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iStock/Thinkstock(AUCKLAND, New Zealand) — Nearly 2,000 New Zealand residents signed up for a countrywide “Secret Santa” game this holiday season, continuing an annual tradition in which complete strangers mail presents to each other after learning their interests on social media.

The massive gift exchange, sponsored by the nation’s postal service, and this year drawing 1,979 participants, assigns Kiwis a recipient with a Twitter profile, where past postings can provide clues as to what type of present one might want.

The country of 4.5 million has a relatively close-knit community of Twitter users, uniquely lending itself to such a game, according to Sam Elton-Walters, a government worker who founded the exchange in 2010, after the idea popped up in an online conversation.

“You know how you have six degrees of separation in most places in the world?” Elton-Walters told ABC News. “In New Zealand, it’s more like two degrees.”

The gifts have been diverse: a hand-crafted chili chocolate for lover of spicy food; a crocheted rock; laptops and cellphones gifted by companies; a 3-D printed silhouette of the recipient face-to-face with Harry Styles from the band One Direction; and a painting of a Christmas tree decorated with pumpkins for Elton-Walters, who grows giant ones in his free time. The suggested $10-value limit often flies out the window.

Some participants make specific asks with their tweets, while others work to obfuscate their research by following and liking posts from dozens of people using the #nzsecretsanta hashtag.

Three-time exchanger Alison Poulter, a social media marketing specialist from Christchurch, New Zealand, tweeted in 2014 that she broke her garden hose’s nozzle, before “suddenly, a few weeks later, a new one arrived from Twitter,” she told ABC News.

“It’s quite cool to get to know somebody, and obviously you’re trying to stalk someone as much as you can online,” Poulter said. “It’s kind of creepy, but kind of cool.”

Organizers shy away from encouraging Kiwis to “stalk” each other, according to AJ Sheterline, a “Secret Santa” organizer at New Zealand Post dubbed the “head elf.”

“We prefer to call it ‘sleuthing,’” Sheterline said. “Very Sherlock Holmes-y.”

In its beginning years, Elton-Walters actually sent participants the addresses of their recipients so they could mail gifts directly — which led to at least one uncomfortable instance of an unwanted hand-delivery. Since the postal service took over in 2012, gifts have flown through a central facility run by the postal service.

When people do not send a present as promised, the gift intended for them will go to young cancer patients instead.

Dan Bowden, an IT engineer in Wellington, New Zealand, told ABC News he once sent vinyl records customized to show members of the Beatles, after his recipient expressed an interest in art and the band. This year, he sent a coffee mug with a photograph of a British opera singer printed on it.

The exchange has proven to be an escape for Kiwis saddened by recent earthquakes and flooding there, according to Sheterline.

“It’s fun to jump on Twitter and watch all the people tweeting about it,” Bowden said of the exchange. “You kind of feel like you’re part of this community.”

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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NASA/Bill Ingalls(NEW YORK) — Buzz Aldrin, the second man on the moon, has been medically evacuated from the South Pole.

Aldrin, 86, was visiting the South Pole as part of a tourist group run when “his condition deteriorated” and it was decided that he should be evacuated as a “precaution,” according to White Desert, a private tourist firm.

Aldrin’s “condition was described as stable” when he was handed over to the U.S. Antarctic Program medical team and evacuated. He was accompanied by a member of his team and was under the care of a doctor with the U.S. Antarctic Program, White Desert said.

The National Science Foundation said it provided the “humanitarian medical evacuation flight” for the “ailing” former astronaut. The U.S. government agency flew out Aldrin from its Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station to McMurdo Station on the Antarctic coast. From there, Aldrin will embark on a flight to New Zealand as soon as possible, according to the National Science Foundation.

In 1969, Aldrin became one of the first men to ever set foot on the moon as part of the famed Apollo 11 mission, accompanying Neil Armstrong and Michael Collins. The New Jersey native posted pictures on his official Twitter account earlier this week showing him preparing for his trip to Antarctica.

“We’re ready to go to Antarctica! May be our last opportunity to tweet for a few days! We’re go for departure to the launchpad!” Aldrin tweeted on Tuesday.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Elaine Chao, Donald Trump’s pick for secretary of transportation, has a big job in front of her if confirmed by the Senate.

Rehabbing America’s aging infrastructure is clearly a Trump priority.

“We are going to fix our inner cities and rebuild our highways, bridges, tunnels, airports,” the president-elect said in his victory speech. “We’re going to rebuild our infrastructure, which will become, by the way, second to none.”

Crumbling transportation was a major theme during his presidential bid as well.

“Our infrastructure is broken,” then-candidate Trump said in June. “The roadways are so bad. Our bridges are bad. Airports are bad. … We need to rebuild our country.”

The need for infrastructure investment was one of the only issues Trump and his rival, Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, seemed to agree on.

According to the Federal Highway Safety Administration, nearly 10 percent of America’s bridges — around 60,000 in all — are classified as “deficient,” and the American Society of Civil Engineers says 32 percent of our major roads are in “poor” or “mediocre” condition. AAA estimates that potholes alone cost American drivers $3 billion a year. The Federal Aviation Administration says airport congestion and flight delays cost the country more than $31 billion. And the ASCE gives America a D+ for infrastructure.

Two weeks before Election Day, the business mogul released a plan, pledging to spend up to $1 trillion on transportation and infrastructure over the next decade.

The infusion of cash would be spurred by $137 billion in tax credits for construction companies, which, according to Trump advisers Wilbur Ross and Peter Navarro, would be later repaid through taxes on contractor profits and taxes on wages earned by the workers — thus making the plan “revenue neutral,” according to the Trump campaign.

Theoretically, these tax credits would incentivize investors to spend big. (A trillion dollars’ worth of infrastructure would require an initial outlay of about $167 billion, Trump’s advisers said.) That investment would generate “thousands” of jobs in construction and manufacturing, his campaign said.

To quote Ross and Navarro, a Trump administration would seek a “private sector solution to the provision of public infrastructure.”

Trump’s plan also criticizes the Obama administration’s expenditures on “endless studies,” “layer-upon-layer of red tape” and litigation. A Trump administration would focus instead on finishing projects on time and under budget by streamlining permitting and eliminating wasteful spending, according to the campaign.

“Nobody can build better than I can,” Trump said in answer to a question about infrastructure repair, adding that mending roads and bridges is “not so different” from erecting buildings.

According to GreatAgain.gov, Trump also plans to tackle a number of transportation issues, from eliminating Transportation Security Administration wait times and reforming air traffic control systems to incorporating next-gen vehicles and upgrading water pipelines.

And it’s beginning to sound like he may be able to get somewhere.

In the hours following Trump’s election, Rep. Nancy Pelosi indicated that a “robust infrastructure jobs bill” could be Trump’s “common ground” with Democrats on the Hill.

Chao also happens to be married to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell — causing some speculation that her nomination could give Trump leverage over McConnell’s caucus, which is sometimes uncomfortable with high spending.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) — Sexual harassment knows no occupational boundaries, and many women who experience sexual harassment never report it.

ABC News gathered 10 women from 10 different industries who opened up about being sexually harassed. To protect the women, only their first names were used.

When asked how many of the participants have been sexually harassed over the course of their career, all 10 women raised their hands.

“I worked in restaurants for 10 years, and every time I walked into the kitchen, someone would whistle,” said Blayne, who’s in hospitality services.

“This person used guilt-tripping to try to get me to do sexual activity as compensation,” Samantha, in marketing, said of her experience.

A majority of the 10 women at the forum left their hands up when asked if they had experienced workplace sexual harassment more than twice, then more than three times and then more than four.

Amanda, who works in politics, admitted that in the past, she has considered wearing an engagement ring to “make it apparent” that she’s not interested in sexual advances at her workplace.

“[I] am here to talk to you about work, not about a date, not about whatever else and I sometimes wonder as a young woman,” she said. “Do you assume that I am out here looking for my life partner at my next 3 o’clock meeting? And would you feel differently if I had on a wedding band or an engagement ring? Would it allow you to shut that door and only look at me as a fellow professional?”

Only two women raised their hands when asked if they filed a complaint with human resources against their harasser.

ABC News“I think it always feels like an uncomfortable choice,” said Amanda. “I have to really think about my values and what’s important to me and weigh them against my career.”

“I often feel that in the grand scheme of things, I’m just not that important to the company,” said Sore, who works in education. “I sort of silenced myself; in that moment, there’s an erasure of yourself.”

Jenny Yang leads the federal commission tasked with investigating and litigating charges of workplace harassment. She said “gender-based putdowns” can also be a form of sexual harassment because it’s harassment based on gender.

“Sexual harassment is very much about power, but sexual harassment doesn’t always involve propositioning,” Yang said. “It can involve demeaning comments — crude language — that makes women feel like they’re in a hostile work environment.”

ABC NewsMany of the women at the forum said they’ve often heard that they’re “too emotional” when it comes to being on the receiving end of unwanted sexual advances in the workplace.

“You’re being too emotional — that’s the new word for sexism that men use and they put you down,” said Lesley, who has a career in media. “But you say anything, you’re emotional because you’re a woman.”

To stop men from behaving inappropriately, Lesley’s opinion was, “it starts in the home.”

“[A]nd it starts with the parents, and it starts with our discussion with our young men saying, ‘This is not OK.”

Yang said workplace supervisors and leadership must be required to hear the message loud and clear “that harassment is not tolerated.”

And a message from the forum of women: That part of the solution may lie within us.

“I’m raising my voice because I want to be an agent of change,” said Elizabeth, finance.

“To encourage other young women,” — Sore, education.

“That they too can take a stand,” — Njambi, retail.

“To break out of silence,” — Samantha, marketing.

“I am speaking out against sexual harassment because it exists,” — Judnick, journalism.

“Because it even exists,” — Sylvia, philanthropy.

“Because it exists, and it shouldn’t,” — Blayne, hospitality services.

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Chris Jackson/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Real-life royalty met music royalty Wednesday when Britain’s Prince Harry and Rihanna met at events in Barbados celebrating the nation’s 50 years of independence from British rule.

Harry, 32, first met Rihanna, a Barbados native, at the Toast the Nation event on Wednesday afternoon. He later joined Rihanna on stage for a concert to celebrate the country’s independence.

Prince Harry meets @rihanna at today’s Toast to the Nation marking 50 years of Independence for Barbados 🇧🇧 #50Barbados #RoyalVisitBarbados pic.twitter.com/ejmt1r2IDl

— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) November 30, 2016

Prince Harry and @rihanna join the stage as tonight’s concert celebrating 50 years of Independence in Barbados begins 🇧🇧 #RoyalVisitBarbados pic.twitter.com/dgW8LCwHs9

— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) December 1, 2016

Harry visited Barbados as part of his 15-day royal tour of seven Caribbean nations on behalf of his grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II.

“I am honored to be here representing my grandmother, the queen, as we celebrate the historic milestone of 50 years of independence of this beautiful nation,” Harry told the crowd in Barbados. “Her Majesty visited your beautiful country on the eve of independence in early 1966. The people of Barbados have held a special place in her heart ever since.”

Prince Harry speaks to an audience of thousands in Barbados before tonight’s concert celebrating 50 years of Independence #50Barbados pic.twitter.com/8NdvrdapAt

— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) December 1, 2016

Queen Elizabeth also sent out a special tweet to show her support for Barbados.

Read the full message from The Queen to the people of Barbados in the nation’s 50th year of Independence https://t.co/PNPdyHr0GV

— The Royal Family (@RoyalFamily) November 30, 2016

Harry’s appearance with Rihanna onstage came after a busy day during which Harry visited a pediatric ward at the nation’s largest hospital, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Bridgetown.

Harry, the fifth-in-line to the British throne, gave out his trademark hugs and stopped to play thumb war with a little boy who had been hit by a car and was slowly recovering.

A hug for Prince Harry in the Paediatric Ward at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, which The Queen visited in 1966 #RoyalVisitBarbados pic.twitter.com/sMsr9EDpM8

— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) November 30, 2016

Harry’s unscheduled visit to the hospital, which he’d seen on his last visit in 2010, also included a stop to discuss the hospital’s work on HIV and AIDS, one day ahead of World AIDS Day.

He kept another group of orphans giggling at the Nightingale Children’s Center, which houses 90 children, including those with special needs. Harry showed his inner child by kneeling down and embracing the children and even sticking out his tongue to elicit laughter from the disadvantaged kids.

📽 Prince Harry visits Nightengale Children’s Home in Barbados #RoyalVisitBarbados pic.twitter.com/zDaZo3jrMM

— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) November 30, 2016

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Netflix(NEW YORK) — Ever want to watch a Netflix show or movie, but you’re stuck on a plane or train with no WiFi?

Well, that’s no longer a problem. On Wednesday, the streaming service announced that “members worldwide can now download in addition to stream great series and films at no extra cost.”

Films and shows can be downloaded to a tablet, phone or computer, just like Apple’s iTunes service.

“We’ve often heard [members] also want to continue their Stranger Things binge while on airplanes and other places where Internet is expensive or limited,” the official release said. “Just click the download button on the details page for a film or TV series and you can watch it later without an internet connection.”

Airplane mode. Road trip mode. Stuck-in-the-subway-for-20-minutes mode. Your favorite stories are now available for download any time. pic.twitter.com/g7QZA3TyE8

— Netflix US (@netflix) November 30, 2016

Some shows are available now but more will be added.

“The new feature is included in all plans and available for phones and tablets on Android and iOS,” Eddy Wu, director of product innovation at Netflix, added.

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ABC News(CHICAGO) — Goran Cobanovski is the embodiment of the American dream.

Arriving in the U.S. from Macedonia in 2001 with no savings, he settled in Chicago, and within five years, he opened his own beauty salon, Goran Coban Salon. Today his flagship salon location in downtown Chicago employs a staff of 18 people.

“I don’t see it as a business. Maybe that’s the most important. I consider myself an artist,” he said. “All my colleagues are very artistic people. And it’s more of a fun environment for everyone, and for me.”

But with a salon that serves up to 50 clients a day, that perspective can create some management and organizational problems.

Good Morning America brought in Carol Roth, a small business expert and host of Microsoft’s Office Small Business Academy, to give Cobanovski a lesson in the basics of business management. Microsoft is a sponsor of Good Morning America.

First lesson: how to keep an artistic staff both inspired and happy.

“What you need to do is sit down with each of your employees individually. Because when it comes to motivation, not all of us are motivated by the same things,” Roth said. “Some of them might want to make more money, some might want more recognition … you need to know what motivates each of your employees individually.”

Second, don’t be afraid to delegate responsibility, Roth advises, but not “abdicate.”

“Either you need to put in systems and processes into place in your business so that you can have everybody follow those and make everything flow as smooth as some of the beautiful blowouts that you do here. If you don’t want to do that yourself, you can also outsource that. You could actually bring on a manager to put in those processes and systems,” she said. “However, I will tell you that if you’re going to delegate responsibility, you cannot abdicate your responsibility. Because at the end of the day, your name is on the door.”

Third, and the biggest concern for Cobanovski, is managing the front desk and the scheduling of appointments.

“We need to make that to be a little bit smoother process where we don’t get two clients coming at the same time for this one appointment,” he explained. “It’s pretty simple, but it’s not that simple.”

Roth suggests bringing in a new app from Microsoft called Bookings, part of their Business Premium Office 365 Suite, to help ease scheduling woes.

“What you’re going to be able to do is have your receptionist have a page so she can see all the timeslots available and be able to hold those timeslots very easily,” Roth said. “But I love most about it is that it’s so easy from a customer’s perspective. It is just a three-step process. So they pick their service, they pick the date that they want and the time. And then after that, they get all of those details that you need, including the phone number, and they press ‘book.’ And it will actually hold that time, put a reminder on their calendar, and then your receptionist can just follow up and make sure that it works.”

Microsoft gave Cobanovski the service at no charge to help support his small business.

For more tips to boost your small business from our sponsor Microsoft, click here.

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iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) — Every morning, Fatima Mustafa boils rice for her 1-year-old daughter to eat for breakfast. Once in a while, she’ll have a little bread that she’ll give her as well, along with a cup of tea. “I don’t want her to be hungry,” Mustafa, a mother of two, told ABC News. She breastfeeds her youngest daughter, a newborn, but says it’s not enough.

“I have to eat and get nutrition before I can breastfeed properly. My youngest daughter is not getting full from my milk and there is no milk in the stores,” Mustafa said. “I feel disappointed and depressed because I am unable to secure the most basic rights for my children like food and diapers, and the reason is the conditions we live under because of the horrible war.“

The family lives under siege in east Aleppo, where many mothers have little or no access to basic products such as baby milk and diapers. When Mustafa first ran out of diapers two months ago, she didn’t know what to do. Today, she takes her husband’s old undershirts, cuts them into the right shapes and uses them as diapers for her daughters, 1-month-old Raha and 1-year-old Masa. She then washes the dirty cloth by hand — with soap because laundry detergent isn’t available — and reuses them.

Shortages of Key Supplies

Six months ago, 486,700 people in Syria lived under siege, according to the United Nations. Since then, the U.N. estimates that the number has doubled. Today, nearly one million Syrians, about half of them children, are living under siege, which is imposed mainly by the Syrian government and its allied forces, according to the U.N. Some besieged communities have barely received any aid in almost two years. In addition to the dangers of bombardments, residents live with little access to food, water, fuel and healthcare. For many mothers with infants and toddlers, this means that they have to find alternatives for diapers and milk.

“There have been quite a lot of shortages of baby formula both in Aleppo and other besieged areas in Syria,” Misty Buswell, Save the Children’s regional advocacy director for the Middle East, told ABC News. “Even when formula is available, a lot of time it is being diluted, which can also lead to diarrhea and malnutrition.” Other times, the bottles aren’t sterile and the formula is mixed with contaminated water, which can also make the babies sick, she said. Save the Children has also heard reports of baby formula being removed from aid convoys going to besieged areas — but it is not clear who is removing the baby milk and why, said Buswell.

Even before the war, only about 43 percent of Syrian mothers were breastfeeding exclusively for the first six months of their infants’ lives, which is the recommended time, said Buswell. Today, more mothers struggle with breastfeeding.

“If women are malnourished, they might not think that it’s possible to breastfeed,” Buswell said. “Even in the best conditions, breastfeeding for the first time can be very difficult. In siege conditions, without enough medical support and without enough nutrition, it’s even more difficult.”

As a substitute for breastfeeding, when no formula is available, women sometimes give the babies water mixed with sugar — or milk from goats and cows, which isn’t sanitary.

Maha, a teacher and mother of five in the besieged opposition-held part of Aleppo, has some baby milk but few diapers left for her youngest children, a 3-month old and a 1-year-old. So she uses women’s sanitary pads with the diapers.

“That way, they will last longer,” Maha, who didn’t give her last name, told ABC News. “But many other mothers ran out of diapers a long time ago.”

Malnutrition Is Widespread

Around 200 miles away, in rural Damascus’ besieged rebel-held city of Douma, mothers are facing similar struggles.

Ulla, a 24-year-old mother with three young children, breastfeeds her youngest child, a 1-year-old daughter. But after a recent miscarriage, she’s been feeling weak and dizzy after breastfeeding, she said.

“It’s difficult to breastfeed. My body is very tired,” Ulla, who requested that her last name not be published, told ABC News. “I get dizzy and tired easily after what happened. But if I stop breastfeeding, what will I give my daughter? We don’t have milk now and very few meals.”

She says her children have been getting rashes from the pieces of fabric and old clothes she uses as diapers because she doesn’t have any disposable ones left. The water she uses to wash the cloth is not very clean, and they don’t always have water at home. So sometimes she has to wait for her husband to come home with water pumped from a tube well outside.

The only way to heat up the house is with firewood, but this year the wood is more expensive than usual and they can’t afford it, she said — Ulla doesn’t have a job. Her husband worked as a mechanic before the war but is currently unemployed. At the same time, their house has been damaged from four attacks, she said. They have sealed the windows and door with silicone, but every time there is an airstrike nearby, it falls off, the house gets colder and they have to reseal it. The children get sick often and easily because their house is cold and she can’t give them nutritious food, said Ulla.

“I wish I could change this situation for my children,” she said. “I was hoping they would have a better life than this. I feel very sad that I can’t bring them the things I was dreaming of and that I can’t protect them. Sometimes I just feel like sitting by myself and not seeing anyone because I’m so sad.”

Amal, another resident of besieged Douma, has five children — two teenage sons, an 11-year-old, a 7-year-old and a 1-year-old. She says there’s a huge difference between being a mother now compared to before the siege, which was imposed in 2013. When her 7-year-old was a toddler, she had disposable diapers, milk and a washing machine for dirty clothes. Today, she uses old sheets as diapers and washes them by hand because there’s no electricity. She has little access to baby milk.

“My children’s bodies are tired and I’m tired,” Amal, who didn’t want her last name to be published, told ABC News. “I breastfeed my youngest son, but his body is weak. He gets infections and a fever easily and medicine is expensive. I wish I didn’t have this son because he’s suffering a lot.”

She said she doesn’t think her milk is nutritious because she doesn’t get enough vitamins. Some fruits and vegetables are available, but they are very expensive because of the siege, especially in the winter. One day, she bought a banana for her 1-year-old son. He kept having diarrhea and some friends told her that feeding him banana would help. It cost around 700 Syrian pounds, approximately $3. For that price, she said, she could have bought more than two pounds of rice, enough to feed the whole family.

“When the other children saw the banana they wanted bananas too, but I can’t afford that,” she said, adding that she was forced to only feed her other children bread with olive oil and thyme that day.

Her husband was a construction worker before the war but he can no longer find work. She has started to work as a seamstress to provide for the family but her income varies from day to day. Some days she has no customers at all.

“On a good day, we can have two meals — either breakfast and lunch or breakfast and dinner,” she said. “Other days we only have one meal at around noon.” She added that on days with little or no income, the family’s diet consists of only tea and bread.

In besieged Madaya, a small rebel-held town surrounded by government forces in the countryside of Damascus, an estimated 40,000 residents, mostly women and children, live in hunger. Some there have starved to death.

Hala, a mother of two and one of Madaya’s residents, tries to feed her baby daughter rice because she doesn’t have enough baby milk, she said. When her 12-year-old daughter was an infant long before the siege, she was able to breastfeed her, but now she has very little milk for her youngest daughter who does not get full even after 30 minutes of breastfeeding. Hala said that her own body is very weak, but that her daughter’s health is even worse.

“My daughter is getting weaker and weaker in front of me and I can’t do anything,” Hala, who didn’t give her last name, told ABC News. “I can’t give her the nutrition she needs like any other child so that she can grow in a normal way like her older sister did.”

Unwanted Pregnancies

Some pregnant women in Madaya are so desperate that they try to self-abort.

About a year ago, Salimeh, 25, a resident of Madaya, started feeling dizzy and weak. In a short amount of time, she lost 50 pounds, she said. When she didn’t get her period for three months she assumed it was because of malnutrition. That happened to many women in Madaya, she said, because they have so little food — mainly rice and bulgur, almost no vegetables or proteins. But when she started to feel an intense stomach ache, she went to see the local midwife.

“She told me that I was pregnant,” Salimeh, who didn’t give her last name, told ABC News, adding that she doesn’t have access to birth control. She didn’t want to keep the baby but also couldn’t get medicine that would induce an abortion or see a doctor who could perform the procedure. The three doctors at Madaya’s hospital are a veterinarian and two dentists who haven’t graduated yet and there is little medical equipment, according to a medical source at the hospital. So Salimeh looked for alternatives.

“I tried to jump from high places to get rid of the baby because of our situation and how difficult it is,” said Salimeh.

But she didn’t lose the child. Many babies in Madaya are born unhealthy or with deformities because their mothers are malnourished, locals and charities say. Some are born prematurely and die right after the birth. So when Salimeh gave birth to a healthy 7-pound boy three months ago, she was surprised.

“I was surprised that he was in really good health,” she said. ”But unfortunately, I wasn’t able to breastfeed my son because I didn’t get milk at all due to malnutrition. And I had no formula milk I could give him to make sure he wasn’t hungry.”

She now has a little baby milk but not enough. So sometimes she gives him milk, other times boiled rice with sugar. She says the boy is getting sick from the lack of nutrition.

“It’s very important to me that my son is healthy and healthier than me,” she said. “I was very tired and suffered for nine months and tried to abort this child. But I don’t ask about my own health because it doesn’t matter to me as much as my son’s health. I wish to see my child healthy because then I will be fine.”

Mona, 23, a newlywed, is two months pregnant and says she is trying to do everything she can to lose the baby.

“I’m jumping from high places, pumping water from the well, doing physical work that men aren’t even doing because I want to lose the baby, but it hasn’t happened yet,” she told ABC News. She said she went to see one of Madaya’s doctors and asked for any type of medicine that could help induce an abortion. The doctor told her to get a drug called Cytotec, which Mona hasn’t been able to find in Madaya. She’s tried to get it from smugglers or anyone who might be coming into town but so far has failed, she said.

“I am still hoping that I will lose the baby,” she said. “I don’t want to live through the suffering that other mothers have had to live through. Often, children are stillborn or deformed. I am scared to have a baby that I will not be able to give a good life because of the siege. I have suffered and I don’t want my child to suffer.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The government of Pakistan provided a readout of a phone call between Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and Donald Trump Wednesday claiming that the president-elect heaped praise on the Pakistani leader, describing the South Asian nation and its people as “fantastic.”

According to the readout, Prime Minister Sharif called Trump and “felicitated him on his victory.”

The readout said President-elect Trump told Prime Minister Sharif “you have a very good reputation” and “you are a terrific guy … doing amazing work which is visible in every way.”

Trump told Sharif, according to the readout, “Your country is amazing with tremendous opportunities. Pakistanis are one of the most intelligent people. I am ready and willing to play any role that you want me to play to address and find solutions to the outstanding problems. It will be an honor and I will personally do it.”

Trump’s presidential transition team has not provided its own readout of the call and has yet to respond to ABC News’ request for comment, other than to confirm the call happened.

“On being invited to visit Pakistan by the Prime Minister, Mr. Trump said that he would love to come to a fantastic country, fantastic place of fantastic people,” the readout said. “‘Please convey to the Pakistani people that they are amazing and all Pakistanis I have known are exceptional people,’ said Mr. Donald Trump.”

The U.S. relationship with Pakistan is vital, albeit tenuous and complex. The two countries share a military alliance against terrorism, but at times, in pursuit of its own interest, elements of the Pakistani government have undermined the U.S. war effort in Afghanistan by supporting the Afghan Taliban. And while its makes an effort to combat terror organizations with Pakistan, such as the TTP or Pakistani Taliban, the government’s intelligence wing has been known to support that group’s overseas efforts. Also, some in the U.S. government, including former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, believed there were officials in Pakistan’s government who knew about the whereabouts of Osama bin Laden before he was hunted and killed by U.S. forces inside Pakistan’s borders.

Pakistan is also involved in a high-stakes territorial dispute with India which has turned violent in recent months. The international community has long feared any escalation between the two nuclear-armed countries and the U.S. has to approach those issues carefully.

Trump’s reported remarks also seem to stand in contrast to his suggested policies of a “Muslim ban” and “extreme vetting” of immigrants from nations where terrorists are known to reside — a category Pakistan would fit in either circumstance.

The comments are also surprising considering Trump tweeted Wednesday that the Somali-born attacker at Ohio State University, who the FBI believes may have been inspired by radical jihadists, “should not have been in our country.”

ISIS is taking credit for the terrible stabbing attack at Ohio State University by a Somali refugee who should not have been in our country.

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 30, 2016

Sources tell ABC News the attacker had been a legal permanent resident of the U.S. since 2014 and said that before he had been living at a refugee camp inside Pakistan.

Whether or not Trump’s statements were sincere or mere diplomacy jargon is hard to tell. Either way the Pakistanis took the reported remarks public and might soon remind the President of his proposal to “play any role that you want me to play.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The government of Pakistan provided a readout of a phone call between Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and Donald Trump Wednesday claiming that the president-elect heaped praise on the Pakistani leader, describing the South Asian nation and its people as “fantastic.”

According to the readout, Prime Minister Sharif called Trump and “felicitated him on his victory.”

The readout said President-elect Trump told Prime Minister Sharif “you have a very good reputation” and “you are a terrific guy … doing amazing work which is visible in every way.”

Trump told Sharif, according to the readout, “Your country is amazing with tremendous opportunities. Pakistanis are one of the most intelligent people. I am ready and willing to play any role that you want me to play to address and find solutions to the outstanding problems. It will be an honor and I will personally do it.”

Trump’s presidential transition team has not provided its own readout of the call and has yet to respond to ABC News’ request for comment, other than to confirm the call happened.

“On being invited to visit Pakistan by the Prime Minister, Mr. Trump said that he would love to come to a fantastic country, fantastic place of fantastic people,” the readout said. “‘Please convey to the Pakistani people that they are amazing and all Pakistanis I have known are exceptional people,’ said Mr. Donald Trump.”

The U.S. relationship with Pakistan is vital, albeit tenuous and complex. The two countries share a military alliance against terrorism, but at times, in pursuit of its own interest, elements of the Pakistani government have undermined the U.S. war effort in Afghanistan by supporting the Afghan Taliban. And while its makes an effort to combat terror organizations with Pakistan, such as the TTP or Pakistani Taliban, the government’s intelligence wing has been known to support that group’s overseas efforts. Also, some in the U.S. government, including former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, believed there were officials in Pakistan’s government who knew about the whereabouts of Osama bin Laden before he was hunted and killed by U.S. forces inside Pakistan’s borders.

Pakistan is also involved in a high-stakes territorial dispute with India which has turned violent in recent months. The international community has long feared any escalation between the two nuclear-armed countries and the U.S. has to approach those issues carefully.

Trump’s reported remarks also seem to stand in contrast to his suggested policies of a “Muslim ban” and “extreme vetting” of immigrants from nations where terrorists are known to reside — a category Pakistan would fit in either circumstance.

The comments are also surprising considering Trump tweeted Wednesday that the Somali-born attacker at Ohio State University, who the FBI believes may have been inspired by radical jihadists, “should not have been in our country.”

ISIS is taking credit for the terrible stabbing attack at Ohio State University by a Somali refugee who should not have been in our country.

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 30, 2016

Sources tell ABC News the attacker had been a legal permanent resident of the U.S. since 2014 and said that before he had been living at a refugee camp inside Pakistan.

Whether or not Trump’s statements were sincere or mere diplomacy jargon is hard to tell. Either way the Pakistanis took the reported remarks public and might soon remind the President of his proposal to “play any role that you want me to play.”

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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