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PHOTO: Wider seating while you enjoy panoramic views.

Imagine flying on an airplane and being able the clouds all around you. That’s what one company plans on achieving in the next 10 years — an airplane without windows.

The Centre for Process Innovation (CPI), a U.K.-based cutting edge technology association, envisioned the next generation aircraft in efforts to conserve fuel, while drastically transforming the customer experience.

Centre for Process Innovation

PHOTO: Wider seating while you enjoy panoramic views.

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“Removing the windows will significantly reduce the weight of the aircraft, saving fuel and therefore reducing operational costs,” says Matthew Herbert, marketing manager for CPI. “The windows will be replaced by high quality flexible OLED displays that are connected to digital cameras integrated into the exterior of the plane,” he says.

Lower operational costs, the company claims, will in turn result in reduced airfares.

PHOTO: Live video, information, and in-flight services at your fingertips.

Centre for Process Innovation

PHOTO: Live video, information, and in-flight services at your fingertips.

In addition to the windowless element, passengers can surf the web, enjoy in-flight entertainment, or change the views from different angles of the plane.

PHOTO: Windows to be replaced by full-length screens.

Centre for Process Innovation

PHOTO: Windows to be replaced by full-length screens.

A few months ago, Spike Aerospace, Inc. introduced the concept behind the “world’s first supersonic jet.” called the Spike S-512, which also has a windowless feature.

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A nurse who returned from fighting Ebola in West Africa challenged the demands that she remain quarantined by leaving her home this morning for bike ride with her boyfriend.

Kaci Hickox, 33, went on the bike ride with her boyfriend in Fort Kent, Maine, after vowing last night she wasn’t willing to “stand here and have my civil rights violated.” State officials said they were preparing to file a court order to enforce a mandatory quarantine, but it would first have to be approved by a judge.

Hickox was treating Ebola patients in Sierra Leone for Doctors Without Borders. She returned to the United States on Friday, landing in Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey, where she was questioned and quarantined in an outdoor tent through the weekend despite having no symptoms of the lethal virus.

Hickox registered a fever on an infrared thermometer at the airport, but an oral thermometer at University Hospital in Newark showed that she had no fever, she said.

After twice testing negative for the Ebola, Hickox was released and returned home to Maine on Monday. Maine’s health commissioner announced that Maine would join the handful of states going beyond federal guidelines and asking that returning Ebola health workers be self-quarantined for 21 days.

“Our true desire is for a voluntary separation from the public. We do not want to have to legally enforce an in-home quarantine,” Maine Health Commissioner Mary Mayhew said in a statement. “We are confident that the selfless health workers, who were brave enough to care for Ebola patients in a foreign country, will be willing to take reasonable steps to protect the residents of their own country. However, we are willing to pursue legal authority if necessary to ensure risk is minimized for Mainers.”

Hickox said she doesn’t think it is reasonable.

“I will go to court to attain my freedom,” Hickox told “Good Morning America” Wednesday via Skype from her hometown of Fort Kent. “I have been completely asymptomatic since I’ve been here. I feel absolutely great.”

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention doesn’t consider health workers who treated Ebola patients in West Africa to be at “high risk” for catching Ebola if they were wearing protective gear, according to new guidelines announced this week. Since they have “some risk,” the CDC recommends that they undergo monitoring — tracking symptoms and body temperature twice a day — avoid public transportation and take other precautions. But the CDC doesn’t require home quarantines for these workers.

Someone isn’t contagious until Ebola symptoms appear, according to the CDC. And even then, transmission requires contact with bodily fluids such as blood and vomit.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just “star” this story in ABC News’ phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner, left, and Buster Posey celebrate after winning 3-2 to win the series over Kansas City Royals after Game 7 of baseballs World Series Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014, in Kansas City, Mo.

San Francisco Giants ace Madison Bumgarner earned the World Series MVP after he threw nearly five perfect innings Wednesday, leading the Giants to a 3-2 win over the Kansas City Royals and their third title in five years.

The performance capped off a special October for the 25-year-old lefty.

“I wasn’t thinking about innings or pitch count. I was just thinking about getting outs, getting outs, until I couldn’t get them anymore and we needed someone else,” Bumgarner said after the game.

Here’s five things to know about Bumgarner:

Matt Slocum/AP Photo

San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner, left, and Buster Posey celebrate after winning 3-2 to win the series over Kansas City Royals after Game 7 of baseball’s World Series Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014, in Kansas City, Mo.

1. Bumgarner’s Big Time October

Bumgarner went 4-1 with an incredible 1.03 ERA in the postseason. He threw two shutouts in October, tossed a record 52 2-3 innings and won the World Series and NL Championship Series MVPs.

His overall World Series stats are mind-boggling: 4-0, a save and a 0.25 ERA. Oh, and three championship rings.

2. Bumgarner Was Apparently Always This Awesome

Bumgarner, who graduated from South Caldwell High in Hudson, North Carolina, finished his prep school career by hitting a walk-off, two-run, inside-the-park home run to win a state title, according to the Giants. He was also named Gatorade’s North Carolina Player of the Year.

3. His Nickname Is ‘Mad Bum’

Madison Bumgarner. Get it?

4. He Married His High School Sweetheart

Bumgarner married Ali Saunders in Valentine’s Day in 2010. He once gave her a cow as a gift and the two usually stay in North Carolina during the off-season, his mother told the Hickory Record last year.

San Francisco Giants Madison Bumgarner (40) celebrates after Game 7 of baseballs World Series against the Kansas City Royals Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014, in Kansas City, Mo. The Giants won 3-2 to win the series.

Matt Slocum/AP Photo

San Francisco Giants Madison Bumgarner (40) celebrates after Game 7 of baseball’s World Series against the Kansas City Royals Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014, in Kansas City, Mo. The Giants won 3-2 to win the series.

5. He’s Serious All the Time

Just look at the photos. Ben Walker with The Associated Press wrote that “He shows virtually no emotion on the mound, blowing his nose as if no one is watching, and seems to be the only person unimpressed by what he’s done.”

“What a warrior he is, and truly incredible what he did throughout the postseason,” Giants manager Bruce Bochy said of his ace. “I just told him I just can’t believe what he accomplished through all this. He’s such a humble guy, and we rode him pretty good.”

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Associated Press

NEW YORK — Oct 30, 2014, 8:05 AM ET

Apple CEO Tim Cook says he’s proud to be gay.

The public declaration, in an essay written for Bloomberg Businessweek, makes Cook the highest-profile business CEO to come out as gay.

Cook said that while he never denied his sexuality, he never publicly acknowledged it, either. The executive said that for years he’s been open with many people about his sexual orientation and that plenty of his Apple colleagues know he is gay.

Cook wrote in the column published Thursday that it wasn’t an easy choice to publicly disclose that he is gay, but that he felt the acknowledgement could help others.

“I’ve come to realize that my desire for personal privacy has been holding me back from doing something more important,” he wrote.

Three days ago, Cook challenged his home state of Alabama to better ensure the rights of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

Alabama is among the states that do not recognize same-sex marriage, and it also doesn’t offer legal protections on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. Cook is a native of Robertsdale, Alabama, and attended Auburn University.

“I consider being gay among the greatest gifts God has given me,” Cook wrote in the essay Thursday.

The executive said that “being gay has given me a deeper understanding of what it means to be in the minority and provided a window into the challenges that people in other minority groups deal with every day.”

Cook said he’s been lucky to work for a company that “loves creativity and innovation and knows it can only flourish when you embrace people’s differences.”

Cook succeeded Apple founder Steve Jobs as CEO of Apple Inc. in 2011.

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Associated Press

NEW YORK — Oct 30, 2014, 8:05 AM ET

Apple CEO Tim Cook says he’s proud to be gay.

The public declaration, in an essay written for Bloomberg Businessweek, makes Cook the highest-profile business CEO to come out as gay.

Cook said that while he never denied his sexuality, he never publicly acknowledged it, either. The executive said that for years he’s been open with many people about his sexual orientation and that plenty of his Apple colleagues know he is gay.

Cook wrote in the column published Thursday that it wasn’t an easy choice to publicly disclose that he is gay, but that he felt the acknowledgement could help others.

“I’ve come to realize that my desire for personal privacy has been holding me back from doing something more important,” he wrote.

Three days ago, Cook challenged his home state of Alabama to better ensure the rights of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

Alabama is among the states that do not recognize same-sex marriage, and it also doesn’t offer legal protections on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. Cook is a native of Robertsdale, Alabama, and attended Auburn University.

“I consider being gay among the greatest gifts God has given me,” Cook wrote in the essay Thursday.

The executive said that “being gay has given me a deeper understanding of what it means to be in the minority and provided a window into the challenges that people in other minority groups deal with every day.”

Cook said he’s been lucky to work for a company that “loves creativity and innovation and knows it can only flourish when you embrace people’s differences.”

Cook succeeded Apple founder Steve Jobs as CEO of Apple Inc. in 2011.

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San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner, left, and Buster Posey celebrate after winning 3-2 to win the series over Kansas City Royals after Game 7 of baseballs World Series Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014, in Kansas City, Mo.

San Francisco Giants ace Madison Bumgarner earned the World Series MVP after he threw nearly five perfect innings Wednesday, leading the Giants to a 3-2 win over the Kansas City Royals and their third title in five years.

The performance capped off a special October for the 25-year-old lefty.

“I wasn’t thinking about innings or pitch count. I was just thinking about getting outs, getting outs, until I couldn’t get them anymore and we needed someone else,” Bumgarner said after the game.

Here’s five things to know about Bumgarner:

Matt Slocum/AP Photo

San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner, left, and Buster Posey celebrate after winning 3-2 to win the series over Kansas City Royals after Game 7 of baseball’s World Series Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014, in Kansas City, Mo.

1. Bumgarner’s Big Time October

Bumgarner went 4-1 with an incredible 1.03 ERA in the postseason. He threw two shutouts in October, tossed a record 52 2-3 innings and won the World Series and NL Championship Series MVPs.

His overall World Series stats are mind-boggling: 4-0, a save and a 0.25 ERA. Oh, and three championship rings.

2. Bumgarner Was Apparently Always This Awesome

Bumgarner, who graduated from South Caldwell High in Hudson, North Carolina, finished his prep school career by hitting a walk-off, two-run, inside-the-park home run to win a state title, according to the Giants. He was also named Gatorade’s North Carolina Player of the Year.

3. His Nickname Is ‘Mad Bum’

Madison Bumgarner. Get it?

4. He Married His High School Sweetheart

Bumgarner married Ali Saunders in Valentine’s Day in 2010. He once gave her a cow as a gift and the two usually stay in North Carolina during the off-season, his mother told the Hickory Record last year.

San Francisco Giants Madison Bumgarner (40) celebrates after Game 7 of baseballs World Series against the Kansas City Royals Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014, in Kansas City, Mo. The Giants won 3-2 to win the series.

Matt Slocum/AP Photo

San Francisco Giants Madison Bumgarner (40) celebrates after Game 7 of baseball’s World Series against the Kansas City Royals Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014, in Kansas City, Mo. The Giants won 3-2 to win the series.

5. He’s Serious All the Time

Just look at the photos. Ben Walker with The Associated Press wrote that “He shows virtually no emotion on the mound, blowing his nose as if no one is watching, and seems to be the only person unimpressed by what he’s done.”

“What a warrior he is, and truly incredible what he did throughout the postseason,” Giants manager Bruce Bochy said of his ace. “I just told him I just can’t believe what he accomplished through all this. He’s such a humble guy, and we rode him pretty good.”

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A man claims he was under a sort of exorcism when he confessed to killing a fellow member of a religious group in Kansas City, Missouri, whose death was originally ruled a suicide.

The body of Bethany Deaton was found Oct. 30, 2012, in the back seat of her minivan with the doors locked and a note inside.

“My name is Bethany Deaton. I chose this evil thing,” the note read, according to court documents. “I did it because I wouldn’t be a real person and what is the point of living if it is too late for that? I wish I had chosen differently a long time ago. I knew it all and refused to listen. Maybe Jesus will still save me.”

Deaton, 27, was a member of a religious group called the International House of Prayer, which was led by her husband, Tyler Deaton. A few weeks after her death, Micah Moore, another member of the group, confessed to her slaying.

Tyler Deaton had a cult-like following within the group and controlled virtually every aspect of some members’ lives, according to court documents.

When Moore confessed, he told police Deaton ordered him to kill his wife to stop her from telling anyone about sexual assaults against her in the house, according to police records. The three lived in a communal house with other male members of the group.

“This is a horrible, horrible crime,” Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker said. “A young woman lost her life. She lost her life in a very violent way and today, we do know what happened to her.”

Now Moore claims he only confessed to killing Deaton because he was under the influence of what some have called an exorcism. Moore, who is scheduled for trial next month, has pleaded not guilty.

“They were the statements of a distraught and confused young man,” his attorney, Melanie Morgan, said.

The medical examiner has also changed the manner of Deaton’s death to undetermined.

“We are aware of no evidence that a crime has occurred,” Morgan said.

The International House of Prayer denied any affiliation with Deaton’s group in a statement to ABC News.

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Associated Press

Jeff and Denise Lagrimas’ single-story home is just across the street from properties where lava from Kilauea volcano is expected to slither past on its way to the ocean.

But they’re moving to another town 14 miles away before they’re able to find out whether this forecast comes true or whether the molten rock oozes into their home instead.

“I don’t want to stick around and just wait for it to come and take it,” Denise Lagrimas said while taking a break from loading kitchen cups and bowls in cardboard boxes. “You just never know.”

Civil defense officials in Hawaii County said late Tuesday the lava was about 370 yards from the main road in Pahoa town, the commercial center of Puna, a sprawling, mostly agricultural and forested part on the Big Island.

The lava entered private property next to the main road and was burning tires and other materials. This prompted authorities to warn downwind residents with respiratory problems to stay indoors. The lava was edging forward at a rate of about 10 to 15 yards per hour.

Earlier Tuesday, the lava burned down an empty shed.

The lava picked up speed last week after weeks of slow, stop-and-go movement. It broke out of forest and pastureland and crossed into inhabited areas for the first time since scientists began warning about lava in August.

Pahoa residents have had weeks to prepare for what’s been described as a slow-motion disaster. Most have either already left or are prepared to go.

At least 50 or 60 structures — including homes and businesses — are in an area civil defense officials are currently warning will likely be hit.

Josiah Hunt, who has farm in a part of Puna that is not immediately threatened, described smelling burning grass, feeling warmth from the lava and hearing “popping and sizzling and all the methane bursts that are happening in the distance … mixed with the birds chirping and the coqui frogs.”

The Lagrimas family decided to move to Kurtistown, a safe distance from Kilauea’s current flow.

“We didn’t want to go anywhere where it’s close enough where we would have to evacuate again,” she said.

The Lagrimases are also worried the lava will block roads leading out of Pahoa and prevent them from commuting to their jobs in Hilo. Then there’s the prospect of subsequent flows gradually swallowing more of the community, which is what happened to the Royal Garden and Kalapana subdivisions in the 1980s and 1990s.

“It’s so surreal, it’s so surreal. Never in my wildest dreams as a kid growing up did I think I would be running from lava,” said Denise Lagrimas.

Some people want to watch the lava destroy their homes as it’s one way to cope with the loss.

“You can only imagine the frustration as well as … despair they’re going through,” said Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira.

Hunt watched last week as the lava crept toward Pahoa and saw a woman whose house is near its path put a lei at the front of the flow. “It helps a person come to grips with the reality of the situation,” he said. “I found it to be oddly comforting in a really strange way.”

Terri Mulroy, who runs Kumu Aina Farm with her husband, said the lava flow, while unnerving, has a cleansing quality to it because it keeps development on the lush Hawaiian island in check.

“If it wasn’t for the flow, I wouldn’t be able to live here,” she said. “This land would have been a golf course for the rich.”

———

Associated Press writer Alina Hartounian contributed to this report.

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Associated Press

Wearing a lapel camera and posing as an Internet repairman, an undercover government agent walked into a luxury villa at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas and recorded everything he saw as part of a major international gambling bust.

Defense lawyers said the FBI shut off Internet access to the suspects’ villas and then agents impersonated repair technicians to get inside and collect evidence in an elaborate ruse the morning of July 4.

Video recordings of the encounters show investigators devising code words to use while they were inside; a back-and-forth about the cover story for an agent, who adopted the name “Sam,” which he had used in other operations in the past; and a brief exchange about how an investigator should dress for the role of Internet repairman.

“If you put on that shirt, you have to look the part. Go all the way,” said Mike Wood, an outside technician working for Caesars, advising Nevada Gaming Control Board Agent Ricardo Lopez before Lopez headed to one of the suites. The AP obtained about 30 minutes of audio and video recordings of the covert reconnaissance.

Inside another Las Vegas villa a day later, Lopez appeared to try to fix an Internet outage for several minutes while glancing around the room and asking more than once to view a laptop screen to verify that Internet connectivity was still down. Defense lawyers said in their filing that Mike Kung, the FBI agent, was sent inside with Lopez because he spoke Chinese.

Still undercover, Lopez appeared to call Wood from inside the villa and asked him to “check the frame,” the code they had previously worked out. In a brief back-and-forth, Wood responded that he would “trace the wire and make sure it’s tied down good.”

Defense lawyer Thomas Goldstein, who is challenging evidence the government collected in what he described as an illegal search, said that was code to turn Internet access back on.

After the agents left the villa, Lopez was recorded saying he saw the Internet address of the website that defendant Wei Seng Phua was operating, adding, “Phua had the odds up on his page the whole time.” Federal authorities described Phua, 50, as a high-ranking member of the 14k Triad, a Chinese organized crime group. Goldstein said Phua denied that allegation, which he said had nothing to do with the criminal case in Nevada.

Phua, his son Darren Wai Kit Phua, Seng Chen Yong, Wai Kin Yong and four others were arrested in July after federal agents raided three high-roller villas at the hotel. All eight face charges of transmission of wagering information, operating an illegal gambling business and aiding and abetting. None of defendants has entered a plea, but Goldstein said they all deny wrongdoing.

Phua also faces charges of running an illegal sports gambling business in Macau. He was arrested in the Chinese gambling enclave on June 18 and flew to Las Vegas a few days later.

The FBI employed the ruse against the recommendation of an assistant U.S. attorney, Kimberly Frayn, according to defense lawyers. They filed a 54-page motion late Tuesday night in federal court in Las Vegas to dismiss evidence in the case. According to a conversation recorded by an investigator for the hotel, the prosecutor told FBI agents “it was a consent issue,” the lawyers said.

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Associated Press

Madison Bumgarner and the San Francisco Giants succeeded where no team had in 3 1/2 decades, winning Game 7 on the road for their third World Series title in five years.

Punctuating one of the finest October performances in baseball history, Bumgarner came out of the bullpen to pitch five scoreless innings on two days’ rest for his third win of the Series, and the Giants held off the Kansas City Royals 3-2 Wednesday night in a championship pushed to the limit.

A two-out misplay in the ninth almost wrecked it for Bumgarner and the Giants. He had retired 14 in a row when Alex Gordon’s single fell in front of center fielder Gregor Blanco, who let the ball get past him for an error that allowed Gordon to reach third.

San Francisco Giants Pablo Sandoval celebrates after catching the final out in the ninth inning of Game 7 of baseballs World Series against the Kansas City Royals Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014, in Kansas City, Mo.

Jeff Roberson/AP Photo

San Francisco Giants’ Pablo Sandoval celebrates after catching the final out in the ninth inning of Game 7 of baseball’s World Series against the Kansas City Royals Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014, in Kansas City, Mo.

Bumgarner calmly retired Salvador Perez on a foulout to third Pedro Sandoval. Bumgarner was immediately embraced by catcher Buster Posey, and rest of the Giants rushed to the mound to join the victory party. Most of the San Francisco players tossed their gloves high in the air as they ran to the center of the diamond.

Three days after throwing 117 pitches in a four-hit shutout to win Game 5, Bumgarner threw 68 more and dropped his record-low career Series ERA to a barely visible 0.25.

He joined Arizona ace Randy Johnson (2001) as the only pitchers in the expansion era to win three games in one Series.

The Giants were dubbed a “Band of Misfits” in 2010 when they beat Texas to win the franchise’s first title since 1954 in New York. Two years later, they swept Detroit for another championship.

And this time, keeping up their every-other-year success, the Giants became just the second NL team with three titles in a five-year span, matching Stan Musial’s St. Louis Cardinals of 1942-46.

Home teams had won nine straight Game 7s in the Series since Pittsburgh’s victory at Baltimore in 1979, including the Royals’ 11-0 rout of St. Louis in 1985. Teams hosting the first two games had won 23 of the last 28 titles, including five in a row. And the Giants had lost all four of their previous World Series pushed to the limit.

But before a pumped-up, blue-and-white-clad crowd of 40,535 that hoped noise and passion could lift the small-market Royals to a title that seemed improbable when Kansas City was languishing two games under .500 in mid-July, the Giants won the second all-wild card World Series, 12 years after losing Game 7 to the Angels in the first.

Both managers promised quick hooks if their starters showed the slightest signs of faltering, and both managers delivered as Tim Hudson and Jeremy Guthrie combined for 15 outs — matching the fewest by Game 7 starters. Hudson, at 39 the oldest Game 7 starter, allowed two runs in 1 2-3 innings. The 35-year-old Guthrie took the loss, giving up three runs in 3 1-3 innings

Jeremy Affeldt followed Hudson with 2 1-3 innings of one-hit, scoreless relief in his longest outing since July 2012, getting help from the first successful replay challenge in World Series history.

With his shaggy hair making him look every bit a gunslinger, Bumgarner entered to boos in the bottom of the fifth, coated his long arms with rosin and groomed the pocked-up mound with his spikes.

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