Review Category : Health

Iowa Students to Wear Heart Rate Monitors

iStock/Thinkstock(DUBUQUE, Iowa) — Students going back to school in Dubuque, Iowa, are going to find it a little harder to slack off in gym class.

Public middle and high school students will have to wear heart rate monitors in gym class to make sure they are actually being physically active.

“It will be a large portion of their grade, because we want to grade them on what they’re actually doing in our class,” Dubuque Schools Athletic and Wellness Director Amy Hawkins told ABC News.

Teachers will use the information collected from the heart rate monitors to write report cards.

“It really takes the opinion out of things,” Hawkins said. “You know it’s not really ‘I think your kid is doing this and this in class.'”

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The Do’s and Don’ts of Digital Flirting

iStock/Thinkstock(STANFORD, Calif.) — Flirting is certainly an art form, and one that has taken on new dimensions due to texting.

As it happens, people who receive these texts are pretty particular not only about the content of the messages sent but how they’re conveyed.

Stanford University students who developed the chat app Omlet conducted a survey of 1,000 adults and young people on “Digital Flirting Rules,” and the number-one turnoff for both men and women is “Funky or very informal spelling.”

“Lack of punctuation and grammar” was the second biggest irritant for the ladies, while guys complained about “Multiple exclamation points in chat messages.”

Using a lot of slang, such as LOL, also isn’t inadvisable if you’re trying to make an impression.

Here are women’s five biggest digital flirting turnoffs and disapproval ratings:

  1. Funky or very informal spelling — 73 percent
  2. Lack of punctuation and grammar — 59 percent
  3. Excessive slang — 54 percent
  4. Messages during sleeping hours — 51 percent
  5. All lowercase words — 50 percent

Men’s five biggest digital flirting turnoffs and disapproval ratings:

  1. Funky or very informal spelling — 58 percent
  2. Multiple exclamation points in chat messages — 47 percent
  3. Lack of punctuation and grammar — 46 percent
  4. All lowercase words — 41 percent
  5. Excessive slang — 40 percent

Meanwhile, emoticons and emojis apparently hit the right spot when it comes to flirting. Thirty-one percent of men and 38 percent of women enjoy receiving them, according to the researchers.

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Flies Not Viewed as Major Restaurant Annoyance

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The poor cockroach still gets a bad rap while the fly gets a pass, according to a survey of 300 people by pest-control company Orkin.

When asked, “Which of the following would make you stop chowing down if you spied them while you were in a restaurant?” 61 percent said a cockroach.

Meanwhile, only three percent said they’d stop eating if a fly was buzzing around the dinner table.

However, Orkin entomologist and Technical Services Director Ron Harrison remarked, “Many restaurant patrons may not be aware that houseflies are twice as filthy as cockroaches.”

Without getting too graphic, flies carry all sorts of pathogens on their legs and body’s small hairs that are easily transferred to food or touched surfaces, according to Harrison.

Incidentally, other choices in the Orkin survey of critters you might (or might not) spot in a restaurant included rodents, ants, snakes and geckos.

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Woman Who Drank Toxic Tea Shows Signs of Improvement

iStock/Thinkstock(SALT LAKE CITY) — The woman who was hospitalized in extremely critical condition after drinking iced tea laced with lye in suburban Salt Lake City is showing signs of improvement.

Jan Harding, who suffered severe throat burns, has reportedly whispered to her family and has gotten out of her hospital bed.

Police believe Harding drank a tea that had been mixed with the industrial cleaning solution lye.

Harding, who has ulcerated burns in her upper esophagus, hasn’t been able to speak for days– but now her breathing tube has been removed and she seems to be improving.

Lye is an extremely harsh chemical and is an ingredient in a cleaning product meant for de-greasing deep fryers. Investigators think it was mistakenly mixed into a bag of sugar, which a worker at Dickey’s Barbeque unknowingly added to the ice tea dispenser.

Harding, they think, was the only customer burned.

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Iowa School District is Requiring Heart Rate Monitors in Gym Class

iStock/Thinkstock(DUBUQUE, Iowa) — Starting this school year, public middle and high school students in Dubuque, Iowa will wear heart rate monitors in gym class.

It’s all an effort to make sure students are actually getting some physical activity in P.E. class, and not just sitting on the sidelines.

Dubuque Schools Athletic and Wellness Director Amy Hawkins says this will also make writing report cards easier for teachers.

“It will be a large portion of their grade, because we want to grade them on what they’re actually doing in our class,” Hawkins said. “It really takes the opinion out of things. You know it’s not really ‘I think your kid is doing this and this in class.'”

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Woman Who Drank Toxic Tea Shows Signs of Improvement

iStock/Thinkstock(SALT LAKE CITY) — The woman who was hospitalized in extremely critical condition after drinking iced tea laced with lye in suburban Salt Lake City is showing signs of improvement.

Jan Harding, who suffered severe throat burns, has reportedly whispered to her family and has gotten out of her hospital bed.

Police believe Harding drank a tea that had been mixed with the industrial cleaning solution lye.

Harding, who has ulcerated burns in her upper esophagus, hasn’t been able to speak for days– but now her breathing tube has been removed and she seems to be improving.

Lye is an extremely harsh chemical and is an ingredient in a cleaning product meant for de-greasing deep fryers. Investigators think it was mistakenly mixed into a bag of sugar, which a worker at Dickey’s Barbeque unknowingly added to the ice tea dispenser.

Harding, they think, was the only customer burned.

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Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Iowa School District is Requiring Heart Rate Monitors in Gym Class

iStock/Thinkstock(DUBUQUE, Iowa) — Starting this school year, public middle and high school students in Dubuque, Iowa will wear heart rate monitors in gym class.

It’s all an effort to make sure students are actually getting some physical activity in P.E. class, and not just sitting on the sidelines.

Dubuque Schools Athletic and Wellness Director Amy Hawkins says this will also make writing report cards easier for teachers.

“It will be a large portion of their grade, because we want to grade them on what they’re actually doing in our class,” Hawkins said. “It really takes the opinion out of things. You know it’s not really ‘I think your kid is doing this and this in class.'”

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Girl With Rare Disorder Has One Birthday Wish

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Ali Najera is turning 10 next month and it’s a birthday that calls for a big celebration. Diagnosed at age 8 with a rare neurological disorder, making it to 10 years old is a gift in itself for this Texas girl, and Ali wants one thing to mark the occasion.

“She want cards from all over the world,” Tianna Morgan, Ali’s mother, told ABC News.

Ali, one of five children, was diagnosed with neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) two weeks after her 8th birthday. The disorder is progressive and causes movement and communication difficulties.

“She has iron accumulating in her brain, and it’s actually destroying a part of her brain,” Morgan said. “As it accumulates, it affects her nervous system and her muscle tone, and eventually it will take away her ability to control any of her muscles.”

Though Ali has had the diagnosis for two years, her mother said, it has rapidly progressed within the last year. At the end of July, Ali found out she was going to have to stay in a wheelchair, but she continues to stay positive.

“Even through all this, she always has a smile on her face,” said Morgan.

On Sept. 9, Ali will turn 10, and it’s an important milestone to reach.

“It’s a double digit birthday,” Morgan said. “We don’t know how many birthdays she has left.”

Ali’s mother has worked to get out the word of Ali’s wish for birthday cards from all over the world to as many people as possible.

“That’s a wish we hope we can grant,” Morgan said.

Early birthday cards sent to Ali have instantly brightened her day, Morgan said. Though Ali stays in her room a lot because of how difficult it is for her to get around, when cards are delivered she always comes out to read them.

“She loves all of her birthday cards,” Morgan said. “Every single one is special to her.”

“It’s been very inspirational and touching to see how much love is being shown towards Ali,” Morgan said.

You can participate by sending a birthday card marked with “Ali’s Birthday” to P.O. Box 2586, Jasper, TX 75951.

Need some card-related inspiration? Ali loves princesses, music, coloring, reading and anything that falls under the category of “artsy stuff.”

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Minimizing Salt Intake Could Save Over One Million Lives Annually Worldwide

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Researchers say that minimizing salt intake could help prevent upwards of 1.5 million deaths each year.

According to the study, published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine, taking in less than 2,000 milligrams of sodium each day could reduce high blood pressure for most Americans. On average, the researchers say, Americans take in nearly twice the recommended amount of salt daily. Furthermore, approximately 58,000 Americans die each year due to diseases linked to high salt consumption.

Worldwide, researchers say, an estimated 1.65 million cardiovascular deaths in 2010 were attributable to excess sodium intake.

Researchers say further evidence must be collected to determine potential risks and benefits of low-sodium diets, but that adhering to existing World Health Organization recommendations of 2,000 milligrams per day is the best option until further investigation can be done.

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WHO Provides Update on Ebola Outbreak, Warns Against False Treatments

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The World Health Organization released an update on Friday acknowledging about 150 new cases of Ebola and nearly 100 more deaths after saying on Thursday that the existing figures may have “vastly underestimate[d] the magnitude of the outbreak.”

On Friday the WHO acknowledged again that their numbers still were unlikely to paint a final picture of the degree to which the disease has spread. After airlines expressed concern over the possibility of air travel being a high-risk activity for the transmission of the disease, the United Nations health agency noted, yet again, the that disease cannot be transmitted through the air and simply traveling on a plane with an individual who has Ebola would not put passengers or crew at a severe risk.

The WHO also released a country-by-country breakdown of the outbreak, which noted 152 new cases and 76 new deaths within the last two weeks. In total, the agency says there have been 2,127 cases of Ebola and 1,145 deaths.

The release also paralleled a U.S. Food and Drug Administration release from Thursday, which warned consumers about the danger of products marketed on the Internet that claim to treat or prevent Ebola. The WHO notes a pair of people in Nigeria who died after drinking salt water, which was rumored to be protective against Ebola.

“Decades of scientific research have failed to find a curative or preventive agent of proven safety and effectiveness in humans,” the WHO said, “though a number of promising products are currently under development.”

Even those products, however, are far from ready for widespread use in humans.

“Evidence of their effectiveness is suggestive, but not based on solid scientific data from clinical trials,” the WHO noted. Pointing out that the safety of using experimental drugs is not known, and while they have approved the use of the experimental drug in exceptional circumstances, supplies are limited or exhausted.

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