Review Category : Health

Sugary Drinks Linked to Poor Memory Function

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Sugary drinks may hurt more than your waistline and teeth.

Researchers at USC found a disturbing connection between regular sweetened drink consumption in childhood and poor memory function in adulthood.

They reported that the hippocampus region of the brain — where memories are made and stored — is particularly sensitive to environmental assault including high fructose levels.

This includes soda, apple juice, lemonade, sports drinks, and anything with added sugar or syrup.

They recommend sugar intake be limited to four teaspoons a day.

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Sen. Boxer: Obama’s Pollution Proposal Can Prevent Bronchitis, Asthma Attacks, Heart Attacks

US Senator Barbara Boxer(WASHINGTON) — Environmental Protection Agency hearings are discussing a proposed rule that would limit carbon pollution from power plants.

The proposal, from the Obama administration, would cut pollution 30% by 2030.

Senator Barbara Boxer supports the proposal, saying it would save and improve thousands of lives.

“It will avoid up to 3,700 cases of bronchitis in children; 150,000 asthma attacks; 3,300 heart attacks; 6,600 premature deaths and 490,000 missed days of school and work,” Boxer said.

Boxer cited a recent ABC News/Washington Post poll that reported about 70% of Americans believe such a rule is needed.

The June poll found 57% of Republicans, 76% of Independents, and 79% of Democrats support limiting greenhouse gases from existing power plants.

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How US Government Could Evacuate Americans with Ebola

U.S. Centers for Disease Control(WASHINGTON) — A government-owned jet equipped with a plastic isolation tent could evacuate Ebola-stricken Americans from the West African hot zone, health officials say.

The portable tent, designed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Department of Defense and the Phoenix Air Group, transforms an airplane into a portable isolation ward.

It’s called an Aeromedical Biological Containment System, and it can house a sick patient along with medical personnel. It can be loaded on a Gulfstream jet, which has a flight range of seven hours or 3,500 miles.

“CDC sends personnel all over the globe to respond to some of the most dangerous infectious agents,” said ABC News’ chief health and medical editor Dr. Richard Besser, who served as the CDC’s director of emergency preparedness and response when the tent was constructed. “It was essential that if the agency was going to send people out to help others, it had a way to bring them back if they got sick. That was the impetus behind this project.”

At least two Americans have contracted Ebola while working to contain the outbreak — Dr. Kent Brantly and missionary Nancy Writebol. Both are currently receiving treatment in Liberia, according to their organization, Samaritan’s Purse.

Another 12 American CDC workers are in the area, according to the agency, but none of them have been reported sick.

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CDC: Two Thousand Americans Die from Weather Every Year

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Weather reportedly kills 2,000 Americans every year.

According to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, only 6% of weather-related deaths are from extreme situations like storms– 63% of the victims die from cold exposure, while 31% die from heat.

The old, the poor, people in cities, and people in rural areas are the most susceptible.

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Woman Dies on US Airways Flight

iStock/Thinkstock(PHEONIX) — A passenger died aboard a US Airways flight from Honolulu to Phoenix.

The victim, a woman in her 50’s, suffered a medical emergency as flight 693 was decending.

She reportedly became unconsious, and when the plane touched down in Phoenix, firefighters say she had no pulse and was declared dead.

Her cause of death is not yet known.

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Aid Group Pulls Some Workers from West Africa Amid Ebola Outbreak

iStock/Thinkstock(BOONE, N.C.) — An American aid group on the front lines of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa is evacuating non-essential personnel as two if its workers fight to survive the deadly infection.

Samaritan’s Purse, an evangelical Christian charity based in Boone, North Carolina, said it would pull non-essential personnel from Liberia “because of instability and ongoing security issues in the area.”

Two workers with the group, Dr. Kent Brantly and missionary Nancy Writebol, are being treated for Ebola in Liberia, where 249 people have been infected and 129 have died, according to the World Health Organization.

More than 1,200 people have contracted the virus in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea in what experts have called the largest ever Ebola outbreak. At least 672 people have died, according to WHO.

“We ask that people continue to pray for Kent and Nancy and all those who are affected by Ebola, and the tremendous group of doctors and nurses who are caring for them,” Samaritan’s Purse said in a statement.

Brently and Writebol are in “serious condition,” according to the group, but have shown “a slight improvement in the past 24 hours.”

It’s unclear whether Samaritan’s Purse will evacuate health care workers.

Dr. Stephen Morris, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, said there is already a lack of professional medical personnel to fight the outbreak, which can make things even more difficult for overtaxed doctors who risk infection by treating the sick.

“You can’t accidentally stick yourself with a needle or cut yourself,” Morris said, explaining of the hazards of working while tired. “I think the reality is there aren’t enough personal and resources. I think the key things that are really needed are health care personnel and others who can help in the situation, such as epidemiologists.”

More than 100 health care workers from various organizations have contracted Ebola in West Africa and at least 50 have died, according to WHO.

A spokesperson for Doctors Without Borders confirmed to ABC News that the group has no plans to pull its estimated 300 medical workers out of west Africa.

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Hungry People Feel More Entitled at Work, Study Finds

iStock/Thinkstock(ITHACA, N.Y.) — You don’t necessarily have to be brought up spoiled to have a sense of entitlement. Instead, all it might take is skipping a meal.

After a series of experiments, Cornell University and Dartmouth College researchers say that workers on empty stomachs tend to think they’re owed certain privileges than those who’ve satisfied their hunger.

In one of the trials, students both entering and leaving the Cornell cafeteria were asked if they agreed with statements that included “I honestly feel I’m more deserving than others” and, “Things should go my way.”

It was the hungry students who more often agreed with those feelings of entitlement.

At work, this expectation of favorable treatment, particularly when one is hungry, seems to boost self-confidence and spurs people to push a little harder for raises or promotions.

However, feeling entitled also has a bunch of downsides, in that it can make you harder to work with and more apt to blame others when things go wrong. In other words, the person at work no one likes.

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Radio Voices Are Born Not Made

iStock/Thinkstock(SYDNEY) — Say, with a voice like that, you ought to be on the radio. If you’ve been told that, you can thank certain vocal cord vibration patterns that set you apart from people with ordinary voices.

Speech pathologists at the University of Sydney Voice Research Laboratory say until now, scientists haven’t been able to figure out what makes radio voices deep, warm and resonant.

However, by using a device called a videoendoscopy camera, Dr. Cate Madill and Dr. Samantha Warhurst noticed that announcers’ vocal cords move and close more quickly, giving their voices that unique sound made for radio.

Warhurst said these findings offer “some significant clues on how a good voice for radio might be trained.”

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The Hard Lives of Organ Transplant Doctors

iStock/Thinkstock(DETROIT) — Organ transplant surgeons usually deal in life-and-death situations. With so much riding on the outcome of their work, it’s no wonder that so many of these doctors are experiencing burnout, according to a study led by the Henry Ford Transplant Institute.

In the survey of 218 transplant surgeons, 40 percent reported feeling emotionally exhausted, which is certainly understandable given the nature of the work they do.

However, what is far more surprising is that close to half of these surgeons also admit feeling a low sense of personal accomplishment.

The researchers attribute this to several factors, including the health of patients, the often long period of recuperation and the frustration that comes when patients die while still waiting for organs.

As for organ transplant surgeons who didn’t experience burnout, their higher sense of accomplishment was related to a sense of greater control in their work lives and more cooperation among co-workers.

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The Hard Lives of Organ Transplant Doctors

iStock/Thinkstock(DETROIT) — Organ transplant surgeons usually deal in life-and-death situations. With so much riding on the outcome of their work, it’s no wonder that so many of these doctors are experiencing burnout, according to a study led by the Henry Ford Transplant Institute.

In the survey of 218 transplant surgeons, 40 percent reported feeling emotionally exhausted, which is certainly understandable given the nature of the work they do.

However, what is far more surprising is that close to half of these surgeons also admit feeling a low sense of personal accomplishment.

The researchers attribute this to several factors, including the health of patients, the often long period of recuperation and the frustration that comes when patients die while still waiting for organs.

As for organ transplant surgeons who didn’t experience burnout, their higher sense of accomplishment was related to a sense of greater control in their work lives and more cooperation among co-workers.

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