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Hemera/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — World Cup – Round of 16: Netherlands 2 – Mexico 1

Costa Rica (5) 1-1 Greece (3) Penalty Kicks

MLB: Oakland Athletics 4 (51-30) – Miami Marlins 3 (39-43)

Pittsburgh Pirates 5 (42-40) – New York Mets 2 (37-45)

Chicago White Sox 4 (39-44) – Toronto Blue Jays 0 (45-39)

Atlanta Braves 3 (44-38) – Philadelphia Phillies 2 (36-46)

Tampa Bay Rays 12 (35-49) – Baltimore Orioles 7 (42-29)

Colorado Rockies 10 (36-46) – Milwaukee Brewers 4 (51-33)

Houston Astros 6 (36-47) – Detroit Tigers 4 (44-34)

Kansas City Royals 5 (42-39) – Los Angeles Angels 4 (45-35)

Minnesota Twins 3 (37-43) – Texas Rangers 2 (37-44)

Cincinnati Reds 4 (43-38) – San Francisco Giants 0 (46-36)

Seattle Mariners 3 (44-38) – Cleveland Indians 0 (39-42)

Los Angeles Dodgers 6 (47-37) – Saint Louis Cardinals 0 (44-39)

San Diego Padres 2 (35-47) – Arizona Diamondbacks 1 (35-49)

IndyCar: Simon Pagenaud wins the Shell-Pennzoil Grand Prix of Houston 2

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RICK FINDLER/AFP/Getty Images(TIKRIT, Iraq) — The United States has rushed 75 Hellfire missiles to the Iraqi government, but that small arsenal will last the regime only about three days as they battle to take back the city of Tikrit.

The government of President Nouri al-Maliki ran out of the missiles shortly after the al-Qaeda offshoot ISIS chased his troops out of northern Iraq by taking Mosul, Tikrit, and the border posts with Syria.

This weekend, the government made its first concerted effort to take back territory and is battling ISIS and its Sunni Muslim allies in Tikrit, the one-time hometown of former dictator Saddam Hussein.

The Iraqi army is receiving information used in its offensive from U.S. advisers who have been using intelligence gathered by U.S. drones that have been flying over Iraq.

Other highlights in the murky fog of war that has enveloped Iraq are expectations that it will likely be at least six months before Mosul, Iraq’s second largest city, can be recaptured by government forces.

Before moving on Mosul, the government will need to recruit forces from the region and rebuild the 2nd Division of the Iraqi army, which totally collapsed and fled in the face of the ISIS attack.

Three U.S. teams of miltary advisers are now operating in Iraq, some of them north of Baghdad. Three more teams are expected to arrive. President Obama has authorized as many as 300 miltary advisers to return to Iraq.

The advisers, along with the intel from the drones, will help direct the Iraqi offensive and give Obama targets to hit if he decides to become more aggressive in Iraq.

There is some skepticism that two Russian Sukhoi fighter jets that are being prepared by technicians can be made ready in three days as promised.

The introduction of help from Russian now means that three of the U.S.’s rivals — Russia, Iran and Syria — are helping Iraq’s Shia-dominated government.

Iraq needs some help in the air, however. Sixty of its helicopters have been damaged since January and six have been shot down.

Despite the huge swath of territory through northern Syria and northern Iraq that ISIS — the Islamic State of Syria and Iraq — has conquered, the radical Sunni militants are believed to have vulnerabilities.

In Iraq there is friction with their more secular Sunni allies, particularly the Baathists who were loyal to Saddam Hussein. And their strict form of ruling has not taken hold in Mosul.

The size of the ISIS army has been estimated to be in the thousands, but even if the highest estimate of 10,000 is used they are spread across two countries, leaving them thinly dispersed.

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Christian Petersen/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — On Monday, President Obama will nominate former Procter & Gamble executive Robert McDonald as the next head of the Department of Veterans Affairs, the White House confirms to ABC News.

McDonald, a West Point graduate, served five years before joining Proctor & Gamble, where he eventually rose to become CEO of the company.

According the White House, McDonald has dedicated time and resources to serving veterans. He’s significant supporter of the U.S. Military Academy and is a life member of the U.S. Army Rangers Association.

McDonald would take over the department following an investigation that found widespread problems, including delayed care at VA hospitals across the country.

Upon confirmation, McDonald would replace interim Secretary Sloan Gibson, who had stepped in after Secretary Eric Shinseki stepped down.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Although President Obama called the influx of undocumented minors on the U.S.-Mexico border a “humanitarian crisis” this week, Mayor Jim Darling of the U.S. border town of McAllen, Texas told ABC’s George Stephanopoulos he disagrees with that label.

“We don’t think it’s a crisis,” Darling said Sunday on This Week. “We’re doing everything — efforts here at the border to make sure it doesn’t turn into a crisis.”

Darling described how McAllen’s border bus station serves as “point zero” for the undocumented immigrants as they are processed by border patrol. In order to alleviate the situation from reaching what he would consider to be a crisis, Darling said many of McAllen’s community organizations have stepped up to offer services to help the incoming arrivals.

“They come — they only have the clothes that they have on their back. They haven’t had proper hygiene for the last couple of weeks. They’re hungry. They’re a lot of little kids,” Darling said. “And so what happened to us is a Catholic church at the city of McAllen, [in addition to] other community entities got together and decided that we’re not going to send them from our city in those conditions. And they’re providing for all those needed services.”

Despite the town’s best efforts, McAllen’s local newspaper The Monitor ran a front page headline Friday stating that costs were mounting for immigrant care for towns on the border.

“We’ve spent $70,000 so far. We expect to spend over half a million before the end of the year,” Darling said. “The Catholic charities and other charitable organizations are spending about $150,000. They expect to spend almost a million dollars before the end of the year. So it’s not fair to our taxpayers. It’s not fair to the charities to have to front those monies when really this is a federal situation.”

In addition to the financial burden, Darling said that McAllen may not have the human resources to continue to aid more undocumented immigrants in the future.

“We’re really worried about sustainability, both from the standpoint of dollars, but also from community participation,” Mayor Darling told Stephanopoulos. “We have doctors that volunteer to see the kids and the moms, and that’s way, way too much to expect them to do that on any kind of sustainable basis.”

On Monday, President Obama is expected to ask Congress for $2 billion in emergency funding to help send some of these children home.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Although President Obama called the influx of undocumented minors on the U.S.-Mexico border a “humanitarian crisis” this week, Mayor Jim Darling of the U.S. border town of McAllen, Texas told ABC’s George Stephanopoulos he disagrees with that label.

“We don’t think it’s a crisis,” Darling said Sunday on This Week. “We’re doing everything — efforts here at the border to make sure it doesn’t turn into a crisis.”

Darling described how McAllen’s border bus station serves as “point zero” for the undocumented immigrants as they are processed by border patrol. In order to alleviate the situation from reaching what he would consider to be a crisis, Darling said many of McAllen’s community organizations have stepped up to offer services to help the incoming arrivals.

“They come — they only have the clothes that they have on their back. They haven’t had proper hygiene for the last couple of weeks. They’re hungry. They’re a lot of little kids,” Darling said. “And so what happened to us is a Catholic church at the city of McAllen, [in addition to] other community entities got together and decided that we’re not going to send them from our city in those conditions. And they’re providing for all those needed services.”

Despite the town’s best efforts, McAllen’s local newspaper The Monitor ran a front page headline Friday stating that costs were mounting for immigrant care for towns on the border.

“We’ve spent $70,000 so far. We expect to spend over half a million before the end of the year,” Darling said. “The Catholic charities and other charitable organizations are spending about $150,000. They expect to spend almost a million dollars before the end of the year. So it’s not fair to our taxpayers. It’s not fair to the charities to have to front those monies when really this is a federal situation.”

In addition to the financial burden, Darling said that McAllen may not have the human resources to continue to aid more undocumented immigrants in the future.

“We’re really worried about sustainability, both from the standpoint of dollars, but also from community participation,” Mayor Darling told Stephanopoulos. “We have doctors that volunteer to see the kids and the moms, and that’s way, way too much to expect them to do that on any kind of sustainable basis.”

On Monday, President Obama is expected to ask Congress for $2 billion in emergency funding to help send some of these children home.

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Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — When a group of mostly white college students traveled to the heart of the Jim Crow South to help African American citizens register to vote in June of 1964, they had no idea just how difficult the task would be, nor of the lasting impact it would have.

“I think it’s really important that we understand the struggle that we had to go through to get people the right to vote and that probably that struggle isn’t over,” said Stanley Nelson, who wrote and directed the new PBS film Freedom Summer.

Nelson’s film, which premiered on PBS this week, recounts the stories of men and women — both black and white — who fought for right of African Americans to vote in Mississippi, a state where white supremacy and segregation were violently enforced.

“You’d be fired from your job if you even tried to go down and register to vote,” Nelson told ABC News’ Martha Raddatz in an interview for This Week. “If you had a loan, any kind of loan, they would cut your loan… they would publish your name in the paper… Then there was something called the registrar who would then make you take a test and inevitably if you’re African American, you fail.”

For 10 weeks in the summer of 1964, volunteers from northern states traveled to Mississippi to join local community activists helping African American citizens with voter registration. They were strongly opposed by white supremacists, who resorted to intimidation, violence, and even murder to stop their efforts.

“One of the terms that people always use for what was happening in Mississippi was terrorism. And you know, they were being terrorized,” Nelson said.

Three young Freedom Summer activists — James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner — disappeared on June 21, 1964, on the first day of the Freedom Summer movement. Their bodies were not discovered for six months, their murders later dramatized in the 1988 film Mississippi Burning.

“The people who understood Mississippi knew that they were never going to be found alive,” Nelson said. “It put this kind of shadow over the whole summer.”

Still, this tragic event did not deter the other organizers. The Freedom Summer movement caught the nation’s attention, and played a role in President Lyndon Johnson signing the Voting Rights Act the following year, banning voter discrimination.

The act remained intact until last year, when a sharply divided Supreme Court struck down a key part, citing racial progress in the last 50 years.

Nelson’s film, filled with interviews with former Freedom Summer activists and their first-hand perspective of the events of 1964, is available in full on the PBS website.

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iStock/Thinkstock(COBB COUNTY, Ga.) — The father of a Georgia toddler who died in a hot car allegedly looked online for information about the dangers of overheated cars before the tragedy.

Cobb County authorities claim that, according to search warrants, Jason Harris specifically searched for “child deaths inside vehicles and what temperature it needs to be for that to occur.”

Additionally, according to new warrants released Sunday, Harris’ wife Leanna Harris told police she also researched car deaths.

Jason Harris, who remains in jail, used a speaker phone to call into his child’s funeral Saturday and thank people for their support.

He is being held without bond.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The Obama administration may ask overseas partners to enhance security measures at airports and is weighing whether to do the same here at home to address deepening concerns that terrorists in war-ravaged Syria are trying to develop a new generation of bombs that could be smuggled onto commercial planes, ABC News has learned.

“[This threat] is different and more disturbing than past aviation plots,” one source said.

The issue was discussed this past week at the White House during a meeting of top-level officials from intelligence agencies, sources said.

For months the Department of Homeland Security, FBI and other agencies have been quietly debating whether to boost the U.S. security posture and encourage overseas partners to take action too. The agencies have also been debating whether to make a public announcement on potential new security measures at airports.

The back-and-forth has been based on intelligence showing that a particularly extreme “subset” of terrorist groups in Syria was working alongside operatives from al Qaeda’s prolific offshoot in Yemen to produce “creative” new designs for bombs, as one source put it.

Specifically, U.S. officials learned that associates of the al Qaeda affiliate in Syria — the Al Nusrah Front — and radicals from other groups were teaming up with elements of the Yemen-based group Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, which built such innovative devices as the “underwear bomb” that ultimately failed to detonate in a plane over Detroit on Christmas Day 2009.

Bolstered by more recent intelligence, U.S. analysts believe the “subset” of extreme terrorists in Syria could be looking to down a U.S.- or European-bound plane, with help from one of the thousands of Americans and other foreign fighters carrying U.S. and European passports who have joined Al Nusrah Front and other groups in the region.

Intelligence obtained by the U.S. government, however, has not indicated a specific target or a specific timeline.

While U.S. officials have been outspoken about the dangers posed by Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula and – separately – the threat of foreign fighters in Syria, the latest intelligence shows that the two threats have bonded in an unusually powerful way, essentially creating a sum more worrisome than its parts.

After coming across the initial thread of intelligence earlier this year, U.S. officials, in regular consultation with the White House, began developing plans and potential security measures to address the threat. The development of those plans is now in its final stages, according to sources.

It’s unclear exactly what new measures are being considered for U.S. airports and U.S. stations in airports overseas. But one source said new measures could include increasing the rates of random screenings at airports, targeting certain types of travelers, or more obvious changes for travelers going through security lines.

The potentially lethal partnership in Syria is at least part of what sparked an advisory to airlines earlier this year to look out for explosives-laden toothpaste tubes, cosmetics and shoes.

Since January, officials with access to the country’s most sensitive intelligence have warned publicly that hard-to-detect “technologies and techniques” were being exported to Syria, that foreign fighters from the West were “learn[ing] new things” and “build[ing] new relationships” in Syria, and that “training complexes” were popping up there to prepare Western fighters for terrorist attacks against their home countries.

In May, FBI Director James Comey told a Senate panel the U.S. government has a plan to mitigate the direct threat to the U.S. homeland from Syria, though he declined to offer any details.

More recently, Comey said the U.S. government is spending “a tremendous amount of time and effort trying to identify” anyone who’s gone to Syria, but “the challenge” is not missing anyone.

In an exclusive interview on Thursday with ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos, President Obama noted that “battle hardened” foreign fighters in Syria are increasingly slipping over porous borders and joining terrorist groups in Iraq, where the group Islamic State of Iraq and Syria — or ISIS — is now wreaking havoc.

Though al Qaeda denounced and cut ties with ISIS earlier this year, elements of both groups are committed to attacks against the West.

“Then they come back, they’ve got European passports … [and] don’t need a visa to get into the United States,” the president said of certain foreign fighters.

As part of a much larger request to fund U.S. military operations, the White House has asked Congress to approve $500 million so that U.S. forces can train and arm “moderate” rebels fighting against the Syrian regime.

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Paramount(LOS ANGELES) — Transformers: Age of Extinction had the biggest opening weekend of the year, bringing in $100 million at the box office.

Michael Bay’s action flick, the fourth film in the series, stars Mark Wahlberg, Jack Reynor, Stanley Tucci, Nicola Peltz, TJ Miller, and Kelsey Grammer.

In second at the box office was the Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill comedy 22 Jump Street, earning $15.4.

In third place this weekend was How to Train Your Dragon 2 with $13.1.

Here are the weekend’s top ten films according to boxofficemojo.com:

1. Transformers: Age of Extinction: $100 million
2. 22 Jump Street: $15.4 million
3. How to Train Your Dragon 2: $13.1 million
4. Think Like a Man Too: $10.4 million
5. Maleficent: $8.2 million
6. Jersey Boys: $7.6 million
7. Edge of Tomorrow: $5.2 million
8. The Fault in our Stars: $4.8 million
9. X-Men: Days of Future Past: $3.3 million
10. Chef: $1.6 million

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — On Sunday New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced an ambitious initiative to end the AIDS epidemic by 2020.

The plan includes better tracking and treatment of people who have the virus, as well as bulk discounts for HIV drugs.

Gov. Cuomoy is also participating in New York City’s annual Gay Pride Parade on Sunday.

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