Review Category : Health

Eye Movements May Be Key Marker of ADHD

iStock/Thinkstock(TEL AVIV, Israel) — Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a serious behavioral disorder but as just as serious is the misdiagnosis of the condition, which can result in patients needlessly receiving the powerful stimulant Ritalin.

However, researchers from Tel Aviv University believe they have a foolproof way of knowing whether a child or adult is suffering from ADHD and that’s from observing involuntary eye movements.

Using participants diagnosed with ADHD and a control group without the disorder, the researchers had them take an ADHD diagnostic computer test.

The chief difference was that ADHD group was given the test both before and after taking Ritalin.

What Dr. Moshe Fried and his team observed was that those with ADHD were unable to suppress eye movements in anticipation of visual stimuli prior to their medication.

But once the Ritalin took effect, they could control their eye movement equally as well as the control group participants. According to Fried, “Eye movements tracked in this test are involuntary, so they constitute a sound physiological marker of ADHD,” making it a far more accurate gauge on whether someone is indeed afflicted with the disorder.

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Adults’ Top Kid Worries: Obesity and Bullying

iStock/Thinkstock(ANN ARBOR, Mich.) — Rightfully so, American adults are worried about all the problems that children face these days, but probably none more so than the obesity epidemic, which can put kids at a disadvantage as early as their toddler years.

Of the more than 2,000 adults surveyed in a University of Michigan poll on children’s health, 55 percent ranked obesity number one.

Meanwhile, bullying came in second place with 52 percent, followed by drug abuse at 49 percent.

Poll director Matthew Davis says one of the chief reasons for the poll was to give health professionals, lawmakers and community leaders a better understanding of how to deal with the problems affecting youngsters in their own backyards “to improve and safeguard our children’s health.”

Here’s the list of the top ten concerns and the percentage of respondents who listed them as their major concerns:

  1. Childhood obesity: 55 percent
  2. Bullying: 52 percent
  3. Drug abuse: 49 percent
  4. Smoking and tobacco use: 47 percent
  5. School violence: 44 percent
  6. Child abuse and neglect: 42 percent
  7. Alcohol abuse: 41 percent
  8. Internet safety: 40 percent
  9. Gun-related injuries: 39 percent
  10. Teen pregnancy: 37 percent

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Experts Weigh In on the Health Benefits of Hot Lemon Water

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Given the staggering number of freshly pressed juices, herb-filled supplements and complicated cleanses that have flooded the nutritional market, it is perhaps surprising that the most popular elixir in the wellness community of late is made of just two simple ingredients.

Nutritionists, celebrities and healthful eating enthusiasts all over the Internet seem to agree: A single glass of hot lemon water before breakfast can not only help you stay hydrated but may also improve digestion and regulate an overactive appetite.

Miranda Kerr told Net-a-Porter that she begins each day with warm water and lemon, which she claims cleanses the body. On her blog, Lauren Conrad termed the citrus fruit and still water a “match made in heaven.” And Stacey Kiebler confirmed in People magazine that she, too, relies on the beverage to jump start her day.

Between them, these imbibers have claimed that the brew has helped them lose weight, cleared up their skin, and even equipped their body to better absorb vitamins and minerals.

Celebrity nutritionist Keri Glassman, who launched Nutritious Life magazine, told ABC News that she often drinks water with lemon in the morning.

If for nothing else, she said, as a method to ensure that she stays hydrated. “Many people like the taste [of lemon] and if that gets you to drink water then that alone is positive,” she said.

As far as resolutions go, the habit is certainly not a difficult one to pick up. According to Melisse Gelula, the co-founder and editorial director of Well + Good, an online wellness bible, the ease with which enthusiasts can find hot water and lemon feeds its widespread appeal.

Unlike so many other fitness and health fads, this one does not require a substantial investment of time or money.

“You don’t need to be a member of the wellness cognoscenti to do it,” Gelula surmised. “It has become one of those ‘Health 101′ things that people all across the spectrum can do. … You don’t have to be a green juicing kind of person to enjoy it.”

And while the drink is most popular in the morning, Gelula recommended it as an after-dinner drink.

“Right after you’ve had something a little rich or a little indulgent, I kind of like lemon water,” she said. “If it’s post-Thanksgiving dinner, for example, have some lemon water.”

The warm citrus can settle your stomach, she said, and clear your palate.

Dana James, the founder of Food Coach NYC, said that though she thinks the trend is perhaps “over-hyped,” it is not without nutritional merit.

“What it does do is increase detoxification because the bitterness of the lemon activates the bile flow,” which, she said, “helps emulsify and remove fat soluble toxins.”

Furthermore, James said the habit often makes her clients “feel virtuous, which leads to better all-day eating habits.” Ultimately, the thrice-certified nutritionist concluded that there is “no reason not to be doing it.”

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Researchers Say Experimental Chikungunya Vaccine Shows Promise

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Researchers may have laid the groundwork for a vaccine to prevent the Chikungunya virus that has spread to a number of U.S. states after originating in the Caribbean.

According to a study published in The Lancet medical journal, researchers say that they have begun the initial phases of testing on a vaccine and found only minimal side effects. The study included just 25 human subjects, but each of the subjects demonstrated a strong immune response and lasting antibody presence.

The disease, which is not fatal, can cause excruciating joint pain and can be spread by mosquito bite.

Researchers say their subjects showed similar numbers of antibodies to a pair of previously infected individuals. Side effects of the trial vaccine included pain at injection site or headaches, though less common side effects included increased risk of liver damage and decreased white blood cell count.

The vaccine was created in a similar manner to approved vaccines for Hepatitis B and Human Papillomavirus. Still, much testing remains to be completed before the vaccine would be considered for a clinical trial.

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WHO: Number of Ebola Cases, Deaths May ‘Vastly Underestimate the Magnitude of the Outbreak’

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The World Health Organization speculated on Thursday that the number of individuals sickened or killed by the Ebola outbreak in West Africa may “vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak.”

The United Nations health agency said that there is evidence that the current figures of at least 1,060 deaths and 1,975 sickened in the outbreak may be lower than the actually numbers. The WHO noted that it was prepared with an operational response plan that spans the “next several months.”

In the meantime, the WHO is “coordinating a massive scaling up of the international response,” including accumulating support from individual nations, disease control agencies, U.N. agencies and others.

The World Food Programme is working to deliver food to over one million individuals in quarantine zones in West Africa, while the WHO works to map and contain the disease.

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FDA Warns Americans About Products Fraudulently Claiming to Treat Ebola

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning consumers to beware of products being sold online that fraudulently claim to treat or prevent the Ebola virus.

The FDA notes that there are currently no FDA-approved vaccines or drugs to treat or prevent Ebola. Additionally, while there are experimental treatments and vaccines, they “have not yet been fully tested for safety or effectiveness,” and are not available for purchase on the Internet.

The agency said that it has received a number of consumer complaints about products making such claims since the outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa.

Despite the concern, the FDA maintains that the disease does not pose a significant risk to the American public. Ebola is not water-borne or food-borne and can not be transmitted through the air.

Anyone who sees fraudulent products or products making false claims about their effectiveness in preventing or treating Ebola are urged to report them to the FDA, and anyone promoting such products could face FDA action if those claims aren’t removed or corrected.

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Extra Weight Ups Risk of Common Cancers, Study Finds

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — By now you’ve probably heard that obesity increases the risk of heart disease and diabetes. But you might not know that the extra weight can have other serious health consequences, including cancer.

A new study found that 10 percent of all gallbladder, kidney, liver and colon cancers could be attributed to excess weight. A whopping 41 percent of uterine cancers were tied to obesity, according to the study published Thursday in The Lancet.

More than 36 percent of Americans are now considered obese, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An additional 34 percent are considered overweight.

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Extra Weight Ups Risk of Common Cancers, Study Finds

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — By now you’ve probably heard that obesity increases the risk of heart disease and diabetes. But you might not know that the extra weight can have other serious health consequences, including cancer.

A new study found that 10 percent of all gallbladder, kidney, liver and colon cancers could be attributed to excess weight. A whopping 41 percent of uterine cancers were tied to obesity, according to the study published Thursday in The Lancet.

More than 36 percent of Americans are now considered obese, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An additional 34 percent are considered overweight.

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Hand Surgery for Better Engagement Ring Selfies

Courtesy of Dr. Ariel Ostad(NEW YORK) — When Christa Hendershot got engaged last fall, she, like thousands of other women, wanted to show off her engagement ring on social media. But after snapping a few photos, she realized she didn’t like the way her hands looked.

So the 33-year-old from Mount Sinai, New York, turned to plastic surgery, hoping it would smooth out her hands in order for them to become more “selfie worthy.” She recently shelled out more than $3,000 for hand rejuvenation at her plastic surgeon Dr. Ariel Ostad’s office in New York.

Hendershot told Ostad she was unhappy with her hands because she thought they were veiny and her knuckles were “very red.”

Within minutes of the procedure, Hendershot was happier about the appearance of her hands. “The veins are not as blue,” she said.

Ostad said he has had several patients show him photos they had taken of themselves and point out their flaws.

“I’ve noticed over the last six months [that] patients actually bring a selfie in the examining room,” he said. “They show me what bothers them and what they would like to fix.”

The quest for the perfect selfie photo has gotten so extreme that filters and photo edits just aren’t cutting it for some people, who are instead going under the knife to psychically alter their appearance in hopes of a better selfie.

After seeing how she looked in photos from her wedding day, Jen Muir, 33, said she realized she hated the way her nose looked and has shied away from taking selfies ever since.

“I can see everybody posting pictures of themselves, and I’m thinking, ‘Why can’t I do it? What’s the problem?’” the Long Island, New York, woman who’s originally from Costa Rica said. “I saw a guy taking a selfie one of these days, and I thought, ‘I wish, I wish I could do it.’”

So Muir decided to have a nose job and spent $15,000, all for a better selfie.

“I want to change my profile. I feel like my nose hangs,” she said. “I also want to change my bump. I feel like it’s too big.”

Her plastic surgeon, Dr. Samuel Rizk of New York City, also credited social media for an uptick in business, the biggest trend he has seen in his 16-year career. “I personally would see two to three patients a day that have come in from selfies and social media,” he said.

Muir was so happy with her new nose that she started crying.

“I love it,” she said. “I just see my eyes and my lips and my teeth. I can see my teeth more, and that’s what I wanted.”

Watch the full story on ABC News’ 20/20 Friday at 10 p.m. ET.

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Hand Surgery for Better Engagement Ring Selfies

Courtesy of Dr. Ariel Ostad(NEW YORK) — When Christa Hendershot got engaged last fall, she, like thousands of other women, wanted to show off her engagement ring on social media. But after snapping a few photos, she realized she didn’t like the way her hands looked.

So the 33-year-old from Mount Sinai, New York, turned to plastic surgery, hoping it would smooth out her hands in order for them to become more “selfie worthy.” She recently shelled out more than $3,000 for hand rejuvenation at her plastic surgeon Dr. Ariel Ostad’s office in New York.

Hendershot told Ostad she was unhappy with her hands because she thought they were veiny and her knuckles were “very red.”

Within minutes of the procedure, Hendershot was happier about the appearance of her hands. “The veins are not as blue,” she said.

Ostad said he has had several patients show him photos they had taken of themselves and point out their flaws.

“I’ve noticed over the last six months [that] patients actually bring a selfie in the examining room,” he said. “They show me what bothers them and what they would like to fix.”

The quest for the perfect selfie photo has gotten so extreme that filters and photo edits just aren’t cutting it for some people, who are instead going under the knife to psychically alter their appearance in hopes of a better selfie.

After seeing how she looked in photos from her wedding day, Jen Muir, 33, said she realized she hated the way her nose looked and has shied away from taking selfies ever since.

“I can see everybody posting pictures of themselves, and I’m thinking, ‘Why can’t I do it? What’s the problem?’” the Long Island, New York, woman who’s originally from Costa Rica said. “I saw a guy taking a selfie one of these days, and I thought, ‘I wish, I wish I could do it.’”

So Muir decided to have a nose job and spent $15,000, all for a better selfie.

“I want to change my profile. I feel like my nose hangs,” she said. “I also want to change my bump. I feel like it’s too big.”

Her plastic surgeon, Dr. Samuel Rizk of New York City, also credited social media for an uptick in business, the biggest trend he has seen in his 16-year career. “I personally would see two to three patients a day that have come in from selfies and social media,” he said.

Muir was so happy with her new nose that she started crying.

“I love it,” she said. “I just see my eyes and my lips and my teeth. I can see my teeth more, and that’s what I wanted.”

Watch the full story on ABC News’ 20/20 Friday at 10 p.m. ET.

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Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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