Review Category : Health

One Drink Per Day Increases Risk of Cancer in Women: Study

iStock/Thinkstock(CAMBRIDGE, Mass.) — Many studies rave about the benefits of moderate drinking, like the ones that suggest red wine is good for the heart. But now there’s a new study that claims women who drink daily are at more risk for breast cancer.

According to a study by Harvard University researchers published in the British Medical Journal, there’s a link between alcohol consumption and cancer in women — specifically, women who enjoy a cocktail per day have an increased risk of cancer, and for breast cancer, an increase of 15 percent.

The study also said there’s a link between drinking and cancer in men too, but only for those who have smoked at one point in their lives. Men who never smoked didn’t have the cancer/drinking link, but with women, it didn’t matter if they smoked or not. They were still at risk for cancer if they drank.

Researchers recommend women with a history of cancer in their family should consider reducing the amount of alcohol they consume daily.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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How to Keep Kids from Buckling Under Back-to-School Stress

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Headaches, stomach aches and even trips to the emergency room are some of the symptoms of stress exhibited by kids as young as 5.

“Stress and anxiety is one of the biggest struggles that our child and youth are facing today,” Michele Kambolis, a child and family therapist in Vancouver, Canada, told ABC News.

Kambolis is the author of Generation Stressed. She says she has seen a steady uptick in the number of stressed-out kids, often peaking as kids head back to school.

“The anticipation of not knowing what to expect, all of that anticipatory anxiety can really be upsetting to them,” she explained.

Kids’ trips to the emergency room for complaints regarding headaches, for instance, jump in the fall, according to a study conducted over the course of five years by Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

Hannah Faustus, of Arlington, Texas, knows all about school-related stress.

“I get headaches; I get the feeling I’m going to throw up,” Hannah, 7, said.

Her mom, Carrie Lenamond, says the stress became more pronounced a few days before school started this year.

“The routine and the schedule and going back and the transition, that does produce some anxiety,” Lenamond said.

While every child is different, experts recommend trying these tips:

  • Encourage your kids to put down the iPad and get up and exercise.
  • Use active listening. Stay empathetic and repeat what your child says to ensure you understand him or her correctly.
  • And create a worry wall in your home, where your kids can add their worries on Post-It notes to avoid internalizing their stress.

“What really seems to help the most is talking to her, reassuring her we’re for her, we love her no matter what happens,” Lenamond said.

Although every kid reacts differently to high-pressure situations, the first step is to make sure they know that nobody’s perfect and that they should let parents and adults know when they feel overwhelmed.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Woman Recounts Climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro at 300 Pounds in New Book

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Climbing Tanzania’s Mount Kilimanjaro can be brutal for anyone, but Kara Richardson Whitely’s weight made it even more so.

Whitely, who weighed 300 pounds, described the 2011 climb, her third up the famed mountain, as being “like hiking the mountain with someone on your back.”

Whitely’s first trek up the dormant volcanic mountain, years before her 2011 climb, had been a triumph. The 32-year-old New Jersey woman had lost 120 pounds before her first climb and she was eager to celebrate her success.

“Everybody was focusing on how much weight I had lost. And it was great. It was an amazing adventure. My husband and I both summited together,” she said in an interview with ABC News’ Juju Chang.

One year later, and by then a new mother, Whitely regained more than half of the 120 pounds she’d worked so hard to lose. And then she went back to Kilimanjaro.

“I was really in a dark place. And I wanted to get myself out. But … I didn’t do the work that was necessary to end up on top of the mountain again,” she said.

In 2011, she set out on a third climb of Africa’s tallest mountain, while weighing 300 pounds.

Guides on the ascent actually bet against her, but she stood up for herself and she proved them wrong. She reached the peak of Kilimanjaro.

“I felt tremendous gratitude for the journey that I had taken … and there was a knowing at that moment that I was the one who had to decide which baggage I would continue to carry with me. And I’m not talking about my backpack,” she said.

Whitely has chronicled her personal battles, including her struggle with weight, in the book Gorge: My Journey Up Kilimanjaro at 300 Pounds.

Whitely’s weight problems are rooted in personal trauma. As a 9-year-old, she dealt with her parents’ divorce by hiding in the pantry and comforting herself with snacks.

Asked why people binged in secret, Whitely replied: “Well, it’s about not feeling. Binging is about swallowing your feelings, really. I would binge in private because then I wouldn’t have to feel the hard stuff, or even the happy stuff.”

During a sexual assault when she was 12, Whitely says she offered her attacker something to eat. The offer ended the assault.

In her book, she wrote that food saved her.

“Maybe food saved me for a time. But like a lot of bad habits or addictions … it became the thing that consumed me,” she said.

Whitely finally realized that, instead of radical weight loss, she needed smaller, sustainable victories to keep her obsessive eating under control.

And yet, Whitely says the struggle is never really over.

“Your book doesn’t have a fairy tale ending,” Chang said. “You don’t, you know, miraculously end up a size zero.”

“Right,” Whitely replied. “And I wrote the book to give a true feeling of what it’s like to struggle with weight. And that’s actually what I’m finding a lot of people love about it, is it doesn’t have that ending. It’s a realistic story of the experience.”

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Woman Recounts Climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro at 300 Pounds in New Book

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Climbing Tanzania’s Mount Kilimanjaro can be brutal for anyone, but Kara Richardson Whitely’s weight made it even more so.

Whitely, who weighed 300 pounds, described the 2011 climb, her third up the famed mountain, as being “like hiking the mountain with someone on your back.”

Whitely’s first trek up the dormant volcanic mountain, years before her 2011 climb, had been a triumph. The 32-year-old New Jersey woman had lost 120 pounds before her first climb and she was eager to celebrate her success.

“Everybody was focusing on how much weight I had lost. And it was great. It was an amazing adventure. My husband and I both summited together,” she said in an interview with ABC News’ Juju Chang.

One year later, and by then a new mother, Whitely regained more than half of the 120 pounds she’d worked so hard to lose. And then she went back to Kilimanjaro.

“I was really in a dark place. And I wanted to get myself out. But … I didn’t do the work that was necessary to end up on top of the mountain again,” she said.

In 2011, she set out on a third climb of Africa’s tallest mountain, while weighing 300 pounds.

Guides on the ascent actually bet against her, but she stood up for herself and she proved them wrong. She reached the peak of Kilimanjaro.

“I felt tremendous gratitude for the journey that I had taken … and there was a knowing at that moment that I was the one who had to decide which baggage I would continue to carry with me. And I’m not talking about my backpack,” she said.

Whitely has chronicled her personal battles, including her struggle with weight, in the book Gorge: My Journey Up Kilimanjaro at 300 Pounds.

Whitely’s weight problems are rooted in personal trauma. As a 9-year-old, she dealt with her parents’ divorce by hiding in the pantry and comforting herself with snacks.

Asked why people binged in secret, Whitely replied: “Well, it’s about not feeling. Binging is about swallowing your feelings, really. I would binge in private because then I wouldn’t have to feel the hard stuff, or even the happy stuff.”

During a sexual assault when she was 12, Whitely says she offered her attacker something to eat. The offer ended the assault.

In her book, she wrote that food saved her.

“Maybe food saved me for a time. But like a lot of bad habits or addictions … it became the thing that consumed me,” she said.

Whitely finally realized that, instead of radical weight loss, she needed smaller, sustainable victories to keep her obsessive eating under control.

And yet, Whitely says the struggle is never really over.

“Your book doesn’t have a fairy tale ending,” Chang said. “You don’t, you know, miraculously end up a size zero.”

“Right,” Whitely replied. “And I wrote the book to give a true feeling of what it’s like to struggle with weight. And that’s actually what I’m finding a lot of people love about it, is it doesn’t have that ending. It’s a realistic story of the experience.”

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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FDA Votes to Approve Female Libido Drug Addyi

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a first of its kind drug aimed at improving the female libido.

The drug called Addyi (flibanserin) is designed to help pre-menopausal women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) and had been rejected twice by the FDA’s expert panel. Experts had concerns that some of the risks of the drug outweighed the benefits.

While sometimes referred to as the “female Viagra,” the drug is notably different from Viagra, which targets erectile dysfunction, a physiological problem. Flibanserin instead targets actual libido and sex drive.

Early studies found that the drug helped women have more “satisfying sexual events,” but women on the drug also faced rare but serious side effects including nausea, dizziness, fatigue and fainting, according to the summary released by the FDA.

Gynecologist Dr. Lauren Streicher explained to ABC News that the drug targets an issue far more complicated than erectile dysfunction and one that can have long-lasting effects on a patient.

HSDD “is a very specific problem in a woman who doesn’t think about sex, she doesn’t fantasize, she doesn’t desire sex,” Streicher told ABC News last year.

“What makes it different is that it’s distressing to her. This has a negative impact on her. She’s worried about it, she’s frustrated.”

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Dad of ‘Success Kid’ Undergoes Successful Kidney Transplant

Courtesy Laney Griner(JACKSONVILLE, Fla.) — The father of the boy made into a famous meme dubbed “Success Kid” is back at home after having a successful kidney transplant last week.

Sammy Griner became famous on the Internet after a picture of him as an 11-month-old infant went viral. In the picture Sammy has his hand balled up into the fist with a pugnacious look on his face, the image quickly turned into a the “Success Kid” meme.

While the family thought that funny viral moment would be the end of it, the family credits the meme with helping them raise funds for the operation. By using the “Success Kid” meme they were able to raise thousands of dollars in just days after launching the fundraiser. In total the family said they raised more than $100,000 to help with care surrounding the operation.

“It’s just all been really amazing,” Sammy’s mother, Laney Griner, of Jacksonville, Florida, told ABC News in an earlier interview. “It never stops being weird, and it never stops being awesome.”

Justin Griner had been spending hours on dialysis every day after his kidneys started to fail. But last week the family got the exciting call that a kidney was available, according to their GoFundMe account.

“This is absolutely the best news we could receive and it’s totally thanks to you,” the family said on their fundraising site. “You allowed us to break the cycle from his mother dying from this disease. You’ve given life back to my husband, and a hope for a future for Sam and I.”

On Instagram, Laney Griner documented her husband’s recovery and asked others to consider being an organ donor.

“If the #successkidney story has a moral, it’s be an organ donor! Thanks for being part of our amazing #transplant adventure,” she wrote on Twitter.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Dad of ‘Success Kid’ Undergoes Successful Kidney Transplant

Courtesy Laney Griner(JACKSONVILLE, Fla.) — The father of the boy made into a famous meme dubbed “Success Kid” is back at home after having a successful kidney transplant last week.

Sammy Griner became famous on the Internet after a picture of him as an 11-month-old infant went viral. In the picture Sammy has his hand balled up into the fist with a pugnacious look on his face, the image quickly turned into a the “Success Kid” meme.

While the family thought that funny viral moment would be the end of it, the family credits the meme with helping them raise funds for the operation. By using the “Success Kid” meme they were able to raise thousands of dollars in just days after launching the fundraiser. In total the family said they raised more than $100,000 to help with care surrounding the operation.

“It’s just all been really amazing,” Sammy’s mother, Laney Griner, of Jacksonville, Florida, told ABC News in an earlier interview. “It never stops being weird, and it never stops being awesome.”

Justin Griner had been spending hours on dialysis every day after his kidneys started to fail. But last week the family got the exciting call that a kidney was available, according to their GoFundMe account.

“This is absolutely the best news we could receive and it’s totally thanks to you,” the family said on their fundraising site. “You allowed us to break the cycle from his mother dying from this disease. You’ve given life back to my husband, and a hope for a future for Sam and I.”

On Instagram, Laney Griner documented her husband’s recovery and asked others to consider being an organ donor.

“If the #successkidney story has a moral, it’s be an organ donor! Thanks for being part of our amazing #transplant adventure,” she wrote on Twitter.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Office Rudeness Is Contagious, Study Finds

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Do you have a rude co-worker? If so, you could be at risk of catching an attitude as well.

According to new study in the Journal of Applied Psychology, researchers from the University of Florida monitored 90 graduate business school students who were practicing negotiation methods with several other students. After seven weeks, those students who rated their negotiation partner as “rude” were often judged to be “rude” as well.

“What we found in this study is that the contagious effect is based on an automatic cognitive mechanism — automatic means it happens somewhere in the subconscious part of your brain, so you don’t know its happening and can’t do much to stop it,” Trevor Foulk, the study’s lead author, told Health.com.

Foulk added that “anything from simple insults to ignoring a co-worker, to purposely dis-including someone or withholding information” can taint a work experience.

The study adds that an alarming 98 percent of workers have experienced rudeness in the workplace, with 50 percent of workers saying they deal with rude coworkers on a weekly basis.

Foulk said to ensure you don’t catch an attitude based on someone else’s rudeness, communicate in a clear manner.

“Our results suggest that what is happening is that prior rudeness is biasing people’s interpretation of future events towards rudeness. In order for a bias to have an effect, there must be ambiguity in the message. Messages that are completely clear won’t be subject to bias,” he said.

In other words, if someone was rude to you in the past, you expect them to be rude to you in the future. But if you — and they — make your messages crystal clear, there’s less room for misinterpretation of that message, including causing someone to think you’re rude.

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Yosemite Works to Rid Campsites of Plague After Camper Infected

California Department of Public Health(YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, Calif.) — An outbreak of the plague among wildlife at the famed Yosemite National Park has led officials to close down two campsites in an effort to stop the spread of disease to people.

Officials said they are working to protect campers after a child contracted the plague after visiting the park’s Crane Flat campground. Medical experts are attempting to determine if the child’s case can be definitively connected to the cases of plague found in wildlife in the area or if they contracted the bacterial disease at a different location.

Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical School, said a key component of staying safe while camping is using bug spray and doing everything possible to keep rodents out of a campsite. He said it’s important to keep food clear so that rodents are not attracted to campsites. Additionally, even a dead rodent doesn’t mean it’s safe from causing infection.

“There’s a tendency to want to get rid of it. I would advise not doing that,” Schaffner said, explaining that infected rodents are most dangerous when dead as infected fleas look for their next host. “Don’t try to clean up the area.”

The California Department of Public Health is warning anyone visiting the area in Yosemite to wear bug spray, avoid rodents and to never feed wildlife.

Both the Crane Flat and Tuolumne Meadows campgrounds at Yosemite have been closed after park officials found infected wildlife in the area. They are treating rodent burrows with pesticides in an effort to halt the spread of disease.

Danielle Buttke, a veterinarian epidemiologist with the National Park Service, said squirrels and other rodents are the primary hosts of the disease, which is endemic in the area.

“Studies have shown when you kill squirrels in an area you’re at higher risk for plague,” Buttke explained as to why they target fleas. “The fleas don’t have hosts,” and can jump to people.

Plague is endemic to the area now but not native, and as a result it can have devastating effects on wildlife in the region. Buttke said multiple rodent species have faced extinction as a result of a plague outbreak.

The plague is caused by the Yersinia pestis bacteria and can incubate in a person between two to six days before they show symptoms, experts said. There are three kinds of plague: bubonic, which leads to swollen lymph nodes; septicemic, which leads to a blood infection; and pneumatic, which is when the bacteria settle in the blood and cause pneumonia.

Buttke stressed that human cases of plague in Yosemite park are exceptionally rare with the last confirmed case occurring in 1959.

“It’s not a routine occurrence,” she explained. But “we’re definitely seeing more activity nationwide.”

She said officials are mystified about why there has been a increase in plague cases in the U.S., including two fatal cases this summer in Colorado. One theory is that the long drought has stressed animals and driven them to be closer together and more able to spread the disease.

“The ultimate answer is we don’t know at this time,” she said.

Buttke said park officials are working to develop a new vaccine that will protect wild rodents from the bacterial disease, but that has not been released yet.

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FATwater: What to Know About the Oil and Water Drink

ABC News(NEW YORK) — Oil and water traditionally don’t go well together, but a new drink aims to change that.

Called FATwater, the drink combines water with tiny droplets of coconut oil, natural flavoring and vitamins. According to creator Dave Asprey, the concoction will leave the consumer hydrated and energized.

The drink may even suppress appetite, Asprey claims.

“This is a new category,” Asprey told ABC News. “This hasn’t been done before.”

If Asprey’s name sounds familiar, he is also the man behind another unique drink, Bulletproof coffee, a 460-calorie cup of coffee made with low-toxin coffee, unsalted and grass-fed butter and coconut oil.

According to FATwater’s website, the coconut oil fats in this drink are quickly absorbed by the body and turned in to energy faster than that gained through the consumption of sugary sports drinks. Any leftover energy is quickly excreted rather than stored as fat, the website claims.

Asprey says there is no specific study highlighting the benefits of FATwater, but he says research into coconut oil shows it can have fat-burning capabilities.

“We take fresh coconut oil and we remove only about 15 percent of that oil, the 15 percent that is documented to have these biological effects in humans,” Asprey said.

The beverage, which costs around $3.95 per bottle, packs a total of 20 calories and two grams of saturated fat. Some nutritionists say this might not be enough fat to have an impact on the body.

“It is substantially lower than what the average person might add to a meal to potentially increase absorbability of different nutrients,” said Rachel Beller, founder of the Beller Nutritional Institute in Beverly Hills.

For now, FATwater sells its products in only a few Los Angeles retailers and online, but Asprey said he plans to take FATwater “mainstream.”

The four flavors of FATwater currently available have already sold out on the company’s website.

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