Review Category : Health

Researchers Believe an Ingredient in Wine May Help Men Build Healthier Bones

Purestock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Researchers in Denmark conducted a study that indicated an ingredient in wine may play a role in helping men build healthier bones.

The study, conducted by researchers at Aarhus University Hospital in Denmark and published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, looked at data from 74 men between the ages of 30 and 60. Each man was given resveratrol, a compound present in nuts and grapes — and thereby, wine — in a range of dosages.

After 16 weeks of receiving those doses, the researchers found that those men who had received the highest dose of resveratrol also had significantly higher blood levels of bone alkaline phosphatase, which can be used as a marker for healthy bone turnover. The men with the highest doses of resveratrol also had higher bone mineral density measurements.

Additional studies will need to be done to determine whether the findings are universal, or unique to the population that researchers looked at in this study.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

Texas Health Care Workers Who Treated Ebola Patient Told to Stay Out of Public Places

iStock/Thinkstock(DALLAS) — Hospital workers who treated the Ebola patient who died at a Texas hospital are being asked to stay away from any public space for 21 days.

The Texas Department of State Health Services has asked the approximately 70 health care workers at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital who entered the room of Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan to stay home while they are being monitored during the 21-day Ebola incubation period.

Currently, health care workers are being asked to sign a written acknowledgement that they will not enter a public place. However, if they violate that agreement or refuse to sign it, the state could pursue a court order, which would force them to stay in their home in isolation during the allotted time.

The three-week time frame is due to the approximate incubation period of the Ebola virus, which is 2 to 21 days.

The agreement states that the health care worker will not use public transportation, including planes, buses or trains, and will also not enter any kind of public space, including grocery stores and restaurants.

Two nurses from the Texas Health Presbyterian were infected after treating Duncan earlier this month. One nurse, Amber Vinson, traveled by plane to Cleveland for a trip to plan her wedding. Officials from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that she might have started feeling ill before her first flight and authorities are now working to identify hundreds of passengers who were on the flights with her and could possibly be exposed to the virus.

Duncan’s family members were ordered to remain in quarantine by court order, after they temporarily left their home before it had been sanitized.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

WHO Declares Ebola Outbreak in Senegal Over

iStock/Thinkstock(DAKAR, Senegal) — The World Health Organization declared the Ebola outbreak over for the nation of Senegal, praising the country for its diligence and handling of the disease.

The first case of the disease in Senegal was confirmed on Aug. 29 in a young man who traveled from Guinea, where he had come in contact with an Ebola patient, the WHO said in a statement. That patient tested negative for the disease on Sept. 5, indicating that he had recovered. He was later allowed to return to Guinea on Sept. 18.

Senegal has, since then, “maintained a high level of active ‘case finding’ for 42 days — two times as long as the maximum incubation period of the disease with no further cases reported.

The WHO notes that Senegal government “under laedership of President Macky Sall and the Minister of Health Dr. Awa Coll-Seck, reacted quickly to stop the disease from spreading.”

“The government’s response plan included identifiying and monitoring 74 close contacts of the patient, prompt testing of all suspected cases, stepped-up surveillance at the country’s many entry points and nationwide public awareness campaigns,” the WHO statement read.

While the outbreak has been declared over, the WHO notes that Senegal’s “geographical position makes the country vulnerable to additional imported cases of Ebola.”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

Girl Celebrates End of Chemo with ‘Unicorn’ Ride

WBRZ/ABC News(NEW YORK) — When Lily Raffray completed her final round of chemotherapy this month she had one not-so-simple request, she wanted “a ride on a unicorn.”

Lily’s mom, Juliet Raffray, said her reaction was basically shock, but that Lily’s nurses didn’t blink.

“Her nurses put together the whole unicorn experience,” said Raffray.

The special request was part of planning Lily’s “No Chemo” party to celebrate the end of her eight weeks of chemotherapy treatment.

Lily, 5, was diagnosed with stage one Hodgkin’s lymphoma in August and had been getting treatment at the St. Jude clinic at the Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

“We noticed it just as an enlarged lymph node. We were pretty shocked that it was Hodgkin’s lymphoma,” said Raffray.

Raffray, of St. Amant, Louisiana, said Lily managed to avoid some of the worst symptoms associated with chemotherapy, but she did end up losing all her hair.

“It formed into a mohawk and now it’s just straggles of hair,” said Raffray.

But Raffray said her daughter isn’t too bothered by her lack of hair and for her “No More Chemo” party, the 5-year-old got to wear a special headdress to complete her princess look. After getting a party with cake and decorations, Lily got to go to Wildwood farm and meet her very first “unicorn.”

While Lily was shy around some of the adults, Raffray said her daughter was just excited to meet the unicorn and get a ride.

“She walked up to that thing and was just entranced,” Raffray said of Lily.

However, on the ride home, Raffray said her daughter had a few questions.

“Afterwards she said ‘Hey mommy, that unicorn was kind of wobbly,’” Raffray recalled Lily talking about the “unicorn’s” horn.

“[I told her] ‘a unicorn is so special that their horn is not the same as a bone. …It’s magical,’” Raffray said with a laugh.

Raffray said Lily will go for a final round of testing later this month to determine if she is cancer-free.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

Girl Celebrates End of Chemo with ‘Unicorn’ Ride

WBRZ/ABC News(NEW YORK) — When Lily Raffray completed her final round of chemotherapy this month she had one not-so-simple request, she wanted “a ride on a unicorn.”

Lily’s mom, Juliet Raffray, said her reaction was basically shock, but that Lily’s nurses didn’t blink.

“Her nurses put together the whole unicorn experience,” said Raffray.

The special request was part of planning Lily’s “No Chemo” party to celebrate the end of her eight weeks of chemotherapy treatment.

Lily, 5, was diagnosed with stage one Hodgkin’s lymphoma in August and had been getting treatment at the St. Jude clinic at the Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

“We noticed it just as an enlarged lymph node. We were pretty shocked that it was Hodgkin’s lymphoma,” said Raffray.

Raffray, of St. Amant, Louisiana, said Lily managed to avoid some of the worst symptoms associated with chemotherapy, but she did end up losing all her hair.

“It formed into a mohawk and now it’s just straggles of hair,” said Raffray.

But Raffray said her daughter isn’t too bothered by her lack of hair and for her “No More Chemo” party, the 5-year-old got to wear a special headdress to complete her princess look. After getting a party with cake and decorations, Lily got to go to Wildwood farm and meet her very first “unicorn.”

While Lily was shy around some of the adults, Raffray said her daughter was just excited to meet the unicorn and get a ride.

“She walked up to that thing and was just entranced,” Raffray said of Lily.

However, on the ride home, Raffray said her daughter had a few questions.

“Afterwards she said ‘Hey mommy, that unicorn was kind of wobbly,’” Raffray recalled Lily talking about the “unicorn’s” horn.

“[I told her] ‘a unicorn is so special that their horn is not the same as a bone. …It’s magical,’” Raffray said with a laugh.

Raffray said Lily will go for a final round of testing later this month to determine if she is cancer-free.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

People Still Work with the Flu, Even If It Hurts Productivity

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Although Ebola is on everyone’s mind these days, health care professionals contend a more immediate and likely concern is the onset of the flu season.

Staple’s Annual Flu Survey says that coming to work sick with the flu is more harmful to job productivity than a security breach, a product issue or even a natural disaster.

Yet, in spite of all the recommendations that people should stay home when they have the flu, six in ten still trudge into work anyway.

The survey revealed that 40 percent come to the office because their workloads are so demanding while about a third say their boss appreciates the fact that they put their job ahead of their health.

However, there are signs that attitudes are changing, albeit, somewhat slowly. The number of those who will work with the flu is actually lower than it’s been in five years. About one in four explain that productivity does go down when workers are sick and just over a third say that their personal productivity when they feel ill is about half of what it normally is.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

Speed Diets Just as Effective as Losing Weight Gradually

Stockbyte/Thinktsock(MELBOURNE, Australia) — For years, dieters have been warned that if they attempt to lose weight as rapidly as possible, they run the risk of putting the pounds back on just as quickly. The recommended method then is gradual weight loss…or is it?

Researchers at the University of Melbourne say it’s all a myth, claiming they’ve proved it in an experiment involving 200 obese people. Half of the test subjects went on a 36-week weight-loss program, consuming 500 fewer calories daily than their regular diet. The other half went on a 12-week diet in which they could only eat 450-800 calories daily.

Not surprisingly, 81 percent of those on the rapid-loss weight plan lost 12.5 percent of their total body fat while 50 percent of the participants on the gradual plan shed the same amount.

Afterwards, everyone was put on a three-year weight-maintenance diet. By the end, participants in both groups each regained 71 percent of the body fat they lost.

In an accompanying commentary, the authors wrote, “For weight loss, a slow and steady approach does not win the race, and the myth that rapid weight loss is associated with rapid weight regain is no more true than Aesop’s fable.”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

Frontier Airlines Seeks Passengers on Same Plane as Ebola-Infected Nurse

WEWS(NEW YORK) — Frontier Airlines is searching for passengers from at least five different flights who flew on the same plane as an Ebola-infected nurse from Dallas.

The airline announced that it was reaching out to passengers who traveled on the same plane as Amber Vinson. They also said the plane was out of service as they replace seat covers and carpet in the middle of the aircraft, where Vinson was sitting.

Vinson, 29, was infected with Ebola after treating Thomas Eric Duncan earlier this month. She was isolated and diagnosed with Ebola on Oct. 14.

A day before being diagnosed, Vinson flew on Frontier Airlines Flight 1143 from Cleveland to Dallas. The plane was cleaned after Vinson’s flight.

The following day the plane was used for at least five different commercial flights, including a return trip to Cleveland, where it was cleaned again.

Frontier Airlines has not clarified why they are reaching out to passengers and did not provide specifics to ABC News.

The plane is scheduled to return to service in the next several days.

Before flying from Cleveland, Vinson had reportedly called U.S. Centers for Disease Control personnel to report she had an elevated temperature of 99.5. The temperature was below the 100.4 reading that would designate a fever. She was not told that she could not fly on a commercial airliner.

She arrived at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital the following day with a fever.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

Dallas Hospital Staff Had No Ebola Training, Official Says

ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Health care workers in the Dallas hospital that treated a patient who died from Ebola and then treated two nurses who contracted the disease never received in-person training on how to treat Ebola patients and avoid spreading the highly contagious disease, a top hospital official said at a Congressional hearing Thursday.

Dr. Daniel Varga said that, even though guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were sent to the emergency department at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in late July, there was no follow-up training ordered for the staff. Less than two months later, the hospital staff sent a man with Ebola home with a fever even though he was likely contagious at the time.

Varga is one of the panel of top American health officials testifying in Congress as part of a hearing on the federal government’s response to Ebola cases in the United States.

During the hearing Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said that one of the infected nurses did not violate any rules.

Frieden said that while nurse Amber Vinson, 29, was in contact with Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man who died of Ebola, she had worn personal protective equipment and she did not need to have her movement restricted.

Frieden said that Vinson did contact the CDC before flying back to Dallas.

“I have not seen the transcript of the conversation,” Frieden said. “My understanding is that she reported no symptoms to us.”

At the start of the hearing, members of the House Energy and Commerce Committee made it clear that they would focus on the agency’s handling of the first Ebola patient in Dallas and the ensuing infections of two nurses, one of whom was allowed to fly a plane a day before she tested positive for the disease.

In prepared remarks for the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Frieden claimed that the CDC “remain[s] confident that Ebola is not a significant public health threat to the United States.”

“Within hours of confirming that the patient had Ebola, CDC had a team of 10 people on the ground in Dallas to assist the capable teams from the Texas state health department and local authorities,” he said, referring to Duncan.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

How to Feel Less Guilty About Guilty Pleasures

Thinkstock(HONG KONG) — So you’re sitting in a restaurant after the main course and along comes the waiter with the desert tray to offer a delectable treat to top off the meal.

Often, people will turn down the dessert, not because they’re not hungry but because they feel guilty about the indulgence.

However, what happens if a dinner companion gets a desert and offers to share it? Well, that’s a different story for a lot of people, according to researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

Fangyuan Chen and Jaideep Sengupta say, “When it comes to purchasing and consuming products normally associated with feelings of guilt, reducing someone’s sense of free choice could ultimately boost their overall well-being.”

In other words, people don’t need to have their arm twisted to enjoy a guilty pleasure, provided somebody else is making the choice for them.

The researchers say that companies that sell products considered indulgent, such as chocolate cake, can use this information to entice consumers by making them feel less responsible for their actions.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →