Review Category : Health

Possible Signs of Autism Show Up in Fetus

Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(EDINBURGH, Scotland) — In what appears to be a major breakthrough in the early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, researchers at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland have found certain fetal defects in ultrasound scans that may help lead to better education about ASD.

Specifically, children with brains and bodies that seemed to be growing more rapidly than their peers during the start of the second trimester went on to develop autism at about the 20th week.

Lead researcher Lois Salter says that typically symptoms turn up at age three or four, although newer studies show it can be detected during infancy.

However, Salter and her colleagues have been searching for fetal defects since late 2008 in an attempt to link larger brains and bodies with the likelihood of developing ASD.

More research will be necessary since the study has only 160 children, about a fourth of whom were later diagnosed with autism.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

Heart Monitors May Prevent Future Strokes

iStock/Thinkstock(CHICAGO) — Strokes are both frightening and frustrating, often resulting in problems with speech and cognition and sometimes, paralysis.

Adding to the frustration is that about 40 percent of stroke victims never find out what exactly caused the stroke and after leaving the hospital, they’re often unsure about what therapy to pursue.

However, Dr. Rod Passman, a cardiologist at Northwestern University, says more physicians have been equipping stroke patients with heart monitors that can detect one potential cause, that is, atrial fibrillation, which is a fast and irregular heartbeat.

If a monitor discovers that atrial fibrillation is occurring, doctors can change prescriptions to put stroke victims on a better blood thinning medication in order to prevent blockages.

This is especially important since those who’ve suffered strokes have a 500 percent chance of having another one if diagnosed with atrial fibrillation.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

Heart Monitors May Prevent Future Strokes

iStock/Thinkstock(CHICAGO) — Strokes are both frightening and frustrating, often resulting in problems with speech and cognition and sometimes, paralysis.

Adding to the frustration is that about 40 percent of stroke victims never find out what exactly caused the stroke and after leaving the hospital, they’re often unsure about what therapy to pursue.

However, Dr. Rod Passman, a cardiologist at Northwestern University, says more physicians have been equipping stroke patients with heart monitors that can detect one potential cause, that is, atrial fibrillation, which is a fast and irregular heartbeat.

If a monitor discovers that atrial fibrillation is occurring, doctors can change prescriptions to put stroke victims on a better blood thinning medication in order to prevent blockages.

This is especially important since those who’ve suffered strokes have a 500 percent chance of having another one if diagnosed with atrial fibrillation.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

Dancing Can Help Seniors with Bad Knees and Hips

Photodisc/Thinkstock(ST. LOUIS) — To paraphrase an old Bee Gees song, “You should be dancing, yeah, if you’re a senior citizen.”

Hitting the dance floor, albeit gently and slowly, will help to alleviate chronic knee and hip pain, according to a Saint Louis University study.

What’s more, lead author Jean Krampe says that dancing also improves everyday walking of the elderly.

Krampe conducted her study with three dozen seniors, average age of 80. who danced in two 45-minutes sessions weekly for 12 weeks. Virtually all the seniors were women and complained about arthritis that made their knees and hips stiff.

Compared to a control group that did not participate, the dancers said they felt less pain in their knees and hips after the 12 weeks and found they were walking better as well.

Perhaps even more significantly is that the control group increased their pain medications by 21 percent while those who took part in dance-based therapy reduced their meds by 39 percent.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

Dancing Can Help Seniors with Bad Knees and Hips

Photodisc/Thinkstock(ST. LOUIS) — To paraphrase an old Bee Gees song, “You should be dancing, yeah, if you’re a senior citizen.”

Hitting the dance floor, albeit gently and slowly, will help to alleviate chronic knee and hip pain, according to a Saint Louis University study.

What’s more, lead author Jean Krampe says that dancing also improves everyday walking of the elderly.

Krampe conducted her study with three dozen seniors, average age of 80. who danced in two 45-minutes sessions weekly for 12 weeks. Virtually all the seniors were women and complained about arthritis that made their knees and hips stiff.

Compared to a control group that did not participate, the dancers said they felt less pain in their knees and hips after the 12 weeks and found they were walking better as well.

Perhaps even more significantly is that the control group increased their pain medications by 21 percent while those who took part in dance-based therapy reduced their meds by 39 percent.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

Study Confirms Childhood Vaccines Are Safe

Fuse/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The latest study on the subject found, once again, that childhood vaccines are safe for children and are not linked to autism or other major health issues.

According to the study, published Tuesday in the journal Pediatrics, was part of a federally commissioned report which looked at previous research to determine that the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) was not associated with onset of autism and that the vaccines for MMR, diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP), Tetanus diphtheria, Haemophilus influenza type b and hepatitis B were not associated with childhood leukemia.

The study also went one step further than the 2011 report from the Institute of Medicine by filtering data for children under the age of six and adding findings related to additional vaccinations.

In some cases, the latest study found that vaccination could result in non-serious side effects.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

(HFR 7/1 12:01 am) Study Confirms Childhood Vaccines Are Safe

Fuse/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The latest study on the subject found, once again, that childhood vaccines are safe for children and are not linked to autism or other major health issues.

According to the study, published Tuesday in the journal Pediatrics, was part of a federally commissioned report which looked at previous research to determine that the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) was not associated with onset of autism and that the vaccines for MMR, diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP), Tetanus diphtheria, Haemophilus influenza type b and hepatitis B were not associated with childhood leukemia.

The study also went one step further than the 2011 report from the Institute of Medicine by filtering data for children under the age of six and adding findings related to additional vaccinations.

In some cases, the latest study found that vaccination could result in non-serious side effects.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

Doctors’ Group Says Annual Pelvic Exams for Women May Be Unnecessary

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The American College of Physicians says annual pelvic exams for women may not be necessary.

The study, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, is based on data from 52 past studies, during which researchers found no data to support the idea that annual exams reduce the rate of sickness or death from any condition except cervical cancer. The ACP recommends that women undergo screening for cervical cancer every three years.

While the ACP says women should consult their doctors to determine whether annual pelvic exams may be a better preventative measure, they note that such exams can cause pain, discomfort, fear, anxiety and/or embarrassment. Additionally, the ACP says that false-positive findings in annual exams may lead to unnecessary and invasive diagnostic procedures.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

HIV Prevention Drug May Also Decrease Risk of Contracting Genital Herpes

Photodisc/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A medication used to decrease transmission of HIV may also be effective in minimizing the risk of developing genital herpes, researchers said.

A new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine looked at 131 participants in Kenya and Uganda to determine whether the use of tenofovir, an HIV medication, may also help to prevent the acquisition of the herpes simplex virus type 2.

Researchers looked at a specific set of heterosexual men and women who were at risk of contracting HIV from their partners. Those participants were approximately 30 percent less likely to contract herpes if they took the HIV medication tenofovir either alone or with emtricitabine.

Still, due to expense and the risk of side effects, researchers did not, based on this study, indicate that tenofovir should be used as a method to prevent genital herpes in those not at risk of HIV infection.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

HIV Prevention Drug May Also Decrease Risk of Contracting Genital Herpes

Photodisc/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A medication used to decrease transmission of HIV may also be effective in minimizing the risk of developing genital herpes, researchers said.

A new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine looked at 131 participants in Kenya and Uganda to determine whether the use of tenofovir, an HIV medication, may also help to prevent the acquisition of the herpes simplex virus type 2.

Researchers looked at a specific set of heterosexual men and women who were at risk of contracting HIV from their partners. Those participants were approximately 30 percent less likely to contract herpes if they took the HIV medication tenofovir either alone or with emtricitabine.

Still, due to expense and the risk of side effects, researchers did not, based on this study, indicate that tenofovir should be used as a method to prevent genital herpes in those not at risk of HIV infection.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →