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US Senate(WASHINGTON) — Sen. Lindsey Graham announced Thursday that he is retiring from the Air Force Reserves this summer.

“I’ll turn 60 this summer which is the mandatory retirement age for the Air Force Reserves,” Graham said. “Although I would cherish the opportunity to continue to serve, I know that the time has come for me to end my service and transfer to the retired reserves.”

Graham served in the Air Force on active duty for six and a half years in the 1980s, including four years served in Europe. He has also served in the South Carolina Air National Guard and then joined the U.S. Air Force Reserves in 1995.

If Graham officially enters the 2016 presidential race as he is expected to do next week, he will be one of the few running this cycle who served in the military. Others include Rick Perry, Jim Webb and Jim Gilmore.

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Warner Bros.(NEW YORK) — Here’s a look at the new movies opening nationwide Friday:

San Andreas — When a magnitude-9 earthquake strikes California, a search-and-rescue helicopter pilot and his estranged wife travel to San Francisco in an effort to save their daughter. Dwayne Johnson, Carla Gugino, Alexandra Daddario, Ioan Gruffudd, Archie Panjabi and Paul Giamatti star. Rated PG-13.

Aloha — Bradley Cooper is a military contractor who heads to Hawaii and reconnects with his ex-wife while falling for the Air Force pilot assigned to him. Emma Stone, Rachel McAdams, Bill Murray, John Krasinski, Danny McBride and Alec Baldwin also star in the Cameron Crowe-directed film. Rated PG-13.

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Digital Vision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Pilots on four commercial flights reported being targeted by green lasers during flights over New York Thursday, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

According to the FAA, the flights — American 185, Shuttle America 4213, Delta 2292 and Delta 2634 — were flying at an altitude of 8,000 feet approximately four miles northwest of Farmingdale on Long Island when the pilots reported that lasers were illuminating their aircraft, a federal crime.

The planes were flying out of John F. Kennedy International Airport.

The incidents all occurred between 9:30 and 10 p.m. No injuries were reported, and the flights all continued without further incident.

Authorities are investigating, but at this point no one has been taken into custody.

Pointing a laser into the cockpit of a plane carries a maximum of five years in federal prison and a quarter of a million dollars fine.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Digital Vision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Pilots on four commercial flights reported being targeted by green lasers during flights over New York Thursday, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

According to the FAA, the flights — American 185, Shuttle America 4213, Delta 2292 and Delta 2634 — were flying at an altitude of 8,000 feet approximately four miles northwest of Farmingdale on Long Island when the pilots reported that lasers were illuminating their aircraft, a federal crime.

The planes were flying out of John F. Kennedy International Airport.

The incidents all occurred between 9:30 and 10 p.m. No injuries were reported, and the flights all continued without further incident.

Authorities are investigating, but at this point no one has been taken into custody.

Pointing a laser into the cockpit of a plane carries a maximum of five years in federal prison and a quarter of a million dollars fine.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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iStock/Thinkstock(SANAA, Yemen) — It’s been just more than two months since a Saudi Arabia-led coalition began its airstrike campaign against Houthi rebels in Yemen, and the country has since become a “humanitarian catastrophe,” experts said Thursday.

“I am shocked about what I have seen,” said Medecins Sans Frontieres’ Middle East Operations Manager Pablo Marco, who spent 50 days inside the country recently. “The biggest problem is the fact both parties in the conflict are not respecting the civilians and, specifically, they are not respecting medical facilities and medical staff.”

Marco was one in a panel of three experts in Washington who took a hard line against attacks by the Houthis as well as the 10-country coalition engaged in a bombing campaign against them for the past 10 weeks. The U.S. provides intelligence and material support to that Arab-led coalition.

The World Health Organization said on Wednesday that more than 2,000 people have been killed and more than 8,000 injured in the conflict since airstrikes began, and that 8.6 million people are in urgent need of medical help.

In the past, Saudi Arabia has pushed back against reports of civilians being targeted by its airstrikes and said the coalition has “exercised restraint.”

Last week, U.S. State Department press director Jeff Rathke said the only solution to Yemen’s crisis is “to get back to the political dialogue process,” adding, “the Houthis have to cease unilateral aggressive actions inside Yemen in order for that to have a chance.”

Rathke added that the U.S. has urged “Saudi and other authorities to continue to allow commercial shipments of fuel and food to avert a humanitarian crisis for the 16 million Yemenis in need of assistance. And we also understand that humanitarian aid organizations and the United Nations will continue to try to deliver aid as conditions permit.”

However, the panel said dozens of hospitals have had to shut down inside the country, and nearly all that are still operating are powered by generators.

“We are witnessing how the whole health system in the country is literally coming to a halt,” Marco said. “In a matter of 15 days or two weeks there will be hundreds of people who will be dying from this.”

Philippe Bolopion, a crisis advocacy director for Human Rights Watch (HRW), said his teams have documented cases where coalition airstrikes have caused “disproportionate damage” to the civilian population.

He said HRW has called on the U.S. to exercise pressure on the coalition.

“They have made the case that they are supportive to the coalition but are not a party to the conflict,” Bolopion said. “We are trying to challenge that a little bit, because according to publicly available information the U.S. has been refueling war planes in the air, providing intelligence possibly on some targets, helping with coordination. And if they are in some cases they are a party to the conflict, they could be found to be complicit to some of the violations that have occurred.”

The panel said the Houthis share some of the blame for lack of access to those in need of medical assistance, citing sniper attacks and bombings around hospitals.

“One of the more shocking things is that they reacted to the start of the military operation by recruiting even more children in their ranks,” Bolopion said.

The panel said that the coalition could provide some relief to the health crisis by easing the tight control of Yemen’s border and ports. Bolopion called it “a blockade,” and said it hindered efforts to provide aid to the population during the five-day humanitarian cease-fire earlier this month.

Bolopion said Yemen receives almost 80 percent of its food supply from international shipments.

“It’s hugely dependent on the outside, and the same thing for fuel,” Bolopion said.

Many have classified the conflict in Yemen since Saudi intervention as a proxy war, citing the Houthis’ alignment with Iran.

Robert Blecher, deputy director of the International Crisis Group, said the poor execution of the airstrike campaign has exacerbated a more domestic conflict into a regional powder-keg.

“The longer this goes on, the more and more the Houthis will be forced to have an external patron,” Blecher said. “The highest probability of a direct Iranian-Saudi clash is in Yemen right now.”

With the coalition focusing on the Houthis and the U.S. counterterrorism operations in the country severely hindered, Blecher said it has afforded al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula “more territory than it has ever held before.”

“So far, the biggest winner politically of the fighting probably has been al Qaeda,” Blecher said. “We’ve seen around the region — look at Syria, look at Iraq, look at what’s happening in Libya — the longer these conflicts go on, the more ribbed these extremists become.”

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Warner Bros.(NEW YORK) — Is Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson an impressive action star? Yes and no. Lately, he’s had moments when it seems he’s on the verge of becoming an above-average actor. Then he backslides.

I found Johnson backsliding a bit in San Andreas, though I by no means think he’s bad. He’s charming and has excellent comedic timing, but some of his more emotional scenes aren’t quite as believable as they need to be. Then again, they work for an audience that just wants to watch perfectly rendered earthquake destruction and doesn’t mind an unbelievable, ham-fisted story that has more plot holes than the moon has craters.

Quick synopsis: Johnson plays Ray, a helicopter pilot for the Los Angeles Fire Department whose personal life is in turmoil. His wife, Emma (Carla Gugino), is divorcing him and dating a rich guy she’s about to move in with, along with Ray’s daughter, Blake (Alexandra Daddario). Ray was scheduled to take Blake to her volleyball tournament, but that was before a massive earthquake in Nevada requires all first responders on deck, even in Los Angeles. But no worries — Emma’s rich boyfriend will fly Blake to her tournament on his private plane. What’s a handsome, mountain-of-a-man with a thousand-watt smile supposed to do? Sulk a bit, return to his heroic job and then call Emma from his chopper to apologize. Conveniently, Emma’s having lunch on the roof of a downtown skyscraper when the first devastating earthquake hits Los Angeles. And off we go.

The plot, the beats, the character arcs? They all seem like they come from a Hollywood build-your-own-disaster movie kit. Yet as dumb as the story gets, Gugino and Paul Giamatti, who plays a Caltech seismologist, turn in terrific performances. Solid as her career’s been to date, Gugino’s best days as an actress may be ahead of her. It was almost a disservice to Johnson to put him in emotional scenes with someone whose game is so good. Daddario, yet another actress in her late 20s who’s asked to play somebody roughly 10 years younger, is also a gem.

But San Andreas isn’t about the acting. It’s disaster porn on another level. I’m not talking about the cheap disaster porn you can download for free. I’m talking about premium disaster porn you need a subscription for, and don’t act like you don’t know what I’m talking about. The destruction is a work of art — we’re talking other-level CGI. It’s jaw-dropping, and if you love that sort of thing, you’ll eat it up. If you also love intelligent movies? Not so much.

Two-and-a-half out of five stars.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — While the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) can lack gender diversity, an online career site names a handful of jobs in those categories for having the best prospects for women.

CareerCast on Thursday released its Best Jobs for Women in 2015 report, listing 11 jobs, unranked, in which the percentage of women working in that field is rising or steady.

The barriers of entry for women in those fields are disappearing, CareerCast publisher Tony Lee said. The role of biomedical engineer, for instance, has one of the highest percentages of new graduates who are women of any STEM field.

CareerCast also selected the jobs for their relative high income and strong growth potential, using data from the U.S. Labor Department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics that represent the entire labor force.

“Because technological jobs are such a bedrock of the 21st century economy, STEM employers would be wise to meet growing demand through the active hiring of more women,” Lee said in a statement.

Lindsey Piegza, Sterne Agee chief economist, said employment opportunities for women have greatly expanded over the years because women themselves are increasingly willing to break the mold and seek employment outside of traditional female roles. There’s also an increased willingness on the part of employers to hire the most qualified candidate, regardless of gender, she added.

Still, Piegza said there are many other factors to consider when judging whether a particular job may be “best” for a woman.

“In the end, society benefits from producing a highly educated and entrepreneurial labor force comprised of men and women,” Piegza said.

Here are the CareerCast’s best job picks for women this year, in alphabetical order:

Actuary

  • Annual Median Wage: $93,680
  • Projected Growth Outlook (through 2022): 26 percent

Advertising and promotions manager

  • Annual Median Wage: $115,750
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 12 percent

Biomedical engineer

  • Annual Median Wage: $86,960
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 27 percent

Dental hygienist

  • Annual Median Wage: $70,201
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 33 percent

Education administrator

  • Annual Median Wage: $86,490
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 15 percent

Event planner

  • Annual Median Wage: $45,810
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 33 percent

Human resources manager

  • Annual Median Wage: $99,720
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 12 percent

Market research analyst

  • Annual Median Wage: $60,330
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 32 percent

Occupational therapist

  • Annual Median Wage: $75,400
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 29 percent

Public relations manager

  • Annual Median Wage: $95,450
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 13 percent

Statistician

  • Annual Median Wage: $75,560
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 27 percent

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — While the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) can lack gender diversity, an online career site names a handful of jobs in those categories for having the best prospects for women.

CareerCast on Thursday released its Best Jobs for Women in 2015 report, listing 11 jobs, unranked, in which the percentage of women working in that field is rising or steady.

The barriers of entry for women in those fields are disappearing, CareerCast publisher Tony Lee said. The role of biomedical engineer, for instance, has one of the highest percentages of new graduates who are women of any STEM field.

CareerCast also selected the jobs for their relative high income and strong growth potential, using data from the U.S. Labor Department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics that represent the entire labor force.

“Because technological jobs are such a bedrock of the 21st century economy, STEM employers would be wise to meet growing demand through the active hiring of more women,” Lee said in a statement.

Lindsey Piegza, Sterne Agee chief economist, said employment opportunities for women have greatly expanded over the years because women themselves are increasingly willing to break the mold and seek employment outside of traditional female roles. There’s also an increased willingness on the part of employers to hire the most qualified candidate, regardless of gender, she added.

Still, Piegza said there are many other factors to consider when judging whether a particular job may be “best” for a woman.

“In the end, society benefits from producing a highly educated and entrepreneurial labor force comprised of men and women,” Piegza said.

Here are the CareerCast’s best job picks for women this year, in alphabetical order:

Actuary

  • Annual Median Wage: $93,680
  • Projected Growth Outlook (through 2022): 26 percent

Advertising and promotions manager

  • Annual Median Wage: $115,750
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 12 percent

Biomedical engineer

  • Annual Median Wage: $86,960
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 27 percent

Dental hygienist

  • Annual Median Wage: $70,201
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 33 percent

Education administrator

  • Annual Median Wage: $86,490
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 15 percent

Event planner

  • Annual Median Wage: $45,810
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 33 percent

Human resources manager

  • Annual Median Wage: $99,720
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 12 percent

Market research analyst

  • Annual Median Wage: $60,330
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 32 percent

Occupational therapist

  • Annual Median Wage: $75,400
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 29 percent

Public relations manager

  • Annual Median Wage: $95,450
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 13 percent

Statistician

  • Annual Median Wage: $75,560
  • Projected Growth Outlook: 27 percent

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Warner Bros.(NEW YORK) — Is Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson an impressive action star? Yes and no. Lately, he’s had moments when it seems he’s on the verge of becoming an above-average actor. Then he backslides.

I found Johnson backsliding a bit in San Andreas, though I by no means think he’s bad. He’s charming and has excellent comedic timing, but some of his more emotional scenes aren’t quite as believable as they need to be. Then again, they work for an audience that just wants to watch perfectly rendered earthquake destruction and doesn’t mind an unbelievable, ham-fisted story that has more plot holes than the moon has craters.

Quick synopsis: Johnson plays Ray, a helicopter pilot for the Los Angeles Fire Department whose personal life is in turmoil. His wife, Emma (Carla Gugino), is divorcing him and dating a rich guy she’s about to move in with, along with Ray’s daughter, Blake (Alexandra Daddario). Ray was scheduled to take Blake to her volleyball tournament, but that was before a massive earthquake in Nevada requires all first responders on deck, even in Los Angeles. But no worries — Emma’s rich boyfriend will fly Blake to her tournament on his private plane. What’s a handsome, mountain-of-a-man with a thousand-watt smile supposed to do? Sulk a bit, return to his heroic job and then call Emma from his chopper to apologize. Conveniently, Emma’s having lunch on the roof of a downtown skyscraper when the first devastating earthquake hits Los Angeles. And off we go.

The plot, the beats, the character arcs? They all seem like they come from a Hollywood build-your-own-disaster movie kit. Yet as dumb as the story gets, Gugino and Paul Giamatti, who plays a Caltech seismologist, turn in terrific performances. Solid as her career’s been to date, Gugino’s best days as an actress may be ahead of her. It was almost a disservice to Johnson to put him in emotional scenes with someone whose game is so good. Daddario, yet another actress in her late 20s who’s asked to play somebody roughly 10 years younger, is also a gem.

But San Andreas isn’t about the acting. It’s disaster porn on another level. I’m not talking about the cheap disaster porn you can download for free. I’m talking about premium disaster porn you need a subscription for, and don’t act like you don’t know what I’m talking about. The destruction is a work of art — we’re talking other-level CGI. It’s jaw-dropping, and if you love that sort of thing, you’ll eat it up. If you also love intelligent movies? Not so much.

Two-and-a-half out of five stars.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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The 404 page on Rick Santorum’s campaign website. (RickSantorum.com)(WASHINGTON) — Iowa and New Hampshire typically play host to the rough-and-tumble early days of presidential campaigning, but in recent weeks another arena has gained traction in the battle for voters’ hearts and minds: candidates’ website error pages.

Campaigns on both sides of the aisle have put a creative spin on the usually boring “404 page,” the website page that appears when a URL is entered incorrectly. Animal puns, pleas for donations and a video that tells voters to, “just scoot down,” greet visitors who click a broken link or type in the wrong URL on certain candidates’ sites.

Here’s a round-up of the 2016 contenders who have made their mark in the mistaken web page world:

Hillary Clinton: Link not ‘what it was quacked up to be’

Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton’s 404 page features a cute, old photograph of herself with former President Bill Clinton and their daughter, Chelsea — complete with Donald Duck and cartoon hats.

“Oops, that link wasn’t what it was quacked up to be,” quips the error message. “But while you’re here, how about signing up to volunteer?”

Rick Santorum: More helpful than Hillary?

A large photo of Clinton holding her phone — similar to an image previously used by Clinton on her Twitter profile — greets visitors lost amid the Web pages of Republican Rick Santorum’s site.

So does a dig at the former diplomat, who’s been criticized for using a private email account as secretary of state. She has said she did so out of “convenience.”

“We’re sorry, but we couldn’t find that page,” Santorum’s error page reads. “But we do have this search box. You know, ‘for convenience.’”

Bernie Sanders: ‘Just scoot down’

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., takes his 404 page to an entirely new level, with a video in which he tries to help visitors get out of Internet purgatory.

“The good news is, you’re on the right website, and it’s a really good website,” says Sanders, the longest-serving independent member of Congress in U.S. history. “The bad news is, you’re on the wrong page.”

“Just scoot down to the bottom of the page,” he adds, waving his hand, “and you’ll find your way back home to where you should be.”

Marco Rubio

“FUMBLE! You seem a little lost,” proclaims the error page on Sen. Marco Rubio’s site. The Florida Republican’s website gives viewers a taste of his favorite football team, with an image of a Miami Dolphins player in the background.

And like Sanders, Rubio shares a video — although his is a more inspirational, professionally produced clip about his work coaching youth football.

Mike Huckabee

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, a Republican, gets casually punny with visitors to his website who have lost their way.

On his 404 page, a photo shows Huckabee relaxing on a boat with a happy-looking dog and a fishing rod, alongside a message that reads: “Oops! Looks like you caught the wrong page.”

Carly Fiorina

California businesswoman Carly Fiorina gets a bit simpler — and more direct — with her site’s error page.

Next to giant buttons asking for contributions to her campaign, the Republican uses a video to implore visitors to join her cause.

“We can do this, together,” she says, before giving viewers an opportunity to submit their email address and “Join the Team.”

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