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Pedro PARDO/AFP/Getty Images(ACAPULCO, Mexico) — The U.S. Embassy in Mexico has issued a security warning on Saturday, urging U.S. citizens to avoid Acapulco due to violence and protests.

The protests have escalated in recent weeks after the disappearance of 43 Mexican students. U.S. Embassy personnel have been told to put off all non-essential travel to the area by air or land. The embassy also notes that road travel in other areas of Guerrero state is prohibited.

The embassy notes a ban in the Mexican Constitution on political activities by foreigners, warning Americans to avoid demonstrations or other activities that could be deemed political by Mexican authorities, as such actions could result in detention or deportation.

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Pedro PARDO/AFP/Getty Images(ACAPULCO, Mexico) — The U.S. Embassy in Mexico has issued a security warning on Saturday, urging U.S. citizens to avoid Acapulco due to violence and protests.

The protests have escalated in recent weeks after the disappearance of 43 Mexican students. U.S. Embassy personnel have been told to put off all non-essential travel to the area by air or land. The embassy also notes that road travel in other areas of Guerrero state is prohibited.

The embassy notes a ban in the Mexican Constitution on political activities by foreigners, warning Americans to avoid demonstrations or other activities that could be deemed political by Mexican authorities, as such actions could result in detention or deportation.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) — The CEO of Craiglist posted an open letter to a top U.S. government safety official Friday, saying that while he agrees the consumer product recall system is deeply flawed, he was “dismayed” that the official singled out his company in an ABC News report.

“You rightly lamented to ABC [News] that for a typical recall, 95 [percent] of the recalled items are still in the hands of consumers 5 years after the recall notice… These figures are utterly shocking,” the letter from Craigslist CEO Jim Buckmaster says. “Imagine our dismay when you and ABC ‘came out shooting’ at craigslist. Last we knew from your representatives, earlier this year, we were taking all appropriate steps to reduce the number of free classified ads for recall items by craigslist users.”

Buckmaster invited Kaye to San Francisco to “discuss how craigslist can further assist the CPSC in addressing product recalls.” “Since you, personally, have been the one leading the criticism, I trust you agree it will be time well spent for you as CPSC chairman, and I as craigslist CEO, to meet in person,” the letter says.

The letter came hours after ABC News Good Morning America broadcast parts of an interview with Chairman of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Elliot Kaye, who said that Craigslist is “morally irresponsible” for not doing what some other major internet resale sites do to block the sale of defective products under government recall.

“They do not and will not do it to date,” said Kaye, despite repeated requests from commission officials to set up the same filters used by Amazon and eBay to prevent recalled items from being posted.

Kaye said the result is the easy availability of items that could injure or kill children.

”I think it is irresponsible,” Kaye told ABC News in an interview to be broadcast further Friday night on World News with David Muir and 20/20.

Previously, Craigslist founder Craig Newmark refused to answer questions about the site’s refusal, saying he was only a “customer service representative” at the company that has made him a multi-millionaire.

An ABC News investigation, conducted with 17 ABC stations across the country, found the Craigslist site loaded with items that are illegal to sell because they have been recalled for safety defects.

Among the potentially dangerous items discovered on the Craigslist site was a Bumbo baby seat linked to a series of accidents in which infants fractured their skulls or suffered other serious injuries.

The Bumbo was later recalled, and owners were offered a safety belt, but the original version continues to be offered for re-sale on Craigslist.

When ABC News attempted to list the recalled version of the Bumbo on Amazon it was immediately blocked. On eBay, the listing was removed by the site 24 hours after we posted it.

But the Craigslist ad ABC News posted for the recalled item remained on the site for a week until we took it down on our own.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission praised Amazon and eBay for acting “responsibly.”

“They filter hundreds and thousands of online product notices to make sure with certain tags, make sure that these products are not up there,” Kaye said.

Craigslist, he said, “will not do it, has not done it, but should do it.”

In a written statement, the Washington government relations executive for Craigslist, William C. Powell, said the site has an automated system to help prevent posting of recalled items and also “provides a system where users can flag postings advertising recalled items for removal.” (Click here to read Powell’s statement in full.)

The spokesperson said Craigslist prohibits the sale of recalled items.

That notice is on the posting page, and elsewhere the prohibition of recalled items is on line 15 of a 22 line-long list of a wide range of prohibited categories.

“I still think it’s irresponsible not to join in with the rest of the community who have certainly recognized that they should take action in this arena,” he said.

Craig Newmark and Craigslist came under similar criticism five years ago over its policy of allowing postings that appeared to be ads for prostitution, and were linked to several murders.

At the time, Newmark addressed the issue in an interview with ABC News, saying, “If an ad on our site appears which is wrong for any reason, if it is criminal, we don’t want that on our site.”

Craigslist later dropped its adult service section.

Five years later, Newmark refused to address the issue of ads for the illegal sale of recalled items, saying he was no longer involved in the management of the company is only a customer service representative. In his letter, Buckmaster said Newmark had become a “victim of completely underserved criticism” and is a “dedicated philanthropist.”

After asking for the name of the ABC News director, he walked away from ABC News cameras.

To see if a product you’ve purchased has been recalled, go to www.SaferProducts.gov.

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(LAS VEGAS) — As a grand jury debates whether or not to indict Ferguson, Missouri, police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of Michael Brown, President Barack Obama on Friday — in an exclusive interview with ABC News — urged the residents of the city and all others to “keep protests peaceful.”

“Well I think, first and foremost, keep protests peaceful. You know, this is a country that allows everybody to express their views,” Obama told ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos during an interview conducted Friday in Las Vegas. “Allows them to peacefully assemble to protest actions that they think are unjust, but using any event as an excuse for violence is contrary to rule of law and contrary to who we are.”

A grand jury in Missouri is in the midst of determining if Wilson — who fatally shot the unarmed teenager on Aug. 9 — should be charged for the incident. It is not known precisely when a decision by the grand jury will be reached, but it’s expected to be announced soon.

On Thursday, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and Brown’s father asked for calm ahead of the decision. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has also declared a state of emergency in preparation, and the FBI is sending approximately 100 of its own to the St. Louis area in anticipation of possible unrest that could mirror the chaos that ensued after Brown was shot earlier this year.

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iStock/Thinkstock(RUTHERFORDTON, N.C.) — They say true love knows no boundaries, and a collection of recently discovered World War II love letters between a soldier and the apple of his eye, a beauty whom he’d never even met, certainly proves that to be true.

“Mama always said that she let him chase her, until she turned around caught him,” Jane Simmons, the wartime lovebirds’ daughter, told ABC News.

Simmons and her brother, Larry Davis, who just recently suffered a fatal stroke, always knew their parents had something extraordinarily special.

They were “very much still in love to the end,” Davis’ wife, Beverly, said of her in-laws’ 55-year marriage.

But what it took to form that bond, however, was something even more extraordinary than their love itself—a story which the soldier’s children are only just now learning.

“That was what was surprising. Mama never said anything about them,” Simmons, 63, of Rutherfordton, North Carolina, explained of the antiqued stack of 18 handwritten love letters she’s just inherited.

The letters were, for the most part, penned from her father, Teal Davis, while he was stationed in Burma in 1945, to her mother, Evangeline Poteat, a 22-year-old factory worker in North Carolina. At the time of their writing, the two had never even met. Despite being separated by oceans, miles and war however, Davis knew Poteat would someday be his bride.

“It rains pennies from heaven,” he wrote of how it feels to receive a letter from Poteat.

“I’ll be looking forward to the day when I can meet you in person, but for now a letter will do,” he said in another. “Be good, have fun this summer and write soon.”

The lovestruck couple was initially “introduced” by Poteat’s roommate at Appalachian State Teachers College at the time, Sarah Kate Davis, who suggested she write to her brother, Teal, while he was deployed in Burma.

Poteat did, and the two fell hard and fast.

But apparently Teal, an Army Air Force crew chief, wasn’t the only one who found Poteat irresistible.

“She was a beautiful woman with this auburn hair,” said Beverly. “She was the real deal.”

There were two other soldiers, both young men stationed in California, who were also writing to her—one of whom was even asking for her hand in marriage.

“I know that you think that I am crazy for asking you so many times,” he writes from Camp Cooke. “Did you think the ring idea is OK with you, or is it? I love you.”

The other soldier, a former beau from high school, separately wrote, “We used to really have a swell time until Uncle Sam nabbed me.”

Unfortunately for them though, Teal was the one who ultimately nabbed her.

All of the men’s love stories are chronicled in a complete stack of 18 love letters that the couple’s children, Simmons and Davis, came to unexpectedly inherit, all thanks to a reporter with the local paper, The Charlotte Observer.

“It’s odd to see that, but it’s wonderful too,” Simmons said of reading the 70-year-old letters from her mother’s other admirers.

Over time, Poteat’s World War II love letters somehow ended up in Oregon and were being sold by a historical collector on Ebay when Gary Schwab, a reporter with the Charlotte Observer found them, outbid everyone to purchase them, and tracked down the relatives to ensure they were safely returned home.

“We were just shocked,” Simmons said of the unexpected discovery. “Mama was good at keeping stuff. I just really don’t know how in the world they got to Oregon.”

“We can’t figure that out,” Beverly, Davis’ wife, added. “We’d really like to know how that happened.”

The family is thrilled to have the letters in their possession now— a treasure they never even knew was missing.

“It’s a keepsake to me that I never knew I had,” said Simmons. “It just means the world to me. I miss my mom and daddy every day. It’s been quite a few years since they passed and this just brought them back.”

Beverly knows her husband felt the same way, and knows his receiving these special letters just weeks before his sudden death was one of the best gifts he could have ever gotten.

And as for their mother’s additional admirers, “She wound up with the one she was supposed to have,” said Simmons.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The Dow Jones Industrial Average and S&P 500 reached record closes on Friday.

The Dow soared just after Friday’s opening bell when China’s central bank cut a key interest rate. It closed up 88.94 points at 17,807.94.

The Nasdaq went up 11.10 points to 4,712.97, and the S&P went up 10.73 points to a record finish of 2,063.48.

The Labor Department says unemployment rates fell in 34 states in October– a sign that steady hiring is becoming the norm across most of the country.

Online streaming service Aereo filed for bankruptcy less than five months after an unfavorable ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court. The court said Aereo had been operating like a cable TV company, and unless it paid broadcasters licensing fees, it was in violation of copyright law.

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Weinstein Company(LONDON) — Sixty years after his death, Alan Turing is back in the public eye.

Turing, a British mathematician who helped defeat the Nazis by cracking their codes, is played by Benedict Cumberbatch in the film The Imitation Game, which is set for a Nov. 28 release.

Even if this is the first time you’ve heard Turing’s name, chances are you’ve already experienced his impact.

The “Turing Machine” was the first modern computer to logically process information, running on interchangeable software and essentially laying the groundwork for every computing device we have today — from laptops to smartphones.

Turing also predicted that computers would keep getting smarter. In 1950, he devised an artificial intelligence test that asks, “Can machines think?”

Known as the “Turing Test,” it investigates whether people can detect if they are conversing with a human or a computer. In order to pass, a computer must be mistaken for a human by 30 percent of judges during a series of five-minute keyboard conversations.

Earlier this year, an artificially intelligent “teenager” became the first computer to pass the test by successfully duping enough judges into believing they were conversing with a real human, according to the University of Reading, which organizes the annual event.

Despite his tremendous contributions to computer science and his role in the war effort, Turing was arrested and charged under a law that criminalized homosexuality in the United Kingdom.

As part of a deal to avoid prison time, Turning agreed to be injected with female sex hormones. He died on June 7, 1954 — believed to be a suicide by eating an apple poisoned with cyanide.

He was posthumously pardoned last year by Queen Elizabeth II.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The Dow Jones Industrial Average and S&P 500 reached record closes on Friday.

The Dow soared just after Friday’s opening bell when China’s central bank cut a key interest rate. It closed up 88.94 points at 17,807.94.

The Nasdaq went up 11.10 points to 4,712.97, and the S&P went up 10.73 points to a record finish of 2,063.48.

The Labor Department says unemployment rates fell in 34 states in October– a sign that steady hiring is becoming the norm across most of the country.

Online streaming service Aereo filed for bankruptcy less than five months after an unfavorable ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court. The court said Aereo had been operating like a cable TV company, and unless it paid broadcasters licensing fees, it was in violation of copyright law.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Weinstein Company(LONDON) — Sixty years after his death, Alan Turing is back in the public eye.

Turing, a British mathematician who helped defeat the Nazis by cracking their codes, is played by Benedict Cumberbatch in the film The Imitation Game, which is set for a Nov. 28 release.

Even if this is the first time you’ve heard Turing’s name, chances are you’ve already experienced his impact.

The “Turing Machine” was the first modern computer to logically process information, running on interchangeable software and essentially laying the groundwork for every computing device we have today — from laptops to smartphones.

Turing also predicted that computers would keep getting smarter. In 1950, he devised an artificial intelligence test that asks, “Can machines think?”

Known as the “Turing Test,” it investigates whether people can detect if they are conversing with a human or a computer. In order to pass, a computer must be mistaken for a human by 30 percent of judges during a series of five-minute keyboard conversations.

Earlier this year, an artificially intelligent “teenager” became the first computer to pass the test by successfully duping enough judges into believing they were conversing with a real human, according to the University of Reading, which organizes the annual event.

Despite his tremendous contributions to computer science and his role in the war effort, Turing was arrested and charged under a law that criminalized homosexuality in the United Kingdom.

As part of a deal to avoid prison time, Turning agreed to be injected with female sex hormones. He died on June 7, 1954 — believed to be a suicide by eating an apple poisoned with cyanide.

He was posthumously pardoned last year by Queen Elizabeth II.

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Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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State Department photo/ Public Domain(VIENNA) — With three days left until this round of talks on Iran’s nuclear program concludes, the outcome appeared so uncertain Friday that Secretary of State John Kerry reversed his travel plans, first announcing that he would be leaving Vienna, where negotiators have huddled, for Paris, and a few hours later saying he’d actually be staying in the Austrian capital.

It’s clear what the United States and its allies want from Iran: a significant and irreversible rollback of its nuclear program, plus ironclad monitoring of any remaining civilian nuclear activity, in exchange for sanctions relief. But the parties, while remaining tight-lipped in public, have not yet agreed on how to implement such a deal.

There are really only three possible scenarios that could arise come Monday: the talks conclude with a deal, no deal or an agreement to extend the talks with some outline for how to proceed.

DEAL

Most observers and some participants have said a comprehensive deal by the start of next week is probably not going to happen.

“Right now, I think it’s going to be difficult to get to where we want to go. It’s not impossible,” Tony Blinken, the nominee to be the next deputy secretary of state, added during his Senate confirmation hearing Wednesday.

Iran and the Western negotiators, made up of the United States plus five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council and Germany, remain far apart on many of the core issues under discussion, including the number and kind of centrifuges Iran would be allowed to keep, under a final deal, in order to enrich uranium for a peaceful nuclear program; the length of such a deal; and the way in which economic sanctions on Iran get phased out.

But on the off chance the sides do reach a deal by Monday, members of Congress are already signaling they will seek to impose additional sanctions on Iran if it continues any nuclear activity, even for what it contends is a peaceful civilian program.

NO DEAL

Many skeptics of an Iran nuclear deal say they don’t want diplomacy to fail, but they also don’t believe the Iranian regime is sincere in its desire for a strictly peaceful nuclear program. It has become a common refrain in Washington and Israel that no nuclear deal is better than a bad one; it just depends on one’s definition of a “bad” deal. Israeli president Benjamin Netanyahu warned in a video message earlier this month against “rush[ing] into a deal that would let Iran rush to the bomb.”

In this way, the potential failure of these talks might give relief to those doubters, like Mark Dubowitz of the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies. He testified in Congress Thursday, saying negotiation is the right way to go, but “the dispute that is taking place now is between those who are skeptical of Iran and those who may be skeptical but they fundamentally believe…that we have a chance to fundamentally change the Iranian regime’s approach to its nuclear weapons program.”

Those participating in the negotiations have warned that failure to reach a deal could lead to dire consequences. “There’s no question that, if everything goes away, escalation will be the name of the game on all sides, and none of that is good,” Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman, the top U.S. negotiator, said in a speech Oct. 23.

But others contend that no one really knows what would happen if these talks fail. Asked that question in the same hearing as Dubowitz, Gen. Michael Hadyen, who served as the director of the National Security Agency and Central Intelligence Agency during the George W. Bush administration, responded, “That’s why we left this, an ugly baby, for the next administration. We didn’t have any good answers.”

INTERIM DEAL

Secretary of State John Kerry may have tipped his hand to what the parties believe will happen when he said during remarks in Paris Thursday, “we’re driving towards what we believe is the outline of an agreement that we think we can have” — a far cry from a comprehensive deal.

More likely is another interim agreement that extends the talks with the stipulation that Iran continue to freeze progress on aspects of its nuclear program in exchange for sanctions relief. That’s what happened back in July, when the negotiations were originally supposed to end, and the parties decided to extend until No. 24, which is three days away.

But even in the past month, the political situation in the United States has only gotten more hostile to a deal with Iran. Forty-three Republican senators, plus 11 incoming GOP senators-elect, have already pledged they will attempt to impose additional sanctions on Iran if it’s allowed to continue any nuclear development in a final agreement.

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