Review Category : Business

3 last-minute gifts for mom on Mother’s Day

liquidlibrary/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — If you still haven’t gotten a gift for Mother’s Day, it’s not too late.

From massages to personalized gifts, mom can be made to feel really special thanks to these last-minute gift ideas by ABC News Lifestyle Editor Genevieve Shaw Brown. And you can get them all through the convenience of your smartphone.

Pamper Mom

It may be too late to get mom a spa appointment, but have the spa come to you! On-demand massage apps are all the rage, and you can get a licensed massage therapist to mom in under an hour. The Zeel app handles all the payment, including tax and tip, so no money exchanges hands. They’re in 60 U.S. cities. Choose from 60-, 70- or 90-minute Swedish, deep tissue, sports or even sleep massage options. Also check out Soothe — a similar service open from 8 a.m. to midnight, seven days a week.

Personalize Your Gift

No need to rush to the drugstore for a generic greeting card. Simply log on to Imprint.com and upload a few photos, favorite songs and video messages from family and friends on what a great woman she is. Simply send the link to everyone you want to contribute a note or message and the gift literally creates itself. It’s free, thoughtful and can be done in just a few minutes.

Leave Mom Alone

There’s no doubt mom loves her kids more than anything, but what she really needs is some time to herself and a good night’s sleep. Enter HotelTonight, an app that specializes in same-day discounted hotel reservations. Rates are up to 70 percent off and the app can be used in dozens of U.S. cities. Simply log on, reserve a room and pack her an overnight bag for a local hotel stay for her to relax and rejuvenate.

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The non-mother who started Mother’s Day

Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Ironically, the founder of Mother’s Day was not a mother herself. Anna Jarvis created the holiday to honor her late mother, Ann.

Ann Jarvis was a dedicated community organizer and philanthropist. According to the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library, she “founded Mothers’ Day Work Clubs in five cities in West Virginia to improve sanitary and health conditions.” The clubs hired women to help families with sick mothers and created programs that tested the quality of milk (the FDA did not exist back then). During the Civil War, Ann’s clubs provided aid to injured soldiers.

According to Katharine Lane Antolini’s book, “Memorializing motherhood: Anna Jarvis and the struggle for control of Mother’s Day,” Anne once said, “[I] hope and pray that someone, sometime, will found a memorial mother’s day [sic] commemorating her for the matchless service she renders to humanity in every field of life. She is entitled to it.”

Two years after Ann’s death on May 12, 1907, Anna handed out 500 white carnations to all the mothers at Anna’s church, St. Andrew’s Church in Grafton, West Virginia. The white carnation became the official flower of Mother’s Day, according to an article in The Atlantic Constitution from May 7, 1912. After years of lobbying, President Woodrow Wilson declared Mother’s Day a national holiday that would be celebrated on the second Sunday of every May.

However, by the 1920s, florists and confectioners had capitalized on the holiday much to its founder’s dismay. Anna spent the rest of her life fighting the commercialization of Mother’s Day. In 1925, she was arrested for disturbing the peace at a confectioner’s convention in Philadelphia, according to the Baltimore Sun.

Anna died at age 84, blind and penniless, according to the Daily Boston Globe. Her birthplace in Grafton, West Virginia, has been turned into a museum.

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US stocks close mixed on weak retail earnings

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — U.S. stocks closed mixed Friday as retail stocks dragged.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average gave up 22.81 (-0.11 percent) to finish at 20,896.61.

The Nasdaq gained 5.27 (+0.09 percent) to close at 6,121.23 while the S&P 500 finished at 2,390.90, down 3.54 (-0.15 percent) from its open.

Crude oil remained flat with prices under $48 per barrel.

Winners and Losers: Shares of J. C. Penney Company, Inc. tumbled 14 percent after reporting revenue and same-store sales much lower than expected by analysts in the first-quarter.

Despite online sales growing 11 percent last quarter, Nordstrom’s stock tanked 10 percent as both same-store sales and comparable sales were down.

AstraZeneca PLC’s shares climbed 9 percent after the pharmaceutical company announced positive results in trials of its lung cancer treatment drug.

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Trump’s tax law firm has ‘deep’ ties to Russia

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The lawyers who wrote a letter saying President Trump had no significant business ties to Russia work for a law firm that has extensive ties to Russia and received a “Russia Law Firm of the Year” award in 2016.

Sheri Dillon and William Nelson, tax partners at the law firm Morgan, Lewis & Bockius, which has served as tax counsel to Trump and the Trump Organization since 2005, wrote a letter in March released by the White House on Friday stating that a review of the last 10 years of Trump’s tax returns “do not reflect” ties to Russia “with a few exceptions.”

In 2016, however, Chambers & Partners, a London-based legal research publication, named the firm “Russia Law Firm of the Year” at its annual awards dinner. The firm celebrated the “prestigious honor” in a press release on its website, noting that the award is “the latest honor for the high-profile work performed by the lawyers in Morgan Lewis’ Moscow office.”

According to the firm’s website, its Moscow office includes more than 40 lawyers and staff who are “well known in the Russian market, and have a deep familiarity with the local legislation, practices, and key players.” The firm boasts of being “particularly adept” at advising clients on “sanction matters.”

Following the release of the letter, Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn) noted the firm’s connection to Russia, calling it “unreal.”

Asked if there could be other business ties between Trump and Russian partners, Sheri Dillon told ABC News that “the letter speaks for itself.”

As for the firm’s presence in Russia, a firm spokesperson said that no lawyers from Morgan Lewis have handling any business dealings for Mr. Trump in Russia.

Dillon has never been to Russia and does no work there, the spokesperson said.

Jack Blum, a Washington tax lawyer who is an expert on white-collar financial crime and international tax evasion, called the Dillon letter “meaningless.”

Blum told ABC News that real estate projects, in particular, can be structured with partners and subsidiaries so that it would be easy to shield the identity of all involved. Trump’s tax returns would not show where all the money came from to finance these projects, he said.

“There’s no substance to it. The letter is just another puff of smoke,” Blum said. “It has no meaning at all. It’s just another way to not answer the question.”

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Kushner family business cancels meetings with Chinese investors

Albee Zhang/Getty Images(SHANGHAI) — The company owned by the family of Donald Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, has canceled presentations planned in China this weekend, according to the BBC.

Kushner Companies was expected to pitch real-estate opportunities to Chinese investors in the southern cities of Guangzhou and Shenzhen.

But Mr Kushner’s sister, Nicole Meyer Kushner, was criticized last week for using the White House advisor’s name in a pitch.

Critics accused her of playing up the family’s close ties to the White House. The company has since apologized.

The BBC reported on Thursday that James Yolles, a spokesman for the company, said in a statement: “No one from Kushner Companies will be in China this weekend.”

Meyer had mentioned her brother while urging investors to put $500,000 into a property in New Jersey through the EB-5 visa program. This program grants residency to foreign investors if they invest at least $500,000 in a project that creates jobs in the U.S.

This isn’t the first time critics have raised questions about Kushner Companies. In March, the company ended talks with Chinese firm Anbang Insurance about a New York City redevelopment project after critics raised questions about a potential conflict of interest.

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Moms open up about how they make money on Instagram: ‘I try to be really choosy’

Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Two mothers who are using social media to earn money shared with Good Morning America their secrets for how to turn Instagram accounts into lucrative businesses.

Texas mother of two Shay Jiles, whose Instagram account, @theprinceandthep, has over 43,000 followers, told ABC News that in order to earn money from her social media accounts she has to “do it all.”

“I’m superwoman, I’m magical, I’m like a unicorn,” the mother joked when asked about how she is able to work as a creative director, copywriter, photographer, talent wrangler and mom.

Jiles added that when running a business through social media, compensation can come in some non-traditional forms.

“Sometimes things come in the form of vacations or hair products,” she said, but adds that she would call her business lucrative.

Arkansas mother of four Hannah Carpenter, whose Instagram account, @hannahacarpenter, has over 100,000 followers, also told ABC News that payments may come in the form of clothing, furniture, or cash.

Carpenter emphasized that it is especially important to be picky when deciding what companies to work with, saying, “I try to be really choosy.”

“I don’t want to be spam-y,” Carpenter said. She doesn’t accept “whatever collaboration, partnership, comes along … just because it’s going to be $100 here or $300 there.”

Experts cited in the book “Influencer Marketing for Dummies” lay out a rate schedule for Instagram of $250 per post for a user with 10,000 followers or less. Instagram users with hundreds of thousands of followers can earn as much as $3,000 per post, according to the book.

“For a very influential person, you could be talking into the tens of thousands of dollars,” Ashley Lutz, deputy executive editor of Business Insider, told ABC News.

Both Carpenter and Jiles said that when advertisers approach them, they must disclose that it is a sponsored post.

Carpenter said that her main goal with Instagram, however, is to inspire her audience.

“I try to find images that portray where reality and inspiration co-exist,” she said.

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Moms open up about how they make money on Instagram: ‘I try to be really choosy’

Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Two mothers who are using social media to earn money shared with Good Morning America their secrets for how to turn Instagram accounts into lucrative businesses.

Texas mother of two Shay Jiles, whose Instagram account, @theprinceandthep, has over 43,000 followers, told ABC News that in order to earn money from her social media accounts she has to “do it all.”

“I’m superwoman, I’m magical, I’m like a unicorn,” the mother joked when asked about how she is able to work as a creative director, copywriter, photographer, talent wrangler and mom.

Jiles added that when running a business through social media, compensation can come in some non-traditional forms.

“Sometimes things come in the form of vacations or hair products,” she said, but adds that she would call her business lucrative.

Arkansas mother of four Hannah Carpenter, whose Instagram account, @hannahacarpenter, has over 100,000 followers, also told ABC News that payments may come in the form of clothing, furniture, or cash.

Carpenter emphasized that it is especially important to be picky when deciding what companies to work with, saying, “I try to be really choosy.”

“I don’t want to be spam-y,” Carpenter said. She doesn’t accept “whatever collaboration, partnership, comes along … just because it’s going to be $100 here or $300 there.”

Experts cited in the book “Influencer Marketing for Dummies” lay out a rate schedule for Instagram of $250 per post for a user with 10,000 followers or less. Instagram users with hundreds of thousands of followers can earn as much as $3,000 per post, according to the book.

“For a very influential person, you could be talking into the tens of thousands of dollars,” Ashley Lutz, deputy executive editor of Business Insider, told ABC News.

Both Carpenter and Jiles said that when advertisers approach them, they must disclose that it is a sponsored post.

Carpenter said that her main goal with Instagram, however, is to inspire her audience.

“I try to find images that portray where reality and inspiration co-exist,” she said.

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A look at the wild life of anti-virus software pioneer John McAfee

Fred Dufour/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — If the name “McAfee” rings a bell, it should. There’s a chance that McAfee anti-virus software is on your home computer right now.

John McAfee, the man who created the software in the 1980s, became a household name for his anti-virus software and the millions of dollars he made when he sold his security software firm McAfee Associates.

But after he moved to Belize in 2009, McAfee made headlines again for his alleged connection to the murder of his neighbor Gregory Faull.

In a recent interview with ABC News’ “20/20,” McAfee denied having any involvement in Faull’s death and showed off his latest cybersecurity venture.

Here is a timeline of the major events of John McAfee’s life since the software founder first introduced the world to McAfee Associates.

Late 1980s and early 90s

John McAfee pioneers anti-virus software bearing his name that is still used by millions of computers today. The software was created in less than two days, McAfee said.

“Four million people were using it within a month,” he said.

He made his fortune when he sold his security software firm. His reported worth was $100 million, though he later claimed it was more. Over the years, he spent millions on properties, art and cars.

2009

After the financial crisis in 2008, McAfee let it be known in 2009 that he had lost most of his money. He sold a property in Rodeo, New Mexico — the last of his major real estate holdings — at an auction in August 2009.

Recently, McAfee told “20/20” that he was just “using” the media when he said he lost his fortune.

“I’ve had 200 lawsuits because my name is John McAfee. No, I did not lose everything. I wanted to stop people trying to sue me,” McAfee said. “No, I did not lose my fortune. I’m not that stupid.”

Later in 2009, McAfee took his remaining money and moved to Belize, where he had purchased a property on an island called Ambergris Caye. He purchased a second property in the interior of the country and moved deep in the jungle to a place called Orange Walk, where he had set up a lab to create plant-based antibiotics.

McAfee said he was helping the locals by feeding poor families and providing them with jobs.

April 2012

McAfee claimed his refusal to pay bribes to the Belize government caused a raid on his lab in 2012, which Belize authorities said was brought on by suspicions that he was manufacturing methamphetamine.

“I was on the verge of something … when I refused to pay an extortion for $2 million,” McAfee said. “A week later, that gang suppression unit destroyed my lab.”

No methamphetamine was found, and McAfee abandoned the jungle and moved back to Ambergris Caye. One of his neighbors was Gregory Faull, a builder from central Florida who wanted to spend his retirement in Belize.

Nov. 2012

According to friends, Faull had a problem with McAfee’s pack of aggressive dogs and told friends he was going to take care of the problem.

“Greg had told them he was going to poison the dogs,” Eileen Keeney, Faull’s mother, told “20/20.”

One evening in November 2012, some poisoned meat was thrown over McAfee’s fence, and all nine of his dogs were killed.

The next night, police said an intruder snuck into Faull’s home and shot him with a stun gun several times. Faull was then shot in the head and died.

Belize police called McAfee “a person of interest” in connection with Faull’s death and sought to question him. As news of the murder broke, McAfee disappeared into the jungle. McAfee contacted journalists while on the run.

“As long as the world was paying attention, they couldn’t actually shoot me in the street,” McAfee said.

McAfee then traveled to Guatemala.

Dec. 4, 2012

Immigration officials in Guatamala arrested McAfee in Guatamala City for entering the country illegally on Dec. 4, 2012.

In an exclusive interview with ABC News’ Matt Gutman, McAfee claimed he was innocent of the murder.

Dec. 12, 2012

Before Guatemalan authorities could put him on a plane back to Belize, McAfee collapsed and was rushed to the hospital on Dec. 12, 2012. McAfee later admitted to faking a heart attack.

The delay allowed his lawyer to file an appeal, and McAfee was granted a stay of deportation to Belize.

McAfee was eventually deported to Miami, Florida.

While in Miami, McAfee met his current wife Janice Dyson, who was a prostitute at the time.

June 2013

McAfee posted a parody video online explaining how to uninstall McAfee Anti-Virus in June 2013. At the time, the company that owned the software called the video “ludicrous.”

Sept. 28, 2013

McAfee spoke at the C2SV conference in Silicon Valley, announcing plans for a new company, Future Tense Central.

August 2015

McAfee was pulled over and arrested by Tennessee state troopers for DUI and gun possession in August 2015. He pleaded guilty to driving under the influence and has yet to get his license back.

He claims he wasn’t drunk but that he was high on Xanax, which he said a doctor had just prescribed him.

2016

Nanette Burstein’s documentary “Gringo” is released in September 2016. The film includes interviews where people implicated McAfee in Faull’s murder for the first time .

McAfee’s beachfront caretaker, Cassian Chavarria, alleged in the film that McAfee paid someone to have Faull killed.

“He said, ‘Take this $5,000 and go put it in this guy’s account,’ ” Chavarria said in an interview in “Gringo.”

Chavarria said the man who got the money called him late the night of the murder. The supposed killer denied killing Faull and said Chavarria’s story was untrue.

McAfee recently laughed off the documentary and accused Burstein of paying Chavarria and others who appear in the film to tell lies.

He posted multiple videos online where Chavarria and others took back what they said in the documentary.

Burstein denied paying for any interviews, though she did pay for some photos. She claims McAfee was the only one who paid for a story, pressuring Chavarria to recant.

“[Chavarria] said, ‘Someone showed up at my house who works for John, and they offered me thousands of dollars to say this,’ ” Burstein told “20/20.”

McAfee denies paying Chavarria and others to recant their interviews with Burstein. McAfee also denies hiring a hit man to kill Faull.

An attorney for Chavarria and three others featured in the film held a press conference in Belize City shortly after the film was released, in which they all claimed they had lied in the documentary to get money from filmmakers for their interviews. Chavarria also denied that McAfee had paid him to recant.

This same year, McAfee ran to become the Libertarian Party candidate for president, finishing as the runner-up to Gary Johnson.

May 2017

McAfee is the CEO of MGT Capital, a company that invests in cybersecurity. He spoke to ABC News’ Matt Gutman in an interview that will air on ABC News’ “20/20” on Friday, May 12, at 10 p.m. ET.

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Consumer advocates descend on D.C. to push back against Trump policies

MBPROJEKT_Maciej_Bledowski/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Consumer advocates who specialize in everything from finance to telecommunications are gathering in Washington, D.C. this week to plot how to resist Trump Administration moves they say weaken consumer protection.

The gathering, the 51st Annual Consumer Assembly, is coordinated by the Consumer Federation of America and is an annual affair that leaders of consumer organizations say has taken on a new urgency.

“We are definitely facing new challenges, incredible threats to consumers’ well-being,” said Martha Tellado, president and CEO of Consumer Reports, the publishing arm of Consumers Union.

In addition to CFA and Consumers Union, co-sponsors include U.S. PIRG, National Consumer Law Center, Public Citizen, National Consumers League, National Association of Consumer Advocates and Americans for Financial Reform.

Top issues include opposing legislation that would gut the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and scuttle proposed rules that would limit predatory payday loans and forced arbitration clauses in contracts.

Several advocates voiced concern about one of President Donald Trump’s policies, an executive order that requires government to get rid of two regulations for every new regulated adopted. Consumer groups say such an arbitrary approach threatens the ability to enact new health, safety and financial protections.

“We’re facing an unprecedented attack in Congress on sensible consumer protections that help protect our wallets and keep us safe,” CFA’s executive director Stephen Brobeck said in a statement. “Lawmakers should stand with consumers and reject proposals that threaten to weaken the CFPB and block essential safeguards for working families.”

Tellado said she is encouraged, however, by renewed consumer activism, citing the recent outcry over United Airlines’ treatment of the passenger who was recently dragged off on overbooked flight.

Citizens, Tellado said, are speaking up when they feel mistreated.

“No matter what side you’re on,” she said, “there really has been an activation.”

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Walt Disney’s original hand-drawn map of Disneyland up for auction

ABC News(NEW YORK) — A hand-drawn map of Disneyland by Walt Disney himself is about to become available.

It’s the “single most significant piece of Disneyland memorabilia to come to auction to date,” according to Van Eaton Galleries, the auction house arranging the sale. The map has not been viewed by the public in more than 60 years.

The map — the first-released vision of Disneyland, which was pivotal in securing the financing Disney needed for the park — has been in the possession of Grenade Curran all these years. Curran, who in 1955 was a young Disney employee, saw the map abandoned in the corner of Disney’s office and asked if he could keep it.

“Curran, knowing that the map was important, stored it away carefully as a memento of his time at the Studio and his friendship with Walt,” according to a press release about the upcoming auction. “However, Curran was unaware that he was unknowingly preserving one of the most significant artifacts in Disney history.”

The auction house estimates the map will sell for between $750,000-$1,000,000 and says that will make it the most valuable Disneyland artifact ever offered at auction.

The auction is set to take place June at Van Eaton Galleries in Sherman Oaks, California, with an exhibition in May where the public can view the items in person.

The Walt Disney Company is the parent company of ABC News.

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