Review Category : Health

Researchers Say Male Breast Cancer Treatment Falling Behind Female Treatment

Purestock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Researchers say that treatment of male breast cancer is failing to keep up with that of female patients.

According to the study, presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, while there has been significant improvement in treatment for male breast cancer patients, men are still less likely than female breast cancer patients to receive the appropriate treatment. Men are more likely to undergo a mastectomy, which have been found to negatively affect quality of life.

While male breast cancers are often different on a cellular level, those cancers are often susceptible to more treatment options. Instead, researchers say, a lack of access to providers specializing in male breast cancer inhibits many male breast cancer patients.

The study was part of a three-part program, which includes future plans to create a registry of male breast cancer patients, and later clinical trials for new treatment options.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

Why Rape Victims Don’t Report and Why Details Can Be Hazy

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Rolling Stone magazine’s move to backpedal its story about a University of Virginia student’s alleged gang rape has put another twist in the shocking narrative. But as the story unfolds, experts say people should keep in mind that trauma victims’ memories are often imperfect.

The victim, identified in a December Rolling Stone article as “Jackie,” told the publication that she was raped by seven members of a UVA Phi Kappa Psi fraternity in 2012, but the Washington Post raised several questions about Jackie’s story regarding the number of assailants, where she was attacked and who attacked her.

Many trauma victims don’t clearly remember certain details of what happened to them, said Dr. Phillip Resnick, who directs the forensic psychiatry program at UH Case Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio, and is not involved in the UVA case. For example, victims who have been robbed at gunpoint might focus on the gun but not remember details of the robber’s face, he said.

“This is an issue with all crime victims,” he said. “It doesn’t mean that the victim will be unreliable.”

He said if a victim remembered a license plate number but was off by one digit, it wouldn’t suggest false reporting, but hint at a memory distortion or omission.

Sexual assault victims often have a hard time recalling what happened leading up to or following the assault, regardless of whether they were drugged, said Jennifer Marsh, director of victim services at the anti-sexual assault group RAINN, which stands for Rape Abuse and Incest National Network.

Sexual assault victims may also try to fill in the gaps in their memories as they try to make sense of what happened to them, Marsh said. Sometimes victims do this because they’re afraid that no one will believe them without a coherent story, she said. As a result, many law enforcement officials have been trained to see these memory gaps not as red flags but as “perfectly normal following a traumatic event.”

Resnick also said an inability to remember some aspects of trauma is actually part of the diagnostic criterion for post-traumatic stress disorder, which The Post wrote Jackie told them she was diagnosed with following the rape. That doesn’t mean all PTSD sufferers have memory loss, but it means it’s common enough that it’s listed in official diagnostic manuals as a symptom, he said.

“And of course time decays memory,” Resnick said. “So someone is more likely to give an accurate picture to police [immediately after the fact] than if they’re interviewed by a reporter two years later.”

Despite advantages gained by women’s and victims’ rights groups more than three decades ago, Resnick said people are still hesitant to report sexual assaults because of the stigma and humiliation that goes along with it. Victims are also less likely to report these crimes if they were drunk or knew their assailant, he said, often asking themselves whether they did anything to provoke an attack. And if the victim doesn’t think she (or he) will be taken seriously, they won’t want to go through the trauma of talking about it, Resnick said.

Groups disagree over how many victims of sexual assault don’t report them to police. According to RAINN, 60 percent of sexual assaults go unreported, and only 3 percent of all rapists go to prison. Rolling Stone reported that only about 12 percent of rape victims report the crimes against them, and a Department of Justice report estimated the rate to be 27 percent.

Though Rolling Stone reported that between 2 and 8 percent of sexual assault accusations are unfounded, Resnick said he wasn’t sure how accurate the number was. Even so, he said a victim would be more likely to lie about sexual assault if that victim had been rejected by a lover or was a teen who had been found in a compromising position by his or her parents.

Marsh said it’s important to keep in mind that about 10,000 people call RAINN’s phone and web hotlines for sexual assault each month.

“The big picture is that we hear stories like the one told in the Rolling Stone piece every week — if not daily — on the national sexual assault hotline,” she said. “And unfortunately stories like Jackie’s, the one told in the piece, are all too common.”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

Chocolate May Reduce Diabetes Risk

iStock/Thinkstock(BOSTON) — Chocolate, the miracle food, gets another gold star if a new study is to be believed.

According to Dr. Chisa Matsumoto, moderate consumption of chocolate might help to reduce the risk of diabetes.

In the research, a team led by Matsumoto of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston and Tokyo Medical University looked at the records of more than 18,000 men with an average age of 66 who all reported their intake of chocolate. In a follow-up nine years later, about 1,120 men had developed diabetes.

The researchers determined that men who ate one to three servings per month had a seven percent reduced risk for diabetes compared to men who ate no chocolate. The risk went down further when one or two servings of chocolate were consumed per week. Furthermore, men with a body mass index (BMI) under 25 who ate two or more chocolate servings weekly lessen their diabetes risk by 41 percent as opposed to men who did not indulge in the sweet treat.

Although there was no direct reason given for this phenomenon, Matsumoto believes it might have to do with cocoa and chocolate improving insulin resistance as previous studies have shown.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

Men Who Remarry Often Go for Much Younger Wives

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Many divorced men like to “rob the cradle,” so to speak, if they decide to marry again.

A Pew Research Center analysis of Census data finds that 20 percent of guys who decide to take another wife will find one who’s at least 10 years younger than them.

The first time around is a lot different for men, according to Pew. Just five percent will walk down the aisle with a woman 10 years his junior.

As far as men looking for an older woman is concerned, which doesn’t happen all that often, there really is no difference between first and second marriages.

When it comes to what women want, things are bit different. During a first marriage, about seven percent of women pick a man at least 10 years older than her, which rises to 13 percent if a woman remarries.

The Pew study reveals that women aren’t so enamored with younger men during their first trip to the altar with only three percent marrying guys who are younger. However, that increases to 13 percent if they opt to tie the knot again.

To show how thing have changed culturally over the last half century, just 13 percent of married adults were on their second marriage five decades ago. That number has risen to 23 percent today.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

Men Who Remarry Often Go for Much Younger Wives

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Many divorced men like to “rob the cradle,” so to speak, if they decide to marry again.

A Pew Research Center analysis of Census data finds that 20 percent of guys who decide to take another wife will find one who’s at least 10 years younger than them.

The first time around is a lot different for men, according to Pew. Just five percent will walk down the aisle with a woman 10 years his junior.

As far as men looking for an older woman is concerned, which doesn’t happen all that often, there really is no difference between first and second marriages.

When it comes to what women want, things are bit different. During a first marriage, about seven percent of women pick a man at least 10 years older than her, which rises to 13 percent if a woman remarries.

The Pew study reveals that women aren’t so enamored with younger men during their first trip to the altar with only three percent marrying guys who are younger. However, that increases to 13 percent if they opt to tie the knot again.

To show how thing have changed culturally over the last half century, just 13 percent of married adults were on their second marriage five decades ago. That number has risen to 23 percent today.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

Men Who Remarry Often Go for Much Younger Wives

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Many divorced men like to “rob the cradle,” so to speak, if they decide to marry again.

A Pew Research Center analysis of Census data finds that 20 percent of guys who decide to take another wife will find one who’s at least 10 years younger than them.

The first time around is a lot different for men, according to Pew. Just five percent will walk down the aisle with a woman 10 years his junior.

As far as men looking for an older woman is concerned, which doesn’t happen all that often, there really is no difference between first and second marriages.

When it comes to what women want, things are bit different. During a first marriage, about seven percent of women pick a man at least 10 years older than her, which rises to 13 percent if a woman remarries.

The Pew study reveals that women aren’t so enamored with younger men during their first trip to the altar with only three percent marrying guys who are younger. However, that increases to 13 percent if they opt to tie the knot again.

To show how thing have changed culturally over the last half century, just 13 percent of married adults were on their second marriage five decades ago. That number has risen to 23 percent today.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

‘MSSNG’ Project, Partnership Between Autism Speaks and Google for Autism Research, Has Official Launch

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A research project by Google and Autism Speaks to sequence and study human genomes and seek a breakthrough for autism was officially launched Tuesday.

News of the partnership between the tech giant and the science and advocacy organization was first announced in June. The project aims to break new ground in understanding or treatment of autism, the developmental disorder which the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has estimated affects 1 in 68 children across the nation.

The effort is called The MSSNG Project — with the missing vowels representing the missing information. Liz Feld, the president of Autism Speaks, says the project is “the most promising autism research that’s ever been done,” adding that prior research has shown that answers lie in the DNA.

“What we know about autism is not enough,” she said. “We don’t know what causes it, and we don’t have a cure for it. And we have very few treatments.”

Robert Ring, the chief science officer of Autism Speaks, said researchers planned to sequence 10,000 genomes — the comprehensive genetic material contained in DNA — in the first phase of the program.

“Understanding what makes individuals different from one another is a critical part to moving this story forward, developing new treatments,” he said.

Those treatments can’t come soon enough for the affected families.

Designer Tommy Hilfiger is the parent of a child with autism. The fashion icon talked to ABC’s Good Morning America about the project’s potential.

“I am hoping someday I can pick up the New York Times…and there is a discovery and there is a reason children are born with it or do get autism and there is a cure,” he said.

When his family first learned of the diagnosis, he said, “You begin to question yourself and say ‘why us?’”

Their lives have changed, he said.

“We’re much more involved in every aspect of our child’s life — from therapies to schooling to treatments and its nonstop, it’s every day,” he said.

This research has been a dream of Autism Speaks for years, but the technology to store and share the information hasn’t been available until now. Google’s resources will allow the dream to become reality.

The data from just one person’s genome would take hours to download onto drives, but this project aims to store 10,000 genomes. The amount of data is massive — the equivalent of watching more than 13 years of continuous streaming high-definition TV.

The database will be completely open, so scientists all over the world — regardless of funding or connections — will have access to the enormous pool of information.

Ring described the database as a “game-changer” and added: “We’re going to use the same tools and technology that we use every day to search the Internet to look into the genome to find these missing answers.”

Feld agreed.

“The faster we can sequence the genomes, the sooner we’re going to have the answers. And the missing project is a search for those answers. And the answers are in the DNA. And we’re going to find them,” she said.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

Heart Disease, Infection Top List of Causes of Pregnancy-Related Deaths

Kmonroe2/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A new study found that the women were more likely to die during pregnancy between 2006 and 2010 than in previous years.

According to the study, published in the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology, the top causes of pregnancy-related deaths were heart disease and infection. Researchers say that women should undergo improved screening for heart disease — in particular older women and African-Americans.

Black women, the study found, were three times more likely to be part of the statistical set than women of other races.

Also on the list of most common causes of pregnancy-related deaths was the flu, prompting researchers to suggest all pregnant women get a flu shot this winter.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

Flu Vaccines Effective in Keeping Children Healthy

luiscar/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Researchers say that the flu vaccine is generally effective at keeping children out of the hospital.

Researchers looked at children both six months old and five years old, in an attempt to determine whether a 2008 recommendation to give the vaccine to all children over six months old was still accurate. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, began in 2000 and continued collecting data through 2011.

According to researchers, vaccination rates for eligible children jumped from six percent to 40 percent, but fewer children were admitted to hospitals for flu-related illness.

The study did note, however, that the number and severity of hospital visits was highest during the years when the H3N2 strain of influenza was predominant. In particular, the results were worst in years when the flu vaccine was mismatched to the predominant strain of the virus, as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said this year’s vaccine is.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

Sophie Tweed-Simmons Launches ‘All-Size’ Clothing Line

Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Life & Style Weekly(NEW YORK) — Sophie Tweed-Simmons is best known as the daughter of legendary rocker Gene Simmons and former playboy model Shannon Tweed, but she’s making a name for herself on her own.

The 22-year-old is taking on the world of fashion by designing a line that, she said, doesn’t discriminate. Her designs will fit every body type, she told ABC News’ Abbie Boudreau.

“We’re not trying to thin shame. We’re not trying to fat shame. We’re just saying that there’s not really an option for girls that look like me,” said Tweed-Simmons, who wears between a size 8 and 10.

Tweed-Simmons told Good Morning America that she was frustrated with how clothing fit her body, so she partnered with The Style Club online to launch a New Year’s Eve collection. She describes her look as a combination of rocker meets conservative.

“So it’s, like, a sexy grandma,” she said.

It’s called “an all-size clothing line. We don’t call it plus size,” she said.

Tweed-Simmons, who’s now starring alongside her mother on a new reality show, Shannon and Sophie, said she names each of her pieces after a strong-minded woman. The line includes pieces such as the “Oprah open back sweater,” the “Malala skirt” and the “Hepburn bowtie jumper.”

There are also pieces named for music superstar Taylor Swift and writer Emily Dickinson.

Tweed-Simmons, who grew up in front of the cameras on her family’s reality TV show, Gene Simmons: Family Jewels, said her body was constantly judged.

“You know, ‘Gene Simmons’ chubby daughter,’ or, ‘Gene Simmons’ whale,’” she said, recalling some of the comments that were made. “And so I had to become comfortable with what I had to work with at a really early age.”

Comfortable with her own curves — according to a recent interview with Yahoo Style, she stands 5 feet, 8 inches tall — Tweed-Simmons chooses not to have photos of herself digitally enhanced.

“I don’t want to lie to people about what I look like. …I’m not trying to pretend to be thinner,” she said. “Not trying to pretend to be more blonde or have smoother skin. Like, this is just how I look.”

Many celebrities have been accused of altering their own images online. Tweed-Simmons takes issue with that.

“You’re telling your followers, ‘I don’t think I’m pretty enough,’” she said. “So what is that saying to these young girls?”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →