Review Category : Health

Third Ebola Patient Treated at Emory University Hospital Released

Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images(ATLANTA) — A patient who was hospitalized at Emory University Hospital last month with the Ebola virus was discharged on Sunday, the hospital said.

The patient, who was not identified, was the third Ebola patient treated at Emory University, following Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol. According to a hospital statement, the patient was discharged after being “determined to be free of virus and to pose no public health threat,” and asked to remain anonymous.

A fourth patient, Amber Vinson, who contracted Ebola while treating Thomas Eric Duncan — the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States — at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, remains at Emory University Hospital. She arrived at Emory on Oct. 15.

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The Heartbreaking Poem a Nurse Who Cared for Thomas Eric Duncan Wrote in Tribute

Will Montgomery(DALLAS) — The last nurse to leave the hospital room where Thomas Eric Duncan died has written a poem about the Ebola patient, penned during the sleepless days after Duncan’s death, a source told ABC News.

The source provided the poem to ABC News, noting that the nurse who wrote it asked to remain anonymous. Duncan, the first person in the United States to be diagnosed with Ebola, died at the Dallas hospital on Oct. 8. Two of the nurses who cared for Duncan — Nina Pham, 26, and Amber Vinson, 29 — have been diagnosed with Ebola.

(Editor’s note: THR refers to Texas Health Resources, the company that owns Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.)

This is the poem:

A message to you

Inspired by the THR Family

You came to us sick, frightened, confused
What happened next became international news.
We saw you so ill, with everything to lose
Our goal was to help you because that’s what we do.
Alone in a dark ICU room
We fought for your life, our team and you.
We cared for you kindly
No matter our fear
You thanked us each time that we came near.
As each day pressed on, you fought so hard
To beat the virus that dealt every card.
No matter how sick or contagious you were
We held your hand, wiped your tears, and continued our care.
Your family was close, but only in spirit
They couldn’t come in; we just couldn’t risk it.
Then the day came we saw you in there
We wiped tears from your eyes, knowing the end was drawing near.
Then it was time, but we never gave up
Until the good lord told us he had taken you up.
Our dear Mr. Duncan, the man that we knew
Though you lost the fight, we never gave up on you.
All of us here; at Presby and beyond
Lift our hats off to you, now that you’re gone.
You touched us in ways that no one will know
We thank you kind sir for this chance to grow.
May you find peace in heaven above
And know that we cared with nothing but love.

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Dallas Nurses Call Colleagues Who Contracted Ebola ‘Heroes’

Pham family/ Debra Barry(DALLAS) — On Monday, nurses at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital hailed as “heroes” their two colleagues who contracted Ebola caring for Thomas Eric Duncan — the Liberian national who became the first person to be diagnosed with, and die of, Ebola in the United States.

Despite criticism against the Dallas hospital for mishandling the Ebola situation in recent days, chief nursing officer Cole Edmonson said the nurses were “devastated” by Duncan’s death, but nevertheless “proud” of their work. His colleague, nurse Chantea Irving, called media reports “widely inaccurate,” but none of the nurses elaborated on the investigations under way to determine why Duncan was initially sent home and how the nurses contracted Ebola from him.

“The men and women of this hospital worked tirelessly to save Mr. Duncan,” said emergency department nurse Julie Boling. “Some things went wrong and we’re proud to say [the hospital] owned those things.”

Nurses Nina Pham, 26, and Amber Vinson, 29, were diagnosed with Ebola last week and are being cared for at the National Institutes of Health hospital in Bethesda, Maryland, and Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, respectively. Both women cared for Duncan between Sept. 28 and Sept. 30, before he was isolated and when he was extremely contagious because he was vomiting and having diarrhea, officials said.

Duncan arrived at Texas Health Presbyterian on Sept. 26, but was sent home with antibiotics despite telling a nurse about having recently been in Liberia. He returned two days later in an ambulance when his symptoms worsened and was diagnosed and isolated. He died on Oct. 8.

Pham tested positive for Ebola in Dallas on Oct. 12, making her the first person to contract the deadly virus in the U.S. Vinson tested positive for Ebola on Oct. 15.

Later that day, the National Nurses’ Union released a statement critical of Texas Health Presbyterian’s Ebola protocols. Dr. Dan Varga, the chief clinical officer of Texas Health Resources, which owns the Dallas hospital, last week told Congress that its employees never got face-to-face Ebola training.

Vinson was flown to Emory on Oct. 15, the same day she was diagnosed at Texas Health Presbyterian. Pham had initially asked to stay at the Dallas hospital where she treated Duncan and was diagnosed with Ebola, but at the hospital’s request, she was flown to the NIH facility on Oct. 16.

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Your Brothers and Sisters May Have Made You a Better Person

iStock/Thinkstock(PROVO, Utah) — Siblings often fight like cats and dogs but they also may be helping each other in ways they never imagined.

In a study, co-author Laura Padilla-Walker of Brigham Young University’s Department of Family Life found that having a sibling teaches children to be more compassionate and generous as they age.

Padilla-Walker says this is particularly true of boys even if these positive qualities are considered more feminine.

To arrive at these conclusions, 308 pairs of teenage siblings were studied, regarding their personal development and the kinds of relationships they had with both family members and friends.

What the researchers determined is that siblings value their relationships with their brothers and sisters and even though they’ll fight from time to time, they often walk away from conflicts sensitive to the other person’s feelings.

Another positive that comes from a larger family, according to Padilla-Walker, is that there’s more of a feeling of community and sharing.

On the other hand, youngsters who grow up as an only child can be at a disadvantage if there’s no need to sacrifice or compromise.
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Uncertainty Can Add Excitement to Your Life

iStock/Thinkstock(HONG KONG) — It’s said that people like a sure thing. However, uncertainty can be more exciting.

That’s what’s called the motivating-uncertainty effect, according to researchers at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and University of Hong Kong.

Apparently, while knowing the outcome of something provides a relative degree of comfort, uncertainty is seen as a way to motivate people.

To demonstrate this, the researchers ran several experiments. One included splitting college students into two groups. The first was told they’d received $2 for drinking an entire glass of water while the other group was told the reward would be either $1 or $2 for completing the same task.

It turned out that more people who were uncertain about what the reward would be finished the water.

The researchers surmised that when people are uncertain about outcomes, it can make the situation seem more like a game than work.

Therefore, they said, managers can possibly use this information as an incentive to motivate workers.

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Men Often Get the Wrong Idea of a Woman with a Drink

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(MELBOURNE, Austalia) — Having a drink at a bar may say more about a woman than she would like, particularly if people get the wrong idea about her intentions.

Case in point: a study out of Deakin University School of Psychology in Melbourne, Australia, reveals that if a beer is placed next to a woman at a bar, the general consensus of men is that she’s flirty and more willing to consent to having sex than a woman who is drinking alcohol.

Researchers had about 150 people view a video in which a man and woman were seen talking, with either a beer or a bottle of water next to the woman. The participants were also asked to perceive sexual intent.

As it happened, the men rated the woman with the beer more flirtatious, promiscuous, and seductive than the one with the water.

According to the study, men perceive alcohol as more of a gateway to having sex with a woman. The researchers said that her personality didn’t factor into perceptions about whether the woman was interested in sex or not.

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Men Often Get the Wrong Idea of a Woman with a Drink

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(MELBOURNE, Austalia) — Having a drink at a bar may say more about a woman than she would like, particularly if people get the wrong idea about her intentions.

Case in point: a study out of Deakin University School of Psychology in Melbourne, Australia, reveals that if a beer is placed next to a woman at a bar, the general consensus of men is that she’s flirty and more willing to consent to having sex than a woman who is drinking alcohol.

Researchers had about 150 people view a video in which a man and woman were seen talking, with either a beer or a bottle of water next to the woman. The participants were also asked to perceive sexual intent.

As it happened, the men rated the woman with the beer more flirtatious, promiscuous, and seductive than the one with the water.

According to the study, men perceive alcohol as more of a gateway to having sex with a woman. The researchers said that her personality didn’t factor into perceptions about whether the woman was interested in sex or not.

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Men Often Get the Wrong Idea of a Woman with a Drink

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(MELBOURNE, Austalia) — Having a drink at a bar may say more about a woman than she would like, particularly if people get the wrong idea about her intentions.

Case in point: a study out of Deakin University School of Psychology in Melbourne, Australia, reveals that if a beer is placed next to a woman at a bar, the general consensus of men is that she’s flirty and more willing to consent to having sex than a woman who is drinking alcohol.

Researchers had about 150 people view a video in which a man and woman were seen talking, with either a beer or a bottle of water next to the woman. The participants were also asked to perceive sexual intent.

As it happened, the men rated the woman with the beer more flirtatious, promiscuous, and seductive than the one with the water.

According to the study, men perceive alcohol as more of a gateway to having sex with a woman. The researchers said that her personality didn’t factor into perceptions about whether the woman was interested in sex or not.

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Hearing-Impaired Kids Get Their Own Superhero

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — For more than 35 years ear specialist and surgeon Dr. Ronald Hoffman has searched for new treatments and devices to help hearing-impaired children. But no matter how impressive the newest hearing aids or cochlear implants were, Hoffman said he’s seen many children bullied for being different.

“One of the moms told us that her son had taken [his hearing aids] and buried them in the sand,” Hoffman said.

As director of the Ear Institute at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, Hoffman said he is constantly looking for new ways to empower his patients, in addition to treating them.

This year Hoffman stumbled upon a slightly unusual way to educate the public and children about hearing loss.

Hoffman and the team at the Ear Institute at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary along with the Children’s Hearing Institute in New York were able to partner with a division of Marvel Comics to create a hearing-impaired superhero named Sapheara.

The comic book heroine sports cochlear implants and fights alongside Blue Ear, a fellow superhero with hearing aids.

“We wanted the pediatric patients to really revel in the experience of having a super hero all their own,” said Melissa Willis, executive director of the Children’s Hearing Institute in New York, which hosted the unveiling event.

The comics are designed to do more than just entertain; the story lines will educate children about devices used by the hearing impaired, including cochlear implants and hearing aids.

The comics will be given as part of educational material to children in the New York area and will reach approximately 150,000 children, according to New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai Hospital.

Hoffman said the goal of the comics was also to help decrease the stigma surrounding hearing-aids for children and to help stop bullying.

“We’re very excited,” Hoffman said, adding that he hoped the books could “enlighten children” and “promote tolerance and decrease bullying.”

Hoffman said the disabled super hero will also help parents and children learn more about different options to handle all levels of hearing loss.

“It is crucial parents and children understand the facts about hearing impairment and the many viable treatment options available for patients,” Hoffman said in a statement. “Having Sapheara as a resource for entertainment and education could help many more patients receive the evaluations and care they need to lead active and engaged lives.”

Marvel Comics is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Walt Disney Company, which also owns ABC News.

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Pentagon Orders 30-Member Ebola Response Team

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The Pentagon has ordered that a 30-person military medical team be prepared to be put on standby to quickly assist the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with its Ebola response in the United States if needed.

The move followed a request to the Defense Department made Saturday by the Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees the CDC.

Rear Admiral John Kirby, the Pentagon Press Secretary, said the move was “an added prudent measure to ensure our nation is ready to respond quickly, effectively, and safely in the event of additional Ebola cases in the United States.”

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered U.S. Northern Command Command “to prepare and train a 30-person expeditionary medical support team that could, if required, provide short-notice assistance to civilian medical professionals in the United States,” Kirby said.

The team will be made up of personnel from various military services and include “20 critical care nurses, five doctors trained in infectious disease, and five trainers in infectious disease protocols.”

They will be sent to Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas, for up to seven days of specialized training in infection control and personal protective equipment.

An official says the majority of the team will come from military bases in the San Antonio area, though Navy members of the team will come from other parts of the U.S.

The military is preparing to send as many as 4,000 personnel to Liberia to assist with that country’s response to the Ebola outbreak, but those military personnel will not be involved in the care or treatment of Ebola infected patients.

That will not be the case with this new 30-person team of military health professionals, who will be directly involved in the care of Ebola patients if their services are requested.

The training of team members is expected to start as early as this week and will be provided by the Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases.

After their training is complete they will return to their home units and remain in a “prepare to deploy” status for 30 days, where they could be sent anywhere in the United States if their services are required.

“They will not be sent to West Africa or elsewhere overseas and will be called upon domestically only if deemed prudent by our public health professionals,” Kirby said.

The U.S. official familiar with the request said that on Thursday an initial contact had been made to the Pentagon by the Centers for Disease Control about the possibility of military medical personnel helping out their efforts if needed.

HHS Secretary Sulvia Burwell made a formal written request of Hagel on Saturday. In the request, Burwell asked that the team be ready no later than Oct. 25 and that when ready it be prepared to augment HHS/CDC operations within 72 hours of notification.

According to the official, Burwell said that if needed the military personnel will not be requested to enforce quarantine measures in the United States.

Kirby said the preparation of the team is similar to how the Defense Department prepares for natural disasters.

“Secretary Hagel is committed to ensuring DoD is prepared to provide appropriate capabilities, as required, to support our government’s response to this deadly disease” Kirby said. “He is extraordinarily proud of the skill and professionalism of our servicemen and women and of the unique capabilities they bring to bear in this important effort. As always, their safety and security will remain foremost on his mind.”

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