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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The family of Philando Castile, who was shot and killed by officer Jeronimo Yanez of the St. Anthony Police Department, has reached a nearly $3 million settlement with the City of St. Anthony Village, Minnesota, according to a joint statement from both parties.

The settlement follows the acquittal of Yanez on June 16 of second-degree manslaughter and two counts of intentional discharge of a firearm that endangers safety.

Castile was killed on July 6, 2016, during a traffic stop, and his death, as well as the acquittal of Yanez, have drawn protests across the country.

The joint statement notes that no taxpayer money from the City of St. Anthony Village will be used to fund the settlement.

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iStock/Thinkstock(MEDELLIN, Colombia) — At least six people died when a boat carrying more than 150 passengers capsized while on a sightseeing tour on a reservoir in northwestern Colombia.

Colombian president Juan Manuel Santos visited the El Peñol-Guatapé reservoir, about 40 miles east of the city of Medellin, and promised authorities would do “everything in their power” to rescue any survivors and promised that searches would continue through the night.

Colombia’s national disaster agency reported that 133 people were rescued, 16 were missing and six had died on Sunday evening.

“Rescue operations will continue as long as the weather conditions allow. There are 25 well-equipped rescue experts working,” said the agency’s director, Carlos Iván Márquez Pérez.

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iStock/Thinkstock(MEDELLIN, Colombia) — At least six people are dead and 16 missing after a tourist boat capsized near Guatapé, Colombia, according to emergency officials.

Other boats quickly came to the rescue, saving 99 people immediately after the sinking, the head of the Antioquia Department’s Disasters Prevention unit said, and another 40 people swam to shore.

At least 133 were rescued as of Sunday night, the official said, and at least 25 people were transported to hospitals.

Divers with the police and Army helicopters assisted in the search and rescue operation.

.@FuerzaAereaCol apoya a esta hora rescate de personas de embarcación que naufragó en Guatapé, Antioquia #FAC pic.twitter.com/f5yowjBcMe

— FuerzaAéreaColombian (@FuerzaAereaCol) June 25, 2017

An eyewitness told the BBC the boat appeared to sink in less than five minutes.

The cause of the shipwreck was unknown as of Sunday night.

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iStock/Thinkstock(COLUMBUS, Ohio) — Several government websites in Ohio, including one for Gov. John Kasich, were hacked on Sunday displaying a pro-ISIS message, according to officials.

The message read, “You will be held accountable Trump, you and all your people for every drop of blood flowing in Muslim countries.”

It ended with, “I love Islamic state.”

Other websites that were affected by the hacking were those belonging to the Ohio First Lady Karen Kasich, the Office of Workforce Transformation, the Casino Control Commission, Medicaid, the Office of Health Transformation, the state Inspector General, the Office of Facilities and Construction Commission and LeanOhio, according to the Plain Dealer.

A group known as Team System Dz claimed responsibility for the hacking. According to ABC affiliate WEWS-TV, the Dayton City Paper, a free weekly arts publication, was hacked by the same group in 2015.

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iStock/Thinkstock(MEDELLIN, Colombia) — At least nine people are dead and 28 missing after a tourist boat capsized near Guatapé, Colombia, according to emergency officials.

Other boats quickly came to the rescue, saving 99 people immediately after the sinking, the head of the Antioquia Department’s Disasters Prevention unit said, and another 40 people swam to shore.

At least 25 people were transported to hospitals, the official said.

Divers with the police and Army helicopters assisted in the search and rescue operation.

.@FuerzaAereaCol apoya a esta hora rescate de personas de embarcación que naufragó en Guatapé, Antioquia #FAC pic.twitter.com/f5yowjBcMe

— FuerzaAéreaColombian (@FuerzaAereaCol) June 25, 2017

An eyewitness told the BBC the boat appeared to sink in less than five minutes.

The cause of the shipwreck was unknown as of Sunday night.

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KAZUHIRO NOGI/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Takata Corp. filed for bankruptcy protection in the U.S. and Japan on Sunday.

The Japanese auto parts maker has struggled to stay afloat amid lawsuits and recall costs over its deadly air bag inflators.

More than a dozen deaths are linked to the company’s faulty airbags. About 100 million have been recalled worldwide, with 70 million being pulled in the U.S., marking the largest automotive safety recall in history.

Chinese-owned Key Safety Systems in Detroit, Michigan, a Takata rival, reached an agreement with the auto parts maker to buy most of its assets and acquire its manufacturing operations for about $1.6 billion.

Takata agreed to pay the U.S. $1 billion in criminal penalties earlier this year, including a $25 million fine, $125 million to those who were injured by the airbags, and $850 million to automakers.

Kevin Dean, a lawyer in South Carolina who has dozens of cases pending against Takata, told ABC News the company’s bankruptcy filing was “a cowardly act by a cowardly company and their lawyers to avoid liability.”

“We currently have pending a number of cases across the United States involving wrongful deaths, people that are hit with these flying shrapnel,” he said. “One gentleman can not smile anymore. It damaged one of his facial nerves to the point where he can not speak anymore.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The celebratory tone of gay pride marches from San Francisco to Istanbul on Sunday were undergirded by an atmosphere of political expression and protest.

Chelsea Manning, the transgender U.S. army soldier who was imprisoned for leaking classified military information about the Iraq war before being released through a pardon by outgoing president Barack Obama, celebrated her first New York City Pride March on Sunday in front of a float sponsored by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

Happy first Pride March, Chelsea Manning! #NYCPride2017 pic.twitter.com/nLfXV3KAKK

— ACLU National (@ACLU) June 25, 2017

As the same New York parade started, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced that artist Anthony Goicolea was chosen to design the first official monument to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people commissioned by the state of New York. Goicolea’s design will take the form of “nine boulders, some bisected with glass that acts as a prism and can emit a subtle rainbow,” according to a report in The New York Times.

In addition to appearances by performers like LeAnn Rimes, progressive organizations like The Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), a group that has seen a surge in membership since Trump’s election, gave the event a more urgent tone. Marchers and revelers held signs that criticized capitalism, and highlighted the radical undertone of the 1969 Stonewall riots that helped to launch the modern day LBGTQ movement.

“Vulnerable communities are under attack right now, and they’re suffering systemic oppression, including transphobia, homophobia, and racism,” Natalie James, who served as one of the organizers for DSA’s contingent at the New York City Pride march, told ABC News by phone from the event. “We feel that socialism, as a political approach, is uniquely situated to addressing those issues.”

Remember:
No pride for some of us,
Without liberation
For all of us!

✊🏿✊🏾✊🏽✊🏼✊🏻#SFPride #Intersectionality pic.twitter.com/LeP8ztfm8I

— Mia Tu Mutch Satya (@miatumutch) June 25, 2017

In downtown Minneapolis on Sunday, activists briefly disrupted a pride march by bringing attention to lingering anger over the death of Philando Castile, and the acquittal of Jeronimo Yanez, the officer who shot him, according to a report in the Star Tribune.

Protesters held signs that read “No KKKops, make pride revolutionary again!” and “No pride for some of us without liberation for all of us,” the paper reports.

In the progressive hub of San Francisco, some marchers used pride to criticize the influence of corporations on the event, with one woman holding a sign that said, “COPS and CORPORATIONS OUT OF OUR PARADE.”

Other signs at the march also focused on health care and President Trump’s immigration policies.

A transgender female activist at the San Francisco rally held a sign that read: “NO PRIDE FOR SOME WITHOUT LIBERATION FOR ALL OF US.”

Meanwhile, Turkish police attempted to stop activists for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex rights from gathering in large numbers for an LGBTQ pride event in Istanbul on Sunday, dispatching officers after a ban on the event was imposed.

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Crystal Nadareski/Facebook(QUEENSBURY, N.Y.) — Stunning video published on social media shows the moment when a teenage girl dropped from a stopped ride at an upstate New York amusement park and fell into a crowd of park visitors and employees who had gathered below her to catch her.

The unidentified 14-year-old girl from Greenwood, Delaware, survived the ordeal and is at Albany Medical Center in stable condition with no serious injuries, according to The Warren County Sheriff’s Office.

“This is insane! We were just about to leave The Great Escape a Six Flags theme park, when I hear screams of a girl calling for help! People and security started to gasp and gather not knowing what to do. The ride continued to dangle her for 2-3 minutes before it stopped. Once it stopped she continued to hang for about 3-4 minutes screaming!,” Facebook user Crystal Nadareski wrote in a post accompanying the video.

The accident happened on the “Sky Ride” at Six Flags Amusement Park, about 55 miles north of Albany, New York.

Six Flags released a statement saying that New York State’s Department of Labor has cleared the ride for operation, but that no one can use it until an internal review of the incident has occurred.

“As the safety of our guests and team members is our top priority, and out of an abundance of caution, the ride will remain closed while we conduct a thorough internal review,” the company wrote in a statement.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Flying can be costly, especially for those who don’t do it often. FareCompare CEO Rick Seaney sat down with ABC News to tell us what infrequent fliers need to know before they book a flight.

Here’s what he had to say:

Some people fly frequently for work, but more of us are what you could call leisure travelers who might fly one summer, drive the next.

Traveling by plane only sporadically can leave gaps in our knowledge because the air-travel industry changes its rules and practices often.

A few years ago, for instance, getting free meals when flying coach was the norm. Then that perk disappeared. Now it’s making a comeback.

Here are some other things infrequent travelers may need to know.

1. Get to the airport early.

Rushing to the gate with seconds to spare is a thing of the past. These days, airlines have added incentive to take off and arrive on time because the government publishes these statistics for the world to see; as a result, airlines like Delta suggest domestic passengers arrive at the airport two hours early, check in 30 minutes before departure and be at the gate at least 15 minutes before takeoff. Why? Because sometimes planes leave early, and if you’re not there, they’re not going to wait for you.

Suggestion: Don’t be late. You could get stuck with a $200 ticket-change fee.

2. Checking bags usually costs

Free checked bags: Southwest is the only U.S. airline that will still check bags for free.

Free carry-on bags: Most of the big airlines offer this, with the exception of travelers flying on basic economy fares on American and United. Smaller airlines including Allegiant, Frontier and Spirit generally charge fees for all luggage.

Suggestion: Use a carry-on even if you have to pay for it because the bag that travels by your side is a bag that won’t go missing.

3. Forget about refunds

Except in very rare cases, once you buy your ticket, there’s no changing your mind because the cheapest tickets are almost always nonrefundable. Be very sure of your travel dates before you book.

Suggestion: If you must change your mind about a trip, do so within 24 hours of ticket purchase; by law, changes within this grace period are free.

4. Pay-to-pick seats

This is increasingly common, and you’ll see it on nearly every airline: You buy a ticket, go to pick your seat and find that the only free seats are middle seats way in the back. If you want a seat next to an aisle, window or not directly across from a restroom, you may have to pay a fee for it. On some discount airlines, you get no choice at all; if you don’t pay the fee, you will be randomly assigned a seat and should not expect much.

Suggestion: These pick-your-seat fees can change as the departure date gets closer, so keep checking back to see if you can get a better deal.

5. Freebies, what freebies?

Meals in economy are making a comeback, but don’t get too excited because they are offered on only a few routes of a few airlines. As for blankets and pillows, those airlines that still offer these amenities will make you pay for it. The availability of entertainment options is all over the map, but some airlines are phasing out seat-back screens because so many travelers bring their own electronic devices. Be sure you have your device.

Suggestion: Save money, bring a lunch from home, take a warm jacket, and carry headphones or ear buds for your device. And keep your charger handy.

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iStock/Thinkstock(ALLENTOWN, Pa.) — A man and a woman wanted for parole violation barricaded themselves inside a Pennsylvania home after allegedly firing shots at police, and later died in an apparent murder-suicide on Saturday.

The couple was being pursued after allegedly firing at police shortly before noon on Saturday. Following that incident, the man and woman fled and then barricaded themselves inside the attic of a home in Upper Saucon Township, according to authorities.

Police approached the home where they were hiding out and heard three gunshots that were not directed at them, according to Lehigh County District Attorney Jim Martin.

Officers dispatched a robot to investigate the area prior to finding the pair dead, Martin said.

While fleeing police, the man and woman approached at least two occupied homes, according to a report in local newspaper The Morning Call.

Edward Petro, a resident of the neighborhood where the couple fled, told the paper that he was sitting in his living room and flipping through TV channels when he saw strange shadows moving across the wall.

“I’m waiting for them to ring the doorbell, but the doorbell doesn’t ring,” Petro told the paper. “The guy comes in with a gun in his hand — not in his waistband, in his hand. And I just stood in my tracks.”

Petro told the paper that the man asked for his car keys, which he said he did not have. The encounter lasted only a few minutes.

The house where the man and woman eventually died was a few blocks from Petro’s house, according to The Morning Call.

The names of the deceased have not been released yet by authorities, but police said they were wanted for violating parole.

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