Review Category : Health

Fit In Exercise with Harley Pasternak’s Five-Minute Workouts

Wavebreak Media / Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Time seems to be the number one reason so many of us say we don’t make it to the gym but it doesn’t have to be the case.

As part of the Good Morning America Yahoo Your Day series, GMA met up with Michele Promaulayko, Yahoo Health’s editor-in-chief, and celebrity trainer Harley Pasternak to bust fitness myths and demonstrate a quick, efficient workout routine.

Promaulayko says one fitness fallacy is that working out in a hot room equates to a greater calorie burn.

“That’s not true,” she said. “Your body burns more in a cold environment.”

A second myth is that by eating less food you will lose more weight.

“Of course, there’s an ideal number of calories you want to consume in a day,” Promaulayko said. “But you also don’t want to consume too few calories, because then your metabolism slows down to conserve energy. So you eat a little more, you burn more.”

A third myth is that doing crunches will lessen your belly fat.

“You can’t spot reduce,” Promaulayko said. “So what you want to do is burn fat all over your body and have a nice, clean diet and then those abs will be revealed.”

Pasternak, the author of 5 Pounds: The Breakthrough 5-Day Plan to Jump-Start Rapid Weight Loss (and Never Gain It Back!), showed ABC News’ Sara Haines a no-excuse workout that focuses on just one movement each day of the week.

“Each day of the week, we pick a different exercise that does a different part of the body so at the end of the seven days, you’ve hit all the major body parts,” Pasternak said. “You don’t even need to change. You don’t need to go to the gym.”

Pasternak says each of the below seven moves should only take five minutes out of your day each day:

MONDAY: Reverse Lunges

Start off with your feet shoulder-width apart. Step back with your right leg, drop your knee down and return. Rotate with the other leg.

TUESDAY: Superwoman

Lie face down on the ground with both your legs and your arms fully extended and off the ground. Raise your arms and legs up and down, never touching the ground. “Every time you come up, you’re working not only the erector spinae, but if you come to the very top, your glutes are contracting,” Pasternak said. “The higher the thighs go, the more the glutes are working.”

WEDNESDAY: Lying Dumbbell Tricep Extension

Lie on a bench or elevated flat surface with a dumbbell or weighted item in each hand, arms extended above your head. Bring the dumbbells down on either side of your head and then back up, repeat. “Imagine that your fists are hammers and there’s a nail in the ceiling,” Pasternak said. “And nail them up all the way.”

THURSDAY: Stiff-Legged Dead Lift

Hold a dumbbell or weighted item in each hand with your feet shoulder-width apart. Slide the dumbbells up and down your leg, pushing your butt back. Then bring your hips back to neutral. “This is all about feeling the hamstring stretch,” Pasternak said.

FRIDAY: Standing Dumbbell Curl Press

Hold a dumbbell or weighted item in each hand with your feet shoulder-width apart. Curl the dumbbells up, press them above your head, bring them back down and extend. “This is a good time saver,” Pasternak said. “It’s biceps, brachioradialis and shoulders all in one.”

SATURDAY: Single Arm Dumbbell Row

Stand in a lunge position with the dumbbell in your right arm and left forearm on your bent left thigh. Looking straight ahead, pull your right elbow up along your body. Repeat on the other side. “Imagine there’s a rope attached to your elbow. And we’re just dragging the elbow up along your body,” Pasternak said.

SUNDAY: Standing Dumbbell Side Bend

Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart with a dumbbell or weighted item in your hand. Bend to the side opposite the dumbbell to work your obliques. Repeat on the other side.

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Single Baby Boomer Women Are Happy, Empowered and Fit

Fuse/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Take no pity on single women who are 55 and older. Many of them say they’re having the time of their lives.

In a survey of so-called Baby Boomer women, Del Webb, the builder of adult communities, says that almost three-quarters of them claim to be happier now than when they were 35.

The same number also felt more empowered today than when they were much younger.

Del Webb broke the single women into four categories: never been married, separated, divorced and widowed and for the most part, the results were around the same for all the women 55 and up.

Most felt younger than their age and more active than when they were 35. In fact, eight in ten agreed that staying physically healthy is very important and almost seven in ten say it’s a top priority.

To that end, close to two-thirds of single women 55 and older say they exercise at least a few times a week.

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Genes May Account for a Lack of Motivation in School

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(COLUMBUS, Ohio) — Everyone wants their kids to do well in school but when they fall short of expectations, parents have a tendency to lash out at their children, their teachers or even society in general.

But guess what: parents might be the ones to blame for an underachieving student and it’s not even really their fault.

Stephen Petrill, a professor of psychology at Ohio State University, found out by studying 13,000 twins from six countries including the U.S., that genes might explain differences in a children’s motivation up to 50 percent of the time.

On top of that, Petrill says that non-shared environments rather than shared environment such as the same classroom and teachers, was a major factor.

Apparently, the results were pretty much the same among twins no matter what country they were from: the U.S., United Kingdom, Canada, Japan, Germany and Russia.

After being asked a series of questions regarding their studies and interests, identical twins’ answers were far more commonly matched than those of fraternal twins, suggesting a strong genetic component.

Petrill says that he and other researchers are not suggesting that it’s pointless to push children who aren’t motivated. Rather, it’s important to recognize personality differences that may affect motivation and determine how best to steer kids in the right direction.

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California’s Drought Could Increase Health Risks, Experts Say

Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — The ongoing California drought could cause more problems for state residents by creating favorable conditions for dangerous infectious diseases previously limited to hotter, drier climates, experts said.

The California Department of Public Health announced this week the state had a record-breaking number of deaths related to the mosquito-borne West Nile Virus in 2014, with 31 fatalities recorded.

The agency says that 801 cases of West Nile Virus were reported in 2014, the second-highest number of cases ever recorded, second only to 2005, when there were 880 reported cases.

The ongoing drought across much of California might have exacerbated cases, state health officials said, noting that areas with stagnating water become prime spots for mosquitoes to lay eggs.

A record number of birds were found to have the virus as well, with 60 birds testing positive for West Nile, health officials said.

“As birds and mosquitoes sought water, they came into closer contact and amplified the virus, particularly in urban areas,” California Department of Public Health Director Dr. Karen Smith said in a statement. “The lack of water could have caused some sources of water to stagnate, making the water sources more attractive for mosquitoes to lay eggs.”

Officials also said warmer temperatures might have led to an especially long mosquito season.

In addition to West Nile, the arid conditions could also mean increasing cases of Valley Fever in the state, health officials said.

The potentially fatal disease is caused by a fungus called Coccidioides that can grow in the soil and that can spread in the air through spores if soil dries out. While more than 60 percent of people exposed to the spores don’t have symptoms, people who start to develop the disease can have cough, fever, and headache, and in rare cases it can lead to death, experts said.

Art Reingold, professor of infectious disease at the University of California, Berkeley, said it’s possible that climate change could lead to ongoing drier conditions that would be favorable for more Valley Fever infections.

“It’s so clearly related to soil and dust — dust getting into the air…then that’s quite plausible,” he told ABC News.

Rates of Valley Fever infection steadily increased between 2001 and 2011, when reported numbers peaked at 5,182 cases before dropping off again, according to the state health department. In 2013, there were 3,298 reported cases of the disease. The increase in numbers has not officially been linked to drought conditions.

John Galgiani, director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence at University of Arizona, said that in Arizona, rain can initially help grow the fungus in the soil but if it’s followed by months of arid weather, the spores can start to float in the area and even travel hundreds of miles.

“There’s reason to think that it should apply also to California,” he said.

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Ebola Patient Released from NIH Facility In Good Condition, Not Contagious

Photo by Mark Wilson/Newsmakers(BETHESDA, Md.) — The patient admitted last month to the National Institute of Health’s Clinical Center in Bethesda after falling ill with the Ebola virus while volunteering in West Africa has been released in good condition.

The patient’s identity was never released. On March 13, the individual was admitted to the facility after volunteering in Sierra Leone.

The NIH facility is one of four hospitals in the U.S. with isolation units set up to handle an Ebola patient. The patient released Thursday was the second to be successfully rehabilitated from Ebola at NIH, after Dallas nurse Nina Pham last year.

A press release from the NIH says that the patient is no longer contagious. The NIH said that the individual requested that no other information about the case be made public.

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Mom Wakes Up from Coma to Find She’s Had Her Baby

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Sharista Giles was five months pregnant when a car accident left her in a coma in December.

Doctors originally told her family that the she would never wake up, but on Wednesday, the 20-year-old opened her eyes, her aunt told ABC News.

“The doctors were telling us there was nothing else they could do,” said Beverly Giles, 49, of Madisonville, Tennessee. “They already gave up hope. We never gave up. She’s fought this hard.”

Sharista’s family moved her to the Harriman Care and Rehabilitation Center in March, according to a Facebook page that Beverly Giles manages. The center called to tell them she was awake on Wednesday and they rushed to see her, she said.

“The whole place was packed out with family,” Giles said.

Doctors were forced to deliver the baby prematurely in January, but Sharista’s family hasn’t named him yet. For now, they call him “Baby L,” Giles said, adding that he was less than two pounds when he was born, but now weighs 6 pounds and 4 ounces.

Sharista blinked, gave her family members’ hands a squeeze when they tickled her and followed her father around with her eyes, Giles said.

“He showed her a picture of her baby, and she followed the picture,” she said. “When he turned around to put it back on the bulletin board, she turned her neck, her whole head trying to follow and find the picture again.”

It’s too soon to know Sharista’s prognosis, but Giles said the family hopes to bring Baby L to her when he is ready to leave the University of Tennessee Medical Center’s neonatal intensive care unit.

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Louisiana Dad Looks to Raise Autism Awareness with Blue Nail Polish

Courtesy Breanne Pittman(NEW YORK) — Brian Batey, a 48-year-old engineer and father of two who grew up in rural Louisiana, isn’t the kind of guy you would guess would be into painting his nails.

But then again, if you were just judging based on his looks, you might not guess that he also has Tourette syndrome and Asperger syndrome. Two years ago, Batey was diagnosed as “being on the spectrum,” as he said, and he’s known for years that his 18-year-old son, Nathan, has the two diagnoses.

With this being Autism Awareness Month, Batey is hoping to raise not just awareness, but acceptance of the diagnosis. Batey’s Facebook page, “Paint ‘Em Blue for Autism,” used to be called “Paint ‘Em Blue for Nathan,” he said. But this year, he wants to include all people with autism, and he’s hoping for 1,000 people to paint their nails blue and post it to the page with the name of the person they’re doing it on honor of.

“When I see blue nails, I always wonder if the person with them knows and loves one of us,” he said.

When people post to the page — and he has more than 300 so far, from as far away as Denmark and Singapore — he knows they do.

“My goal is to get more people talking about autism and taking a different look at the people with autism they encounter,” he said. “It benefits everybody.”

Batey’s take on his diagnosis is that he wouldn’t change it if he could.

“It’s given me many gifts,” he said, citing his hobbies, including being a musician and a cook.

“I can accept the negatives, like anxiety and depression,” he said. “I hope Nathan gets to the same place, where he likes where he is and sees that [autism has] given him as many things as it has taken away from him.”

The Facebook page isn’t raising any money. Acceptance, Batey said, is when neuro-typical people let others with autism into their lives. It’s something his 13-year-old neighbor, Breanne Pittman, has for Nathan, Batey said.

“She comes over and hangs out with the 6-foot-3, 330-pound 18-year-old and just knows how smart he is,” he said.

It was Breanne, he added, who painted his nails and took the photo.

Though his goals surrounding autism awareness and acceptance may sound lofty, he does have one very concrete goal involving a celebrity.

“My wife and I just love Tom Selleck,” he said. “If I could just get him to paint one single toe blue, we would both drop dead.”

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Three Dead in Latest Listeria Outbreak

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Three people have died after eating listeria-tainted ice cream products from Blue Bell, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced this week. Meanwhile, Sabra Dipping Company has recalled 30,000 cases of its classic flavor hummus because of the same bacteria.

The news follows a multi-brand spinach recall, again over listeria.

Before you snack, here’s what you should know:

What is listeria monocytogenes?

Listeria is a bacterium that lives in animals’ digestive tracts but can cause an illness called listeriosis when consumed by humans. This happens when fruit and vegetable crops are contaminated by animal waste. That can happen because of tainted irrigation or wash water, or because animals got into the field.

“It’s very difficult to wash them so completely and disinfect them so completely that they become completely clean and sterile,” said Dr. William Schaffner, chairman of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, explaining that this is one of the reasons it is recommended to give vegetables an additional wash at home before consuming them.

What are the symptoms?

Listeria usually results in a fever, muscle aches and gastrointestinal symptoms, according to the CDC. It’s especially harmful to older adults, newborns and pregnant women, but healthy people may consume the bacteria without getting sick, according to the CDC.

Listeriosis can prompt dehydration from vomiting and diarrhea and be especially harmful to people with underlying health conditions, Schaffner said. The bacterium can also get into the blood stream, he said.

Laboratory tests can confirm diagnosis, and doctors will usually treat with antibiotics and fluids, he said.

How serious is listeriosis?

The deadly bacteria sickens about 1,600 people each year and kills about 260 people, according to the CDC. But healthy people who consume it don’t always become ill.

Why is listeria problematic?

If food hasn’t been heated thoroughly, listeria can live on even after its been cooked, Schaffner said. And unlike other bacteria, listeria can continue reproducing in cold temperatures such as a refrigerator and won’t die in a freezer, he said.

“This is a rascal,” he said. “It may create an infectious dose even though you’ve kept the food in the fridge.”

Blue Bell Recall

The ice cream maker recalled products produced in its Oklahoma plant, which it voluntarily shut down last weekend. Eight people were hospitalized in Texas and Kansas, and three of them died, according to the CDC.

The recall included supermarkets in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Wyoming, according to Blue Bell.

Sabra Recall

Sabra Dipping Company has recalled 30,000 cases of its classic flavor hummus over possible listeria contamination, the company announced in a press release Thursday. It learned of the possible contamination when Michigan health authorities inspected a random sample of the hummus at a retail location, according to the release.

Spinach Recall

Amy’s Kitchen and three other companies — Rising Moon Organics, Superior Foods, Inc., and Twin City Foods, Inc. — voluntarily recalled organic and conventional spinach products last month. Twin City Foods said its products were sold at Wegmans Supermarkets, Inc., which also issued a separate recall because the spinach was sold under the Wegmans brand name.

The Food and Drug Administration said its policy is not to name the supplier or comment on whether it is investigating, but Coastal Green LLC in Oxnard, California, told ABC News it supplied leafy greens to all three companies.

Coastal Green said it notified the FDA as soon as it detected listeria during routine testing and realized some of its shipped product may have been contaminated, spokesman Paul Fanelli told ABC News at the time. Coastal Green processes organic and conventional vegetables and is working with the FDA to resolve the listeria problem, he said.

“We’re in the middle of an investigation here as to what the root cause was of the listeria,” Fanelli said. “Once we determine what that is, we’ll change our policies and our procedures accordingly.”

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Three Dead in Latest Listeria Outbreak

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Three people have died after eating listeria-tainted ice cream products from Blue Bell, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced this week. Meanwhile, Sabra Dipping Company has recalled 30,000 cases of its classic flavor hummus because of the same bacteria.

The news follows a multi-brand spinach recall, again over listeria.

Before you snack, here’s what you should know:

What is listeria monocytogenes?

Listeria is a bacterium that lives in animals’ digestive tracts but can cause an illness called listeriosis when consumed by humans. This happens when fruit and vegetable crops are contaminated by animal waste. That can happen because of tainted irrigation or wash water, or because animals got into the field.

“It’s very difficult to wash them so completely and disinfect them so completely that they become completely clean and sterile,” said Dr. William Schaffner, chairman of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, explaining that this is one of the reasons it is recommended to give vegetables an additional wash at home before consuming them.

What are the symptoms?

Listeria usually results in a fever, muscle aches and gastrointestinal symptoms, according to the CDC. It’s especially harmful to older adults, newborns and pregnant women, but healthy people may consume the bacteria without getting sick, according to the CDC.

Listeriosis can prompt dehydration from vomiting and diarrhea and be especially harmful to people with underlying health conditions, Schaffner said. The bacterium can also get into the blood stream, he said.

Laboratory tests can confirm diagnosis, and doctors will usually treat with antibiotics and fluids, he said.

How serious is listeriosis?

The deadly bacteria sickens about 1,600 people each year and kills about 260 people, according to the CDC. But healthy people who consume it don’t always become ill.

Why is listeria problematic?

If food hasn’t been heated thoroughly, listeria can live on even after its been cooked, Schaffner said. And unlike other bacteria, listeria can continue reproducing in cold temperatures such as a refrigerator and won’t die in a freezer, he said.

“This is a rascal,” he said. “It may create an infectious dose even though you’ve kept the food in the fridge.”

Blue Bell Recall

The ice cream maker recalled products produced in its Oklahoma plant, which it voluntarily shut down last weekend. Eight people were hospitalized in Texas and Kansas, and three of them died, according to the CDC.

The recall included supermarkets in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Wyoming, according to Blue Bell.

Sabra Recall

Sabra Dipping Company has recalled 30,000 cases of its classic flavor hummus over possible listeria contamination, the company announced in a press release Thursday. It learned of the possible contamination when Michigan health authorities inspected a random sample of the hummus at a retail location, according to the release.

Spinach Recall

Amy’s Kitchen and three other companies — Rising Moon Organics, Superior Foods, Inc., and Twin City Foods, Inc. — voluntarily recalled organic and conventional spinach products last month. Twin City Foods said its products were sold at Wegmans Supermarkets, Inc., which also issued a separate recall because the spinach was sold under the Wegmans brand name.

The Food and Drug Administration said its policy is not to name the supplier or comment on whether it is investigating, but Coastal Green LLC in Oxnard, California, told ABC News it supplied leafy greens to all three companies.

Coastal Green said it notified the FDA as soon as it detected listeria during routine testing and realized some of its shipped product may have been contaminated, spokesman Paul Fanelli told ABC News at the time. Coastal Green processes organic and conventional vegetables and is working with the FDA to resolve the listeria problem, he said.

“We’re in the middle of an investigation here as to what the root cause was of the listeria,” Fanelli said. “Once we determine what that is, we’ll change our policies and our procedures accordingly.”

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Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Three Dead in Latest Listeria Outbreak

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Three people have died after eating listeria-tainted ice cream products from Blue Bell, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced this week. Meanwhile, Sabra Dipping Company has recalled 30,000 cases of its classic flavor hummus because of the same bacteria.

The news follows a multi-brand spinach recall, again over listeria.

Before you snack, here’s what you should know:

What is listeria monocytogenes?

Listeria is a bacterium that lives in animals’ digestive tracts but can cause an illness called listeriosis when consumed by humans. This happens when fruit and vegetable crops are contaminated by animal waste. That can happen because of tainted irrigation or wash water, or because animals got into the field.

“It’s very difficult to wash them so completely and disinfect them so completely that they become completely clean and sterile,” said Dr. William Schaffner, chairman of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, explaining that this is one of the reasons it is recommended to give vegetables an additional wash at home before consuming them.

What are the symptoms?

Listeria usually results in a fever, muscle aches and gastrointestinal symptoms, according to the CDC. It’s especially harmful to older adults, newborns and pregnant women, but healthy people may consume the bacteria without getting sick, according to the CDC.

Listeriosis can prompt dehydration from vomiting and diarrhea and be especially harmful to people with underlying health conditions, Schaffner said. The bacterium can also get into the blood stream, he said.

Laboratory tests can confirm diagnosis, and doctors will usually treat with antibiotics and fluids, he said.

How serious is listeriosis?

The deadly bacteria sickens about 1,600 people each year and kills about 260 people, according to the CDC. But healthy people who consume it don’t always become ill.

Why is listeria problematic?

If food hasn’t been heated thoroughly, listeria can live on even after its been cooked, Schaffner said. And unlike other bacteria, listeria can continue reproducing in cold temperatures such as a refrigerator and won’t die in a freezer, he said.

“This is a rascal,” he said. “It may create an infectious dose even though you’ve kept the food in the fridge.”

Blue Bell Recall

The ice cream maker recalled products produced in its Oklahoma plant, which it voluntarily shut down last weekend. Eight people were hospitalized in Texas and Kansas, and three of them died, according to the CDC.

The recall included supermarkets in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Wyoming, according to Blue Bell.

Sabra Recall

Sabra Dipping Company has recalled 30,000 cases of its classic flavor hummus over possible listeria contamination, the company announced in a press release Thursday. It learned of the possible contamination when Michigan health authorities inspected a random sample of the hummus at a retail location, according to the release.

Spinach Recall

Amy’s Kitchen and three other companies — Rising Moon Organics, Superior Foods, Inc., and Twin City Foods, Inc. — voluntarily recalled organic and conventional spinach products last month. Twin City Foods said its products were sold at Wegmans Supermarkets, Inc., which also issued a separate recall because the spinach was sold under the Wegmans brand name.

The Food and Drug Administration said its policy is not to name the supplier or comment on whether it is investigating, but Coastal Green LLC in Oxnard, California, told ABC News it supplied leafy greens to all three companies.

Coastal Green said it notified the FDA as soon as it detected listeria during routine testing and realized some of its shipped product may have been contaminated, spokesman Paul Fanelli told ABC News at the time. Coastal Green processes organic and conventional vegetables and is working with the FDA to resolve the listeria problem, he said.

“We’re in the middle of an investigation here as to what the root cause was of the listeria,” Fanelli said. “Once we determine what that is, we’ll change our policies and our procedures accordingly.”

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