Review Category : Health

American College of Physicians Calls for Healthcare Equality for LGBT Community

fotoedu/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The American College of Physicians decried health disparities in the LGBT population, criticizing discriminatory laws and calling for improved treatment and equality.

The ACP, one of the nation’s top medical groups, released a position paper in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine Monday citing previously presented evidence and the greater burden of HIV/AIDS as notable examples of differences in health issues between the LGBT community and the general population.

The ACP specifically calls for prevention of discrimination and harrassment based on gender identity — fully independent and different from sexual orientation.

“The ACP recognizes that reducing health disparities in the LGBT population will take concerted efforts not only by those in the medical community but also from society as a whole,” the group writes. “Training future physicians to be culturally and clinically competent in LGBT health care, working with practicing physicians to increase their understanding of the LGBT population and their health needs, advocating for practical health policies supported by empirical research, and working to eliminate laws that are discriminatory toward the LGBT community and their families are all important steps.”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Drug-Resistant Typhoid Spreading, Researchers Warn

shironosov/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — An antimicrobial-resistant form of typhoid is spreading around the world, researchers say, and “there is an urgent need” to act against it.

The study, according to the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, indicates that the H58 clade of Typhi is replacing other strains of the disease that have been established for centuries. That family of typhoid, it notes, is often resistant to the commonly used antimicrobials. As it spreads, researchers warn, it also continues to evolve, acquiring new mutations and resistance to new antimicrobial agents.

“Multidrug-resistant typhoid has been coming and going since the 1970s,” Dr. Kathryn Holt, senior author of the study from the University of Melbourne, says. It “is caused by the bacteria picking up novel antimicrobial resistance genes, which are usually lost when we switch to a new drug.”

In this particular strain, however, the genes are becoming a stable part of the genome, making it difficult to eliminate.

“These results must reinforce the message that bacteria do not obey international borders and any efforts to contain the spread of antimicrobial resistance must be globally coordinated,” study author Dr. Stephen Baker from The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, an Oxford University Clinical Research Unit in Vietnam, said.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Mom of Girl With Autism Who Was Kicked Off Plane Speaks Out

PHOTO: Donna Beegle’s daughter, 15-year-old Juliette. Courtesy Donna Beegle(NEW YORK) — Donna Beegle is speaking out after she says a United commercial flight made an emergency landing to kick her family off the plane because she was traveling with her autistic daughter.

Although the captain did not speak to the Beegles, he landed the plane before reaching its final destination in Portland, Oregon, and asked police officers to remove 15-year-old Juliette and her family because he wasn’t “comfortable” having her aboard, Beegle said.

“That hurt. That took my breath,” Beegle said. “She shouldn’t be treated like that.”

Juliette has trouble communicating verbally, so she moves her hands, makes noises and cries when she wants her family to know she’s uncomfortable. She was having problems on the flight because she doesn’t eat cold food, Beegle said. First, there was only one thing on the menu that was hot, but it arrived cold. Then, the flight attendants refused to give Juliette hot food from first class, but she was hungry.

“I was so frustrated,” Beegle said. “I was like, ‘I’m trying to prevent a meltdown here, if you could, so help us out.’ I said, ‘When she melts down and she’s upset, that’s when you’re gonna wanna help her.'”

Finally, they did. After getting some rice and jambalaya, Juliette sat quietly watching a movie, Beegle said. About 25 minutes later, the plane landed and paramedics boarded and left. Then, police officers boarded and asked them to leave.

“I’m not asking for the moon,” she said. “I just have a child with special needs.”

She said she plans to sue.

Beegle said other passengers began shouting at the officers, urging them to leave Juliette alone.

“That was the wonderful part,” she said. “The passengers really rallied and supported us.”

But after a word with the captain, they asked the Beegles to leave anyway because the captain said he wasn’t comfortable with them on board.

She said they took another plane — Delta, instead — and everything went smoothly.

United Airlines gave the following statement to ABC News: “After working to accommodate Dr. Beegle and her daughter during the flight, the crew made the best decision for the safety and comfort of all of our customers and elected to divert to Salt Lake City after the situation became disruptive. We rebooked the customers on a different carrier and the flight continued to Portland.”

United Airlines participates in autism awareness and support programs, including one that provides simulated flights to help families with autistic members get ready for the real thing, added United Airlines spokeswoman Karen May.

Still, at 120 pounds, Beegle said Juliette is hardly a safety concern, especially when she’s seated next to her 200-pound father.

The Beegles fly regularly and have never been treated this way, she said. Juliette’s been to 22 states and five countries because Beegle travels four days a week for work.

“Typically, if she starts crying, people bend over backward,” Beegle said. “This was sheer ignorance about autism.”

“Any parent [would be upset] if you see your child treated disrespectfully as if they’re not human,” she said. “I started to cry. I was crying for her.”

The Federal Aviation Administration directed ABC News’ request for comment to the Department of Transportation. A DOT spokesman said “the Department has received a complaint regarding this incident and we’re investigating the matter.”

ABC Breaking US News | ABC Politics News

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Individual Tests Negative for Ebola at University of Virginia Medical Center

Creatas/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) — A patient is being evaluated for possible Ebola at the University of Virginia Medical Center after exhibiting symptoms of illness upon returning from West Africa.

According to a statement attributed to Eric Swenson, the public information officer for the University of Virginia Health System, “the probability the patient has Ebola is very low, based on the patient’s medical history and not having known exposure to any Ebola cases.” Still, the patient was brought to the medical center as a precautionary measure.

On Monday night, Swensen said that testing has determined the individual does not have Ebola.

The University of Virginia Medical Center was designated as an Ebola treatment facility by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in December 2014.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Individual Being Evaluated for Possible Ebola at University of Virginia Medical Center

Creatas/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) — A patient is being evaluated for possible Ebola at the University of Virginia Medical Center after exhibiting symptoms of illness upon returning from West Africa.

According to a statement attributed to Eric Swenson, the public information officer for the University of Virginia Health System, “the probability the patient has Ebola is very low, based on the patient’s medical history and not having known exposure to any Ebola cases.” Still, the patient was brought to the medical center as a precautionary measure.

The University of Virginia Medical Center was designated as an Ebola treatment facility by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in December 2014.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Could New Blood Test Be a Game Changer in Cancer Treatment?

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — What if testing for cancer was as easy as taking a blood test?

Researchers say “liquid biopsies” could be a major game changer because they can capture cancer cells or even just the tumor DNA in the blood without physically pulling cells directly from the tumor.

“It’s less invasive, it’s quick, it’s something that you can do many, many times in the course of treatment of a patient where ideally you’d be able to monitor their progress as it goes along,” says ABC News’ medical unit managing editor, Dan Childs.

Childs says the new test could be great for hard-to-detect diseases like ovarian, lung or pancreatic cancer.

“They might help doctors detect cancer early. They might help them guess the prognosis of a cancer or its severity. Also, they might even help us monitor treatment to see if it’s working against tumors and maybe even determine what treatments work best,” he says.

But, he notes, more studies needs to be done to find out if the liquid biopsies are effective.

“Wouldn’t it be amazing if we could actually do a blood test and then determine if someone has pancreatic or ovarian cancer early, at a time when we might be able to do something and really cut the death rate from that? The studies have not yet been done to tell us whether that’s a possibility or not, but that’s really the hope that a lot of these proponents are thinking about right now,” Childs says.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Kids Play Doctor with Teddy Bear Hospital

Montefiore Medical Center(NEW YORK) — Montefiore Medical Center in New York City hosted a Teddy Bear Clinic over the weekend to show children under 12 that medicine isn’t so scary after all.

The event drew 240 teddy bear patients, who were triaged, treated and discharged by real doctors, nurses and technicians.

“Our main goal is to make it less scary,” said Helene Mayo, who directs Montefiore’s community and population health program and has been running the event for the last seven years.

When children come to the hospital and are crying and afraid of the doctors, it makes them harder to treat, Mayo said, explaining that the Teddy Bear clinic teaches children that the people in the white coats and the scrubs are nice and there to help.

Three-year-old Sean Polidoro’s bear had asthma, so he learned how to administer oxygen. Sisters Mojore, 3, and Anjola, 5, shared a bear with a fever, so they learned how to take it’s temperature. Maybe some will grow up to become doctors and nurses themselves.

“Of course, you want to always inspire children,” Mayo said.

The event drew girl scout troops, church groups and other members of the community. And the event has more than doubled in size over the years, Mayo said.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Mom Catches 2-Year-Old’s Eye Cancer by Snapping Photo

The Fitzgerald Family(NEW YORK) — Julie Fitzgerald had been worried about strange spots on her 2-year-old’s eye, but she initially brushed them off.

But then she saw viral story on Facebook about how a white glow that appeared someone’s eye in photos could signal cancer. So she decided to snap a photo of Avery.

And there it was, the white glow.

“I just had this gut feeling in my stomach that something was wrong with his eye,” Fitzgerald told ABC News.

Doctors diagnosed Avery with retinoblastoma and said cancerous tumors covered 75 percent of his eye, she said. They had to remove it entirely, but they said they caught the cancer just in time, Fitzgerald said.

“If we did not get this eye out, the cancer would spread to his blood and to his brain,” Fitzgerald said. “Our lives went from normal to cancer to a cancer survivor in three weeks. It turned out to be our worst nightmare but it saved our son’s life.”

Last month, Joanna Murphy caught the rare cancer after noticing a white glow in her daughter’s eye. And Tara Taylor’s Facebook friend noticed a glow in her daughter’s eye, prompting the diagnosis of another rare eye disease.

“It is a medical emergency,” said Dr. Richard Besser, ABC News chief health and medical editor. “You need to see your doctor right away. It may be retinoblastoma. But if you miss that sign, it is usually fatal.”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Healthier Foods Lower Risks of Cognitive Decline

iStock/Thinkstock(HAMILTON, Ontario) — Step one in improving your memory: eat healthier foods.

Sounds simple, right? Well, a study just released from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, says that cutting the risk of memory decline and thinking skills as we age is as easy as adding more fruits, vegetables, nuts and fish to our diets and cutting back on red meat, processed food and alcohol.

In analyzing the eating habits of nearly 28,000 people in 40 countries over five years, lead study author Dr. Andrew Smyth and his team found that people who ate healthier experienced a 24-percent less risk of cognitive decline than people who consumed meats, fatty foods and sugary items.

The group of healthier eaters were generally more active than their counterparts, as well as being non-smokers and having lower BMIs.

To get with the program, so to speak, people should consider the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fish, and healthy fats, along with foods such as spinach, broccoli and blueberries that may help slow down cognitive decline.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Single Moms Are the Queens of Online Dating Sites

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Single moms are finding that having kids is not a deterrent to finding love, according to online dating site PlentyOfFish.

In a poll of 1,000 single women aged 19 to 50 with children under 18, three out of four moms don’t hide the fact they have kids and often post photos of their youngsters as well.

As it happens, PlentyOfFish reports that about 44 percent of women who use online dating are single mothers, and for whatever reason, they’re getting dates about ten percent quicker than women without children.

The reasons single moms use online dating services vary, with about 55 percent saying it’s just more convenient given their hectic lifestyles.

Meanwhile, 54 percent also acknowledged that this form of dating affords them the opportunity to form a relationship without having to cut back on their responsibilities to their youngsters.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →