Review Category : Health

Startling Viral Video Shows Effects of Sun on Skin

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Photographer Thomas Leveritt is hoping his video will help shed light on the importance of sunscreen and it seems to be having an effect.

The video, which has been licensed by ABC News, shows how skin appears when viewed under ultraviolet lights. The difference is like night and day.

People of diverse races are seen approaching the camera and then standing to be viewed. Many of them gasp to see the appearance of their skin under the UV light, which shows the appearance of the skin beyond what can be seen by the naked eye.

Also compelling is what happens when people apply sunscreen to their faces. The portion of skin that’s covered by the lotion appears under the UV as solid black streaks. Levitt says this shows that sunscreen can indeed block UV rays.

“I think what’s interesting about the UV camera is that it shows you exactly how effective sunscreen can be,” he said in a Skype interview with ABC News. “People are so used to being told about certain product’s scientific quality, but when they’re finally shown, it’s a much more deep and emotional impact.”

The video was published to YouTube on Aug. 12. As of Monday night, it had been viewed more than 9 million times.

One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime, according to the publication JAMA Dermatology.

Dr. Doris Day, a New York City dermatologist, said people need to be “sun smart.”

“We know that skin cancer can happen in every skin type…everyone should have their skin checked at least once a year. And if you have a lot of spots check more often,” she said. “Studies show that if you use sunscreen everyday all year round, that you lower your risk of skin cancer and aging by 20 percent.”

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Public Perception of Jobs Also Influences Views on Parenting

Fuse/Thinkstock(IOWA CITY, Iowa) — Your job may be holding you back from being as good a parent as you can possibly be. Or at least, that’s what some people think.

That’s the finding of University of Iowa researchers, who say that the public’s views of particular workers perceived as aggressive, weak, or impersonal may needlessly add more stress.

Researcher Mark Walker says the study conducted with co-author Mary Noonan shows “the cultural meanings of a person’s occupational and parental identities could impact the psychological well-being of working parents.”

Essentially, the low opinion people have of certain workers make them feel they won’t be good parents either.

Those occupations include attorney, salesperson, laborer, receptionist, police officer or politician.

However, teachers, doctors, registered nurses, principals and professors are viewed more favorably by the public, and therefore are seen as better parents.

One solution, according to Walker, is if employers in certain “stress” fields could potentially provide more targeted mental health resources for those in “at risk” occupations.

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Cancer Drug Reverses Baldness Caused by Alopecia in Small Study

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A drug approved to treat a rare form of leukemia reversed hair loss caused by alopecia, a small study found.

The drug, ruxolitinib, helps reduce inflammation caused by disease. But it also helped three alopecia sufferers regrow full heads of hair within five months, according to the study published Sunday in the journal Nature Medicine.

“We still need to do more testing to establish that ruxolitinib should be used in alopecia,” said study author Dr. Raphael Clynes, director of the Columbia Center for Translational Immunology at Columbia University in New York City. “But this is exciting news for patients and their physicians.”

It’s not yet known if ruxolitinib can restore other types of hair loss.

Alopecia is an autoimmune disease that leads to patchy hair loss. It is not the same as male pattern baldness, which has its roots in genetic and hormonal causes.

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Ebola Patient Reunites with Husband Through Isolation Glass

SIM(ATLANTA) — Nancy Writebol, one of two American Ebola patients, was reunited with her husband on Sunday, sharing a tender moment through the isolation glass at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta.

“We both placed our hands on opposite sides of the glass, moved with tears to look at each other again,” David Writebol said in a statement. “She was standing with her radiant smile, happy beyond words.”

Nancy Writebol was working for the aid group SIM in Liberia when she contracted the virus, which has killed 1,145 people in West Africa. She was evacuated to Atlanta on Aug. 5, shortly after the other American Ebola patient, Dr. Kent Brantly.

David Writebol returned from Liberia a week ago but was placed under quarantine in North Carolina out of an abundance of caution. Since he has not shown any symptoms of the virus since his wife’s diagnosis three weeks ago, he was cleared to visit her in Atlanta.

“She is continuing to slowly gain strength, eager for the day when the barriers separating us are set aside, and we can simply hold each other,” he said.

Brantly, who is also recovering at Emory University Hospital, said he is “continuing to heal.”

“I hold on to the hope of a sweet reunion with my wife, children and family in the near future,” he said in a statement Friday.

Both Brantly and Nancy Writebol received the experimental drug known as ZMapp.

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Ebola Patient Reunites with Husband Through Isolation Glass

SIM(ATLANTA) — Nancy Writebol, one of two American Ebola patients, was reunited with her husband on Sunday, sharing a tender moment through the isolation glass at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta.

“We both placed our hands on opposite sides of the glass, moved with tears to look at each other again,” David Writebol said in a statement. “She was standing with her radiant smile, happy beyond words.”

Nancy Writebol was working for the aid group SIM in Liberia when she contracted the virus, which has killed 1,145 people in West Africa. She was evacuated to Atlanta on Aug. 5, shortly after the other American Ebola patient, Dr. Kent Brantly.

David Writebol returned from Liberia a week ago but was placed under quarantine in North Carolina out of an abundance of caution. Since he has not shown any symptoms of the virus since his wife’s diagnosis three weeks ago, he was cleared to visit her in Atlanta.

“She is continuing to slowly gain strength, eager for the day when the barriers separating us are set aside, and we can simply hold each other,” he said.

Brantly, who is also recovering at Emory University Hospital, said he is “continuing to heal.”

“I hold on to the hope of a sweet reunion with my wife, children and family in the near future,” he said in a statement Friday.

Both Brantly and Nancy Writebol received the experimental drug known as ZMapp.

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ALS Association Not Ready to Kick the Ice Bucket Just Yet

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge has vastly exceeded all expectations.

When it was first launched online late last month to hike donations to combat ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s Disease, no one dreamed that people dumping ice cold water on their heads would turn into a fundraising juggernaut.

Thanks to the efforts of both ordinary folks and celebrities, The ALS Association reported Sunday that it had received $13.3 million in contributions from July 29 through August 17, according to The New York Times, that includes 260,000 new donors.

Over the comparable time in 2013, donations were $1.7 million, so the Ice Bucket Challenge, which was mocked by some early on, has happily proven its detractors wrong.

In a statement, Barbara Newhouse, president and CEO of The ALS Association, said, “Never before have we been in a better position to fuel our fight against this disease. Increased awareness and unprecedented financial support will enable us to think outside the box. We will be able to strategize about efforts in ways that previously would not have been possible, all while we work to fulfill and enhance our existing mission priorities nationwide.”

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Diabetic Teen Kicked Out of New Jersey Drive-In Movie

iStock/Thinkstock(VINELAND, N.J.) — A diabetic teenager was kicked out of a drive-in movie theater because he brought in some candy, violating the theater’s policy against outside food.

“Have someone tell me no, because of a really dumb reason. It’s just really humiliating,” 16-year-old Ben Weidner told ABC News.

Weidner has Type 1 diabetes and says he always carries around a backpack containing insulin, an EpiPen, a juice box and candy. The candy is for when his blood sugar suddenly drops.

But when Weidner tried to go to the Delsea Drive-In in Vineland, New Jersey, he was not allowed inside because outside food and drinks are not allowed.

Dr. John Deleonardis, the owner of the drive-in movie theater, and a pediatrician, says that his concession stand has several diabetic-friendly foods available.

“My time shouldn’t be occupied at the box office, trying to explain to people that we have a website. It tells you about this,” Deleonardis told ABC News. “If you don’t want to go to that, don’t come.”

Weidner said he thinks the theater should consider diabetics when enforcing their “no outside food or drink policy,” but Deleonardis says the medical condition should not be an exception to the rule.

“Sorry your kid has an affliction but what can I tell you?” Deleonardis told ABC station WPVI-TV in Philadelphia.

But Weidner’s father, Phil Weidner, says, “It’s just ignorant and unacceptable. Just because he feels people are going to take advantage of him by bringing food in.”

Deleonardis told WPVI that he has no plans to change his policy.

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Iowa Students to Wear Heart Rate Monitors

iStock/Thinkstock(DUBUQUE, Iowa) — Students going back to school in Dubuque, Iowa, are going to find it a little harder to slack off in gym class.

Public middle and high school students will have to wear heart rate monitors in gym class to make sure they are actually being physically active.

“It will be a large portion of their grade, because we want to grade them on what they’re actually doing in our class,” Dubuque Schools Athletic and Wellness Director Amy Hawkins told ABC News.

Teachers will use the information collected from the heart rate monitors to write report cards.

“It really takes the opinion out of things,” Hawkins said. “You know it’s not really ‘I think your kid is doing this and this in class.'”

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The Do’s and Don’ts of Digital Flirting

iStock/Thinkstock(STANFORD, Calif.) — Flirting is certainly an art form, and one that has taken on new dimensions due to texting.

As it happens, people who receive these texts are pretty particular not only about the content of the messages sent but how they’re conveyed.

Stanford University students who developed the chat app Omlet conducted a survey of 1,000 adults and young people on “Digital Flirting Rules,” and the number-one turnoff for both men and women is “Funky or very informal spelling.”

“Lack of punctuation and grammar” was the second biggest irritant for the ladies, while guys complained about “Multiple exclamation points in chat messages.”

Using a lot of slang, such as LOL, also isn’t inadvisable if you’re trying to make an impression.

Here are women’s five biggest digital flirting turnoffs and disapproval ratings:

  1. Funky or very informal spelling — 73 percent
  2. Lack of punctuation and grammar — 59 percent
  3. Excessive slang — 54 percent
  4. Messages during sleeping hours — 51 percent
  5. All lowercase words — 50 percent

Men’s five biggest digital flirting turnoffs and disapproval ratings:

  1. Funky or very informal spelling — 58 percent
  2. Multiple exclamation points in chat messages — 47 percent
  3. Lack of punctuation and grammar — 46 percent
  4. All lowercase words — 41 percent
  5. Excessive slang — 40 percent

Meanwhile, emoticons and emojis apparently hit the right spot when it comes to flirting. Thirty-one percent of men and 38 percent of women enjoy receiving them, according to the researchers.

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Flies Not Viewed as Major Restaurant Annoyance

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The poor cockroach still gets a bad rap while the fly gets a pass, according to a survey of 300 people by pest-control company Orkin.

When asked, “Which of the following would make you stop chowing down if you spied them while you were in a restaurant?” 61 percent said a cockroach.

Meanwhile, only three percent said they’d stop eating if a fly was buzzing around the dinner table.

However, Orkin entomologist and Technical Services Director Ron Harrison remarked, “Many restaurant patrons may not be aware that houseflies are twice as filthy as cockroaches.”

Without getting too graphic, flies carry all sorts of pathogens on their legs and body’s small hairs that are easily transferred to food or touched surfaces, according to Harrison.

Incidentally, other choices in the Orkin survey of critters you might (or might not) spot in a restaurant included rodents, ants, snakes and geckos.

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