Review Category : National News

Ebola Nurse Kaci Hickox Can Swap Quarantine for Blood Test, Gov. Tells ABC News

ABC News(FORT KENT, Maine) — Maine’s governor indicated Thursday that he would abandon his demand that nurse Kaci Hickox remain under quarantine after treating Ebola patients if she would agree to take a blood test for the lethal virus.

Gov. Paul LePage made his comment to ABC News Thursday as Hickox defiantly challenged demands that she remain quarantined by leaving her home in the morning for a bike ride with her boyfriend.

LePage indicated to ABC News that he was willing to abandon his demands that the nurse remain quarantined if she would take a blood test for Ebola.

While Hickox was pedaling, attorneys for the state of Maine went to Superior Court seeking a judge’s permission to give Hickox a blood test for Ebola, LePage said.

“This could be resolved today,” the governor said. “She has been exposed and she’s not cooperative, so force her to take a test. It’s so simple.”

Medical experts have said that an Ebola test would only be positive if someone were symptomatic, and could register a negative result if the amount of Ebola virus in the blood hadn’t reached a detectable level.

The governor said he has a state police car stationed outside Hickox’s home and that she has the town “scared to death.”

Hickox, 33, went on the bike ride in Fort Kent, Maine, after vowing last night she wasn’t willing to “stand here and have my civil rights violated.”

While Hickox was pedaling, attorneys for the state of Maine went to Superior Court seeking a judge’s permission to give Hickox a blood test for Ebola, Maine Gov. Paul LePage told ABC News.

“This could be resolved today,” LePage said. “She has been exposed and she’s not cooperative, so force her to take a test. It’s so simple.”

Medical experts have said that an Ebola test would only be positive if someone were symptomatic.

The governor said he has a state police car stationed outside Hickox’s home and that she has the town “scared to death.”

The nurse, who had been treating Ebola patients in Sierra Leone for Doctors Without Borders, said she was fighting for her rights as well as other health care workers who will be returning from the Ebola hot zone in West Africa. She said that Doctors Without Border told her another 20 health care workers will be coming home in the next month.

“Most aid workers who come home just want to see their family and have a sort of normal life,” she told reporters Wednesday night. “I’m fighting for something other than myself. There are aid workers coming back every day.”

Hickox said she isn’t committed to a quarantine that isn’t “scientifically valid,” she told reporters standing alongside her boyfriend, Ted Wilbur, outside her home Wednesday night. The quarantine demand goes beyond guidelines put out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which indicate that she can’t spread Ebola if she isn’t sick, doesn’t have symptoms and no one is in close contact with her bodily fluids.

“You could hug me, you could shake my hand [and] I would not give you Ebola,” she said.

Hickox returned to the United States on Oct. 24, landing in Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey, where she was questioned and quarantined in an outdoor tent through the weekend despite having no symptoms of the lethal virus.

Hickox registered a fever on an infrared thermometer at the airport, but an oral thermometer at University Hospital in Newark showed that she had no fever, she said.

After twice testing negative for the Ebola, Hickox was released and returned home to Maine on Oct. 27. Maine’s health commissioner announced that Maine would join the handful of states going beyond federal guidelines and asking that returning Ebola health workers be self-quarantined for 21 days.

But Hickox vowed to break the quarantine because it wasn’t based on science.

“I will go to court to attain my freedom,” Hickox told Good Morning America Wednesday via Skype from her hometown of Fort Kent. “I have been completely asymptomatic since I’ve been here. I feel absolutely great.”

The CDC doesn’t consider health workers who treated Ebola patients in West Africa to be at “high risk” for catching Ebola if they were wearing protective gear, according to new guidelines announced this week. Since they have “some risk,” the CDC recommends that they undergo monitoring — tracking symptoms and body temperature twice a day — avoid public transportation and take other precautions. But the CDC doesn’t require home quarantines for these workers.

Someone isn’t contagious until Ebola symptoms appear, according to the CDC. And even then, transmission requires contact with bodily fluids such as blood and vomit.

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Ebola Nurse Kaci Hickox Can Swap Quarantine for Blood Test, Gov. Tells ABC News

ABC News(FORT KENT, Maine) — Maine’s governor indicated Thursday that he would abandon his demand that nurse Kaci Hickox remain under quarantine after treating Ebola patients if she would agree to take a blood test for the lethal virus.

Gov. Paul LePage made his comment to ABC News Thursday as Hickox defiantly challenged demands that she remain quarantined by leaving her home in the morning for a bike ride with her boyfriend.

LePage indicated to ABC News that he was willing to abandon his demands that the nurse remain quarantined if she would take a blood test for Ebola.

While Hickox was pedaling, attorneys for the state of Maine went to Superior Court seeking a judge’s permission to give Hickox a blood test for Ebola, LePage said.

“This could be resolved today,” the governor said. “She has been exposed and she’s not cooperative, so force her to take a test. It’s so simple.”

Medical experts have said that an Ebola test would only be positive if someone were symptomatic, and could register a negative result if the amount of Ebola virus in the blood hadn’t reached a detectable level.

The governor said he has a state police car stationed outside Hickox’s home and that she has the town “scared to death.”

Hickox, 33, went on the bike ride in Fort Kent, Maine, after vowing last night she wasn’t willing to “stand here and have my civil rights violated.”

While Hickox was pedaling, attorneys for the state of Maine went to Superior Court seeking a judge’s permission to give Hickox a blood test for Ebola, Maine Gov. Paul LePage told ABC News.

“This could be resolved today,” LePage said. “She has been exposed and she’s not cooperative, so force her to take a test. It’s so simple.”

Medical experts have said that an Ebola test would only be positive if someone were symptomatic.

The governor said he has a state police car stationed outside Hickox’s home and that she has the town “scared to death.”

The nurse, who had been treating Ebola patients in Sierra Leone for Doctors Without Borders, said she was fighting for her rights as well as other health care workers who will be returning from the Ebola hot zone in West Africa. She said that Doctors Without Border told her another 20 health care workers will be coming home in the next month.

“Most aid workers who come home just want to see their family and have a sort of normal life,” she told reporters Wednesday night. “I’m fighting for something other than myself. There are aid workers coming back every day.”

Hickox said she isn’t committed to a quarantine that isn’t “scientifically valid,” she told reporters standing alongside her boyfriend, Ted Wilbur, outside her home Wednesday night. The quarantine demand goes beyond guidelines put out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which indicate that she can’t spread Ebola if she isn’t sick, doesn’t have symptoms and no one is in close contact with her bodily fluids.

“You could hug me, you could shake my hand [and] I would not give you Ebola,” she said.

Hickox returned to the United States on Oct. 24, landing in Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey, where she was questioned and quarantined in an outdoor tent through the weekend despite having no symptoms of the lethal virus.

Hickox registered a fever on an infrared thermometer at the airport, but an oral thermometer at University Hospital in Newark showed that she had no fever, she said.

After twice testing negative for the Ebola, Hickox was released and returned home to Maine on Oct. 27. Maine’s health commissioner announced that Maine would join the handful of states going beyond federal guidelines and asking that returning Ebola health workers be self-quarantined for 21 days.

But Hickox vowed to break the quarantine because it wasn’t based on science.

“I will go to court to attain my freedom,” Hickox told Good Morning America Wednesday via Skype from her hometown of Fort Kent. “I have been completely asymptomatic since I’ve been here. I feel absolutely great.”

The CDC doesn’t consider health workers who treated Ebola patients in West Africa to be at “high risk” for catching Ebola if they were wearing protective gear, according to new guidelines announced this week. Since they have “some risk,” the CDC recommends that they undergo monitoring — tracking symptoms and body temperature twice a day — avoid public transportation and take other precautions. But the CDC doesn’t require home quarantines for these workers.

Someone isn’t contagious until Ebola symptoms appear, according to the CDC. And even then, transmission requires contact with bodily fluids such as blood and vomit.

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Ebola Nurse Kaci Hickox Goes on Bicycle Ride

ABC News(FORT KENT, Maine) — A nurse who returned from fighting Ebola in West Africa challenged the demands that she remain quarantined by leaving her home Thursday morning for a bike ride with her boyfriend.

Kaci Hickox, 33, went on the bike ride with her boyfriend in Fort Kent, Maine, after vowing last night she wasn’t willing to “stand here and have my civil rights violated.” State officials said they were preparing to file a court order to enforce a mandatory quarantine, but it would first have to be approved by a judge.

Hickox was treating Ebola patients in Sierra Leone for Doctors Without Borders. She returned to the United States on Friday, landing in Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey, where she was questioned and quarantined in an outdoor tent through the weekend despite having no symptoms of the lethal virus.

Hickox registered a fever on an infrared thermometer at the airport, but an oral thermometer at University Hospital in Newark showed that she had no fever, she said.

After twice testing negative for the Ebola, Hickox was released and returned home to Maine on Monday. Maine’s health commissioner announced that Maine would join the handful of states going beyond federal guidelines and asking that returning Ebola health workers be self-quarantined for 21 days.

“Our true desire is for a voluntary separation from the public. We do not want to have to legally enforce an in-home quarantine,” Maine Health Commissioner Mary Mayhew said in a statement. “We are confident that the selfless health workers, who were brave enough to care for Ebola patients in a foreign country, will be willing to take reasonable steps to protect the residents of their own country. However, we are willing to pursue legal authority if necessary to ensure risk is minimized for Mainers.”

Hickox said she doesn’t think it is reasonable.

“I will go to court to attain my freedom,” Hickox told Good Morning America Wednesday via Skype from her hometown of Fort Kent. “I have been completely asymptomatic since I’ve been here. I feel absolutely great.”

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention doesn’t consider health workers who treated Ebola patients in West Africa to be at “high risk” for catching Ebola if they were wearing protective gear, according to new guidelines announced this week. Since they have “some risk,” the CDC recommends that they undergo monitoring — tracking symptoms and body temperature twice a day — avoid public transportation and take other precautions. But the CDC doesn’t require home quarantines for these workers.

Someone isn’t contagious until Ebola symptoms appear, according to the CDC. And even then, transmission requires contact with bodily fluids such as blood and vomit.

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Man Survives Driving Off Cliff, 17 Hours Trapped Underneath Vehicle

iStock/Thinkstock(BOONE, N.C.) — A man in North Carolina survived 17 hours pinned underneath his vehicle after he fell asleep behind the wheel and drove off a cliff, authorities said.

Joseph Woodring’s vehicle fell at least 60 feet when he went off the road in Boone, N.C., on Tuesday night, according to State Highway Patrol.

The crash launched Woodring, 21, from his vehicle, which landed upside down and pinned him underneath it. He was found Wednesday afternoon.

“He was lying on his side. Both legs were pinned under,” Dale Watson told ABC News affiliate WSOC-TV. “He wanted some water so I give him some water.”

Watson said Woodring told him he fell asleep while driving. It took rescue crews an hour to raise the vehicle off him.

Woodring was taken to the hospital with two broken legs, according to the State Highway Patrol.

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Man Survives Driving Off Cliff, 17 Hours Trapped Underneath Vehicle

iStock/Thinkstock(BOONE, N.C.) — A man in North Carolina survived 17 hours pinned underneath his vehicle after he fell asleep behind the wheel and drove off a cliff, authorities said.

Joseph Woodring’s vehicle fell at least 60 feet when he went off the road in Boone, N.C., on Tuesday night, according to State Highway Patrol.

The crash launched Woodring, 21, from his vehicle, which landed upside down and pinned him underneath it. He was found Wednesday afternoon.

“He was lying on his side. Both legs were pinned under,” Dale Watson told ABC News affiliate WSOC-TV. “He wanted some water so I give him some water.”

Watson said Woodring told him he fell asleep while driving. It took rescue crews an hour to raise the vehicle off him.

Woodring was taken to the hospital with two broken legs, according to the State Highway Patrol.

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Man Says He Wrongly Confessed to Murder After Undergoing ‘Exorcism’

iStock/Thinkstock(KANSAS CITY, Mo.) — A man claims he was under a sort of exorcism when he confessed to killing a fellow member of a religious group in Kansas City, Missouri, whose death was originally ruled a suicide.

The body of Bethany Deaton was found Oct. 30, 2012, in the back seat of her minivan with the doors locked and a note inside.

“My name is Bethany Deaton. I chose this evil thing,” the note read, according to court documents. “I did it because I wouldn’t be a real person and what is the point of living if it is too late for that? I wish I had chosen differently a long time ago. I knew it all and refused to listen. Maybe Jesus will still save me.”

Deaton, 27, was a member of a religious group called the International House of Prayer, which was led by her husband, Tyler Deaton. A few weeks after her death, Micah Moore, another member of the group, confessed to her slaying.

Tyler Deaton had a cult-like following within the group and controlled virtually every aspect of some members’ lives, according to court documents.

When Moore confessed, he told police Deaton ordered him to kill his wife to stop her from telling anyone about sexual assaults against her in the house, according to police records. The three lived in a communal house with other male members of the group.

“This is a horrible, horrible crime,” Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker said. “A young woman lost her life. She lost her life in a very violent way and today, we do know what happened to her.”

Now Moore claims he only confessed to killing Deaton because he was under the influence of what some have called an exorcism. Moore, who is scheduled for trial next month, has pleaded not guilty.

“They were the statements of a distraught and confused young man,” his attorney, Melanie Morgan, said.

The medical examiner has also changed the manner of Deaton’s death to undetermined.

“We are aware of no evidence that a crime has occurred,” Morgan said.

The International House of Prayer denied any affiliation with Deaton’s group in a statement to ABC News.

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Man Says He Wrongly Confessed to Murder After Undergoing ‘Exorcism’

iStock/Thinkstock(KANSAS CITY, Mo.) — A man claims he was under a sort of exorcism when he confessed to killing a fellow member of a religious group in Kansas City, Missouri, whose death was originally ruled a suicide.

The body of Bethany Deaton was found Oct. 30, 2012, in the back seat of her minivan with the doors locked and a note inside.

“My name is Bethany Deaton. I chose this evil thing,” the note read, according to court documents. “I did it because I wouldn’t be a real person and what is the point of living if it is too late for that? I wish I had chosen differently a long time ago. I knew it all and refused to listen. Maybe Jesus will still save me.”

Deaton, 27, was a member of a religious group called the International House of Prayer, which was led by her husband, Tyler Deaton. A few weeks after her death, Micah Moore, another member of the group, confessed to her slaying.

Tyler Deaton had a cult-like following within the group and controlled virtually every aspect of some members’ lives, according to court documents.

When Moore confessed, he told police Deaton ordered him to kill his wife to stop her from telling anyone about sexual assaults against her in the house, according to police records. The three lived in a communal house with other male members of the group.

“This is a horrible, horrible crime,” Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker said. “A young woman lost her life. She lost her life in a very violent way and today, we do know what happened to her.”

Now Moore claims he only confessed to killing Deaton because he was under the influence of what some have called an exorcism. Moore, who is scheduled for trial next month, has pleaded not guilty.

“They were the statements of a distraught and confused young man,” his attorney, Melanie Morgan, said.

The medical examiner has also changed the manner of Deaton’s death to undetermined.

“We are aware of no evidence that a crime has occurred,” Morgan said.

The International House of Prayer denied any affiliation with Deaton’s group in a statement to ABC News.

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Man Says He Wrongly Confessed to Murder After Undergoing ‘Exorcism’

iStock/Thinkstock(KANSAS CITY, Mo.) — A man claims he was under a sort of exorcism when he confessed to killing a fellow member of a religious group in Kansas City, Missouri, whose death was originally ruled a suicide.

The body of Bethany Deaton was found Oct. 30, 2012, in the back seat of her minivan with the doors locked and a note inside.

“My name is Bethany Deaton. I chose this evil thing,” the note read, according to court documents. “I did it because I wouldn’t be a real person and what is the point of living if it is too late for that? I wish I had chosen differently a long time ago. I knew it all and refused to listen. Maybe Jesus will still save me.”

Deaton, 27, was a member of a religious group called the International House of Prayer, which was led by her husband, Tyler Deaton. A few weeks after her death, Micah Moore, another member of the group, confessed to her slaying.

Tyler Deaton had a cult-like following within the group and controlled virtually every aspect of some members’ lives, according to court documents.

When Moore confessed, he told police Deaton ordered him to kill his wife to stop her from telling anyone about sexual assaults against her in the house, according to police records. The three lived in a communal house with other male members of the group.

“This is a horrible, horrible crime,” Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker said. “A young woman lost her life. She lost her life in a very violent way and today, we do know what happened to her.”

Now Moore claims he only confessed to killing Deaton because he was under the influence of what some have called an exorcism. Moore, who is scheduled for trial next month, has pleaded not guilty.

“They were the statements of a distraught and confused young man,” his attorney, Melanie Morgan, said.

The medical examiner has also changed the manner of Deaton’s death to undetermined.

“We are aware of no evidence that a crime has occurred,” Morgan said.

The International House of Prayer denied any affiliation with Deaton’s group in a statement to ABC News.

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San Francisco Giants Fans Celebrate World Series Title with Couch Fires

Ron Vesely/MLB Photos via Getty Images(SAN FRANCISCO) — Big crowds hit the streets of San Francisco late Wednesday to celebrate the Giants’ third World Series title in five years.

People burned couches and other debris in the city’s Mission District after the Giants defeated the Kansas City Royals 3-2 in the decisive Game 7.

Two people were shot in the Mission, police told ABC News station KGO-TV.

SF won the #worldseries. This guy is swinging on live wire on a bus. lol

A video posted by Tony Bell (@tb_tonybell) on Oct 10, 2014 at 10:29pm PDT

Police haven’t said how many arrests were made.

I’m covered in beer #GoGiants #madbum

A video posted by Jeff Dean (@most_jeffinitely_) on Oct 10, 2014 at 8:49pm PDT

A victory parade is scheduled for Friday.

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NASA Completes Initial Assessment of Virginia Launch Site Following Rocket Explosion

Image Credit: NASA/Terry Zaperach(WALLOPS, Va.) — NASA said on Wednesday that the Wallops Incident Response Team completed its initial assessment after Orbital Science Corporation’s Antares rocket exploded seconds after liftoff on Tuesday.

“I want to praise the launch team, range safety, all of our emergency responders and those who provided mutual aid and support on a highly-professional response that ensured the safety of our most important resource — our people,” Wallops Director Bill Wrobel said. The initial assessment is just a “cursory look,” the NASA press release notes, though it found numerous broken windows and imploded doors at buildings in the immediate area.

The most severe damage was found at a sounding rocket launcher adjacent to the launchpad and buildings nearest the pad, and there was damage to the transporter erector launcher and lightning supression rods at Pad 0A.

Soil, air and water samples will be taken from the incident area to ensure that the environment is safe. No hazardous substances were detected in initial sampling.

Also on Wednesday, Orbital said in a statement that the “major elements of the launch complex infrastructure…avoided serious damage.”

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