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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The U.S. Department of Labor released a strong jobs report Friday morning. Payrolls expanded by 178,000 jobs in November, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The unemployment rate fell to 4.6 percent — lower than it has been since August 2007.

This is the last Jobs Report of the year and it reinforces what investors already expect: that the Federal Reserve will hike interest rates, for the second time in 10 years when it meets, on Dec. 14.

There were new jobs created in construction, health care and business services, with the economy now creating ample work to absorb all the new entrants into the labor force.

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JEAN-PHILIPPE KSIAZEK/AFP/Getty Images(INDIANAPOLIS) — President-elect Donald Trump touted his job-saving prowess in Indianapolis Thursday at a manufacturing plant, but a portion of the 1,100 jobs he says will now remain stateside may never have been intended to go to Mexico in the first place.

Sources familiar with the deal announced late Wednesday confirmed to ABC News that 800 jobs at the Carrier facility in Indianapolis would remain, but that 600 would still be outsourced to Mexico. The company had announced in February that the factory, which employs 1,400 workers to produce furnaces and furnace parts, would shut down operations over the next three years.

Carrier intends to retain 300 white-collar positions — such as research and headquarters operations — in Indianapolis, but those jobs were never going to Mexico.

Trump and company officials on Thursday celebrated the preservation of 1,100 Carrier jobs in Indiana thanks to the agreement.

“Companies are not going to leave the United States anymore without consequences,” Trump told workers at the Carrier plant. “These companies aren’t going to be leaving anymore. They aren’t going to be taking people’s hearts out.”

Trump added, “I will tell you that United Technologies and Carrier stepped it up and now they’re keeping — actually the number’s over 1,100 people, which is so great.”

Also at the Carrier plant event, United Technologies chairman Gregory Hayes, said, “Today we can talk about 1,100 jobs in Indiana going forward. So I’m pleased to announce that we have decided to keep Carrier [in] Indianapolis.”

Other nearby factories are still shuttering and sending jobs to Mexico. The United Technologies Electronic Controls factory in Huntington, Indiana, which is owned by the same parent company as Carrier, is sending 700 jobs to Mexico. The Rexnord Corporation ball bearings factory in Indianapolis, one mile away from the Carrier factory, is moving 350 jobs south of the border.

Trump has put other companies considering a move out of the U.S. on notice. During the campaign trail, he threatened to levy a 35 percent tax against Carrier imports if the company moved production to Mexico. At Thursday’s rally, Trump said he called the CEO of Carrier after he saw a piece on an evening news broadcast that reported the company was moving jobs out of the country.

“We won’t need so much flexibility for other companies because we are going to have a situation where they’re going to know, number one we’ll treat them well, and number two there will be consequences,” Trump said. “Meaning, they’ll be taxed very heavily at the border if they want leave, to fire their people, leave, make product in different countries and then think they’ll sell that product over the border.”

Carrier said the agreement with Trump is due in part to the incoming administration’s EFFORTS as well as state tax incentives, which Trump’s transition team has refused to disclose the full details of. Carrier company officials said in a statement Thursday that the state of Indiana, where Vice President-elect Pence is governor, offered the company a $7 million package over multiple years, contingent on factors including employment, job retention and capital investment.

“This is a great day for Indiana and it’s a great day for working people all across the United States of America,” Pence said at the rally before introducing Trump. He added that the Trump team was “grateful” that Carrier will now be able to “stay and grow right here in America.”

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Melania Trump has hired the well-respected law firm Pirc Musar & Partnerji in her native Slovenia to warn people against profiting off her name and image.

Honey jars “from Melania’s home garden,” pancakes with golden dust and a special breakfast with strawberries — these are just a few of the many products that Slovenian entrepreneurs have been offering for sale since her husband, Donald Trump, became president-elect of the United States.

“We just want to draw public attention to the fact that the names Trump or Melania Trump are protected as a trademark,” Natasa Pirc Musar, director of the law firm, told ABC News. “We issued a press release and sent it to all Slovenian media. Now we count on people’s prudence to stop the practice.”

She added that Melania Trump does not want to sue anyone.

“Of course, my client does not want any legal proceedings, no lawsuits. That’s out of the question,” said Pirc Musar. “We are closely monitoring the situation and I am in contact with my client on a weekly basis.”

In the tiny factory town of Sevnica, where the future first lady, then known as Melanija Knavs, grew up, a cottage industry hawking Melania Trump-associated products from quintessential Slovenian honey to pastries has sprung up.

Bruno Lojze Vedmar, a local Sevnica entrepreneur and a pizzeria owner, was the first to produce a breakfast dessert made of yogurt, strawberries, mascarpone, cream, cookie base and silver or gold sugar pearls — and he called it Melanija, with a “j.”

“It is a best-seller at my place, and since I don’t use a picture of Melania, I am not worried about copyright infringement,” he told ABC News.

Franc Krasovec, a Slovenian pancake master who has created a Melania Trump-themed pancake, says he’s not worried about copyright infringement either. “I don’t really know what copyright infringement is so I shall not worry about it,” he told ABC News.

He said that he has had 20 different kinds of pancakes on the menu for decades and that people from all over Europe have come to taste them. “Only now that the White House is so close to Sevnica, I invented a 21st pancake with the finest ingredients: wild blueberries picked around the cottage, the finest bourbon vanilla filling and ice cream with edible gold dust to spice it up,” he said.

Pirc Musar said that it’s items using her client’s photo or last name that concern her. “[It’s] not a problem. No photo or last name is attached to it,” said Pirc Musar of Vedmar’s breakfast dessert. “We personally tasted it and it’s very good.” She said that she doesn’t mind that a giant Christmas tree in the Slovenian capital of Ljubljana is called Melania either.

Pirc Musar pointed instead to a billboard advertisement erected in Sevnica featuring the future first lady without her consent. “A huge billboard in Sevnica with Melania’s picture, erected by a private web company for commercial purposes, is problematic,” as are “honey jars from ‘Melania’s home garden’ with Melania’s image and Slovenian and American flags,” she said. “That is Slovenian copyright infringement.”

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Purestock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The U.S.-led coalition fighting ISIS says 54 more civilians were inadvertently killed in airstrikes in Iraq and Syria that took place between March 31 and October 22. Since they began in August of 2014, the coalition has reported 173 civilians killed by coalition airstrikes and another 37 injured.

“We regret the unintentional loss of civilian lives resulting from Coalition efforts to defeat ISIL in Iraq and Syria and express our deepest sympathies to the families and others affected by these strikes,” said a statement released Thursday by Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve (CJTF-OIR).

The coalition investigates reports of civilian casualties to determine if they are credible and periodically releases updates about its investigations.

As of November 17, U.S. and coalition aircraft have conducted a total of 16,291 airstrikes against ISIS in Iraq and Syria, with 12,633 conducted by American aircraft.

The coalition statement said their team “investigates all reports of possible civilian casualties using traditional investigative methods, such as interviewing witnesses and examining the site, the Coalition interviews pilots, reviews strike video when available, and analyzes information provided by government agencies, non-governmental organizations, partner forces and traditional and social media.”

“In addition, we consider new information when it becomes available in order to promote a thorough and continuous review process,” they continued.

In this recent investigation, 276 allegations of civilian casualties were investigated; they found 83 of them to be credible.

They described 7 incidents between March 31 and October 22 that resulted in 54 civilian fatalities, two of which resulted in 39 of the 54 civilian deaths detailed in the coalition’s statement.

Airstrikes on July 18, 2016, near the northern city of Manbij, Syria, killed nearly 100 ISIS fighters, destroyed 13 fighting positions and 10 vehicles, according to the report. But the coalition’s investigation determined that up to 24 civilians “interspersed with combatants were inadvertently killed in a known ISIL staging area where no civilians had been seen in the 24 hours prior to the attack.”

According to the statement, the ISIS fighters were preparing for a large counterattack against Syrian rebel forces who were fighting to retake the ISIS-held city.

“Unknown to Coalition planners, civilians were moving around within the military staging area, even as other civilians in the nearby village had departed over the previous days,” the Centcom statement said.

Another 15 civilians were killed in an airstrike on July 28, 2016 near Arghanndorh, Syria that targeted a moving ISIS vehicle. “15 civilians were inadvertently killed when the munition struck the vehicle after it slowed in a populated area after the munition was released,” said the statement.

Investigations determined that twelve alleged reports of civilian casualties between September, 2015 and October, 2016 were not found to be credible. Three additional allegations remain under investigation.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The United States government returned a collection of stolen artifacts to Egypt on Thursday, including an ancient wooden sarcophagus, a mummy shroud and mummified hand.

The items were seized by federal agents after dual investigations: “Operation Mummy’s Curse” in New York and “Operation Mummy’s Hand” in Los Angeles. They were returned to Egypt at a ceremony with U.S. and Egyptian officials at the Egyptian Embassy in Washington, D.C.

“While we recognize that cultural property, art, and antiquities are assigned a dollar value in the marketplace, the cultural and symbolic worth of these Egyptian treasures far surpasses any monetary value to the people of Egypt,” said U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director Sarah R. Saldaña in a statement.

Repatriation is the final step in federal law enforcement’s ongoing effort to track down the theft and trafficking of antiquities from around the world — many of which end up in the United States. Customs law gives Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) the authority to seize stolen cultural property that has been illegally imported into the country.

In the past year, ICE returned more than 200 artifacts to India, as well as a stolen 1493 copy of Christopher Columbus’ letter describing his discoveries in the Americas to Italy.

“Each of the artifacts returned today tells a story –- a human story, our story. History comes alive when someone is able to not only read about the past, but is also able to visit the historical sites, watch and enjoy the artifacts, appreciate the images and see the actual writings of our ancestors,” read a statement from Foreign Minister of Egypt Sameh Shoukry.

Federal authorities aim to create good will and bolster diplomacy between the U.S. and foreign governments through these types of investigations and returns.

In a statement thanking the work of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and ICE, Egyptian Ambassador to the U.S. Yasser Reda included special praise for the agents working on the case.

“The tireless work of these men and women may often go unseen. But it is nothing short of vital for the preservation of ancient cultures from around the world,” said Reda.

Here is a list of the items of “cultural significance” from 8th century BC returned to the Egyptian government:

Linen Mummy Shroud

Mummified Hand

Child’s Wooden Sarcophagus

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The co-pilot of the plane that crashed Monday night in Colombia and killed 71 people was completing her first flight with LaMia, the Bolivian airline chartered to operate flight 2933, her father said in an emotional interview.

Sisy Arias was trying to build up her flying hours, according to her father, Jorge Arias, a Bolivian journalist.

Jorge Arias said he doesn’t blame anyone for the crash but he is upset at the pilot for miscalculating how much gas much has was left on the aircraft and what was needed to land safely. He also said he cannot blame the air traffic controller for making the pilot wait because the controller didn’t know the full extent of how low the plane was on fuel.

“Those five minutes cost all of those people their lives,” Jorge Arias told reporters, calling the tragedy a “direct flight over there to the sun” and a “flight without a return.”

Arias’ last words to her father were, “Don’t worry. We’ll see each other Saturday,” Jorge Arias said.

“And Saturday will come, but without her,” the grieving father said.

The charter flight was carrying Chapecoense, a Brazilian soccer team on its way from Bolivia to play against Medellin’s Atletico Nacional in the finals of the 2016 Copa Sudamericana on Wednesday.

The plane did not have enough of the required reserve fuel needed in case of an emergency, Aerocivil, Colombia’s civil aviation authority, announced Wednesday. The plane suffered an electrical failure before the crash, according to the official Twitter account for Jose Maria Cordova International Airport.

Six people survived the crash, including three players, two crew members and a journalist.

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ABC News(INDIANAPOLIS) — In Indianapolis Thursday, President-elect Donald Trump will tout his deal to stop nearly a thousand Carrier jobs from moving to Mexico. But at a ball bearing plant just a mile away, hundreds of Hoosiers may soon lose their jobs.

In October, the Rexnord Corp. announced it “tentatively decided” to move its Indianapolis operation to another one of its facilities, in Mexico.

Closing the plant would cost 350 workers their jobs, the union representing employees there told ABC News. The move is anticipated to happen sometime in the spring next year.

Rexnord has not responded to ABC News’ requests for comment.

The president of the Indiana AFL-CIO, Brett Voorhies, started his career at Rexnord and has friends and family members who work at the plant. He told ABC News that people are happy for their friends at Carrier but wish Trump could help them too.

“It’s really sad,” Voorhies said. “They’re looking out the window and seeing what’s going on at Carrier, and they’re happy for their brothers and sisters, but they’re thinking, ‘Why can’t you do this for us as well? Are you able to save my life too, Mr. President?'”

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Mike Pont/WireImage via GettyImages(NEW YORK) — Starbucks coffee announced Thursday that Howard Schultz, the company’s chairman and CEO, would be stepping down from his post this Spring and would be appointed executive chairman of the company.

The coffee magnate, who has been with the company for more than 30 years, is credited with turning the Starbucks into a global brand with name recognition comparable to McDonald’s and Coca-Cola.

The change will be effective April 3, 2017, the company said.

Schultz, the company said, “will shift his focus to innovation, design and development” of its Starbucks Reserve brand products and expansion of Reserve branded locations, while also focusing on the company’s “social impact initiatives.”

“As I focus on Starbucks next wave of retail innovation, I am delighted that Kevin Johnson —- our current president, coo, a seven-year board member and my partner in running every facet of Starbucks business over the last two years —- has agreed to assume the duties of Starbucks chief executive officer,” Schultz said in a statement released by the company.

In a conference call on the leadership shake-up, Johnson characterized Schultz one of the “most iconic leaders and entrepreneurs” in the world.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Wall Street closed mixed Thursday. The Dow closed at a record high, while the Nasdaq fell on weak technology stocks.

The Dow rose 68.35 (+0.36 percent) to finish at 19,191.93.

The Nasdaq dropped 72.57 (-1.36 percent) to close at 5,251.11, while the S&P 500 finished at 2,191.08, down 7.73 (-0.35 percent) from its open.

Crude oil gained nearly 3 percent with prices hitting over $51 a barrel.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — One of the five survivors pulled from the wreckage of the Colombian plane crash that killed 71 people Monday reportedly told South American media he curled up in the fetal position with a bag between his knees before the jet slammed into a mountainside.

“I put the bags in between my legs to form the fetal position that is recommended in accidents,” flight technician Erwin Tumiri told Fox Sports Argentina in Spanish. “During the situation, many stood up from their seats and they started to shout.”

Tumiri suffered non-life threatening injuries, according to the hospital treating him. Others found alive amid the plane’s mangled remnants suffered more serious injuries, including thoracic trauma and spinal damage. One person had a leg amputated.

But the majority of passengers –- most members of a Brazilian soccer team, the Chapecoense, as well as journalists and crew aboard the charter from Bolivia -– perished when the plane, plagued by an electrical problem and running out of gas, was ripped to shreds on impact.

According to the fire chief of the town La Union, Arquimedes Mejia, the aircraft clipped the top of the mountain on its way down, breaking the jet into two pieces. Some in the rear of the plane survived.

“We saw dead bodies everywhere at the site,” Mejia said in Spanish, in a video distributed by Reuters. “And there were people screaming for help. They were crying for help.”

The charter company, LAMIA, has had permits and certifications suspended, the Bolivia Civil Aviation authority told ABC News Thursday.

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