Review Category : Health

Boy with Deadly Disease Celebrates Miracle 13th Birthday

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — When Anthony Katz was born, his doctors predicted he would not survive past a year. But this weekend Anthony’s parents got to celebrate a milestone they never thought would come: Anthony’s 13th birthday.

Anthony was born with myotubular myopathy, a rare genetic disorder that affects skeletal muscle tissue, according to the Muscular Dystrophy Association. The disease has left Anthony so weak he cannot stand or swallow food. Anthony’s mother Tina Katz says that Anthony’s muscles are weak but have not continued to deteriorate.

After surviving infancy, Anthony has thrived as he’s gotten older.

On Saturday, to celebrate the newly-minted teenager, approximately 350 people came to the Katz’s house for the Monsters University-themed birthday party.

“It’s such an amazing gift we’ve been given,” Tina Katz told ABC News. “I can’t even tell you, the way he thrives and the way he’s good.”

Not only were plenty of Anthony’s classmates in attendance, but also the local fire truck and a live band were there as well. Katz said Anthony was the center of attention and even sang a few songs, such as “Moves Like Jagger,” for the audience.

Katz said in spite of the medical hurdles, Anthony is like most other kids, with friends who come over for sleepovers and to do homework.

“I think a lot of times people mistake children with special needs [because] they may look different on the outside,” Katz said. “He is such a normal child. He goes to school every day. He lives life every day [even though] he can’t get up and go like some other children.”

Katz said now that Anthony’s a teenager he’s even started showing a little more attitude. During an interview with the local paper, Katz said she tried to correct her son, but Anthony calmly told her, “Mom this is my interview,” and kept talking.

Katz said she still is frustrated by people who see Anthony and immediately tell her they feel sorry for her.

“I can’t express it enough that when you see somebody for special needs don’t feel sorry for them, feel happy because they feel so alive,” Katz said.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

Boy with Deadly Disease Celebrates Miracle 13th Birthday

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — When Anthony Katz was born, his doctors predicted he would not survive past a year. But this weekend Anthony’s parents got to celebrate a milestone they never thought would come: Anthony’s 13th birthday.

Anthony was born with myotubular myopathy, a rare genetic disorder that affects skeletal muscle tissue, according to the Muscular Dystrophy Association. The disease has left Anthony so weak he cannot stand or swallow food. Anthony’s mother Tina Katz says that Anthony’s muscles are weak but have not continued to deteriorate.

After surviving infancy, Anthony has thrived as he’s gotten older.

On Saturday, to celebrate the newly-minted teenager, approximately 350 people came to the Katz’s house for the Monsters University-themed birthday party.

“It’s such an amazing gift we’ve been given,” Tina Katz told ABC News. “I can’t even tell you, the way he thrives and the way he’s good.”

Not only were plenty of Anthony’s classmates in attendance, but also the local fire truck and a live band were there as well. Katz said Anthony was the center of attention and even sang a few songs, such as “Moves Like Jagger,” for the audience.

Katz said in spite of the medical hurdles, Anthony is like most other kids, with friends who come over for sleepovers and to do homework.

“I think a lot of times people mistake children with special needs [because] they may look different on the outside,” Katz said. “He is such a normal child. He goes to school every day. He lives life every day [even though] he can’t get up and go like some other children.”

Katz said now that Anthony’s a teenager he’s even started showing a little more attitude. During an interview with the local paper, Katz said she tried to correct her son, but Anthony calmly told her, “Mom this is my interview,” and kept talking.

Katz said she still is frustrated by people who see Anthony and immediately tell her they feel sorry for her.

“I can’t express it enough that when you see somebody for special needs don’t feel sorry for them, feel happy because they feel so alive,” Katz said.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

Doctors Admit They Order Too Many Tests

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Physician, heal thyself when it comes to ordering too many medical tests.

In a survey of 600 doctors funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a majority admit that a lot of tests are unneeded, but 53 percent acknowledge that they’re guilty of ordering one when a patient becomes overly insistent about it.

The survey found that 75 percent believe the ordering of tests and procedures that aren’t really warranted is either a very serious or somewhat serious problem, and seven in ten say they’ve been successful at convincing a patient that the test is not needed.

Dr. Richard Baron, president and CEO of the ABIM Foundation, which conducted the study, says ordering too many tests can be harmful to patients and can raise the cost of health care for everyone in general.

In the meantime, just 15 percent of physicians think the federal government should intervene in the matter, with over half saying that they ought to be the ones to correct the problem.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

Can Saturated Fat Be Good for You?

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Bacon, burgers and butter are delicious but unhealthy. At least, that’s the conventional wisdom.

Now, reporter Nina Teicholz, author of the new book The Big Fat Surprise, is saying that she believes the way people think about fat in food is totally wrong.

“Saturated fat is really not bad for health…it doesn’t cause obesity, diabetes and heart disease,” Teicholz said in an interview with ABC’s Good Morning America.

Saturated fat has been linked to higher levels of blood cholesterol and an increased risk for heart disease and stroke.

That thinking “has been the centerpiece of our dietary wisdom for over 50 years…and it really goes back to some very weak science that was done in the 1950s and onward,” Teicholz said. “But it really — when you go back and look into the science, it really has been shown not to be true.”

Current guidelines from the U.S. Department of Agriculture show a recommended daily “food budget” split between grains, vegetables, fruits and proteins, with limited dairy consumption and allowances for so-called healthy, unsaturated fat.

Teicholz disputes the common belief about saturated fat.

“It’s not unhealthy,” she said. “Also it’s a solid fat you can see…it’s not an oil. And that means that it’s far more stable.”

But some nutritionists — including Rachel Beller, a nutritionist and the author of Eat to Lose, Eat to Win — aren’t convinced.

“I think having too much saturated fat could potentially raise numerous risk factors for our health,” she said.

Teicholz says the real culprit behind heart disease and weight gain is the nation’s addiction to carbohydrates and sugar.

Teicholz described her typical day’s diet.

“So I start my day with bacon,” she said, adding that she usually snacks on nuts, cheese and salami for lunch.

“I tried so hard when I was a vegetarian…And I used to obsess about food. But now I just don’t. And I barely exercise,” she said. “I found that I lost 10 pounds…and my cholesterol levels were fine.”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

Chinese Embrace Hugging, But Americans Are Wary of the ‘Awkward Embrace’

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Americans are known worldwide for their enthusiastic hugs, and now the Chinese are emulating the physical warmth of North American culture. School children are being taught emotional intelligence and given “homework” to go home and hug their parents.

Since the death of Chairman Mao in 1976, the physically restrained Chinese are fully embracing hugging, according to a story last week, “More Hugs Please, We’re Chinese,” in the New York Times.

“Recently, it seems like everyone is hugging,” it reports. “Friends are hugging. Family members are hugging. In hugging between Chinese and non-Chinese, it was non-Chinese who once foisted physical affection on the Chinese. Today it may be a Chinese initiating contact. The tables are turning.”

But do they understand the American nuances?

“Hugging is an art form,” says Amy Binette Wolfe, a 35-year-old mother of three from Pittsfield, Mass.

“Too long of a hug is awkward. The short hug is preferred. I’ve started a conversation or a meeting with a handshake and ended with a hug. …But you’re not going to have a meeting where you’re bitching out the tax man and end it with a hug,” she added.

American hugging comes with rules, and Wolfe says, “Beware of the wandering hand-hugger.”

A St. Louis University cultural guide for its international students warns them to keep an 18-inch distance when talking to others. “This personal space is very important and, if limited, the individual may become uncomfortable,” it says.

“Typically, Americans do not hug or kiss an acquaintance upon greeting — but rather shake hands or nod their heads. They also do not touch while speaking, although a brief touch on the arm or shoulder might indicate sympathy or concern to someone they know well. Once a friendship has developed, women may greet each other with a hug or embrace.”

And then there are those who run from the eager-beaver hugger.

“When I run into a male acquaintance, I know exactly how to greet him: shake his hand,” writes Shane Snow of The Medium. “Doesn’t matter how long we’ve known each other. I even shake my dad’s hand. …But with women, I feel like I’m trapped between two walls of a deep-space garbage compactor.”

Jen Doll writes in “The Huggers Among Us: A Guide to Greetings,” on The Wire, “There are, of course, as many types of huggers as there are types of humans.”

She outlines at least a dozen including the “Alternative Greeter,” who high-fives or “clasps hands emotively”; the “Grandma”; the “Political Hug,” like a bear; and the “hugger with room to move” who barely touches the other’s arms and back and whose “torso will forever remain in its own separate continent.”

Within families, hugging can be “key” to attachment, according to Jody Todd Manley, clinical director of the University of Rochester’s Mt. Hope Family center. Still, all families do not have the same “comfort levels” with physical affection.

“Feeling comfortable with a hug from mom is maybe not as close as with Aunt Tilley,” she said.

“There can be personal space issues around how well you know a person,” said Manley. “The personal context and even the length of the hug or intimacy can be uncomfortable if it’s not someone you have a relationship with.”

Some serial huggers say that the custom may be “fading,” as a result of technology and less face-to-face interaction.

Hillary Mains, a 32-year-old mother of two from Pepperell, Mass., said hugging family and friends and even “people you have just recently met, but hit off well with,” used to be “commonplace.”

“I find myself feeling the situation out and even when I feel it’s acceptable, I pre-cursor it with, ‘I’m a hugger, so I’m gonna give you a hug.’ I’ve never been rejected, for it, but if I don’t say that, there is a definite air of ‘should I or…?”

In today’s climate sensitivie to sexual harassment, teachers are hesitant to touch students because of fear of reprisals from suspect parents or potential bullying. Children learn to “keep your hands to yourself,” said Mains.

“With my 6-year-old Tyler, I’ve always encouraged him to hug when he says ‘bye to a person close to him,” she said. “Now, I notice him backing away from it. …The only exception to that is me, his dad and his brother.”

“It seems to tie into when he started school,” she said. “He actually seems slightly more wary to hug his peers than he does with aunts, uncles and grandparents.”

Still, Amy Binette Wolfe says the hugging culture is still alive and well in her small community in the New England Berkshires.

“I’ve met many, many people, and it’s all hugs, hugs, hugs,” she said. “I am not always the initiator. Thank goodness, because this sounds like a love fest. I consciously look for signs that the hug is happening or if the hand is coming out for the firm handshake.”

“But if you’re chatting about your kids and show emotion or vice versa, and the person knows you … the hug might happen,” she said. “That being said, as much as I adore the kids’ pediatrician we don’t start off or end appointments with a hug.”

“I did hug the kids’ dentist once,” she added. “It was purely an accident. …There was a lot of awkwardness. Thankfully, the dentist is awesome.”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

Chinese Embrace Hugging, But Americans Are Wary of the ‘Awkward Embrace’

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Americans are known worldwide for their enthusiastic hugs, and now the Chinese are emulating the physical warmth of North American culture. School children are being taught emotional intelligence and given “homework” to go home and hug their parents.

Since the death of Chairman Mao in 1976, the physically restrained Chinese are fully embracing hugging, according to a story last week, “More Hugs Please, We’re Chinese,” in the New York Times.

“Recently, it seems like everyone is hugging,” it reports. “Friends are hugging. Family members are hugging. In hugging between Chinese and non-Chinese, it was non-Chinese who once foisted physical affection on the Chinese. Today it may be a Chinese initiating contact. The tables are turning.”

But do they understand the American nuances?

“Hugging is an art form,” says Amy Binette Wolfe, a 35-year-old mother of three from Pittsfield, Mass.

“Too long of a hug is awkward. The short hug is preferred. I’ve started a conversation or a meeting with a handshake and ended with a hug. …But you’re not going to have a meeting where you’re bitching out the tax man and end it with a hug,” she added.

American hugging comes with rules, and Wolfe says, “Beware of the wandering hand-hugger.”

A St. Louis University cultural guide for its international students warns them to keep an 18-inch distance when talking to others. “This personal space is very important and, if limited, the individual may become uncomfortable,” it says.

“Typically, Americans do not hug or kiss an acquaintance upon greeting — but rather shake hands or nod their heads. They also do not touch while speaking, although a brief touch on the arm or shoulder might indicate sympathy or concern to someone they know well. Once a friendship has developed, women may greet each other with a hug or embrace.”

And then there are those who run from the eager-beaver hugger.

“When I run into a male acquaintance, I know exactly how to greet him: shake his hand,” writes Shane Snow of The Medium. “Doesn’t matter how long we’ve known each other. I even shake my dad’s hand. …But with women, I feel like I’m trapped between two walls of a deep-space garbage compactor.”

Jen Doll writes in “The Huggers Among Us: A Guide to Greetings,” on The Wire, “There are, of course, as many types of huggers as there are types of humans.”

She outlines at least a dozen including the “Alternative Greeter,” who high-fives or “clasps hands emotively”; the “Grandma”; the “Political Hug,” like a bear; and the “hugger with room to move” who barely touches the other’s arms and back and whose “torso will forever remain in its own separate continent.”

Within families, hugging can be “key” to attachment, according to Jody Todd Manley, clinical director of the University of Rochester’s Mt. Hope Family center. Still, all families do not have the same “comfort levels” with physical affection.

“Feeling comfortable with a hug from mom is maybe not as close as with Aunt Tilley,” she said.

“There can be personal space issues around how well you know a person,” said Manley. “The personal context and even the length of the hug or intimacy can be uncomfortable if it’s not someone you have a relationship with.”

Some serial huggers say that the custom may be “fading,” as a result of technology and less face-to-face interaction.

Hillary Mains, a 32-year-old mother of two from Pepperell, Mass., said hugging family and friends and even “people you have just recently met, but hit off well with,” used to be “commonplace.”

“I find myself feeling the situation out and even when I feel it’s acceptable, I pre-cursor it with, ‘I’m a hugger, so I’m gonna give you a hug.’ I’ve never been rejected, for it, but if I don’t say that, there is a definite air of ‘should I or…?”

In today’s climate sensitivie to sexual harassment, teachers are hesitant to touch students because of fear of reprisals from suspect parents or potential bullying. Children learn to “keep your hands to yourself,” said Mains.

“With my 6-year-old Tyler, I’ve always encouraged him to hug when he says ‘bye to a person close to him,” she said. “Now, I notice him backing away from it. …The only exception to that is me, his dad and his brother.”

“It seems to tie into when he started school,” she said. “He actually seems slightly more wary to hug his peers than he does with aunts, uncles and grandparents.”

Still, Amy Binette Wolfe says the hugging culture is still alive and well in her small community in the New England Berkshires.

“I’ve met many, many people, and it’s all hugs, hugs, hugs,” she said. “I am not always the initiator. Thank goodness, because this sounds like a love fest. I consciously look for signs that the hug is happening or if the hand is coming out for the firm handshake.”

“But if you’re chatting about your kids and show emotion or vice versa, and the person knows you … the hug might happen,” she said. “That being said, as much as I adore the kids’ pediatrician we don’t start off or end appointments with a hug.”

“I did hug the kids’ dentist once,” she added. “It was purely an accident. …There was a lot of awkwardness. Thankfully, the dentist is awesome.”

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

College Students in No Shape for the Future

iStock/Thinkstock(CHICAGO) — College is a time to learn, to grow, to get woefully out of shape.

Northwestern Medicine and Northeastern Illinois University researchers, after studying data from the 2010 National College Health Assessment of 3,000 students, warn that unhealthy behaviors learned at school make young people more prone to cancer in later life.

For example, a stunning 19 out of 20 students fail to eat the recommended amount of five or more servings of fruits and vegetables daily.

Furthermore, 60 percent of students don’t perform at least 20 minutes of vigorous exercise three days a week, which is also recommended under federal guidelines.

The study also takes into consideration such bad habits as smoking, binge drinking and becoming either overweight or obese. What’s more, the researchers are concerned that minority groups, particularly African-Americans and Native Americans, put themselves at greater risk of engaging in unhealthy behaviors that can result in diseases that can cut years off their lives.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

Women Who Drink Beer Less Prone to Develop Rheumatoid Arthritis

iStock/Thinkstock(BOSTON) — Ladies, here’s a toast to quaffing an occasional beer. It can save you a lot of pain down the road.

That’s according to Dr. Bing Lu, who teaches at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

Lu says that women can reduce their chances of developing rheumatoid arthritis, which begins as early as the 20s, by drinking alcohol in moderation.

Tracking the drinking habits of women from two large studies that began in 1976 and 1989, respectively, Lu found that those who enjoyed a few alcoholic beverages per week cut their risk of rheumatoid arthritis by 21 percent. But the risk went down by 31 percent when they only drank beers.

As for the reasons why, Lu and his team were at a loss to explain beer’s and alcohol’s effects on the body that would lessen the development of rheumatoid arthritis, which is primarily a woman’s disease.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

Rare Set of Twins Hold Hands in Delivery Room

iStock/Thinkstock(AKRON, Ohio) — One Ohio mom got a very special present for Mother’s Day, when her identical twin girls were born holding hands.

Sarah Thistlewhistle’s daughters, Jenna and Jillian, are a rare set of monoamniotic or “mono mono” identical twins, which means they shared an amniotic sac and were in constant contact during the pregnancy.

The condition also meant that Thistlewhistle had to remain on bed rest for weeks at Akron General Medical Center in Ohio. The twins had to be constantly monitored for nearly two months, since mono mono twins can easily become entangled in each other’s umbilical cords.

“It’s really mentally challenging. It’s a very tough experience to go through,” Thistlewhistle told ABC News.

Thistlewhistle, who also has a 15-month-old son, had to check into the hospital for nearly two months so doctors could carefully monitor the babies.

“They hook you up to heart rate monitors to watch for heart deceleration or variables,” she said. “That’s what they look for the whole time. I got ultrasounds every other week.”

Thankfully for Thistlewhistle and her husband Bill, their daughters were born healthy at 33 weeks this past Friday. Doctors planned a Caesarian section because if the twins grew too large, they would be at greater risk for entanglement.

As the girls were born, doctors held them up over a sheet so that Thistlewhistle and her husband could see them. The newborns were holding hands.

“I didn’t think they would come out and instantly holding hands. It was overwhelming. I can’t even put into words,” Thistlewhistle said. “There wasn’t a dry eye in the whole OR.”

Although the girls were born healthy, Thistlewhistle said Saturday they had some breathing problems, so they were moved to the neonatal unit at Akron Children’s Hospital. On Sunday, Thistlewhistle will get to celebrate Mother’s Day by introducing her daughters to their older brother for the first time.

“It’s the first time that we’ll all be together in one room,” Thistlewhistle said.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →

14-Year Reign Is Over as Noah Takes Over Jacob for Top Baby Name

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Nothing lasts forever, especially trends in baby names. After a 14-year reign, the name Jacob is no longer America’s most popular baby boy’s name. In 2013, Jacob fell to third most popular boy’s name behind Noah and Liam.

With Noah usurping Jacob’s place, 2013 marks the first time in more than 50 years that neither Michael nor Jacob took the top slot. The two names have been so dominant that one or the other was ranked as the top male baby name since 1960, according to the Social Security Administration.

Sophia came in as number one for girls, though it’s been most popular name for girls for merely three years. However, the name is so popular that a second spelling, Sofia, is ranked as the 13th most widespread.

Here are the top 10 names for each sex:

Boys’ Names:

Noah
Liam
Jacob
Mason
William
Ethan
Michael
Alexander
Jayden
Daniel

Girls’ Names:

Sophia
Emma
Olivia
Isabella
Ava
Mia
Emily
Abigail
Madison
Elizabeth

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather Read More →