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National Museum of Natural History(WASHINGTON) — Washington’s latest arrival is no stranger to tough habitats. The 66 million-year-old Tyrannosaurus Rex arrived at the National Museum of Natural History on Tuesday.

On loan for 50 years from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the fearsome T-Rex fossil — each tooth the size of a banana — will form the centerpiece of the National Museum of Natural History‘s new dinosaur and fossil hall in 2019.

But visitors to the nation’s capital won’t have to wait five years to see the creature’s remains. In the museum’s new “Rex Room,” tourists will be able to watch staff members unpack, photograph and prepare the bones for assembly.

The so-called “Nation’s T-Rex” was discovered in Montana in 1988 by a rancher named Kathy Wankel, who noticed a bone sticking out of the sand and delivered it to the Museum of the Rockies.

The skeleton was originally scheduled to arrive in D.C. on Oct. 15, National Fossil Day, but the 16-day government shutdown derailed the project schedule.

The Rex Room opens Tuesday.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Johnson County Police Dept(OVERLAND PARK, Kan.) — Frazier Glenn Miller, the man who allegedly went on a shooting rampage outside two Jewish community centers in Kansas, was charged Tuesday with one count of capital murder and a second count of premeditated first degree murder.

Prosecutors said the capital murder charge is for the deaths of William Lewis Corporon and his grandson, Reat Underwood, 14, who were gunned down outside the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City, where parents and their children were gathering for a singing contest.

The premeditated first degree murder charge is for the shooting of Terri LaManno, 53, who was shot and killed minutes later outside the Village Shalom assisted living center where she was visiting her mother.

Under the charges, Miller could be eligible for the death penalty. He is expected to appear in court at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday.

The suspect is also known as Frazier Glenn Cross, according to police in Overland Park, and has long been on the radar of anti-hate groups, such as the Southern Poverty Law Center. At a news conference on Monday, police officially classified the massacre as a “hate crime.”

Miller, who was one of the country’s most prominent white supremacists in the 1980s according to two watchdog groups, was armed with at least one shotgun when he allegedly began shooting at people gathered in a parking lot.

Witnesses said the suspect, who is reported to be a former Grand Dragon of the Carolina Knights of the Ku Klux Klan yelled a Nazi salute after the shooting.

Miller served three years in federal prison on weapons and threatening communications charges, according to court records. As part of a plea bargain, Miller testified against other KKK members at a 1988 sedition trial.

After serving his time, Miller became an unwelcome figure in the white supremacist movement and was viewed as a traitor, Mark Pitcavage, director of investigative research at the Anti-Defamation League told ABC News.

“Ever since [he took a plea deal], most white supremacists don’t want anything to do with him,” Pitcavage said.

After laying low for a while, Pitcavage said Miller became active again in the past 15 years, taking his hate into the digital age.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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robeo/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The clock is ticking down on the deadline to file your 2013 tax returns.

You must file something by midnight Tuesday or face a penalty. April 15 is when the bill is due for any taxes owed.

“The late payment penalties that accrue when you file late can be substantial,” says Eric Smith with the Internal Revenue Service.

And the charge for filing late can be even worse.

But you can easily get more time to fill in the forms. Using form 4868 “you can file the extension and give yourself piece of mind,” says tax accountant Janice Hayman. That will give you an additional six months to do the paper work.

“It gives people the chance to do things properly,” she says.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Women who gain more or less weight than recommended during pregnancy give birth to kids with an increased risk of childhood obesity, new research suggests.

Researchers found that normal-weight women who gained more weight than recommended had children who were 80 percent more likely to become obese. On the other side, normal-weight women who fell short of the recommended weight-gain guidelines were 63 percent more likely to have had a child who will eventually become overweight or obese, according to the study published Monday in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Call it the “Goldilocks effect” in pregnancy weight gain. And while research is uncovering numerous factors that can influence the risk of childhood obesity, the results of this new study suggest that weight gain during pregnancy is an important factor.

Indeed, while only 14 percent of children born to women who gained the right amount of weight according to recommendations set forth by the Institute of Medicine were overweight or obese, 20 percent of the children born to women who gained more weight than recommended were above a healthy weight themselves. And 19 percent of the children born to moms who did not gain enough weight while pregnant were overweight or obese.

Obese children are more likely to have more medical problems earlier in life, and most will remain obese into adulthood, according to past research.

“We need to find ways to help women achieve appropriate weight gain — for her health and the child’s — during pregnancy,” said study author Monique Hedderson of Kaiser Permanente in Northern California, who added that the notion that a woman is eating for two is a misconception.

“Sixty percent of women gain too much during pregnancy, and there needs to be more intervention to help women achieve a healthier weight gain during pregnancy,” she said.

More surprising, perhaps, is the idea that women who do not gain enough weight have children who face similar obesity risks as those born to women who gain too much.

“Women that come to clinic that are self-conscious about weight gain during pregnancy, we now have data that shows that not gaining enough is an actual detriment to both the mom and child,” said Dr. Amanda Calhoun, an obstetrician-gynecologist at Kaiser Permanente who has worked with the research group. “This study shows that, for clinicians, we need to take the Institute of Medicine seriously about the benefit of target range weight gain for both mom and child.”

In 2009, the Institute of Medicine created an updated set of guidelines regarding weight gain in pregnancy. According to the guidelines, obese women should gain 11 to 20 pounds over the course of a pregnancy. Overweight weight women should gain 15 to 25 pounds, normal-weight women 25 to 35 pounds, and underweight women 28 to 40 pounds.

The study is an important reminder that pregnant women should keep an eye on weight gain, both for their health and for their baby’s, ABC News Senior Medical Contributor Dr. Jennifer Ashton said.

“We know in obstetrics that a mother’s weight gain can and does have important fetal and neonatal effects,” said Ashton, who is also a practicing ob-gyn. ”The take-home message here is that pregnant women should strive for the middle ground: ‘average’ weight gain during pregnancy: not too little, and certainly not too much.”

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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FBI(NEW YORK) — A year after the Boston Marathon attacks, there are troubling new questions about whether the bombings could have been thwarted and how two brothers from Chechnya learned to allegedly execute their terrorist attack so efficiently, officials tell ABC News.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 20, and his brother Tamerlan, 26, are accused of detonating two bombs at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring more than 260 others a year ago on Tuesday. Tamerlan was killed in a shootout with police days after the bombing, but Dzhokhar was arrested and now sits in jail, isolated from other inmates and awaiting trial. He has pleaded not guilty.

But many current and former senior officials who have investigated the tragedy told ABC News that they question whether the brothers might have been neutralized by a more thorough FBI investigation before the attacks, and whether as bombmaking novices they had to have had help in allegedly building several different types of sophisticated devices, which they used more successfully than any other homegrown terrorists since 9/11.

“I do think that had we taken a second look, we could’ve stopped this,” Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, Chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security, told ABC News.

According to court documents, the inspector general’s report and sources briefed on the federal investigation of the attacks, the FBI and prosecutors contend that both Tsarnaev brothers learned to build their improvised explosive devices using pressure cookers as well as three pipe bombs by downloading instructions off the Internet.

But ABC News has learned that many within the FBI, law enforcement and counter-terrorism strongly disagree that they could have become good enough to make the improvised explosive devices (IEDs) from online how-to’s and suspect an expert taught or instructed Tamerlan on the craft of bombmaking while he was overseas in 2012.

“For a ‘novice’ pair of IED builders and emplacers, for them to work as they did, to be effective, that indicates to me a level of sophistication that they received some sort of training from somewhere,” retired Army Lt. Gen. Mike Barbero, former director of the Joint IED Defeat Organization, told ABC News. Barbero headed the organization at the time of the marathon attacks.

Prosecutors allege that the Tsarnaevs got recipes for the pressure-cooker IEDs — common on battlefields in Afghanistan — and “elbow” pipe bombs from online instructions published four years ago in Inspire, a terrorist magazine published by al Qaeda’s affiliate al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP). AQAP offered wannabe jihadis instructions for both types of IEDs under the headline, “Make a bomb in the kitchen of your mom.”

But an analysis of the bombs done by FBI technicians at the Terrorist Explosive Device Analytical Center (TEDAC) in Quantico, Va., in late April 2013 found that the bombs in Boston had a much more sophisticated design than that in the online magazine, including differences in the initiators, power source and switch/trigger, which utilized a toy car remote control. Inspire never contained instructions for that type of switch/trigger used to remotely set off the IEDs, but had directions for a different type using a motorcycle remote starter.

“While the RC concept is similar, TEDAC assesses INSPIRE would not provide an individual with the appropriate details to translate these instructions for use with RC toy car components. Such construction would likely require previous knowledge of, or additional research into, RC toy car circuitry,” a TEDAC analysis document said.

“They didn’t get it just from online and definitely didn’t get it just from reading Inspire magazine. So where did they get this training and how did they acquire the skill?” Barbero said.

The indictment of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev alleges that he and Tamerlan “armed themselves with five IEDs, a Ruger P95 9mm semiautomatic handgun, ammunition for the Ruger, a machete and a hunting knife” before engaging in their April 19 shootout with Watertown police. The bombs included a pressure cooker IED, three pipe bombs and a Tupperware tub filled with black powder and a fuse — they exploded all but the tub during a firefight. The gun was bought illegally from a suspect still under investigation in another state, a law enforcement official told ABC News.

They also threw small black powder grenades called “crickets” at police during a car chase, sources said.

Allegedly creating and detonating such different IEDs put the Tsarnaevs in a class by themselves as post-9/11 homegrown terrorists, who typically have tried to perfect just one IED design and have rarely succeeded in detonating any at all, officials said.

“It is absolutely a major unanswered question of how they got that good and whether they had assistance of some kind,” a senior counter-terrorism official told ABC News last week. “They had a better success rate than AQAP’s master bombmaker al-Asiri,” who created the underwear and printer cartridge bombs snuck aboard airplanes, which failed to detonate.

McCaul’s staff recently completed a year-long investigation of the Boston attacks. It found federal counter-terrorism officials failed to alert Massachusetts law enforcement that Russia’s security services in 2011 informed the FBI and later CIA that Tamerlan Tsarnaev and his mother Zubeidat Tsarnaeva were suspected of being radicalized Islamists.

“I think it’s very clear today, after the investigation we conducted and the investigation the inspector general conducted of the intelligence community and the FBI that that foreign connection is real and that he was over there meeting with extremists,” McCaul said. “He was greater radicalized and it’s very likely he did receive training.”

An intelligence community inspector general report released last week revealed that the FBI only interviewed Tamerlan and his parents in Boston but not other associates or an ex-girlfriend he had assaulted. The FBI found nothing to support the Russian claim — which stemmed from an intercepted phone call by Russian spy services.

“Now in fairness to the FBI, the Russians had information they didn’t share with the FBI after their warning came in and that’s unfortunate,” McCaul said. McCaul and other officials were also quick to state that they see no evidence the Tsarnaevs were acting on orders of a foreign terrorist group. But extremists likely offered Tamerlan expertise, he agreed.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev soon faded as a counter-terrorism priority and he was able to travel to Chechnya and Dagestan in January 2012. He returned in July without facing further investigative scrutiny — partially because his name was misspelled in a security database — and soon began posting jihadi material including videos on YouTube.

FBI and Justice Department officials declined comment, citing Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s upcoming death penalty trial.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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FBI(NEW YORK) — A year after the Boston Marathon attacks, there are troubling new questions about whether the bombings could have been thwarted and how two brothers from Chechnya learned to allegedly execute their terrorist attack so efficiently, officials tell ABC News.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 20, and his brother Tamerlan, 26, are accused of detonating two bombs at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring more than 260 others a year ago on Tuesday. Tamerlan was killed in a shootout with police days after the bombing, but Dzhokhar was arrested and now sits in jail, isolated from other inmates and awaiting trial. He has pleaded not guilty.

But many current and former senior officials who have investigated the tragedy told ABC News that they question whether the brothers might have been neutralized by a more thorough FBI investigation before the attacks, and whether as bombmaking novices they had to have had help in allegedly building several different types of sophisticated devices, which they used more successfully than any other homegrown terrorists since 9/11.

“I do think that had we taken a second look, we could’ve stopped this,” Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, Chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security, told ABC News.

According to court documents, the inspector general’s report and sources briefed on the federal investigation of the attacks, the FBI and prosecutors contend that both Tsarnaev brothers learned to build their improvised explosive devices using pressure cookers as well as three pipe bombs by downloading instructions off the Internet.

But ABC News has learned that many within the FBI, law enforcement and counter-terrorism strongly disagree that they could have become good enough to make the improvised explosive devices (IEDs) from online how-to’s and suspect an expert taught or instructed Tamerlan on the craft of bombmaking while he was overseas in 2012.

“For a ‘novice’ pair of IED builders and emplacers, for them to work as they did, to be effective, that indicates to me a level of sophistication that they received some sort of training from somewhere,” retired Army Lt. Gen. Mike Barbero, former director of the Joint IED Defeat Organization, told ABC News. Barbero headed the organization at the time of the marathon attacks.

Prosecutors allege that the Tsarnaevs got recipes for the pressure-cooker IEDs — common on battlefields in Afghanistan — and “elbow” pipe bombs from online instructions published four years ago in Inspire, a terrorist magazine published by al Qaeda’s affiliate al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP). AQAP offered wannabe jihadis instructions for both types of IEDs under the headline, “Make a bomb in the kitchen of your mom.”

But an analysis of the bombs done by FBI technicians at the Terrorist Explosive Device Analytical Center (TEDAC) in Quantico, Va., in late April 2013 found that the bombs in Boston had a much more sophisticated design than that in the online magazine, including differences in the initiators, power source and switch/trigger, which utilized a toy car remote control. Inspire never contained instructions for that type of switch/trigger used to remotely set off the IEDs, but had directions for a different type using a motorcycle remote starter.

“While the RC concept is similar, TEDAC assesses INSPIRE would not provide an individual with the appropriate details to translate these instructions for use with RC toy car components. Such construction would likely require previous knowledge of, or additional research into, RC toy car circuitry,” a TEDAC analysis document said.

“They didn’t get it just from online and definitely didn’t get it just from reading Inspire magazine. So where did they get this training and how did they acquire the skill?” Barbero said.

The indictment of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev alleges that he and Tamerlan “armed themselves with five IEDs, a Ruger P95 9mm semiautomatic handgun, ammunition for the Ruger, a machete and a hunting knife” before engaging in their April 19 shootout with Watertown police. The bombs included a pressure cooker IED, three pipe bombs and a Tupperware tub filled with black powder and a fuse — they exploded all but the tub during a firefight. The gun was bought illegally from a suspect still under investigation in another state, a law enforcement official told ABC News.

They also threw small black powder grenades called “crickets” at police during a car chase, sources said.

Allegedly creating and detonating such different IEDs put the Tsarnaevs in a class by themselves as post-9/11 homegrown terrorists, who typically have tried to perfect just one IED design and have rarely succeeded in detonating any at all, officials said.

“It is absolutely a major unanswered question of how they got that good and whether they had assistance of some kind,” a senior counter-terrorism official told ABC News last week. “They had a better success rate than AQAP’s master bombmaker al-Asiri,” who created the underwear and printer cartridge bombs snuck aboard airplanes, which failed to detonate.

McCaul’s staff recently completed a year-long investigation of the Boston attacks. It found federal counter-terrorism officials failed to alert Massachusetts law enforcement that Russia’s security services in 2011 informed the FBI and later CIA that Tamerlan Tsarnaev and his mother Zubeidat Tsarnaeva were suspected of being radicalized Islamists.

“I think it’s very clear today, after the investigation we conducted and the investigation the inspector general conducted of the intelligence community and the FBI that that foreign connection is real and that he was over there meeting with extremists,” McCaul said. “He was greater radicalized and it’s very likely he did receive training.”

An intelligence community inspector general report released last week revealed that the FBI only interviewed Tamerlan and his parents in Boston but not other associates or an ex-girlfriend he had assaulted. The FBI found nothing to support the Russian claim — which stemmed from an intercepted phone call by Russian spy services.

“Now in fairness to the FBI, the Russians had information they didn’t share with the FBI after their warning came in and that’s unfortunate,” McCaul said. McCaul and other officials were also quick to state that they see no evidence the Tsarnaevs were acting on orders of a foreign terrorist group. But extremists likely offered Tamerlan expertise, he agreed.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev soon faded as a counter-terrorism priority and he was able to travel to Chechnya and Dagestan in January 2012. He returned in July without facing further investigative scrutiny — partially because his name was misspelled in a security database — and soon began posting jihadi material including videos on YouTube.

FBI and Justice Department officials declined comment, citing Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s upcoming death penalty trial.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office(PHOENIX) — An Arizona man accused of shooting his wife to death in a so-called “mercy killing” removed his electronic monitoring bracelet while on house arrest and fled, according to the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office.

An arrest warrant was issued on Monday for Howard Randolph, 79, after authorities said he cut off his electronic monitoring ankle bracelet and failed to show up for a pre-trial hearing.

Rudolph was arrested last August after his wife, Earlene Rudolph, 73, was found shot to death in the bathroom of the couple’s home in a Sun City, Ariz., retirement community.

After the killing, Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office said Rudolph told detectives his wife was sick and he couldn’t take it anymore.

Rudolph pleaded not guilty to a murder charge last year.

In February, he was released to the custody of friends while awaiting trial and was ordered to wear an electronic ankle monitor and adhere to a curfew, according to the sheriff’s office.

Maricopa County Sheriff’s Deputy Joaquin Enriquez said Randolph is 6-foot-3, 180-pounds and is believed to have fled in a 2006 white Lincoln Town Car with the Arizona plate BER-4316. Anyone with information is asked to contact authorities.

Rudolph’s public defender did not immediately return a request for comment.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office(PHOENIX) — An Arizona man accused of shooting his wife to death in a so-called “mercy killing” removed his electronic monitoring bracelet while on house arrest and fled, according to the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office.

An arrest warrant was issued on Monday for Howard Randolph, 79, after authorities said he cut off his electronic monitoring ankle bracelet and failed to show up for a pre-trial hearing.

Rudolph was arrested last August after his wife, Earlene Rudolph, 73, was found shot to death in the bathroom of the couple’s home in a Sun City, Ariz., retirement community.

After the killing, Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office said Rudolph told detectives his wife was sick and he couldn’t take it anymore.

Rudolph pleaded not guilty to a murder charge last year.

In February, he was released to the custody of friends while awaiting trial and was ordered to wear an electronic ankle monitor and adhere to a curfew, according to the sheriff’s office.

Maricopa County Sheriff’s Deputy Joaquin Enriquez said Randolph is 6-foot-3, 180-pounds and is believed to have fled in a 2006 white Lincoln Town Car with the Arizona plate BER-4316. Anyone with information is asked to contact authorities.

Rudolph’s public defender did not immediately return a request for comment.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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NASA Ames Research Center/Brian Day(NEW YORK) — If you were asleep when the “blood moon” graced the sky early Tuesday, you’re in luck. The moon will glow red three more times in the next 18 months, scientists say.

It’s all part of a lunar eclipse “tetrad”: a series of four consecutive total lunar eclipses that happen at about six-month intervals.

The next one is due Oct. 8, followed by blood moons on April 4, 2015, and Sept. 28, 2015, according to NASA.

There will be a total lunar eclipse on those dates, when the moon passes into the Earth’s shadow, and the moon will begin to appear bright orange or red because of the way sunlight bends through the Earth’s atmosphere. The sunset hue lasts up to an hour.

The moon appeared reddest Tuesday around 3 a.m.

You’ll have to be an early riser to catch the October “blood moon.” That total eclipse will begin at 6:25 a.m. Clear skies are key and people on the West Coast will have the best view.

NASA eclipse expert Fred Espenak pointed out that this lunar eclipse series is unique because all four eclipses will be visible in North America, which isn’t always the case.

There are about two lunar eclipses a year, but you’ll only see a blood mood during a total eclipse. There are also partial eclipses, when the moon only passes into part of Earth’s shadow, and penumbral eclipses, when the moon barely grazes the Earth’s shadow, which is so subtle most sky-gazers don’t even notice.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Basketball fans have grown accustomed to Kentucky players leaving after their freshman year to enter the NBA Draft. In a move that may come as a surprise to many, center Willie Cauley-Stein will return to Kentucky for his junior season.

Cauley-Stein was expected to be a first-round pick in the upcoming draft, and could have possibly been a lottery pick. Despite the chance to reach the NBA, he’s staying in school.

“I want to come back and have a chance to win a national championship, while also getting closer to earn my degree,” Cauley-Stein said in a statement. “Being at the Final Four this year was special, but not being able to help my teammates on the floor was tough. I look forward to helping us get back there next year, while playing in front of the best fans in the nation.”

While Cauley-Stein may have been a lottery pick in the upcoming draft, he still could improve his game on the offensive end. If he can develop a more all-around game, he could find himself being drafted in the top-10 next year.

This past season, Cauley-Stein averaged 6.8 points, 6.1 rebounds, and 2.9 blocks per game.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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