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All of Hancock County’s polling places will be the same on Tuesday as they were during the November general election.
A full list of county polling sites for the general election follows. The list also can be found online at the Hancock County Board of Elections website, www.hancockboardofelections.com.
Registered voters may use the “Where do I vote?” feature on that website to search for their polling place.
For more information, call the elections board at 419-422-3245.
Findlay Precincts
WARD 1
Precincts 1-A, 1-B and 1-C will vote at the Senior Center, 339 E. Melrose Ave.
Precinct 1-D will vote at Stonebridge Church, 2111 Stonehedge Drive.
WARD 2
Precincts 2-A, 2-B, 2-D and 2-E will vote at Stonebridge Church, 2111 Stonehedge Drive.
Precinct 2-C will vote at First United Church of Christ, 2100 Greendale Ave.
WARD 3
Precincts 3-A and 3-B will vote at St. John’s Lutheran Church, 1701 Tiffin Ave.
Precincts 3-C and 3-D will vote at St. Marks United Methodist Church, 800 S. Main St.
WARD 4
Precincts 4-A and 4-B will vote at St. Andrew’s United Methodist Church, 120 W. Sandusky St., enter off Crawford Street.
Precinct 4-C will vote at St. Marks United Methodist Church, 800 S. Main St.
Precinct 4-D will vote at Bible Methodist Church, in the Youth and Family Center, 529 Stadium Drive.
Precinct 4-E will vote at First Presbyterian Church, in the great room, 2330 S. Main St.
WARD 5
Precinct 5-A will vote at Bible Methodist Church, in the Youth and Family Center, 529 Stadium Drive.
Precincts 5-B, 5-C and 5-D will vote at First Presbyterian Church, in the great room, 2330 S. Main St.
Precinct 5-E will vote at the Hancock County Engineer’s Office, 1900 Lima Ave.
WARD 6
Precinct 6-A will vote at First Church of the Nazarene, in the Family Life Center, 2501 Broad Ave.
Precincts 6-B and 6-D will vote at St. Andrew’s United Methodist Church, 120 W. Sandusky St., enter off Crawford Street.
Precinct 6-C will vote at St. Marks United Methodist Church, 800 S. Main St.
WARD 7
Precincts 7-A, 7-B, 7-C, 7-D and 7-E will vote at First Church of the Nazarene, in the Family Life Center, 2501 Broad Ave.
FOSTORIA
Fostoria South and North precincts will vote at Wesley United Methodist Church, 1200 Van Buren St., Fostoria.
County Precincts
Allen Township’s East and West precincts will vote at Allen Township House, 12829 Ohio 613 East, Van Buren.
Amanda Township will vote at Tandem Transport, 412 S. Buffalo St., Vanlue.
Biglick Township will vote at Biglick Township House, 8273 Township 258, Alvada.
Blanchard Township will vote at Benton Ridge Fire House, 101 Coleman Road, Benton Ridge.
Cass Township will vote at Cass Township House, 2249 Hancock County 18, north of Hancock County 109.
Delaware Township will vote at the Delaware Township House, 601 S. Main St., Mount Blanchard.
Eagle Township will vote at Eagle Township House, 9054 Hancock County 37, one mile west of Hancock County 9.
Jackson Township will vote at Jackson Township House, 16000 Hancock County 8, at Hancock County 26 in Houcktown.
All five Liberty Township precincts will vote at Gateway Church, 9555 Hancock County 9, Findlay.
Madison Township’s East and West precincts will vote at Good Hope Lutheran Church, 300 S. Main St., Arlington.
Marion Township’s North precinct will vote at Shaw Inc., 16406 U.S. 224 East, off Township 243.
Marion Township’s South precinct will vote at Marion Township House, 16003 Ohio 568, Findlay.
Village of McComb will vote at McComb Church of Christ, 400 Ackerly St.
Orange Township will vote at Community Township House, 2909 Hancock County 28 at Ohio 235.
Pleasant and Portage townships will vote at McComb Church of Christ, 400 Ackerly St., McComb.
Union Township’s East and West precincts will vote at Gospel Fellowship Church, 5124 Hancock County 37 at the corner of Hancock County 313, Rawson.
Van Buren Township will vote at Jenera Community Park Building, 1800 S. Main St., Jenera.
Washington Township will vote at Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church, 18974 Ohio 12, Arcadia.

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BLANCHARD VALLEY HEALTH System CEO Scott Malaney, above, and Dr. William Kose, chief quality officer for the  health system, gave a health care update at the Republican Party's First Friday Luncheon. The hospital officials said making health care truly more affordable is going to be difficult. (Photo by Nick Moore)

BLANCHARD VALLEY HEALTH System CEO Scott Malaney, above, and Dr. William Kose, chief quality officer for the health system, gave a health care update at the Republican Party’s First Friday Luncheon. The hospital officials said making health care truly more affordable is going to be difficult. (Photo by Nick Moore)

By DENISE GRANT
Staff Writer
The Affordable Care Act is “an extremely complicated law, and we are still trying to figure out what it means,” Blanchard Valley Health System CEO Scott Malaney told a Findlay audience Friday.
“What I can tell you today is that about two-thirds of the people who have signed up for it have paid their premiums, which means the other third has not. How is that going to be covered? We’re going to have to figure it out as we go,” Malaney said.
He said health care providers are “pretty worried” about the potential for increased bad debt due to unpaid insurance premiums, high co-payments and deductibles.
Malaney and Dr. William Kose, chief quality officer for the Blanchard Valley Health System, gave a health care update at the Republican Party’s First Friday Luncheon.
GOP officials said the topic drew one of luncheon’s larger crowds.
The hospital officials said making health care truly more affordable is going to be difficult.
Malaney started off by giving his audience a quiz.
“When we talk about health care in the Findlay area, you really do need to understand the bigger picture,” Malaney said.
“You look at the cost of health care per person in our country, and pick any of the next 10 industrialized countries in the world that you want … and what do you think that cost curve would look like comparatively?”
Most who responded Friday said the United States spends more, which Malaney said is the typical belief. However, he said until age 60, the nation’s health care costs are comparable to other industrialized countries.
“Where it goes off the charts is from age 60 to death, and at death, it is about four and a half times more expensive to die in America than in any other country in the world,” Malaney said.
“If that’s true, and I would argue that it is, let me ask you a question. Why is our government, state and federal, fixated on changing the health system and all the parts of it that aren’t the problem?”
Another issue, Malaney said, is that politicians in Washington are unwilling to address problems with the Medicare program, the federal health care insurance program for people 65 and older, and for the disabled.
“We cannot touch the Medicare program in this country. … Politically, it is very difficult, but the unfunded liability of the Medicare program is $40 trillion,” Malaney said. In comparison, “the gross domestic product of our country is slightly under $18 trillion. The debt in our country is now slightly over $18 trillion, not counting the Medicare liability of $40 trillion.”
Malaney called it a “huge problem.”
At the state level, Malaney said Gov. John Kasich is working to create a health care model that would reward systems that provide services for less, and penalize those with very high costs.
Malaney said it will force providers to work better together, but the idea is very complex.
Both Malaney and Kose talked about “bundling” services, from doctor, to surgery, to recovery, as a model to bring costs down.
The men said Blanchard Valley Health System is well positioned to handle the coming changes in health care.
“The area here supports our health system better than most other areas in the state,” Kose said. “… This is a terrific medical staff and it is just getting stronger … I don’t think our organization will be as affected as other systems across the country as this massive change takes place.
“And I can promise you, we are not against change,” Kose said.
Grant: 419-427-8412
Send an E-mail to Denise Grant
Twitter: @CourierDenise

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By ANDREW WILLIAMS
STAFF WRITER
It’s the goal of every team at the beginning of a season to win a league title.
Some hopes are more realistic than others, but championships aren’t won based on preseason expectations or talent. It takes a combination of skill, hard work, perseverance, and even a little luck to run through a conference schedule unscathed.
With a 12-0 victory against Cory-Rawson on Friday, Liberty-Benton’s baseball team took a step closer to completing that task.
The Eagles, who are 17-1 overall and 8-0 in Blanchard Valley Conference play, clinched at least a share of their first conference title since 2009 when they shared the crown with Arlington. They will travel to Leipsic Monday afternoon to take on the three-time defending BVC champion Vikings (5-11, 2-2 BVC) with an outright title on the line.
This season hasn’t been a surprise for first year Liberty-Benton coach Scott Arnold or his players. Arnold said winning the conference was something the coaches and players discussed prior to the season, and they decided to make it the focal point for the year.
“The kids made that one of their goals and they’ve done a good job so far,” Arnold said.
“We’ve got one game to take care of, but they’ve stayed focused. We’ve played in some pretty tight games and we’ve had some balls bounce our way.
“The main thing, the pitching has been phenomenal and that’s going to keep us in any game. We’ve got hits when we needed them. We’ve gotten good baserunning when we needed it, good defense as well.”
At the heart of Liberty-Benton’s success this season has been senior Jared Neiling and juniors Alex Harter and Caleb Russell.
Neiling is leading the team with a .429 batting average, and is 7-0 on the mound with a 1.16 ERA and 68 strikeouts in 421/3 innings.
Russell is sporting a 1.35 ERA and 37 strikeouts in 26 innings, while hitting .345 with 15 RBIs. Harter is batting .375 with 13 RBIs and nine stolen bases. He has a 2.33 ERA and 32 strikeouts in 27 innings.
“Coming into the year we knew we had a good pitching staff, had a lot of good players,” Neiling said. “We knew we had a good chance as long as we just kept the goal in our minds and just went out and got it.”
The Eagles have been dominant in all facets of the game and have been especially impressive in BVC competition.
The team has a combined .302 batting average, 16 errors in 432 total chances for a .963 fielding percentage and a team ERA of 1.98 in 120 innings pitched. In its eight BVC wins this season, Liberty-Benton has outscored opponents 57-15.
Arnold said Neiling will make the start on the mound Monday when the Eagles go for their first outright BVC baseball title since 1994. His success on the bump this season has earned him that right and he said he will rely on his teammates to help him get the job done.
“For me on the mound, I’m just going to go out and try to throw strikes,” Neiling said. “We have a good defense behind us so just try to keep the ball on the ground and let them make the plays. At the plate, we’ve had timely hitting all year so hopefully we can continue that on Monday.”
Despite already earning a share of the crown, Arnold and Neiling both made it clear they’re interested in a bigger prize than that.
“We have at least a share, but our goal is to win it outright,” Arnold said. “We understand it’s been quite a long time. We would not like to share that if we don’t have to.”
Said Neiling: “This year was all about getting the tradition back alive, getting L-B baseball back on the map. Really, all year this was our only goal was to win it. Now that we have a share, that’s nice, but we really do want to go out and win it outright.”
Neiling had a triple, double, single and three RBIs in Friday’s 12-0 win against Cory-Rawson.
Russell (3-0) worked five innings and did not allow a hit while striking out eight and issuing one walk.
Harter singled twice and drove in a run, Josh Ostrander singled and had an RBI and Jon Dager doubled and singled for Liberty-Benton.
Logan Cawley allowed eight earned runs on nine hits in four innings to take the loss for the Hornets (2-12, 2-5 BVC).

Cory-Rawson 000 00 – 0 0 5
Liberty-Benton 623 1x – 12 9 0
WP — Russell (3-0). LP — Cawley. top hitters: (L-B) Dager 1B, 2B; Neiling 1B, 2B, 3B, 3 RBI; Harter 2-1B, RBI; Ostrander 1B, RBI.
records: Cory-Rawson 2-12 overall, 2-5 Blanchard Valley Conference; Liberty-Benton 17-1 overall, 8-0 Blanchard Valley Conference.
Williams, 419-427-8407
Send an E-mail to andrewwilliams

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By MAX FILBY
STAFF WRITER
Classmates and parents were stunned when an 11-year-old student at Bigelow Hill Intermediate School committed suicide in his Findlay home in March.
Findlay City Schools knew the student was at risk, but the school district could only do so much, Superintendent Dean Wittwer said.
“I believe the school and the mental health community did everything possible to assist this child and family,” Wittwer said.
The Ohio Department of Education has no formal policy on how schools should work to prevent suicides. Instead, school districts are required to develop their own.
When a student at a Findlay school is considered at risk, the student’s parents are contacted and asked to take the child for evaluation through the Family Resource Center or by clinicians at Century Health.
The parents are responsible for getting further assistance, Wittwer said.
“When we see something, we tell the parents and it really is the obligation of the parent or guardian to have some sort of evaluation or screening done,” Wittwer said.
The district is only obligated to intervene further if neglect or abuse is obvious. Then, the district would likely contact Children’s Services, Wittwer said.
The child who died was among a “group of kids” at Bigelow Hill thought to be at risk, Wittwer said.
In September, Principal Pam Hamlin told the school board a counselor had heard of multiple suicide threats in the school and at Northview Primary School, which feeds students into Bigelow Hill. Hamlin did not return phone calls seeking comment.
Suicides are not unheard of among young students.
In Ohio, there were nine suicides by people between the ages of 5 and 14, and 201 suicides by people between the ages of 15 and 24 in 2011, according to the most recent data available from the Ohio Suicide Prevention Foundation.
Hancock and Allen counties each reported none that year in the 5- to 14-year-old group, and two suicides in the 15- to 24-year-old group. Wood County had none in the 5- to 14-year-old group and one in the 15- to 24-year-old age group. Henry County had one suicide in the 15- to 24-year-old age group and none in the 5- to 14-year-old group.
Hardin, Putnam, Wyandot and Seneca counties reported no suicides in each of the two age groups in 2011.
The foundation said 1,464 Ohioans, including adults, committed suicide in 2011.
Nationally, suicide was the 10th most common cause of death among people age 10 and older in 2009, according to the most recent data from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ohio had 1,296 suicides in 2009, Indiana had 826 and Michigan had 1,164, according to state health agencies.
While Ohio offers little suicide-prevention guidance to schools, it does require teachers and administrators to complete four hours of safety and suicide-prevention training every five years.
Two of those hours can be completed through a program called Safe Schools, and the other two hours of training through different means. Safe Schools is an online program through which teachers and administrators complete lessons and take quizzes on suicide prevention, among other safety measures.
New Findlay teachers and school employees are required to participate in the training, even if it’s an off-year, Wittwer said.
“Our staff has followed the letter of the law in, first of all, getting trained. Second of all, the training talks about … understanding and looking for signs,” he said.
If school employees spot a troubled child, the district can monitor social media, ask permission from parents to have him or her evaluated, and assist families in finding help from mental health agencies.
Wittwer also helps lead a district-wide mental health committee that meets three or four times a year. The committee evaluates how to handle mental health needs in the schools, and works with the Family Resource Center and Century Health to get students and their families help if needed.
Despite the assistance offered, some question whether more should be done.
Precia Stuby, executive director of the Alcohol, Drug and Mental Health Services board of Hancock County, said screening students for mental health problems could help.
“We screen students for drugs, so why don’t we screen them for mental health issues?” Stuby said. “It’s practically the same thing.”
The stigma about mental health problems may be the reason why such screening doesn’t already take place in schools, Stuby said.
There is no “silver bullet” solution for suicide, but Stuby said a screening system would likely help.
A national movement called Zero Suicide provides signs and strategies to identify people at risk, Stuby said. It is pushing a standardized checklist that Stuby said could help identify those at risk, based on emotional issues.
The campaign points to symptoms such as increased use of drugs and alcohol, loss of interest, or feelings of hopelessness.
Zero Suicide is a program by the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention.
Although Stuby supports the campaign, she said the concept of using “cookie cutter” methods to identify at-risk people would not always work.
But, mental health screening could help put mental health on the same level of importance as physical health, Stuby said.
Findlay City Schools is one of several districts in the area that require students to be tested for drugs to participate in athletics and extracurriculars.
Schools won the right to test athletes for drugs in a 1994 U.S. Supreme Court case. A 2002 Supreme Court ruling increased the group of eligible students, so anybody participating in extracurricular activities could be subject to screening.
It may be ideal to require students to undergo mental health screening, Wittwer said, but the court rulings don’t go that far. School districts would need parental knowledge or consent to do mental health screenings, he said.
In Ohio, suicide prevention falls under a portion of the Ohio Revised Code that requires school districts to keep students safe from a number of dangers, said John Charlton, media director for the state Department of Education.
“It’s the same as if a student were to get hurt on the bleachers at a school,” Charlton said. “It’s all covered under that.”
A school district is required to “develop its own curriculum in consultation with public or private agencies or persons,” according to state law.
That curriculum must then be used to help train school employees in safety, and prevention of suicides, bullying, harassment, intimidation and violence.
“We certainly are concerned about student health and safety, but we put that on the district,” Charlton said.
Online:
Findlay City Schools:
http://www.fcs.org
Ohio Suicide Prevention Foundation:
http://www.ohiospf.org
Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services:
http://www.yourpathtohealth.org/adamhs
Zero Suicide:
http://zerosuicide.actionallianceforsuicideprevention.org
Filby: 419-427-8422
Send an E-mail to Max Filby
Twitter: @MaxFilby

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The Hancock County Sheriff’s Office is asking for help in bringing in a Van Buren man for questioning.
The sheriff’s office said 23-year-old Andre “L.D.” White is wanted for questioning about a car crash and a stolen vehicle.
Early Thursday morning, a 2007 Cadillac SUV owned by Melinda Hackenburg was involved in a single-vehicle crash on Hancock County 140, north of Portage Township 107. The people in the SUV fled the scene.
A passenger in the Cadillac was later found. William Carver, 33, suffered severe injuries, the sheriff’s office said. Investigators think alcohol was a factor in the crash.
The sheriff’s office is also investigating a report that a vehicle was stolen in the same area as the crash. Deputies believe the cases are related.
People with information about Andre White’s whereabouts are being asked to call the sheriff’s office at 419-422-2424.

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ALLENDALE, Mich. — Kyra Bradley and Mackenzie Barnwell each scored two goals, but the University of Findlay women’s lacrosse team fell 24-7 to Grand Valley State University on Friday in the Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference tournament semifinals.
The loss ends the Oilers season and they finish the year 8-11.
Taylor Trice, Erin Stacho and Sarah Lankton contributed one goal apiece in the game.
Lankton, Victoria Predmore and Katie Poorman each picked up four ground balls, while Elisabeth Montalvo registered an assist.
The Lakers outshot the Oilers by a 35-16 margin and were led by Ryan Skomial, who had five goals.
Lankton was named GLIAC midfielder player of the year, as well as first team All-GLIAC for her performance in 2014.
The sophomore finished second in the GLIAC with 68 goals, while leading the conference in draw controls (105), ground balls (74) and caused turnovers (40). The 2013 GLIAC freshman of the year, Lankton has compiled 139 career goals in 36 games.
Bradley was an at-large first-team selection, while Nicole Stines earned second-team honors as a midfielder and Jenah Eastep was a second-team choice as a defender.
Western equestrian second
HARRISBURG, Pa. — The University of Findlay western equestrian team is in second place after the first day of the 2014 Intercollegiate Horse Show Association National Championship.
UF has nine points; Ohio State sits in first with 12.
UF’s Sarah Shedd took first place in the novice western horsemanship portion of the team competition while Josh Clevenger was fifth in the open reining.
In individual competition, Kaitlin LeBlanc won the open individual horsemanship.
The championship will continue today.
English also competes
HARRISBURG, Pa. — The University of Findlay’s Jasmine Wehr placed eighth in the individual walk-trot equitation while Sheherazode Scott-Schultz was 10th in the walk-trot-canter equitation team competition as the UF English equestrian team completed the second day of the 2014 Intercollegiate Horse Show Association National Championship.
The championship will continue today.

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HemingerAward

Barbara Dysinger has been named as the inaugural winner of the Edwin L. Heminger Hero Award by the Findlay Rotary Club.

Dysinger designated her $2,000 award to go toward the Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation’s community mental health fund.

Harold “Puck” Rowe and Bill Ruse were also nominated for the award.

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Heritage Christian School students Winfield Oestreich (left) and Josiah Long are shown rehearsing for the school's production of “Les Miserables,” which will be presented at 7 p.m. Friday and at 2 p.m. Saturday in the Calvary Baptist Church auditorium, 2000 Broad Ave. Tickets are $8 for adults, $5 for students and $23 for an immediate family and are available at the school office or at the door. (Photo by Nick Moore)

Heritage Christian School students Winfield Oestreich (left) and Josiah Long are shown rehearsing for the school’s production of “Les Miserables,” which will be presented at 7 p.m. Friday and at 2 p.m. Saturday in the Calvary Baptist Church auditorium, 2000 Broad Ave. Tickets are $8 for adults, $5 for students and $23 for an immediate family and are available at the school office or at the door. (Photo by Nick Moore)

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Members of Boy Scout Explorers Post 236 got hands-on training in how to extract a crash victim from a demolished vehicle on Wednesday, at the Liberty Township Fire Department on Hancock County 140. The Explorers also helped prepare the “victim,” portrayed by firefighter Angela Decker, for transport and loaded her into a Life Flight medical helicopter. Explorer Post 236 is sponsored by the Findlay Fire Department and Hanco Ambulance. (Photo by Nick Moore)

Members of Boy Scout Explorers Post 236 got hands-on training in how to extract a crash victim from a demolished vehicle on Wednesday, at the Liberty Township Fire Department on Hancock County 140. The Explorers also helped prepare the “victim,” portrayed by firefighter Angela Decker, for transport and loaded her into a Life Flight medical helicopter. Explorer Post 236 is sponsored by the Findlay Fire Department and Hanco Ambulance. (Photo by Nick Moore)

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By DENISE GRANT
Staff Writer
Hancock County’s commissioners were urged to “stay the course” on flood control Thursday.
Findlay Mayor Lydia Mihalik and Kathy Kreuchauf, president of the Community Foundation, attended Thursday’s meeting and encouraged the commissioners not to waver in their dedication to Blanchard River flood-control efforts.
Tuesday’s Republican primary race between Commissioner Phillip Riegle and his challenger, Steve Oman, a former commissioner, has been focused on the flood-control issue.
Earlier this week, Trustees David Bower of Eagle Township, and Jerry Wolford of Cass Township delivered petitions to the commissioners. The petitions bear the signatures of trustees from nine of Hancock County’s 17 townships. They asked that all logjams and islands be removed from the river, and that river banks be cleared and planted with grass. That work would be more extensive than the river-clearing project now underway.
In October, a joint board of county commissioners from the Blanchard River watershed voted to hire Tawa Tree Service, Ottawa, to clear the river. Tawa was awarded a $381,302 contract.
Debris will be cleared from 88.5 miles of the river, including 46.2 miles in Hancock County, 34.5 miles in Putnam County, and 7.8 miles in Hardin County.
The project began in Putnam County, and workers are expected to reach Hancock County by June, said Gary Tuttle, a technician with the Hancock Soil and Water Conservation District.
The cleanup includes removing debris from the main channel of the river. Thirty-one islands will be cleared. No sandbars will be removed. Large trees, pulled from the river, will be left along the outer treeline.
The project is not removing islands or clearing the banks, as the township trustees urged.
The contract was awarded in the fall, but Tuttle said so far there have only been 21 work days on the river due to weather. He expects the work in Hancock County will be finished by the end of summer.
Workers started at the Blanchard River’s outlet into the Auglaize River at Dupont, and are moving upstream. A total of 274 trees have been pulled from the river so far, and 89 logjams.
Both Bower and Wolford were highly critical this week of the flood-control plan being developed by the Army Corps of Engineers for the Blanchard River watershed, a position shared by Oman. The trustees encouraged the commissioners to dredge the river, even if it means breaking Environmental Protection Agency rules that prohibit it.
On Thursday, Mihalik cautioned the commissioners against “playing politics with the lives of thousands of people who live in the watershed.” To disregard the EPA’s restrictions on dredging the river, she said, “is taking on a battle we can’t win.”
The EPA prohibits dredging because the Ohio Department of Natural Resources has identified Hancock County as being home to two endangered species of freshwater mussels.
EPA mandates can’t be ignored, the mayor said. Findlay is in the process of updating both its water and sewer lines, Mihalik said, and is spending millions to comply with EPA regulations.
Kreuchauf, who said she attended Thursday’s meeting as a representative of the former Northwest Ohio Flood Mitigation Partnership, said she was aware of the trustees’ petition. The partnership, a private-public group, organized shortly after the flood of 2007 and had a goal of completing the flood study within seven years.
“… I think we all share the frustration of the township trustees who signed that petition,” Kreuchauf said. “I encourage you not to become distracted by half measures.”
She said cleaning the river is important, but it won’t help with flooding, and dredging the river despite environmental rules, as the trustees suggested, is illegal.
“Stay the course, stay unified and continue to push for a complete solution that will benefit the entire watershed,” Kreuchauf said.
Steve Schroeder, a retired Cooper Tire executive and a member of the mitigation partnership, also attended Thursday’s meeting. He kept his comments short.
“We know the facts. Stay the course,” he told the commissioners.
Janet Brodman, of 1715 West-View Drive, pleaded with officials to find a solution to the flooding.
Brodman, 58, said she’s stuck. She can’t sell her home, and has had to evacuate the property 11 times.
“I went to stay in a hotel the week before Christmas. I had to put everything up and vacate the house. I was making the family’s Christmas cookies. That didn’t get done. I was making chocolates and had to leave them.”
She said the flooding is disruptive and depressing, and she blamed the stress for killing several of her neighbors since 2007.
Bill Johns, a downtown building manager, and Warren Krout, owner of Sour Flower pawn shop, also turned out to show their support for flood-control planning.
Grant: 419-427-8412
Send an E-mail to Denise Grant
Twitter: @CourierDenise

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