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iStock/Thinkstock(OUAGADOUGOU, Burkina Faso) — The wreckage of an Algerian airliner that disappeared from radar Thursday was found in Mali near the border of Burkina Faso, according to a statement from the office of the French president.

“The device has been clearly identified despite its disintegrated state,” read the statement.

The Air Algerie jetliner had 110 passengers and six crew members when it took off from Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, en route to Algiers, the airline said.

Air navigation services lost track of the plane, an MD-83 model, about 50 minutes after it took off.

French forces, which are stationed in Mali to help combat al Qaeda and tribal separatists, sent two planes searching for the airliner.

Earlier in the day, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said the aircraft “probably crashed.”

A French military detachment was dispatched to the area to secure the site and gather first information on the wreckage.

The airline said that among the passengers were 51 French nationals along with 24 Burkina Faso nationals, six Lebanese, five Canadians, four Algerians, two Luxemburg nationals, one Swiss, one Nigerian, one Cameroonian and one Malian. The six crew members were Spanish.

News of the plane’s disappearance came when Swiftair, the Spanish company that operated the plane, released a statement saying the plane had not arrived at its destination.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — An estimated four in 100,000 people in the United States live with Amyotriphic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, health officials announced Thursday.

Researchers released the first data summary from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, providing the only known data identifying all ALS cases among patients in the nation.

The disease, which has no cure, causes nerve cells throughout the body to stop working, which leads to paralysis and at times, death within two to five years of diagnosis.

Based on findings from October 2010 through December 2011, a total of 12,187 people were found to have ALS, and the disease was discovered to be more common among whites, men, non-Hispanics, and people between the ages of 60 and 69.

White men and women were twice as likely to have ALS compared to black men and women, and males in general had a higher rate of the disease than females across all racial groups.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — An estimated four in 100,000 people in the United States live with Amyotriphic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, health officials announced Thursday.

Researchers released the first data summary from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, providing the only known data identifying all ALS cases among patients in the nation.

The disease, which has no cure, causes nerve cells throughout the body to stop working, which leads to paralysis and at times, death within two to five years of diagnosis.

Based on findings from October 2010 through December 2011, a total of 12,187 people were found to have ALS, and the disease was discovered to be more common among whites, men, non-Hispanics, and people between the ages of 60 and 69.

White men and women were twice as likely to have ALS compared to black men and women, and males in general had a higher rate of the disease than females across all racial groups.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is resuming shipments of biological samples including tuberculosis bacteria, the agency announced Thursday.

The CDC lifted the moratorium on a specific type of material transfer for its Clinical Tuberculosis Laboratory, but is still keeping it in place for other high-containment facilities.

The decision follows a review from the agency’s internal working group to make improvements to lab safety. Initially, such transfers of TB samples were prohibited after safety issues with anthrax and bird flu.

In addition to the lifting of the temporary ban, the CDC announced the formation of an external laboratory safety workgroup to provide advice and guidance to the agency’s director and the CDC’s new Director of Laboratory Safety.

The group will work to identify potential weaknesses in labs, oversee training needs, and suggest ways to provide stronger safeguards for facilities, among other tasks. Members are scheduled to meet for the first time in early August.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The number of teens receiving vaccines for the human papillomavirus (HPV) remains “unacceptably low,” officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Thursday.

Girls and boys between the ages of 13 and 17 are not being vaccinated for HPV, despite a slight increase in vaccination coverage since 2012, according to data from the CDC’s 2013 National Immunization Survey-Teen.

While it prevents various forms of cancer, the vaccine remains “underutilized,” according to the agency. Experts cite a “substantial gap” between the number of adolescents receiving tetanus, diphteria, and pertussis (Tdap) vaccine, and those for HPV.

An estimated 57 pecent of teen girls and 35 percent of ten boys received one or more doses of the HPV vaccine, while nearly 86 percent received a dose of the agent for Tdap.

“It’s frustrating to report almost the same HPV vaccination coverage levels among girls for another year,” said Dr. Anne Schuchat, assistant surgeon general and director of CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. “Preteens need HPV vaccine today to be protected from HPV cancers tomorrow.”

The study also showed that clinician recommendations played a large role in whether or not parents chose to get their children vaccinated. For those that decided to get their daughters vaccinated against HPV, 74 percent received a tip from a health care professional, compared to 52 percent who did not. For boys, 72 percent of parents who chose to vaccinate their sons received a recommendation, compared to 26 percent of parents who did not.

Not receiving information from a clinician on for HPV was one of the five main reasons parents listed for not choosing the vaccine.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is resuming shipments of biological samples including tuberculosis bacteria, the agency announced Thursday.

The CDC lifted the moratorium on a specific type of material transfer for its Clinical Tuberculosis Laboratory, but is still keeping it in place for other high-containment facilities.

The decision follows a review from the agency’s internal working group to make improvements to lab safety. Initially, such transfers of TB samples were prohibited after safety issues with anthrax and bird flu.

In addition to the lifting of the temporary ban, the CDC announced the formation of an external laboratory safety workgroup to provide advice and guidance to the agency’s director and the CDC’s new Director of Laboratory Safety.

The group will work to identify potential weaknesses in labs, oversee training needs, and suggest ways to provide stronger safeguards for facilities, among other tasks. Members are scheduled to meet for the first time in early August.

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Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The number of teens receiving vaccines for the human papillomavirus (HPV) remains “unacceptably low,” officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Thursday.

Girls and boys between the ages of 13 and 17 are not being vaccinated for HPV, despite a slight increase in vaccination coverage since 2012, according to data from the CDC’s 2013 National Immunization Survey-Teen.

While it prevents various forms of cancer, the vaccine remains “underutilized,” according to the agency. Experts cite a “substantial gap” between the number of adolescents receiving tetanus, diphteria, and pertussis (Tdap) vaccine, and those for HPV.

An estimated 57 pecent of teen girls and 35 percent of ten boys received one or more doses of the HPV vaccine, while nearly 86 percent received a dose of the agent for Tdap.

“It’s frustrating to report almost the same HPV vaccination coverage levels among girls for another year,” said Dr. Anne Schuchat, assistant surgeon general and director of CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. “Preteens need HPV vaccine today to be protected from HPV cancers tomorrow.”

The study also showed that clinician recommendations played a large role in whether or not parents chose to get their children vaccinated. For those that decided to get their daughters vaccinated against HPV, 74 percent received a tip from a health care professional, compared to 52 percent who did not. For boys, 72 percent of parents who chose to vaccinate their sons received a recommendation, compared to 26 percent of parents who did not.

Not receiving information from a clinician on for HPV was one of the five main reasons parents listed for not choosing the vaccine.

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John Stillwell – WPA Pool /Getty Images(LONDON) — Ever wonder what President Obama got Prince George when he was born?

This weekend, the Buckingham Palace children’s exhibit will answer that question and more.

President Barack Obama sent the son of Kate Middleton and Prince William a blue alpaca wool baby blanket shortly after his birth last year on July 22, according to the Palace.

George, who turned one earlier this week, was also sent a handmade rocking horse with the presidential seal on its saddle, and a polo mallet with a head made from the branch of an oak tree that once stood on the south lawn of the White House.

These lavish gifts will be on display at the Palace for the “Royal Childhood” exhibit, which opens Saturday and lasts for eight weeks. It is a yearly tradition that starts with the Queen leaving for Balmoral Castle in Scotland.

While the Queen is on holiday, visitors can come into the palace and tour the exhibit.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NORTHAMPTON COUNTY, Va.) — Police have identified a couple who were killed in their tent by a tornado that ripped through a packed campground on the eastern shore of Virginia early Thursday, injuring two dozen people.

Ferocious winds twisted trailers and mangled trees as golf ball-sized hail rained on more than 1,300 panicked vacationers huddling for safety at the Cherrystone Family Camping Ground and RV Resort in Northampton, Virginia.

During a news conference Thursday, Virginia State Police said a tree had fallen on one tent, killing husband and wife Lord Balatbat and Lolabeth Ortega, both 38, and critically injuring their 13-year-old son, who was in a nearby tent. The family was visiting from Jersey City, New Jersey.

“We’re in a 37-foot motorhome and it started rolling back and forth and we’re hearing stuff slamming,” said Jerry Kennett.

Northampton County had been under a tornado warning until 9 a.m.

Winds up to 100 miles per hour snapped trees and flipped a tractor-trailer. After surveying the damage, the National Weather Service confirmed it was an EF-1 tornado.

“All the sudden, the wind started picking up, hail [the] size of golf balls … and you could see the wind spinning and it would change direction,” said Peyton Asal. “I mean, we were in the eye of this tornado. … It was scary.”

A total of 38 people were taken to hospitals with broken bones, lacerations and cuts.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NORTHAMPTON COUNTY, Va.) — Police have identified a couple who were killed in their tent by a tornado that ripped through a packed campground on the eastern shore of Virginia early Thursday, injuring two dozen people.

Ferocious winds twisted trailers and mangled trees as golf ball-sized hail rained on more than 1,300 panicked vacationers huddling for safety at the Cherrystone Family Camping Ground and RV Resort in Northampton, Virginia.

During a news conference Thursday, Virginia State Police said a tree had fallen on one tent, killing husband and wife Lord Balatbat and Lolabeth Ortega, both 38, and critically injuring their 13-year-old son, who was in a nearby tent. The family was visiting from Jersey City, New Jersey.

“We’re in a 37-foot motorhome and it started rolling back and forth and we’re hearing stuff slamming,” said Jerry Kennett.

Northampton County had been under a tornado warning until 9 a.m.

Winds up to 100 miles per hour snapped trees and flipped a tractor-trailer. After surveying the damage, the National Weather Service confirmed it was an EF-1 tornado.

“All the sudden, the wind started picking up, hail [the] size of golf balls … and you could see the wind spinning and it would change direction,” said Peyton Asal. “I mean, we were in the eye of this tornado. … It was scary.”

A total of 38 people were taken to hospitals with broken bones, lacerations and cuts.

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Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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