Review Category : Health

Study: YouTube Videos Featuring Alcohol Consumption Don’t Tell the Whole Story

Digital Vision/Photodisc/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A study conducted by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh found that YouTube videos related to alcohol intake are often shown to be funny, raising questions as to whether viral videos could be harmful.

Researchers analyzed 70 of the most popular videos that depict consumption of alcohol. The videos totalled over 300 million views, according to the study, published in the journal Alcoholism. Of those videos, 89 percent showed men partaking in alcohol consumption, compared to just 49 percent showing women.

The study noted that liquor was most commonly seen in the videos analyzed, followed by beer, with wine and champagne the leaast frequently depicted drinks. Further, 79 percent of videos included humor and 44 percent contained brand references.

As a whole, the videos received far more “likes” than “dislikes” on YouTube.

Researchers say that the videos, which are heavily viewed, infrequently depict the negative outcomes of drinking. The study does not, however, link viewership of these videos with any particular affect on actual alcohol consumption.

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Study: YouTube Videos Featuring Alcohol Consumption Don’t Tell the Whole Story

Digital Vision/Photodisc/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A study conducted by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh found that YouTube videos related to alcohol intake are often shown to be funny, raising questions as to whether viral videos could be harmful.

Researchers analyzed 70 of the most popular videos that depict consumption of alcohol. The videos totalled over 300 million views, according to the study, published in the journal Alcoholism. Of those videos, 89 percent showed men partaking in alcohol consumption, compared to just 49 percent showing women.

The study noted that liquor was most commonly seen in the videos analyzed, followed by beer, with wine and champagne the leaast frequently depicted drinks. Further, 79 percent of videos included humor and 44 percent contained brand references.

As a whole, the videos received far more “likes” than “dislikes” on YouTube.

Researchers say that the videos, which are heavily viewed, infrequently depict the negative outcomes of drinking. The study does not, however, link viewership of these videos with any particular affect on actual alcohol consumption.

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Scope Manufacturer Comments on LA ‘Superbug’

MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — The company that manufactures the endoscopes that were implicated in the spread of a “superbug” at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center said Friday that it is “committed to developing solutions…that help improve clinical outcomes and enhance quality of life” for patients.

Seven patients have been infected with the “superbug” known as carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae (CRE), and 179 more were exposed, officials say. According to Olympus Corporation of the Americas, their products “[require] careful attention to cleaning and reprocessing steps, including meticulous manual cleaning, to ensure effective reprocessing.”

The company added on Friday that it was making supplemental educational materials available to healthcare professionals to prevent the spread of CRE. Olympus says it “is monitoring this issue closely including today’s Safety Communication from the US Food and Drug Administration” and that it will continue “working with the FDA, relevant medical societies and our customers regarding these concerns.”

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Does Crossing Your Legs Cause Varicose Veins?

Fuse/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — You may have heard at some point that crossing one’s legs causes varicose veins. But is that fact or fiction?

Dr. Debbie Yi, emergency medicine at UPenn Hospital, says fiction.

“It’s never been shown that crossing your legs causes varicose veins,” states Yi.

She goes on to explain that it’s been shown to have different causes for men and women: “What does cause varicose veins in men is smoking and low physical activity. In women, it’s lack of exercise, high blood pressure, and obesity.”

Yi also mentions a study showing that women who stay on their feet all day and pregnant women show higher instances of varicose veins.

So cross your legs with no worries — there are other health factors to consider if you want to reduce your chances of getting varicose veins.

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Health Officials Release Lists of Potential Measles Exposure Sites

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Two outbreaks of the measles virus that have infected at least 141 people have led state and local health departments to release lists of the sites where residents might have been exposed to the virus in the hopes of curbing the outbreak.

In California, the San Bernardino County Health Department’s list reveals how staples of the community, such as grocery stores or a Walmart, could be sites of potential infections and not just hospitals or schools with low vaccination rates.

Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert from Vanderbilt University Medical Center, said the range of potential infectious sites shows how important it is that every eligible person gets the measles vaccine.

The virus “can be in a house of worship, it can be at a theme park. It can really be anywhere,” said Schaffner. “There doesn’t have to be close contact through the measles source and the susceptible person,” to get infected.

In San Bernardino, where nine people measles cases have been reported, the health department list reflects a variety of places where people could have been exposed to the measles virus, from Walmart to Target to a local sushi restaurant and chocolate store.

A Walmart spokesman told ABC News that company officials “take the safety of our customers and associates very seriously” and had instructed their associates, who were working when an infected person visited the store, to adhere to the health department’s guidance.

A Target spokesman told ABC News that the company has posted a notice in the store and were working with local health officials.

The measles virus is among the most contagious viruses identified and can be transmitted four days before an infected person shows symptoms. By simply exhaling, an infected person can leave virus particles in the air that can infect anyone who does not have immunity.

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Substance Abuse Rampant Among Pregnant Teens

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(AUSTIN, Texas) — Teenage girls who become pregnant certainly have to grow up much faster than their non-pregnant peers.

However, it turns out that a majority of them engage in destructive behavior than can harm their unborn child as well as themselves, according to researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and Saint Louis University’s School of Social Work.

Based on a large, nationally representative sample, almost six in ten pregnant teens admitted taking one or more substances during the past 12 months that included alcohol, marijuana and other drugs. That’s compared to 35 percent of girls who are not pregnant.

The study also found that a third of pregnant girls age 12 to 14 years old said they used one or more of these substances within the last 30 days.

However, alcohol and drug use dropped substantially across all ages groups as the girls went further into their pregnancies.

Nevertheless, lead study author Christopher Salas-Wright at UT Austin’s School of Social Work says that statistics show more work needs to be done. He added that levels of substance abuse among pregnant teens declined by 50 percent when the girls came from homes with strong adult support and supervision. Also, girls who kept attending school were also less inclined to use alcohol and drugs.

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Lengthy Unemployment Shown to Change Personalities

iStock/Thinkstock(STIRLING, Scotland) — The longer unemployment lasts, the longer it can affect one’s personality, according to one study, which seems to disapprove the notion that people’s personalities are fixed.

Researcher Christopher Boyce of the University of Stirling in Scotland says that over time, being out of work can make people less agreeable and as a result, may hamper their efforts to get hired.

Based on a standard personality test given to 7,000 German adults, Boyce looked at the effects of unemployment on hundreds who were thrown out of work by examining the following personality traits: conscientiousness, neuroticism, agreeableness, extraversion and openness.

Interestingly enough, unemployed men’s levels of agreeableness increased in the first two years of being out of work but those levels dropped afterwards. Meanwhile, women’s agreeableness declined steadily from the point when they first lost their jobs.

On the other hand, conscientiousness, which is tied to the enjoyment of income, fell among men throughout their unemployment but rose initially for women before declining.

One way or the other, Boyce says prolonged unemployment has a detrimental effect on one’s personality and society should have more compassion for people who are unable to find a job due to changes that are often beyond their control.

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Men Who Share Equally in Housework Don’t Like It Much

Pixland/Thinkstock(ATLANTA) — Who knew? Men who live in a country where the culture is more open to husbands and wives sharing housework seem to get more upset about their participation in this drudgery than in countries where women are expected to do all the housework.

Researchers from Emory University and Umea University in Sweden surveyed 14,000 adults from 30 countries and discovered that women on average said they did about three-quarters of the housework while men handled just over 30 percent.

Meanwhile, around 38 percent of men from the U.S., Australia, Denmark, Mexico, the United Kingdom, Latvia, Sweden and Poland, all considered gender egalitarian countries, said they shared about 50 percent of the chores at home.

But here’s where it gets interesting. Men from these countries also complained about doing an unfair amount of housework as opposed to those from less egalitarian countries.

Although it seems counter-intuitive, lead study author Sabino Kornrich says this resentment may stem from being aware that shared housework is just assumed in the country they live in.

Meanwhile, men in Japan, where women are expected to do most if not all of the housework, don’t feel the same kind of resentment even if they actually get around to helping a little bit around the house.

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Renowned Neurologist Oliver Sacks Announces He Has Terminal Cancer

Thos Robinson/Getty Images for World Science Festival(NEW YORK) — Renowned neurologist and author of Awakenings Oliver Sacks announced Thursday that he has terminal cancer.

Sacks, a professor of neurology at New York University School of Medicine, said in a New York Times article that cancer had been found in his liver nine years after he was first diagnosed with a rare ocular tumor.

The doctor wrote that the initial treatment for the tumor in his eye left him partially blind and noted that most tumors of this kind do not metastasize.

“I am among the unlucky 2 percent,” he wrote for the New York Times. “I feel grateful that I have been granted nine years of good health and productivity since the original diagnosis, but now I am face to face with dying.”

Sacks, 81, is best known for his writing on neurological case histories including “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat” and an “An Anthropologist on Mars.” His book Awakenings, based on his work in the 1960s with patients who were unable to initiate movement, was turned into an Oscar-nominated movie of the same name starring Robin Williams and Robert De Niro.

Sacks, whose biography will be released this spring, wrote that he feels “intensely alive” after his diagnosis.

“Over the last few days, I have been able to see my life as from a great altitude, as a sort of landscape, and with a deepening sense of the connection of all its parts,” he wrote. “This does not mean I am finished with life.”

While the famed doctor plans to give up following “politics or arguments about global warming,” he said he feels the world is being left in good hands.

“I cannot pretend I am without fear. But my predominant feeling is one of gratitude,” he wrote. “Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and adventure.”

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Renowned Neurologist Oliver Sacks Announces He Has Terminal Cancer

Thos Robinson/Getty Images for World Science Festival(NEW YORK) — Renowned neurologist and author of Awakenings Oliver Sacks announced Thursday that he has terminal cancer.

Sacks, a professor of neurology at New York University School of Medicine, said in a New York Times article that cancer had been found in his liver nine years after he was first diagnosed with a rare ocular tumor.

The doctor wrote that the initial treatment for the tumor in his eye left him partially blind and noted that most tumors of this kind do not metastasize.

“I am among the unlucky 2 percent,” he wrote for the New York Times. “I feel grateful that I have been granted nine years of good health and productivity since the original diagnosis, but now I am face to face with dying.”

Sacks, 81, is best known for his writing on neurological case histories including “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat” and an “An Anthropologist on Mars.” His book Awakenings, based on his work in the 1960s with patients who were unable to initiate movement, was turned into an Oscar-nominated movie of the same name starring Robin Williams and Robert De Niro.

Sacks, whose biography will be released this spring, wrote that he feels “intensely alive” after his diagnosis.

“Over the last few days, I have been able to see my life as from a great altitude, as a sort of landscape, and with a deepening sense of the connection of all its parts,” he wrote. “This does not mean I am finished with life.”

While the famed doctor plans to give up following “politics or arguments about global warming,” he said he feels the world is being left in good hands.

“I cannot pretend I am without fear. But my predominant feeling is one of gratitude,” he wrote. “Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and adventure.”

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