address the United Nations General Assembly Tuesday for his eighth and final time as president.

Previewing the speech in a conference call with reporters, White House national security adviser Ben Rhodes said the speech will be an opportunity for the president to both “review some of the progress that’s been made over the last eight years,” while also addressing the “great deal of unease about a range of issues” remaining before the international community Tuesday.

“I think the way the president will approach this is trying to apply what we have done that’s worked in the last eight years as a template for how we deal with other crises,” Rhodes told reporters Friday, pointing to the Paris climate agreement and Iran nuclear deal as specific examples of international cooperation that the White House views as successes.

Rhodes sought to make a contrast with 2009, the time of the president’s first address to the U.N., when the global economy was “in a complete free fall” and 180,000 troops were deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan.

“Today, it’s obviously very different,” he said. “The question is what are the approaches that we’re taking to deal with different challenges, and that’s what he’ll lay out in the speech.”

The president’s speech comes as fighting in Syria has resumed after the Syrian military declared Monday an end to the fragile ceasefire deal that was brokered between the United States and Russia just over a week ago, and in the same month that North Korea conducted its second nuclear test of the year.

U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Samantha Power said the president will address the North Korean threat and need for a coordinated international response.

“Everybody wants to look to the U.S. to solve a range of problems, and we welcome the opportunity to lead, and recognize our indispensability,” Power said. “But I think North Korea is a great example where we have come together as an international community.”

Power specifically pointed to a sanctions resolution passed by the U.N. back in March that, she says, has been effective in impeding the regime’s ability to access important technology, but adding that its ultimate success hangs on “the world’s willingness to enforce this.”

“It’s no secret that the United States is going to enforce that resolution to the T, but for it be effective, as we saw in the case of Iran, all countries need to step forward, and particularly those with significant influence and significant ties with North Korea,” she said.

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