Review Category : Health

Tips for Surviving the Switch to Daylight Saving Time

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — If you’re dreading the start of Daylight Saving Time this weekend, here are a few tips from experts on how to ease into your new schedule without wanting to break your alarm clock:

Eat Dinner Early

Our sleep cycle is impacted by our appetite, so try eating earlier if you want extra shut-eye before the start of Daylight Saving Time.

Dr. Alcibiades Rodriguez, assistant professor in the Neurology Department at the New York University Langone Comprehensive Epilepsy Center-Sleep Center, said finishing dinner an hour earlier than normal will help prime you to expect bed earlier.

“We have a circadian rhythm [that] is coinciding with the time we eat,” he explained. “We need to coincide our sleep pattern with our eating pattern.”

Use a Light Box to Ease into the Day

Shifting an hour will mean more light at the end of the day, but also waking up when it’s a little darker outside. Rodriguez explained that sunlight primes the body to wake up.

“It’s going to be more difficult for people to wake up,” Rodriguez said of the days immediately after Daylight Saving starts.

People who have extreme difficulty getting out of bed can try a specially designed alarm that slowly brightens as you wake up, Rodriguez said, noting it can help mimic the feeling that it’s daylight outside.

Take an Afternoon Nap

If you’re unlikely to be able to go to bed early the night when Daylight Saving kicks in, you can take a nap so that you’re not exhausted the following day. Dr. Charles Czeisler, chief of sleep medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, said many people are not going to be able to get to bed too early.

“Many people they go to bed at usual time and they lose an hour of sleep and many different physiological systems are affected by that loss of sleep and the shift of circadian rhythm,” he explained. “It’s harder to reset to earlier hours.”

He pointed out that even though Daylight Saving Time means losing just one hour, it has large health consequences. Czeisler said that heart attack risk goes up 5 percent and motor vehicle crashes go up 17 percent immediately after Daylight Saving Time starts.

Avoid Screens Before Bedtime

Experts have advised the sleep-deprived to avoid screens before bed for years, but the advice is even more important when Daylight Saving Time kicks in. Czeisler points out reducing time in front of the TV, computer or smartphone will help restless sleepers get extra shut-eye before losing an hour.

“You can turn down intensity in screens or ideally turn them off and just be mindful,” Czeisler said.

He said losing sleep puts extra stressors on different points of the body so it’s extra important to be proactive when Daylight Saving starts.

“The systems that are affected by sleep loss are affected by inflammation,” he said, pointing out the immune system, cardiovascular system and appetite hormones can all go haywire without enough sleep.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Two US Service Members Diagnosed with Zika Virus

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Two male military servicemen have been diagnosed with the Zika virus, according to Adm. Kurt Tidd, commander of U.S. Southern Command.

One military service member was deployed in Colombia and the other in Brazil, Tidd told reporters on Thursday, noting that both men have recovered from their illness and have returned to duty.

In addition, a pregnant female service member stationed in a Zika-affected country was allowed to leave her station early over concerns that she could become infected with the virus, Tidd said.

In other related news, Florida reported on Thursday six new cases of the Zika virus in just 24 hours, bringing its total case number to 54 people diagnosed in the state.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott has already declared a state of emergency in 12 counties where the cases have been diagnosed.

All of the Zika infections except one is believed to have been contracted outside the U.S. One case is believed to have been from sexual contact with a person infected with the Zika virus.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Kids to Parents: Don’t Post About Me on Social Media

iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Before you post that photo of your child on Facebook, be sure to ask for their permission.

According to a new survey investigating families and technology, that’s the social media rule kids want their parents to follow.

Alexis Hiniker led the research and heard from kids and their parents from 249 families across 40 states.

“They weren’t necessarily saying that parents shouldn’t be posting about them at all, they just wanted to have some control over their online image,” Hiniker, a doctoral student at the University of Washington, told ABC News.

The joint survey from the University of Washington and the University of Michigan, while not a scientific poll, found that children are embarrassed and frustrated about the content their parents are posting about them on social media.

New York City mother of three, Wendy Bradford, said she does her best to respect her children’s wishes when it comes to hitting the post button.

“I do ask my kids for permission most of the time,” said Bradford, author of the parenting blog mamaonetothree.com. “Because they’re so aware and they will say, ‘Is this going on Facebook?’ It is a topic of conversation.”

The rules are ever-changing on social media and its role in the family evolving and in a world where the majority of parents are on social media.

“I think it’s great that parents share pictures of their families. I don’t think it’s a bad thing,” Bradford said. “I think it’s a changing thing. As my children have become aware of social media, they have voiced their opinions and I can’t ignore that.”

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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WATCH: History of Heroin in America

ABC News(NEW YORK) — Approximately 29 Americans die from heroin overdoses every day, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But when heroin was first marketed to the public in 1898 by the Bayer Pharmaceutical Company, it was initially marketed as a cough suppressant.

Watch the video below to learn more facts about the history of heroin in America, and tune in to Breaking Point: Heroin in America, a special edition of ABC News’ 20/20 with ABC News World News Tonight anchor David Muir on Friday, March 11, at 10 p.m. ET.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Your Body: Blacklegged Ticks More Prevalent in US than Believed

iStock/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical Contributor

The blacklegged tick, or ixodes scapularis as it’s scientifically known, is the primary source of Lyme disease in the eastern U.S. And now, data show that they live in far more counties than previously thought.

A new study found the ticks in a total of over 1,500 counties across 43 states. That represents nearly half of the counties in the U.S.

So how do you protect yourself?

Cover up with high socks and long pants when going outdoors. After you come back inside, inspect yourself in all areas, especially the ones covered by hair. And make sure to check your pets, too.

If you find an attached tick, save it in a plastic bag after removing it to show your health care provider.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Prince William and Duchess Kate Tackle Suicide Prevention in Latest Mental Health Campaign Initiative

TOBY MELVILLE/AFP/Getty Images(LONDON) — Prince William and Duchess Kate are lifting the veil on one of the most difficult and vexing subjects young people are struggling with as they grow up: suicide.

The future king and queen are continuing their mental health campaign, which has become the number one priority in their charitable endeavors.

The royal couple Thursday comforted mental health patients at St. Thomas Hospital in London, where a suicide prevention program strives to provide a safe place for young people contemplating suicide.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge met with Jonny Benjamin, who was diagnosed with schizophrenia at age 20. Benjamin felt so lost that he attempted to take his life by jumping off a bridge in London six years ago.

A passerby saw Benjamin and talked him off the ledge. Benjamin started a campaign to find the good Samaritan called Neil Laybourn, who changed his life and gave him the courage to survive and deal with his disease.

The campaign went viral. William and Kate visited the two men and other young people struggling with mental disease.

“Someone told me five people a day try and kill themselves,” William told the two men. “I was just blown away by the statistics.”

With Kate at his side, he added: “For both of us, the mental health piece has got lots of aspects. It’s such a big issue that we need to do something about it.”

William’s job as an air ambulance pilot has exposed him to several young men who felt hopeless and wanted to end their lives. As a result, William was struck by the lack of resources for young men struggling with suicidal thoughts.

William, Kate, and Prince Harry are making a renewed commitment to raise awareness on this issue. William plans to focus on male suicide and his brother, Harry, is committed to raising awareness of veterans who’re struggling with mental health issues and invisible injuries.

Kate has been highlighting children’s mental health and has stressed repeatedly that mental health is often the root cause of more significant problems later in life, like addiction, homelessness, crime and abuse.

“We see through the work we do with addiction, homelessness and crime that a lot of it stems back to childhood,” she said.

Benjamin said he hoped to encourage young people who had feelings of hopelessness.

“I wanted to let people know it’s OK to have suicidal thoughts and feelings,” he said. “When you’re in a place where you want to end your life, you’ve got no hope left and no belief left in yourself.”

William and Kate later returned to Kensington Palace where people screened a documentary about Benjamin’s suicide attempt and quest to find the man who saved his life.

William encouraged the young people who had been invited to the palace to feel comfortable taking about their concerns and feelings.

“I really feel that we don’t listen and we don’t talk enough so I hope that, if anything, you take away from today is to talk amongst yourselves, to share your problems and communicate and be there for each other,” he said. “Thank you all for being here today and sharing.”

The duchess has made the mental well-being of young people her priority. Just last month she issued a public service announcement on mental health. She also turned Kensington Palace into a makeshift newsroom to participate as guest editor of a special blog on mental health awareness.

Earlier in the day Thursday, William and Kate made a private visit to a charity providing a residential care center for suicidal young people.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Doctors ‘Grow’ Jaw for Girl with One-in-a-Million Condition

Seattle Children’s Hospital(SEATTLE) — A Washington state girl can now show off her smile after doctors were able to “regrow” her lower jaw.

Alexis Melton, 7, was born with a rare genetic condition called auriculo-condylar syndrome, which caused the malformation of her jaw, according to the Seattle Children’s Hospital.

“Lexi’s condition is extraordinarily rare,” Dr. Michael Cunningham, medical director of Seattle Children’s Craniofacial Center, said on the hospital’s website. “The prevalence is less than one in one million. Without treatment it’s life threatening. Before Lexi, we’d only seen two other children with a similar genetic condition.”

The first sign something was wrong happened when Alexis’ mother, Lisa Skylynd, had a complication during pregnancy, she said. Amniotic fluid started to build up and an ultrasound revealed that Alexis, also called Lexi, had an extremely underdeveloped jaw.

“Until that point, it had been such a seamless pregnancy,” Skylynd said on the Seattle Children’s Hospital’s website. “The only thing we knew from the ultrasounds was that she had a really tiny jaw. It was overwhelming.”

When Lexi was born, doctors immediately performed a tracheostomy, an incision in her neck that could help her breathe. Her jaw was so tiny that it was restricting her airway. Doctors eventually discovered that her jaw was a mirror image of her upper jaw and was fused to her skull. The condition was life threatening without treatment.

“It was very emotional,” Skylynd said. “At the time it was hard to understand how compromised her airway was or the complexity of her condition. She literally didn’t have an airway and could not breathe without the tracheostomy. If the tracheostomy were to ever come out, there was a possibility we could lose her.”

While doctors stabilized the Lexi, they had to wait to help change her jaw. At age 3, Lexi started the process to “grow” her jaw. Doctors would need to get extra bone to help expand her jaw so that her airway wouldn’t be restricted. A device would then be used to slowly expand her jaw by stretching the bone slowly over time.

As bone is stretched, it grows to fill the gaps, effectively “growing” a fully formed jaw, doctors said.

“We began by using one of Lexi’s lower ribs to add bone to the back of her jaw,” Dr. Richard Hopper, surgical director of Seattle Children’s Craniofacial Center, said on the hospital’s website. After adding the device, “it works like the winding of a clock. Twice a day her parents needed to turn the device and it gradually formed new bone. We essentially took her old jaw and made it into a new jaw.”

Throughout the year, Lexi’s airway was cleared as her jaw expanded. Doctors were eventually able to remove the tracheostomy.

“Living without a tracheostomy changed our lives,” Skylynd said. “Things like taking a bath were life-threatening before the surgery. Now she’s taking swim lessons.”

Lexi still has challenges, Skylynd said. She can’t eat due to her jaw, but a procedure in 2017 will hopefully allow her to finally eat on her own.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Nestle Recalls DiGiorno, Lean Cuisine and Stouffer’s Products

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Nestle USA is voluntarily recalling certain lots of more than a dozen of its frozen meals because they may contain small pieces of glass, the company said today in a statement.

The recall comes after several consumers reported finding small pieces of glass in some DiGiorno, Lean Cuisine and Stouffer’s meals, the company said. No injuries have been reported, it added.

Spinach — the only ingredient common to all of the affected products — is believed to be the source of the glass particles, a company spokeswoman told ABC News on Thursday. That’s why the California-based company decided to pull all products in its lines containing spinach — about 3 million individual meals, the spokeswoman said.

The affected products include DiGiorno Thin & Crispy Spinach and Garlic Pizza; DiGiorno Rising Crust Spinach and Mushroom Pizza; DiGiorno pizzeria Thin Crust Spinach and Mushroom Pizza; DiGiorno pizzeria Tuscan-style Chicken Pizza; Lean Cuisine Spinach and Mushroom Pizza; Lean Cuisine Spinach Artichoke Ravioli; Lean Cuisine Ricotta and Spinach Ravioli; Lean Cuisine Spinach, Artichoke and Chicken Panini; Lean Cuisine Mushroom Mezzaluna Ravioli; Stouffer’s Vegetable Lasagna (10 oz., 37 oz. and 96 oz. sizes); Stouffer’s Spinach Soufflé; and Stouffer’s Chicken Lasagna.

The meals are manufactured in plants around the country, but the source of the spinach is the same, the spokeswoman said.

In the statement, the company said that “The quality and safety of our products are the top priority for our company … We are working with both the U.S. Food & Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Agriculture on this voluntary recall and will cooperate with them fully.”

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Doctors ‘Grow’ Jaw for Girl With One-in-a-Million Condition

Seattle Children’s Hospital(SEATTLE) — A Washington state girl can now show off her smile after doctors were able to “regrow” her lower jaw.

Alexis Melton, 7, was born with a rare genetic condition called auriculo-condylar syndrome, which caused the malformation of her jaw, according to the Seattle Children’s Hospital.

“Lexi’s condition is extraordinarily rare,” Dr. Michael Cunningham, medical director of Seattle Children’s Craniofacial Center, said on the hospital’s website. “The prevalence is less than one in one million. Without treatment it’s life threatening. Before Lexi, we’d only seen two other children with a similar genetic condition.”

The first sign something was wrong happened when Alexis’ mother, Lisa Skylynd, had a complication during pregnancy, she said. Amniotic fluid started to build up and an ultrasound revealed that Alexis, also called Lexi, had an extremely underdeveloped jaw.

“Until that point, it had been such a seamless pregnancy,” Skylynd said on the Seattle Children’s Hospital’s website. “The only thing we knew from the ultrasounds was that she had a really tiny jaw. It was overwhelming.”

When Lexi was born, doctors immediately performed a tracheostomy, an incision in her neck that could help her breathe. Her jaw was so tiny that it was restricting her airway. Doctors eventually discovered that her jaw was a mirror image of her upper jaw and was fused to her skull. The condition was life threatening without treatment.

“It was very emotional,” Skylynd said. “At the time it was hard to understand how compromised her airway was or the complexity of her condition. She literally didn’t have an airway and could not breathe without the tracheostomy. If the tracheostomy were to ever come out, there was a possibility we could lose her.”

While doctors stabilized Lexi, they had to wait to help change her jaw. At age 3, Lexi started the process to “grow” her jaw. Doctors would need to get extra bone to help expand her jaw so that her airway wouldn’t be restricted. A device would then be used to slowly expand her jaw by stretching the bone slowly over time. As bone is stretched, it grows to fill the gaps, effectively “growing” a fully formed jaw, doctors said.

“We began by using one of Lexi’s lower ribs to add bone to the back of her jaw,” Dr. Richard Hopper, surgical director of Seattle Children’s Craniofacial Center, said on the hospital’s website. After adding the device, “it works like the winding of a clock. Twice a day her parents needed to turn the device and it gradually formed new bone. We essentially took her old jaw and made it into a new jaw.”

Throughout the year, Lexi’s airway was cleared as her jaw expanded. Doctors were eventually able to remove the tracheostomy.

“Living without a tracheostomy changed our lives,” Skylynd said. “Things like taking a bath were life-threatening before the surgery. Now she’s taking swim lessons.”

Lexi still has challenges, Skylynd said. She can’t eat due to her jaw, but a procedure in 2017 will hopefully allow her to finally eat on her own.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Jedi the Dog Helps His Little ‘Master’ Luke Battle Type 1 Diabetes

iStock/Thinkstock(GLENDALE, Calif.) — The force is strong with Jedi, a 3-year-old diabetic alert dog, and his 7-year-old “master,” Luke Nuttall.

Luke has been battling type 1 diabetes — an autoimmune disease with no cure — ever since he was diagnosed at 2 years old, according to his mother, Dorrie Nuttall, from Glendale, California.

Dorrie, 37, told ABC News that the glucose in Luke’s blood can quickly spike or plummet because his pancreas cannot produce insulin.

If Luke’s blood sugar gets too low, he starts to lose feeling in his hands and feet, gets dizzy, has pains in his stomach and is at risk of seizure, Dorrie said. And if his blood sugar spikes too high, it can cause damage to his vital organs, she added.

But amazingly, Jedi can smell these spikes and dips, and the black English labrador has been trained since he was a puppy to alert Dorrie to such changes in blood sugar. He brings over a brinsel — a cloth tube — to Dorrie and “bows” when Luke’s blood sugar is too low and “waves” if it’s too high, Dorrie said. (Jedi lifts his paw up or down to signal the change).

Dorrie recently shared a photo on Facebook of Jedi alerting her when Luke’s blood sugar had dropped low in the middle of the night. The photo has gone viral with over 373,000 likes and over 182,000 shares as of this afternoon.

“Jedi jumped off the bed, then back on again, though I felt him do this I didn’t wake up,” she wrote on Facebook. “Then Jedi laid on me. I woke up…without Jedi I would have had no idea that he was dropping out of a safe range.”

Though Luke has a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) that sends alerts to her phone and smart watch, Jedi often alerts her faster to Luke’s condition, Dorrie said.

“The CGM probably would have alerted me to the ‘low’ maybe 10 or 15 minutes after, but every early alert from Jedi really helps,” she said. “I don’t think he’s necessarily better than just having the monitor, but it’s definitely helpful to get that earlier alert.”

Jedi has also helped out the family in other ways, Dorrie said.

“The two are the silliest two things together, and Jedi has brought so much joy and laughter,” she said. “Though type 1 diabetes has certainly been a part of Luke’s childhood, we want him to know it didn’t ruin his or our lives and that he had Jedi — this great dog in his life.”

Dorrie added that she hopes the inseparable duo’s newfound Internet fame helps bring more awareness to type 1 diabetes.

“So many people assume it’s preventable, which is not the case,” she said. “I often get told ‘What did you feed him?’ or ‘Just change his diet,’ and that’s hard for a parent to hear.”

Dorrie added that she wants more parents to be informed of the warning signs: frequent urination, increased thirst and appetite, extreme fatigue, blurry vision and weight loss.

“We knew this beautiful, little girl — her doctor thought she had strep throat and by the time they figured out it was type 1 diabetes, she had seizures and ended up passing away,” she said. “It’s heartbreaking.”

And though Luke is a “brave, strong boy,” the 7-year-old gets frustrated once in a while and asks if his diabetes will ever go away, she said.

“I don’t have an answer for him because there is no cure,” Dorrie said. “There is a desperate need for more funding for research to find a cure.”

Meanwhile, Dorrie said she and Luke are just grateful for Jedi.

“Amidst a disease that does everything in its power to make life so much harder, this is a picture of loyalty and love and perseverance,” she wrote on Facebook. “A reminder that we will not let diabetes win, that we will never give up, and that we will always fight for our children.”

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