Review Category : Health

Ashoka Mukpo Says He Doesn’t Know How He Contracted Ebola

Ashoka Mukpo(OMAHA, Neb.) — The freelance cameraman who contracted Ebola while working with NBC in Liberia may be released from an isolation ward in Nebraska this week.

Ashoka Mukpo was transported from Liberia to the Nebraska Medical Center’s biocontainment center on Oct. 6 and could be released this week if new tests confirm he no longer has the virus.

The 33-year-old has opened up via Twitter about how he still is not sure how he contracted the disease but does not regret going to Liberia to help spread the word about Ebola’s impact on West Africa.

He also wrote about the “endless debt, endless gratitude” he owes to his supporters, mentioning how the head of Doctors Without Borders’ burial team took time to visit Mukpo while he was still being treated in Liberia.

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Study Investigates What Traits Make a Kid a Future Killer

iStock/Thinkstock(DALLAS) — Is there any reliable way to predict whether a child will grow up to be a murderer?

Alex Piquero, a University of Texas at Dallas criminologist, says trying to figuring that out is extremely difficult.

About the only two factors that many killers have in common is that their IQ is usually lower than other criminals and they were generally exposed to extreme violence at some point in their lives.

Piquero says in studying 1,350 serious juvenile offenders who mostly committed felony crime, the average IQ of the 18 convicted of murder was 79 compared to 85 for the others. The young killers were also more apt to witness a crime such as assault or rape.

However, Piquero contends that so-called risk factors such as drug use or mental illness are not good indicators of whether a juvenile will turn into a murderer because so many young criminals also have these problems.

Murder, he concludes, is usually driven by the situation.

Piquero says the best way of dealing with the problem is by improving education and lowering neighborhood violence.

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Those Who Feel Good About Aging Take Better Care of Themselves

iStock/Thinkstock(ANN ARBOR, Mich.) — Middle-aged Americans who don’t have a problem with getting older tend to take better care of their health.

Eric Kim, a University of Michigan doctoral student, says in a study that too many people 50 and older seem resigned to the fact that a certain amount of physical and mental decay is inevitable so to them, it makes little sense to take advantage of preventative health care services.

That’s why Kim says it’s important to have a positive mindset about the aging process. He explains that when people are comfortable in their own skin and hope to remain vigorous and healthy in their 50s, 60s and 70s, they get their cholesterol checked regularly and undergo colonoscopies.

For men, higher aging satisfaction also involves prostate exams while women will undergo a mammogram/X-ray or pap smears.

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There’s a Secret to Eating a Healthier Bowl of Pasta

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — People love pasta but it’s not exactly the healthiest thing for you. For example, the carbohydrates in pasta can cause weight gain while the glucose from the starch spikes the body’s blood sugar.

However, a show called Trust Me, I’m A Doctor on Britain’s BBC suggests there’s an easy way to reduce some of the less beneficial effects of pasta.

The solution, according to Dr. Denise Robertson of the University of Surrey, is to let your pasta cool down before eating it and then, reheat it.

Robertson had people eat freshly made pasta, pasta that was cooled down or reheated pasta with each participant then giving a blood sample every 15 minutes for two hours.

The result was that while cold pasta reduced the blood sugar increase, reheated pasta actually cut the increase by 50 percent compared to the just cooked pasta.

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There’s a Secret to Eating a Healthier Bowl of Pasta

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — People love pasta but it’s not exactly the healthiest thing for you. For example, the carbohydrates in pasta can cause weight gain while the glucose from the starch spikes the body’s blood sugar.

However, a show called Trust Me, I’m A Doctor on Britain’s BBC suggests there’s an easy way to reduce some of the less beneficial effects of pasta.

The solution, according to Dr. Denise Robertson of the University of Surrey, is to let your pasta cool down before eating it and then, reheat it.

Robertson had people eat freshly made pasta, pasta that was cooled down or reheated pasta with each participant then giving a blood sample every 15 minutes for two hours.

The result was that while cold pasta reduced the blood sugar increase, reheated pasta actually cut the increase by 50 percent compared to the just cooked pasta.

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Sugary Soda Linked to Cellular Aging

iStock/Thinkstock(SAN FRANCISCO) — Sugary soda seems to do more damage to the body than previously suspected.

University of California San Francisco researchers contend, “Regular consumption of sugar-sweetened sodas might influence disease development, not only by straining the body’s metabolic control of sugars but also through accelerated cellular aging of tissues.”

In other words, the DNA of people who drink the equivalent of 20 ounces of sugary soda daily is almost five years older than those who don’t consume carbonated beverages.

Since diet soda doesn’t have the same effect on cellular aging, the researchers assume the heavy sugar content in most sodas is to blame.

If there’s an upside to the study, it’s that Americans are consuming less sugary drinks than in years past.

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CDC Issues Updated Guidelines on Ebola Treatment

Credit: James Gathany/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(NEW YORK) — The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced on Monday new guidance for the use of personal protective equipment for healthcare workers treating patients with Ebola.

Noting successful and safe treatment of patients at Emory University Hospital, Nebraska Medical Center and the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md., the CDC put out “enhanced guidance” focusing on ensuring no skin is exposed when personal protective equipment is used, and that all healthcare workers are trained, practiced and competent with PPE and are supervised by a trained monitor who watches every worker put PPE on and take them off.

Hospitals are advised to have at least two options of personal protective equipment, designated areas for putting PPE on and taking it off, trained observers and disinfection of gloved hands.

Still, the CDC warns that focusing only on changes to PPE can give a “false sense of security” and that training and practice is integral.

In order to stop the spread of Ebola in healthcare settings, hospitals should also make sure they enact prompt screening and triage of potential patients, limited personnel within isolation rooms and effective environmental cleaning.

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Third Ebola Patient Treated at Emory University Hospital Released

Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images(ATLANTA) — A patient who was hospitalized at Emory University Hospital last month with the Ebola virus was discharged on Sunday, the hospital said.

The patient, who was not identified, was the third Ebola patient treated at Emory University, following Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol. According to a hospital statement, the patient was discharged after being “determined to be free of virus and to pose no public health threat,” and asked to remain anonymous.

A fourth patient, Amber Vinson, who contracted Ebola while treating Thomas Eric Duncan — the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States — at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, remains at Emory University Hospital. She arrived at Emory on Oct. 15.

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The Heartbreaking Poem a Nurse Who Cared for Thomas Eric Duncan Wrote in Tribute

Will Montgomery(DALLAS) — The last nurse to leave the hospital room where Thomas Eric Duncan died has written a poem about the Ebola patient, penned during the sleepless days after Duncan’s death, a source told ABC News.

The source provided the poem to ABC News, noting that the nurse who wrote it asked to remain anonymous. Duncan, the first person in the United States to be diagnosed with Ebola, died at the Dallas hospital on Oct. 8. Two of the nurses who cared for Duncan — Nina Pham, 26, and Amber Vinson, 29 — have been diagnosed with Ebola.

(Editor’s note: THR refers to Texas Health Resources, the company that owns Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.)

This is the poem:

A message to you

Inspired by the THR Family

You came to us sick, frightened, confused
What happened next became international news.
We saw you so ill, with everything to lose
Our goal was to help you because that’s what we do.
Alone in a dark ICU room
We fought for your life, our team and you.
We cared for you kindly
No matter our fear
You thanked us each time that we came near.
As each day pressed on, you fought so hard
To beat the virus that dealt every card.
No matter how sick or contagious you were
We held your hand, wiped your tears, and continued our care.
Your family was close, but only in spirit
They couldn’t come in; we just couldn’t risk it.
Then the day came we saw you in there
We wiped tears from your eyes, knowing the end was drawing near.
Then it was time, but we never gave up
Until the good lord told us he had taken you up.
Our dear Mr. Duncan, the man that we knew
Though you lost the fight, we never gave up on you.
All of us here; at Presby and beyond
Lift our hats off to you, now that you’re gone.
You touched us in ways that no one will know
We thank you kind sir for this chance to grow.
May you find peace in heaven above
And know that we cared with nothing but love.

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Dallas Nurses Call Colleagues Who Contracted Ebola ‘Heroes’

Pham family/ Debra Barry(DALLAS) — On Monday, nurses at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital hailed as “heroes” their two colleagues who contracted Ebola caring for Thomas Eric Duncan — the Liberian national who became the first person to be diagnosed with, and die of, Ebola in the United States.

Despite criticism against the Dallas hospital for mishandling the Ebola situation in recent days, chief nursing officer Cole Edmonson said the nurses were “devastated” by Duncan’s death, but nevertheless “proud” of their work. His colleague, nurse Chantea Irving, called media reports “widely inaccurate,” but none of the nurses elaborated on the investigations under way to determine why Duncan was initially sent home and how the nurses contracted Ebola from him.

“The men and women of this hospital worked tirelessly to save Mr. Duncan,” said emergency department nurse Julie Boling. “Some things went wrong and we’re proud to say [the hospital] owned those things.”

Nurses Nina Pham, 26, and Amber Vinson, 29, were diagnosed with Ebola last week and are being cared for at the National Institutes of Health hospital in Bethesda, Maryland, and Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, respectively. Both women cared for Duncan between Sept. 28 and Sept. 30, before he was isolated and when he was extremely contagious because he was vomiting and having diarrhea, officials said.

Duncan arrived at Texas Health Presbyterian on Sept. 26, but was sent home with antibiotics despite telling a nurse about having recently been in Liberia. He returned two days later in an ambulance when his symptoms worsened and was diagnosed and isolated. He died on Oct. 8.

Pham tested positive for Ebola in Dallas on Oct. 12, making her the first person to contract the deadly virus in the U.S. Vinson tested positive for Ebola on Oct. 15.

Later that day, the National Nurses’ Union released a statement critical of Texas Health Presbyterian’s Ebola protocols. Dr. Dan Varga, the chief clinical officer of Texas Health Resources, which owns the Dallas hospital, last week told Congress that its employees never got face-to-face Ebola training.

Vinson was flown to Emory on Oct. 15, the same day she was diagnosed at Texas Health Presbyterian. Pham had initially asked to stay at the Dallas hospital where she treated Duncan and was diagnosed with Ebola, but at the hospital’s request, she was flown to the NIH facility on Oct. 16.

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