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Patrick and Erin Quarles(AUSTIN, Texas) — Gwendolyn Quarles has a brain disorder that appeared soon after another child lobbed a football at her face in October of last year, her parents said. Her father, Patrick Quarles, said the incident was no accident.

“On the day of the injury, Gwendolyn was in gym class and the coaches left the children alone,” Quarles, a 43-year-old sales representative for an electrical supply company, told ABC News. “There seems to have been an argument and then she remembers a ball flying at her.”

After complaining of a floating feeling, the 11-year-old was sent to the nurse, her father said. Later in the day, her parents took her to the emergency room near her home in Austin, Texas, where she was diagnosed with intracranial hypertension, a rare disorder where pressure inside the skull chokes off the optic nerve from the brain.

The family had notified the school numerous times about previous incidents in which Gwendolyn was pushed around, her father said.

The girl’s mother, Erin Quarles, said that doctors have told the family that they cannot definitively confirm that the disorder is a result of the injury, but according to the Intracranial Hypertension Foundation, the condition is usually the result of a severe head injury.

The school where the incident occurred is The Founder’s Classic Academy, part of the Responsive Education Solutions, a charter school system in Texas. Mary Ann Duncan, vice president of school operations for RES, said they wished the child a speedy recovery but would neither confirm nor deny the incident occurred.

“We are not allowed to speak about confidential student information but the school’s policy is to investigate and notify parents promptly of any accident or bullying,” Duncan said.

It’s unclear whether Quarles will completely recover from the injury, said her parents, who fear she may go blind even if she undergoes risky and expensive surgery. Besides problems with her eyesight, her father said she was also experiencing other difficulties.

“She sometimes has trouble understanding me and sometimes she will trip over things. It comes and goes,” he said, though her mother said her daughter’s symptoms have improved in the last several days.

Gwendolyn is at the prime age for being bullied, according to government statistics. About a third of children report being threatened at school, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the likelihood of bullying peaks in the middle school years when kids are age 10 to 14.

“Kids who are bullied have higher rates of anxiety and depression and lower self-esteem,” said Dr. Joe Shrand, the medical director of CASTLE, an adolescent addiction treatment center in Brockton, Massachusetts.

Though only a small percentage of bullying turns physical, Shrand said kids who are bullied have a higher risk of physical ailments such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and suicide throughout their lifetime. Sometimes kids who are bullied turn the tables and become “victim bullies” perpetuating the cycle, he added.

Quarles said his family has racked up substantial medical bills as a result of his daughter’s condition, only some of which have been covered by insurance. The family has started a GoFundMe.com campaign to help cover the out-of-pocket costs, which Quarles said are piling up quickly.

The family said they sent at least 23 emails to the school, warning them that she was being pushed around by a group of other girls and that they feared the situation might escalate into something physical, Patrick Quarles said. The school did make attempts to remedy the situation, the parents said, but they wish everyone — themselves included — had done more.

And when something actually happened, he said he and his wife were in shock.

“You think, ‘What’s the worst that can happen?’ But you never think this,” Quarles said.

Since no adult was present when it happened, it’s impossible to get the entire story, Quarles said, adding that the family does not plan to sue.

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Joseph Camacho(SUN VALLEY, Calif.) — The father of a man stabbed to death by his roommate in a southern California hospital psych ward won $3 million in punitive damages on Tuesday against the hospital where his son died. But money isn’t on his mind. He wants to make sure it never happens again.

“Mentally challenged individuals have just as many rights as other people,” Joseph Camacho, 79, told ABC News. “Most of the time, they [hospitals] just seem to ignore them and treat them like prisoners instead of a patient.”

His son, Dean Camacho, who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, was attacked at Pacifica Hospital of the Valley in Sun Valley, California, by his roommate, Jerry Romansky in 2011, according to court documents.

The hospital put the two men in the same room of the hospital’s behavioral health unit despite Romansky’s violent history, and didn’t check on them every 15 minutes as they were supposed to, according to the plaintiff’s trial brief. Romansky was hearing voices that told him to “kill himself and others,” according to the brief, and he had tried to strangle a previous roommate at Pacifica with a towel, it said.

Though rooms throughout the hospital were equipped with emergency buzzers, they had been disabled in the mental health wing, according to Joseph Camacho’s lawyer, John Marcin.

Romansky, whose father testified against the hospital as well, stabbed Camacho with a metal bracket that he broke off from a toilet in the room, severing one of Camacho’s arteries and causing him to bleed to death, Marcin said.

He said the hospital’s deficiencies had mostly not changed in the more than three years since the murder.

“I think that’s why the jury became so angry,” Marcin said. “I asked the jury for $2 million in punitive damages, and they came back and awarded 3 [million dollars], they were so angry.”

The jury awarded $5.2 million in damages in all.

“It gives you a good feeling that you’re all on the same page,” Camacho said. “The hospital wasn’t.”

Joseph Camacho and Romansky’s father had a connection in a way because they each lost a son, Joseph Camacho said. Dean Camacho died, and Romansky is serving a prison sentence as a result of Camacho’s murder. They’d both been wronged by the hospital, he said.

Pacifica Hospital of the Valley did not respond to ABC News’ request for comment.

The hospital’s lawyer argued that its doctor had no knowledge Romansky would become violent and kill Camacho, and the two men did not have any prior conflict, according to the defense brief.

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Joseph Camacho(SUN VALLEY, Calif.) — The father of a man stabbed to death by his roommate in a southern California hospital psych ward won $3 million in punitive damages on Tuesday against the hospital where his son died. But money isn’t on his mind. He wants to make sure it never happens again.

“Mentally challenged individuals have just as many rights as other people,” Joseph Camacho, 79, told ABC News. “Most of the time, they [hospitals] just seem to ignore them and treat them like prisoners instead of a patient.”

His son, Dean Camacho, who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, was attacked at Pacifica Hospital of the Valley in Sun Valley, California, by his roommate, Jerry Romansky in 2011, according to court documents.

The hospital put the two men in the same room of the hospital’s behavioral health unit despite Romansky’s violent history, and didn’t check on them every 15 minutes as they were supposed to, according to the plaintiff’s trial brief. Romansky was hearing voices that told him to “kill himself and others,” according to the brief, and he had tried to strangle a previous roommate at Pacifica with a towel, it said.

Though rooms throughout the hospital were equipped with emergency buzzers, they had been disabled in the mental health wing, according to Joseph Camacho’s lawyer, John Marcin.

Romansky, whose father testified against the hospital as well, stabbed Camacho with a metal bracket that he broke off from a toilet in the room, severing one of Camacho’s arteries and causing him to bleed to death, Marcin said.

He said the hospital’s deficiencies had mostly not changed in the more than three years since the murder.

“I think that’s why the jury became so angry,” Marcin said. “I asked the jury for $2 million in punitive damages, and they came back and awarded 3 [million dollars], they were so angry.”

The jury awarded $5.2 million in damages in all.

“It gives you a good feeling that you’re all on the same page,” Camacho said. “The hospital wasn’t.”

Joseph Camacho and Romansky’s father had a connection in a way because they each lost a son, Joseph Camacho said. Dean Camacho died, and Romansky is serving a prison sentence as a result of Camacho’s murder. They’d both been wronged by the hospital, he said.

Pacifica Hospital of the Valley did not respond to ABC News’ request for comment.

The hospital’s lawyer argued that its doctor had no knowledge Romansky would become violent and kill Camacho, and the two men did not have any prior conflict, according to the defense brief.

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iStock/Thinkstock(HELSINKI, Finland) — In addition to physical problems that children who were born prematurely might suffer, scientists say they may encounter certain psychological problems during their teen and young adult years.

In a study of people born prematurely during the 1980s, scientists at the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Helsinki, Finland, says that many of these grown preemies tend to see themselves as less attractive than other individuals.

Another roadblock to their social development, according to Dr. Tuija Mannisto, is that they also have a harder time being sexually intimate with a partner or else, delay having sexual relationships.

While these problems are not insignificant, Dr. Edward McCabe of the March of Dimes says they should also not be too alarming.

McCabe, who was not involved in the study, contends that preemies typically have more cautious personalities than people who were born full-term and that putting off sex isn’t necessarily bad.

He also maintains that there have been advancements in the treatment of preemies at intensive care units so that those born in more recent times may not have the same issues as the older generation.

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NFL Media(PHOENIX) — Arizona health officials are attempting to contain a measles outbreak that has already spread through multiple states as thousands of fans arrive in Phoenix ahead of Sunday’s Super Bowl.

Officials are already monitoring 1,000 people in Arizona who were exposed to the contagious virus after seven people were found to be infected in the state.

“This is a critical point in this outbreak,” said Arizona Department of Health Services’ Director Will Humble. “If the public health system and medical community are able to identify every single susceptible case and get them into isolation, we have a chance of stopping this outbreak here.”

Measles is one of the most contagious viruses in existence and will infect an estimated 90 percent of unvaccinated people who are exposed to the virus. The incubation period is on average 14 days, but an infected person can be contagious up to four days before they start to show symptoms.

With scores of fans expected to head to Phoenix this weekend to watch the game between the New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks, health officials have delivered stern warnings to try and keep the disease from spreading in the state.

Anyone not vaccinated for measles is asked to stay out of public areas for 21 days. In Phoenix’s Maricopa County, the health department is asking unvaccinated children to stay home from school or day care for another three weeks in order to protect them from potential infection.

“If we miss any potential cases and some of them go to a congregate setting with numerous susceptible contacts, we could be in for a long and protracted outbreak,” said Humble on the health department website.

The current measles outbreak has infected at least 84 people in 14 states after originating in the Disneyland theme park, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

While immune globulin can be given to help mitigate symptoms, there is no way for health officials to stop those exposed from developing the disease. Symptoms of measles include fever, cough, runny nose and the tell-tale red rash, according to the CDC. In severe cases it can cause pneumonia, encephalitis or swelling of the brain, and death.

This week, the health department detailed their health and public safety plans for the Super Bowl.

In addition to monitoring for dangerous pathogens and suspicious substances, the department will conduct “illness monitoring at urgent care centers, and monitoring poison control center calls related to Super Bowl events.”

The department said the enhanced surveillance will allow them to more quickly “identify health threats” and respond immediately.

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Vivien Killilea/WireImage(LOS ANGELES) — Marion “Suge” Knight, arrested and booked on suspicion of murder on Friday over a fatal crash Thursday in Compton, California, has a long history as a rap pioneer, as well as a long history of trouble.

The ex-head of Death Row Records has been in the spotlight on and off since the early 1990s, supporting iconic artists on his former label such as Snoop Dogg and Tupac Shakur.

But there’s more to Knight’s story than his influence as a hip-hop mogul, or even his reported connection with an East Coast-West Coast rap feud that may have led to the deaths of Shakur and Bad Boy Records rapper Biggie Smalls.

The 6-foot-4 Knight, 49, also acquired a reputation as a dangerous and physically imposing man. In 1996, for instance, rapper Vanilla Ice told ABC News’ Brian Ross that Knight dangled him off the balcony of a hotel in the early 1990s during an argument over money from the song “Ice Ice Baby.”

“I needed to wear a diaper on that day,” Vanilla Ice said. “I was very scared.”

Knight denied the claim.

Knight was born in Compton, California and, after high school, he played football in college for UNLV before leaving in 1987, according to the Los Angeles Times. Around the early 1990s, Knight went to work as a bodyguard in the music industry, which led to a stint as a talent manager.

Knight opened Death Row Records in 1992 with partner Dr. Dre, whose album The Chronic put the label on the map. The label really started to dominate the rap industry and bring so-called “gansta rap” to the forefront when Snoop Dogg followed Dre with his classic album Doggystyle in 1993. That album earned four- and five-star reviews from the likes of Rolling Stone and The Source. It went quadruple platinum.

In 1996, Shakur, who had just joined Death Row, released All Eyez on Me, a double album, which eventually racked up $10 million in sales, according to The Source.

The entire time Death Row was dominating the music industry, Knight seemed to be the publicity catalyst.

But there was also trouble.

In 1995, Knight famously attended the Source Awards and insulted Bad Boy frontman Sean Combs, now known as Diddy, about performing on his artists’ songs.

“Anyone out there who wanna be a recording artist and wanna stay a star, but don’t have to worry about the executive producer trying to be all in the videos, all on the records, dancing, come to Death Row,” he said.

Some have speculated that was the point where the reported beef between Bad Boy (East Coast-based) and Death Row (West Coast-based) began.

After Shakur joined Death Row, the reported feud seemed to get worse. Shakur insulted Bad Boy’s legendary rapper, The Notorious B.I.G., a.k.a. Christopher Wallace, on records such as “Hit ‘Em Up,” which even talked about Wallace’s wife, R&B singer Faith Evans.

Other artists were attracted to Knight and his empire in the mid-1990s — even M.C. Hammer, who signed with the label in 1995 in an apparent effort to shed his clean-cut image.

In 1996, Knight was behind the wheel of the car with Shakur in the passenger seat when Shakur was shot and killed in Las Vegas at age 25.

Wallace was shot and killed months later in 1997 at age 24 in Los Angeles.

Unrelated to the murders of the two rap stars, Knight did jail time from the late 1990s to 2001 for violating probation on a 1992 assault and weapons case. In 2003, he went to prison again for the same offense.

It was around that time that Knight’s Death Row records began to falter. Dre left in 1996 and, that same year, one of his bodyguards was shot during a dispute and later fired, according to the Times.

After Snoop Dogg left the label, as well, Knight filed for bankruptcy years later in the mid-2000s, according to LegalZoom.

In 2005, Knight was shot at a VMA’s party hosted by Kanye West.

Death Row was sold in 2008.

Before Friday’s arrest, Knight was arrested in Las Vegas in 2012 and was given three years’ probation for driving without a license.

He was shot yet again in 2014 at a pre-VMAs Party hosted by Chris Brown. That shooting happened at 1:36 a.m. at 10ak in West Hollywood, where Brown was having an album release party, a source told ABC News at the time. His multiple gunshot wounds required surgery.

Knight also has another active case against him. He was charged with robbery late in 2014 over a claim that he stole a photographer’s camera. He is expected back in court later this month. He pled not guilty to the charge.

Knight was being held on $2 million bail after Friday’s arrest.

His attorney told ABC News affiliate KABC- TV in Los Angeles that he has not yet been charged. The attorney added that though Knight was behind the wheel of the car that struck and killed Terry Carter, 55, and injured another man, Knight had been fleeing an attack and the collision was accidental.

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images)(LOS ANGELES) — Katherine Jackson has lost her appeal against AEG Live.

California’s Court of Appeals on Friday affirmed a jury’s 2013 judgment in Jackson’s wrongful death suit and awarded AEG costs on appeal.

“Today in a strongly worded opinion, the California Court of Appeal agreed with what a unanimous jury found: AEG was in no way responsible for the tragic death of Michael Jackson,” AEG Attorney Marvin Putnam told ABC News in a statement.

Katherine Jackson and her three grandchildren, Prince, Paris, and Blanket, sued AEG Live in 2010, claiming the company was negligent in hiring the King of Pop’s doctor, Dr. Conrad Murray.

Murray was convicted of involuntary manslaughter in 2011 for administering a fatal dose of propofol to the singer two years before.

However, the court wrote, “We agree with the trial court that Dr. Murray was an independent contractor as a matter of law.”

“The evidence fails to establish a triable issue that AEG had the right to control the manner and means of Dr. Murray’s treatment of Michael,” the opinion continued. “AEG never instructed Dr. Murray on how to treat Michael, and no evidence was presented that AEG had the right to control Dr. Murray’s treatment of Michael.”

An attorney for the Jackson family did not immediately comment on the appeal.

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Peter Kramer/NBC(NEW YORK) — Shakira is a mother for the second time.

The singer confirmed on her website Friday that she and her partner, soccer star Gerard Piqué, have welcomed their second child, a boy.

“We are happy to announce the birth of Sasha Piqué Mebarak, son of Shakira Mebarak and Gerard Piqué, born January 29 at 9:54pm, in Barcelona,” reads the message on Shakira’s website. “The name Sasha is of Greek and Russian descent and means ‘defender of mankind’ and ‘warrior.’ The hospital confirmed that both mother and child are in excellent health.”

Sasha joins big brother Milan, who was born in January of 2013.

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Al Levine/NBC(NEW YORK) — Eddie Murphy has not appeared on Saturday Night Live, the show that launched his career, in over three decades, but that will soon change.

The comedian has revealed he will appear on the sketch-comedy program’s 40th anniversary special, scheduled to air on NBC on Feb. 15.

When asked about his extended absence from the SNL stage during a phone interview with TV One’s News One Now, Murphy commented, “It’s just timing. It just never worked out where the timing was right for me to do it. …They’re having a 40th anniversary, I think, in two weeks, I’m going to that. And that will be the first time I’ve been back since I left.”

Murphy was a cast member on SNL in the early 1980s, making his mark with characters like Buckwheat, Gumby and Mr. Robinson. He left the show in 1984.

Murphy has stated in the past he was upset with SNL after David Spade cracked a joke about his career on the show in the 1990s.

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Al Levine/NBC(NEW YORK) — Eddie Murphy has not appeared on Saturday Night Live, the show that launched his career, in over three decades, but that will soon change.

The comedian has revealed he will appear on the sketch-comedy program’s 40th anniversary special, scheduled to air on NBC on Feb. 15.

When asked about his extended absence from the SNL stage during a phone interview with TV One’s News One Now, Murphy commented, “It’s just timing. It just never worked out where the timing was right for me to do it. …They’re having a 40th anniversary, I think, in two weeks, I’m going to that. And that will be the first time I’ve been back since I left.”

Murphy was a cast member on SNL in the early 1980s, making his mark with characters like Buckwheat, Gumby and Mr. Robinson. He left the show in 1984.

Murphy has stated in the past he was upset with SNL after David Spade cracked a joke about his career on the show in the 1990s.

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