Review Category : Health

Why Women Shaving Their Faces Is Now a Thing

dmitroza/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — If you’re desperate to ward off wrinkles, tell your man to move over and make room at the bathroom sink.

Turns out shaving your face could help skin stay youthful, according to some beauty experts.

Sometimes called “dermaplaning,” the process of shaving a woman’s face can take place in a professional dermatologist’s office or can be a DIY job.

“It’s definitely a thing,” said Alexis Wolfer, editor of The Beauty Bean. “One reason men are thought to get fewer wrinkles is that they’re constantly exfoliating their faces every time they shave, literally shaving away the outermost layers of skin and encouraging your skin to create new layers.”

Television stars shave their faces. Caroline Manzo of Manzo’d With Children (formerly of The Real Housewives of New Jersey) was seen doing it in an episode last season.

“Let me make something clear and hopefully answer your questions once and for all: I shave my face as a method of exfoliating my skin,” Manzo told Reality Tea. “I don’t shave because I have a hairy face! I’ve been practicing this for over 10 years, and I haven’t grown any facial hair because of it, and I have beautiful skin with minimal wrinkles. I think this should clarify any questions.”

There are many questions. What happens to the hair on your face? Does it grow back thicker?

“The consequences are small if you don’t have facial hair,” said Wolfer. “But for women with facial hair, it can make any hair look much darker and thicker when it grows back in with a blunt edge.”

Beauty company Shiseido sells a facial razor for women. A three-pack sells for about $6 on Amazon.

Wolfer said women shaving their faces is “definitely getting more mainstream,” but it’s not yet what she would call common.

She said there are far better ways to exfoliate and recommends mixing a tablespoon of full-fat Greek yogurt (it has lactic acid to break down dead skin cells) and a teaspoon of raw honey to moisturize and kill bacteria. Apply a thick layer to clean skin for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, take one to two tablespoons of white sugar and gently scrub the mask off for 30 seconds. Rinse with warm water and follow with moisturizer.

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Bill Gates Drinks Water from Human Waste

Sean Gallup/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Microsoft billionaire Bill Gates isn’t afraid to put his money where his mouth is, even when it means drinking a glass of water processed from human waste.

Through the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Gates funded the creation of the Omniprocessor by the bioengineering firm Janicki Bioenergy.

The machine works by turning sewage sludge into useable electricity and drinkable water within minutes.

“The water tasted as good as any I’ve had out of a bottle,” said Gates in a written statement. “And having studied the engineering behind it, I would happily drink it every day. It’s that safe.”

The machine will be used in a pilot program in Dakar, Senegal, to see how the local community will react to it.

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Why These Young Boys Were Asked to Slap a Girl

Fanpage.it(ROME) — What happens when you introduce a group of young boys to a beautiful little girl? They blush.

What happens when you tell those little boys to slap that beautiful girl? They refuse.

An online Italian newspaper called Fanpage.it created an eye-opening video showing how children respond to violence against women — and fortunately, their reactions are exactly what you’d hope.

“What do you like about her?,” the voice behind the camera asks the boys one by one as they’re introduced to Martina, the pretty, long-haired little girl.

“I like her eyes,” one of the boy replies.

“Everything,” says another.

They are then prompted to make a funny face at Martina, to which they all comply, and then are asked to caress her. The boys agree to that gesture too, gently rubbing her arm or lightly stroking her cheek.

But then it gets awkward.

“Slap her,” the voice tells them.

Lots of confused looks and sideways glances prompt more coaxing from behind the camera to just “Slap her, hard! Come on.”

They will not do it.

“No,” each one of them says.

“Why not?,” they’re asked.

“Because you’re not supposed to hit girls,” says one.

“Jesus doesn’t want us to hit others,” says another.

Then the romantic of the group chimes in with his reasoning: “As the saying goes, ‘girls shouldn’t be hit, not even with a flower.’”

It’s a lovely reminder to the viewer that “In the kids’ world, women don’t get hit,” the video explains.

“As a newspaper, we thought it was important to raise awareness on domestic abuse that perpetuates in the social silence,” Francesco Piccinini, director of Fanpage.it, wrote to ABC News. “We wanted to show the reactions to an order. It’s a social experiment and a news way to report about this crime.”

Piccinini adds that Fanpage uses videos to “talk in a different way about matters that affect [their] country.”

With more than seven million views, it’s safe to say the video’s success has not only gotten Italy discussing domestic abuse, but helped it become a global conversation.

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Why Missouri Newborn’s Smile Is So Rare

File photo. (Khobe/iStock/Thinkstock)(BRANSON, Mo.) — Alyssa Bailey was born three days after Christmas with a little something extra — two bottom front teeth.

The doctors and nurses who delivered her were quite taken with this dental surprise, said the baby’s mom, Jaklina Bailey.

“Right when she first arrived, everybody was just shocked,” the mother told ABC7, the ABC News affiliate in Branson, Missouri, where the baby was born. “Just like, ‘She has two front teeth? No kidding? Really?’ It was just a big talk about it, you know, in the delivery room.”

While not common, it’s not unheard of for babies to be born with fully formed teeth, said Dr. Laura Corio, a clinical professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

“Teeth can be present in oral cavities at birth and may be related to certain other health problems but not always,” Corio explained.

About one in every 2,000 to 3,000 babies are born with teeth, according to the National Institutes of Health. Like Alyssa Bailey, they usually appear on the lower gums but on occasion you’ll see a baby born with a mouthful of chompers, Corio said.

Typically, the doctor will remove or shave down the natal teeth as soon as possible to avoid problems with nursing and prevent the baby from cutting its tongue, said Corio.

In baby Alyssa’s case, her mom said they’re going to keep an eye out to ensure the tiny teeth don’t come loose and present a choking hazard. But since they’re an extra set, once they fall out, doctors are confident her usual baby teeth will grow in normally.

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Motorists’ Jerky Steering Motions Examined

Brian Jackson/iStock/Thinkstock(GOTHENBURG, Sweden) — “Steady as she goes” should especially apply to maneuvering the steering wheel of a car. Yet, a lot of motorists tend move their hands on the wheel with what can only be described as an inexplicable jerkiness.

It’s not exactly the safest way to drive and probably makes people watching in the passenger seat a little nervous.

So researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden set out to discover why this happens and their best theory is an innate behavior people have whenever they reach for something with their hand.

The researchers based their findings on 1,000 hours of vehicle driving that resulted in 1.3 million steer corrections, about 95 percent corresponding to the reaching theory.

The goal now is to create safety systems in cars that will anticipate jerkiness before it happens to keep vehicles on the straight and narrow.

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Junk Food Purchases Don’t Slow Down in the New Year

Glow Images, Inc./Getty Images(NEW YORK) — The end of the holidays couldn’t come too soon for some people, particularly those who saw their grocery bills swell because of the added parties and guests coming to their homes.

Cornell post-doctoral student Lizzy Pope says that it’s not unusual for people to spend an extra 15 percent on food bills between Thanksgiving and New Year’s. It’s also not that strange for consumers to fill their carts with junk food as only a quarter of the purchases are considered healthy.

However, something very interesting happens once the revelry ends, according to Pope who surveyed more than 200 households in conjunction with the University of Vermont’s Dept. of Nutrition and Food Sciences.

Based on the findings of three shopping periods with July up to Thanksgiving being the baseline, the researchers learned that people kept up their extra purchases after the first of the year and they continued to buy more junk food than usual.

In fact, Pope says that shoppers added nine percent more calories than they did during the peak holiday season, which runs contrary to most New Year’s resolutions. The researchers say if you’re buying more food, at least buy more produce to slow down calorie intake.

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Choosing Between Carrots and Cake Is a Snap Decision, Researchers Say

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Whether you stick to your diet or give in to temptation comes down to just milliseconds, a new study suggests.

Researchers from Caltech tested this theory by asking 28 volunteers to rate the health virtues of more than 150 foods after fasting for four hours. The subjects were then shown random pairings of foods on a computer screen, one healthier than the other, then invited to choose between two.

On average, information about taste begins influencing the decision-making process about 200 milliseconds sooner than health information, according to findings published in the latest issue of the journal Psychological Science.

Lead researcher Nikki Sullivan said based on how quickly subjects navigated their computer mouse to click on their selections, the scientists could tell which factor was important in making a choice — taste or health.

“By assessing how well taste and health are related to the direction of cursor movement we were able to determine that taste was reflected in the choice process much earlier than health,” Sullivan told ABC News, adding that the analysis is actually quite complicated and mathematical.

People who demonstrated high self-control by picking the healthy items such as carrots more often than not began to factor health information 323 milliseconds — a third of a second — sooner than those who succumbed to more sinful items, such as cake.

“Because taste comes into decision-making much earlier, we believe it has an advantage,” Sullivan said.

For 32 percent of the subjects, Sullivan said health never even came into play at all. For those people, making good food choices was all but impossible.

Knowing that the war in the brain waged between taste and health occurs in a timespan less than the blink of an eye might be used to help people eat better, Sullivan said.

“Something we need to test is whether or not delaying decision-making will give people enough time to consider health,” she said. “We’d also like to test if making health information more prominent might make it easier for that information to get through.”

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Choosing Between Carrots and Cake Is a Snap Decision, Researchers Say

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Whether you stick to your diet or give in to temptation comes down to just milliseconds, a new study suggests.

Researchers from Caltech tested this theory by asking 28 volunteers to rate the health virtues of more than 150 foods after fasting for four hours. The subjects were then shown random pairings of foods on a computer screen, one healthier than the other, then invited to choose between two.

On average, information about taste begins influencing the decision-making process about 200 milliseconds sooner than health information, according to findings published in the latest issue of the journal Psychological Science.

Lead researcher Nikki Sullivan said based on how quickly subjects navigated their computer mouse to click on their selections, the scientists could tell which factor was important in making a choice — taste or health.

“By assessing how well taste and health are related to the direction of cursor movement we were able to determine that taste was reflected in the choice process much earlier than health,” Sullivan told ABC News, adding that the analysis is actually quite complicated and mathematical.

People who demonstrated high self-control by picking the healthy items such as carrots more often than not began to factor health information 323 milliseconds — a third of a second — sooner than those who succumbed to more sinful items, such as cake.

“Because taste comes into decision-making much earlier, we believe it has an advantage,” Sullivan said.

For 32 percent of the subjects, Sullivan said health never even came into play at all. For those people, making good food choices was all but impossible.

Knowing that the war in the brain waged between taste and health occurs in a timespan less than the blink of an eye might be used to help people eat better, Sullivan said.

“Something we need to test is whether or not delaying decision-making will give people enough time to consider health,” she said. “We’d also like to test if making health information more prominent might make it easier for that information to get through.”

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California Surfer Dies of Staph Infection

VV-pics/iStock/Thinkstock(SAN DIEGO) — A San Diego surfer has died after contracting an aggressive staph infection, which some suspect he got in the water during his last jaunt in the waves.

Well-known community surfer Barry Ault, 71, went surfing shortly before Christmas despite warnings to avoid it for three days because of runoff from a recent rainstorm. He soon developed flu-like symptoms, and was in a coma just days later, his wife, Sally Ault, told ABC News’ San Diego affiliate KGTV.

Barry Ault, “the essential water man,” died Christmas Day, his wife told the station.

“He had a raging staph infection, so he was in complete sepsis,” Sally Ault told KGTV. “His whole body was full of staph.”

Although staph infections can usually be treated with antibiotics, they weren’t enough to save Barry Ault because he had an underlying condition, Dr. Eric McDonald of San Diego county’s Health and Human Services Agency said.

He had a recently replaced heart valve, his wife told KGTV.

Ault’s wife said two of his other friends also became sick after surfing with him that last day. She couldn’t blame the bacteria in the water “because there’s no proof, but it’s too big of a coincidence,” she said.

In the wake of her husband’s death, Ault’s wife told KGTV she hopes people heed warnings not to surf after rainstorms.

“But there’s runoff everywhere, so I would just hope that anybody who, after a rain, would just wait, even when the surf is good,” she said. “There’s going to be another good day.”

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Minority Groups Fall Far Short of Eating Enough Produce

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Health experts say Americans should be eating at least five servings of fruits and vegetables daily but the nation’s two largest minority groups fall woefully short of this goal.

In a poll of 850 Americans, just seven percent of Hispanics and eight percent of non-Hispanic blacks meet this important benchmark for better nutrition, according to the 2014 Healthy Americas Survey that is supported by the Healthy Americas Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Although non-Hispanic whites do better, it’s not by much: 18 percent claim to consume at least five servings of fruits and vegetables daily.

A plurality of each group seems to settle on two servings a day: 29 percent of Hispanics, 28 percent for blacks and 25 percent for non-Hispanic whites.

The survey also reveals that eight percent of Hispanics say they never consume fruits and vegetables. That’s in contrast to one percent of whites and four percent of blacks.

One of the reasons for the lack of interest in fruits and vegetable is the cost. Thirty-six percent of Hispanics, 30 percent of non-Hispanic blacks and 28 percent of non-Hispanic whites say high prices kept them from purchasing produce.

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