Review Category : Health

Bengals Player’s Cancer-Stricken Daughter to See Him Play for First Time

iStock/Thinkstock(CINCINNATI) — After months of undergoing treatment for pediatric cancer, Cincinnati Bengals player Devon Still’s daughter will get to watch her daddy play pro football in person for the first time on Thursday night.

And the 4-year-old is hoping he’ll do a robot dance.

“I got to do something for her,” Still told ABC News’ Cincinnati affiliate, WCPO, with a smirk. “You got to make a play. You can’t just be out there dancing for no reason.”

Still, 25, a defensive tackle, had originally been cut from the Bengals roster, but once they learned his daughter had stage 4 cancer, they re-signed him to their practice squad. He’s since been placed on the active roster.

Leah is now feeling well enough to leave the Philadelphia hospital where she’d been getting treatment and attend the home game in Cincinnati.

After the first quarter of the game, Leah is expected to be part of a ceremony in which the team presents a check to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital for more than $1 million to go toward pediatric cancer research. The team raised money from sales of Still’s jersey, No. 75, which sold out, according to the team’s website.

“It’s going to be emotional just knowing that she’s there, especially with the check presentation that they’re gonna do at the game,” Still told WCPO.

It will be a special night for the team, Bengals spokesman Jeff Berding said at a news conference.

“It’s a little extra special because we have Leah Still in the house,” Berding said. “There’s been a tremendous amount of support from the community and across the country to support her and Devon Still and their fight against pediatric cancer.”

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“Scandal” Star Kerry Washington Reveals Her Post-Baby Fitness Regimen

ABC/Randy Holmes(NEW YORK) — Kerry Washington and her husband Nnamdi Asomugha welcomed daughter Isabelle in April, but the Scandal actress looks amazing just months after giving birth.

The 37-year-old spoke to BET’s 106 & Park and revealed the healthy approach she’s been taking to getting back in shape.

“I’ve always been a person who really approaches health in a proactive way. I work out, I eat right, so those were things I continued to do once the doctor said I could,” she said. “But not to be crazy about it. I’m breastfeeding, so I can’t starve myself.”

She continued, “It’s important for me to be a good mom and a good actor.”

This is one of the rare times Washington has spoken about her little girl and her personal life.

In August, she appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live and revealed why she chose the name Isabelle. “I heard your baby’s named after her grandmother?” Washington asked Kimmel. “Mine is too, named after my grandmother.”

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New App Can Predict Your Death Date

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Most people don’t know what they’ll be doing this weekend, much less the answer to the biggest question of all: When are you going to die? Well, a new iOS app called Deadline can’t make plans for your weekend but it will supposedly give you an idea of when you’ll meet your maker, provided something unforeseen doesn’t happen first.

Scanning your iPhone’s Healthkit tool, Deadline uses information like height, blood pressure, hours slept, steps walked daily and a few other pertinent facts to give you a ballpark date and time of when you’ll breathe your last breath.

The app’s maker, Gist LLC, wrote on the Apple iTunes page that, “No app can really accurately determine when you will die. Instead, the app actually monitors your own health and motivates you to make better lifestyle choices or consult a physician, if necessary.”

So while no one lives forever, at least you might be able to improve your lifestyle a bit to extend your own personal deadline.

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Why the Flu Has Its Own Season

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Scientists might be able to tell you what causes the flu but they’re at a loss for a definitive explanation as to why it occurs more often during the late autumn and winter months than the rest of the year.

However, that won’t stop health experts from at least offering a conjecture about the prevalence of the flu from late October though early spring.

Previous studies have theorized that flu virus particles hang in the air longer and move greater distance in cold, dry weather than during the hotter summer months.

New York City pulmonary specialist Dr. Len Horovitz says that theory make sense as does the fact that the flu is more easily spread when people spend more time indoors, especially when they go to holiday parties.

Also, the school year typically begins in September, which account for kids spreading germs from classmate to classmate.

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Good Health and an Outgoing Personality Go Hand in Hand

iStock/Thinkstock(ST. LOUIS) — Certain personality traits, which can help people throughout their lives, are also beneficial to one’s physical health.

According to Washington University researchers, it’s easier to protect yourself from contracting a serious illness if you’re an organized, conscientious extrovert who is somewhat easygoing.

Josh Jackson, Sara Weston and Patricia Hill analyzed data on 7,000 people with an average age of 68 and who had been to a doctor or clinic within the past two years. They asked the participants to check off personality traits that described them best.

Based on their answers, the researchers scored each of them on extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness to experience. Meanwhile, the participants were also told to name any conditions they had been diagnosed with from a list of serious illnesses.

In essence, those who were outgoing, organized, conscientious and easygoing were healthier and better able to communicate with their doctor. However, participants ranked as neurotic where at greater risk of contracting diseases.

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Spatial Memory Likely Affected by Sleep Apnea

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Sleep apnea is a potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts. If that’s not enough to make you worried, sleep specialists at the NYU Langone Medical Center contend the disorder might also hamper your spatial memory.

That includes not remembering things like locking the front door of your house or turning off the iron.

Dr. Andrew Varga explained while scientists haven’t found a direct cause-and-effect relationship between sleep apnea and spatial memory impairment, there appears to be some association since sleep apnea normally affects the deepest level of sleep when dreams occur.

Varga say that this might also prevent people from forming certain memories.

About four percent of the population suffers from this disorder, particularly middle-age men. One way to mitigate the problem is with a breathing aid during sleep.

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Study Says Mothers Contribute to Infants’ Language Environment More than Fathers

Wavebreakmedia Ltd/Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Researchers around the country say that their study determined that mothers play a significantly bigger role in the language environment experienced by infants than fathers do.

The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, looked at 33 infants born in two-parent homes by attaching recording devices to the children. Speech vocalizations were recorded at birth, at a few weeks of age, and at seven months old. In analyzing “language-like sounds,” researchers found that 70 percent of adult responses to infants’ vocalization came from mothers.

Interestingly, while 30 percent of adult responses came from fathers, only 10 percent came from fathers who were alone with their child. The other 20 percent were fathers who were with their child in the presence of the mother.

Researchers further found that children generally respond preferentially to their mother’s voice over their father’s.

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Study Says Mothers Contribute to Infants’ Language Environment More than Fathers

Wavebreakmedia Ltd/Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Researchers around the country say that their study determined that mothers play a significantly bigger role in the language environment experienced by infants than fathers do.

The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, looked at 33 infants born in two-parent homes by attaching recording devices to the children. Speech vocalizations were recorded at birth, at a few weeks of age, and at seven months old. In analyzing “language-like sounds,” researchers found that 70 percent of adult responses to infants’ vocalization came from mothers.

Interestingly, while 30 percent of adult responses came from fathers, only 10 percent came from fathers who were alone with their child. The other 20 percent were fathers who were with their child in the presence of the mother.

Researchers further found that children generally respond preferentially to their mother’s voice over their father’s.

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WHO Recommends Increased Access to So-Called Overdose Antidote

Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — The World Health Organization released updated guidelines on Tuesday that say naloxone, the so-called overdose antidote that reverses the effects of opioids, such as heroin, should be more widely available.

The guidelines were updated with the goal of reducing the number of deaths from opioid overdose each year. The WHO cites figures that show approximately 69,000 people die from opioid overdose each year. Among intravenous drug users, opioid overdose is second only to HIV/AIDS for cause of death.

The key recommendations in the updated guidelines include increased availability of naloxone to those who are “likely to witness an opioid overdose, including people at risk of an overdose, their family and friends, and anyone whose work brings them in contact with people susceptible to overdoses, including health care workers, police and emergency service workers.”

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Researchers Say Google Glass Obstructs Wearers’ Peripheral Vision

Photo by Craig Barritt/Getty Images for AOL Inc.(NEW YORK) — Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco say that wearing Google Glass, the polarizing wearable technology that has frenzied techies and critics for different reasons, may inhibit the wearer’s peripheral vision.

According to the study, published in a letter in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the users’ peripheral vision was significantly obstructed by blind spots. Those blind spots, the study found, exist even when the wearing and head positions are altered.

The researchers said their study was likely the first evaluation of “the effect of wearable electronics with head-mounted display on vision.” Interest in such technology has increased in recent years as more products are produced.

Researchers say that the largest blind spot in their testing was in the upper right quadrant of the users’ field of vision.

Blind spots were identified only as an obstruction from the product’s hardware design, and did not include “a distracting effect of software-related interference.”

The study is, however, limited by a small number of participants, and researchers say that additional studies will be needed to fully understand the effects of products like Google Glass on users’ vision.

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