Review Category : Health

Many New Moms Get ‘Bad’ Advice, Study Finds

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Women with newborns get advice, of course, from their families, friends and neighbors. But a new study reveals that up to half of mothers don’t get any advice from their doctors on some important topics, including where and how to put their infant to sleep.

Researchers surveyed more than 1,000 mothers of infants at 32 different medical centers across the country to learn what mothers recalled being told about breastfeeding, immunizations, pacifier use and baby sleep. They also looked at where this advice was coming from (doctors, nurses, family and media) and whether it was accurate.

Doctors were the most common source of advice, but one in five women did not recall receiving any suggestions from them regarding breastfeeding or sleep position. Furthermore, more than half reported getting no advice regarding sleep location and pacifier use.

But even more concerning, the study, published Monday in Pediatrics, found that more than one in four women received “bad” advice on where and how to put their babies to sleep.

Family members seemed to provide the worst recommendations, with two-thirds of advice being inconsistent with current guidelines.

Black mothers, Hispanic mothers and first-time moms were the most likely to get accurate advice.

It’s worth nothing that most of the women getting “bad” advice actually received conflicting, rather than purely bad advice. In other words, they reported receiving at least two different recommendations from their doctors and, in the majority of cases, at least one of these recommendations was consistent with guidelines.

The study was also based on what mothers recalled, so it may not reflect the advice that was actually given.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Your Body: Can Acupuncture Be Used for Stress Relief?

Purestock/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical Contributor

Did you know that acupuncture may be able to help stress and anxiety?

Research shows that this go-to pain reliever may also be good for keeping you calm and can treat things like PMS, menopause symptoms and even infertility.

So how does it work? We don’t completely know. But 3,000-plus years of practice in traditional Chinese medicine has pointed to the targeting of so-called “trigger points” along pathways called meridians or channels.

When an area is stimulated, it causes a therapeutic response in the body that is thought to repair and balance. So if you’d like to give it a try, talk to your doctor and find a licensed and reputable acupuncturist.

And sometimes, it’s even covered by insurance.

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Study: Young Cancer Patients Unaware of Impact on Fertility, Options

Ridofranz/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The overwhelming majority of young cancer patients are unaware of the affect that chemotherapy could have on their fertility, a new study finds.

Researchers looked at nearly 500 patients from around the U.S. involved in the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program. They found that 80 percent of women and 74 percent of men between the ages of 15 and 39 were not aware that cancer therapy can impact their fertility.

In fact, 29 percent of men and 56 percent of women said they hadn’t discussed options that could preserve their fertility, such as egg or sperm freezing.

Researchers also noted that even among those patients who were aware of the risks, 70 percent of men and 93 percent of women did not make arrangements to preserve their fertility.

The study was published in the journal Cancer.

Researchers also note that additional counseling on the impact and options available to cancer patients when it comes to fertility is important, particularly for younger patients.

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CA Town Sees Spike in Mosquitoes Carrying West Nile Virus

Henrik_L/iStock/ThinkStock(TUSTIN, Calif.) — One town in California can’t scratch away this itch.

According to ABC News affiliate KABC-TV, a two-block section of Tustin has “higher than normal rates” of mosquitoes infected with the West Nile Virus. The area includes 40 homes and two public parks.

In Orange County, 32 samples of mosquitoes have tested positive for the West Nile Virus, and 26 of them came from Tustin, said KABC-TV, and officials are working to control the problem.

“Our staff have been canvassing this area for the better part of a month,” Jared Dever, a spokesman for Orange County Mosquito and Vector Control District, told KABC-TV. “Going door-to-door, doing property inspections, finding any mosquito breeding sources we can possibly discover.”

So far there is no explanation for the positive samples because according to KABC-TV, most of Orange County has levels below normal for mosquitoes carrying the West Nile Virus.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says to reduce the risk of being infected with the virus, to wear insect repellent or protective clothing. The CDC also says about 1 in 5 who are infected will develop a fever or other symptoms, and less than 1 percent will develop a serious and potentially fatal neurological illness.

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Six New Cases of MERS Confirmed in Saudi Arabia

VILevi/iStock/Thinkstock(RIYADH, Saudi Arabia) — The World Health Organization announced Friday that in the first two weeks of this month, six new cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, also known as MERS, were identified in Saudi Arabia.

The new cases involve patients between the ages of 35 and 77, according to the WHO. Four of the patients were identified as being in stable condition, with the other two listed as “critical.”

Four of the patients reportedly had a history of contact with camels and/or consumption of their raw milk, which are considered known risk factors.

WHO says there have been 1,374 laboratory-confirmed cases of MERS since September 2012, and at least 490 related deaths.

The disease has also spread in recent months in South Korea, with more than 100 people there diagnosed with the disease this year. At least 14 have died from MERS in South Korea.

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FDA Considering Proposal for New Nutrition Label Rule for Sugar

HandmadePictures/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is considering adding a percent daily value requirement for sugars on food labels.

The proposal, a supplement to a 2014 rule that focused on updating nutrition facts labels, would be based on the recommendation that daily intake of calories from added sugars should not exceed 10 percent of all calories taken in. The FDA will seek public comment over the next 75 days, and will re-open the 60-day period on the 2014 proposal.

The newest proposal, the FDA says, is now further supported by additional studies that suggest lower amounts of sugar-sweetened food and beverages in an individual’s diet are linked to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

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Malaria Vaccine Gets Positive Review from EU Regulators

luiscar/iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) — The world’s first malaria vaccine passed a major hurdle on Friday thanks to a positive review by European drug regulators.

A shot created by British drug makers GlaxoSmithKline, Mosquirix also known as RTS,S is the first of its kind to show promising signs in malaria prevention among children in Sub-Saharan Africa.

According to a statement by GSK, the World Health Organization will recommend a policy on how to use the vaccine by November, but it’s future faces uncertainty as independent African nations must also approve the drug.

In clinical trials conducted in seven African countries, Mosquirix offered mixed results. Children aged five to 17 months received the best protection after being given three doses one month apart; however, results waned after a year which would make a booster shot necessary 18 months later.

Malaria spreads through mosquito bites infected with the parasite plasmodia. It can cause death if left untreated.

“While RTS,S on its own is not the complete answer to malaria,” said CEO of GSK Sir Andrew Witty. ” It’s use alongside those interventions currently available such as bed nets and insecticides, would provide a very meaningful contribution to controlling the impact of malaria on children in those African communities that need it the most.”

According to the WHO, at least 584,000 people died of malaria in African countries — most of them children under five-years-old.

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Malaria Vaccine Gets Positive Review from EU Regulators

luiscar/iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) — The world’s first malaria vaccine passed a major hurdle on Friday thanks to a positive review by European drug regulators.

A shot created by British drug makers GlaxoSmithKline, Mosquirix also known as RTS,S is the first of its kind to show promising signs in malaria prevention among children in Sub-Saharan Africa.

According to a statement by GSK, the World Health Organization will recommend a policy on how to use the vaccine by November, but it’s future faces uncertainty as independent African nations must also approve the drug.

In clinical trials conducted in seven African countries, Mosquirix offered mixed results. Children aged five to 17 months received the best protection after being given three doses one month apart; however, results waned after a year which would make a booster shot necessary 18 months later.

Malaria spreads through mosquito bites infected with the parasite plasmodia. It can cause death if left untreated.

“While RTS,S on its own is not the complete answer to malaria,” said CEO of GSK Sir Andrew Witty. ” It’s use alongside those interventions currently available such as bed nets and insecticides, would provide a very meaningful contribution to controlling the impact of malaria on children in those African communities that need it the most.”

According to the WHO, at least 584,000 people died of malaria in African countries — most of them children under five-years-old.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Malaria Vaccine Gets Postive Review from EU Regulators

luiscar/iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) — The world’s first malaria vaccine passed a major hurdle on Friday thanks to a positive review by European drug regulators.

A shot created by British drug makers GlaxoSmithKline, Mosquirix also known as RTS,S is the first of its kind to show promising signs in malaria prevention among children in Sub-Saharan Africa.

According to a statement by GSK, the World Health Organization will recommend a policy on how to use the vaccine by November, but it’s future faces uncertainty as independent African nations must also approve the drug.

In clinical trials conducted in seven African countries, Mosquirix offered mixed results. Children aged five to 17 months received the best protection after being given three doses one month apart; however, results waned after a year which would make a booster shot necessary 18 months later.

Malaria spreads through mosquito bites infected with the parasite plasmodia. It can cause death if left untreated.

“While RTS,S on its own is not the complete answer to malaria,” said CEO of GSK Sir Andrew Witty. ” It’s use alongside those interventions currently available such as bed nets and insecticides, would provide a very meaningful contribution to controlling the impact of malaria on children in those African communities that need it the most.”

According to the WHO, at least 584,000 people died of malaria in African countries — most of them children under five-years-old.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Girl Raises $47,000 With Bracelets to Help Best Friend With Rare Disease

akiyoko/iStock/Thinkstock(LITTLE ROCK, ARK.) — A 9-year-old girl has raised $47,000 by selling bracelets to get medical treatment for her best friend, who has a rare and dangerous skin disease.

Bethany Walker started making small rubber bracelets in the hopes she could sell them for a few dollars and raise money to help her friend, Anne Marie Cox, get a saltwater pool, she and her family said. In just 19 weeks, the girl managed to raise enough money for the Cox family to construct a therapy pool in their backyard.

The good deed led to Bethany qualifying as a finalist in a national scholarship for community service sponsored by IZOD and J.C. Penney.

“I feel really great,” Bethany told ABC News on Friday about seeing her friend get to use the saltwater pool. She said their favorite things to do in the water are “race and play with the Barbies.”

Anne Marie, 10, needed the pool to help cope with a rare genetic skin condition called epidermolysis bullosa, which causes blisters to appear on the skin due to a slight pressure or friction. The saltwater pool can help her blisters heal and ease her pain.

“Any kind of friction or trauma to the skin causes the skin to blister and come off. Being out in the summertime is just not going to happen,” Anne Marie’s mother Kandi Cox told ABC News. “She can’t go to public pools or anything like that. She really has to be in a protected environment.”

Early last year, Walker decided she wanted to make rubber band bracelets to help her friend after the family had little luck fundraising. Cox said she was touched by Bethany’s offer but didn’t predict how big Bethany’s bracelets could get.

Neither “her mom nor I even fathomed what this little girl could do,” Cox said. “She started making bracelets and put them together with these little cards. … I believe she raised that money in 19 weeks.”

After Walker raised about $47,000 through her Bracelets by Bethany Facebook page, she’s started using the bracelets to fundraise for other causes as well. Construction on the new saltwater pool finished this June, Cox said.

“It’s been really neat watching that relationship cultivate with these two little girls who just have a love for one another,” Cox said, noting that for the first time Anne Marie has been able to take part in the same summer activities as her friends and family.

“We have a race, like who can swim the fastest,” Anne Marie told ABC affiliate KATV in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Even though the pool is therapeutic to help ease Anne Marie’s stiff joints and pain from her scars, she told KATV her favorite part about having the pool is “spending time with my family.”

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