Review Category : National News

Poor Grades for Eighth Graders from the Nation’s Report Card

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The results from the Nation’s Report Card are out, and students won’t want to take this report card home.

The National Assessment of Educational Progress, also known as the Nation’s Report Card, revealed the average scores of eighth-grade students who took the test in 2014.

Only 18 percent of students received scores of “proficient” or better in U.S. History, 23 percent for Civics, and 27 percent for Geography.

Some of the test’s questions included filling in a checks and balances chart, and identifying shaded regions on a map.

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MLB Historian: Baltimore Orioles Fan-less Game ‘Totally Unprecedented’

iStock/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) — Wednesday’s empty Orioles game is “truly unprecedented” for the league and team executives opted to play the game with no fans rather than postpone it because of the Baltimore riots, the official Major League Baseball historian told ABC News.

The only people inside Oriole Park at Camden Yards Wednesday will be the players from the Orioles and Chicago White Sox, credentialed sports reporters and stadium staff. But the game will be televised as scheduled so viewers will get a full view of the nearly 46,000 empty seats.

League historian John Thorn said that has never happened in the league’s history. In the past, after rioting in Detroit in 1967, Baltimore in 1968 and Los Angeles in 1992, those cities’ respective sports games were all rescheduled for later dates. The same applied for larger disasters like the California earthquakes and the Sept. 11 attacks, but this time he believes scheduling conflicts were behind the decision not to postpone.

“It’s a very tight schedule and … when you know you’re going to have other conflicts like weather and unavoidable situations come up, you try to avoid it,” he said.

The Orioles said that ticket holders who are missing either Wednesday’s game or the games scheduled in the stadium on May 1, 2 and 3 will be able to exchange them for any later home game on a “dollar for dollar” basis. The May 1, 2, and 3 games against the Tampa Bay Rays will be played in Florida.

The first two games of the Orioles-White Sox series, which were scheduled for Monday and Tuesday but postponed, will be played in a single-admission double header on May 28.

“After conversations with the Orioles and local officials, we believe that these decisions are in the best interests of fan safety and the deployment of City resources,” league commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement released Tuesday afternoon.

Thorn said the closest situation to this one in terms of the absent fans came only when attendance was just shockingly low. The lowest on record came in 1882 when two now-defunct teams, Troy and Worcester, faced off in front of just six fans.

“In recent memory there was a game in 1966 at Yankees stadium 413 fans showed up. It was just a really lousy team,” Thorn said. “So it is unusual to play before a very sparse crowd but to play before no crowd is truly unprecedented.”

Thorn said a crowd ranging from 20,000 to 30,000 fans could easily have been expected at Wednesday’s afternoon game, and with expected highs of 71 and mostly sunny skies, it would have likely been at the higher end.

Viewers aren’t going to be the only ones unnerved by the ghost-like stadium, because Thorn said it’s “going to be weird” for the players, who probably most recently had empty stands when they were in college or in the minor leagues.

The game change comes after the city is in a state of emergency following violent protests that broke out on Monday, leading to a week-long citywide curfew.

“Baseball is, at best, a tertiary concern when public safety is a concern,” Thorn said.

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Florida Man’s Gyrocopter Was Detected by Radar Before Landing on Capitol Lawn

ABC News(WASHINGTON) — The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform will take up an issue that hit a little too close to home for lawmakers — the April 15 landing of a gyrocopter on the West Front of the Capitol grounds.

The headlines likely will come from the FAA and NORTHCOM/NORAD testimony, which is expected to acknowledge the gyrocopter flown by Douglas Hughes was detected by radar and other sensors.

Aircraft that fly around Washington, D.C., airspace are required to be equipped with a transponder. According to written testimony from FAA Administrator Michael Huerta, “Anything that doesn’t have a transponder shows up as a symbol resembling a simple small dot on the radar screen — and there are typically many of them across a controller’s radar screen.”

Many of those dots are filtered out of what FAA controllers see on their screens. These dots “could be things like vehicles on nearby roadways, flocks of birds, weather events, or occasional kites or balloons,” Huerta says.

“On April 15, Mr. Hughes’ gyrocopter appeared on our radar as one of those small, unidentified elements. All available information about the slow moving, irregular symbol made it indistinguishable from other non-aircraft radar tracks,” Huerta’s written testimony continues.

An unfiltered radar feed is shared with the Department of Defense and other agencies, so those entities can apply their own filters to the data.

After the aircraft landed, the radar data was analyzed and, “A trained radar analyst identified a slow-moving symbol that traveled from Gettysburg [Pennsylvania] toward the Capitol, and vanished from radar at about the time Mr. Hughes landed on the West Lawn. We now believe that unidentified radar element was Mr. Hughes’ gyrocopter. The dot appeared only intermittently throughout the flight.”

NORTHCOM/NORAD commander Adm. William Gortney’s testimony provides another new insight into what the government’s network of sensors saw: The aircraft was detected, but it was not sifted out from clutter to distinguish it from other objects.

“Through post-event analysis, what we now understand is that the gyrocopter was detected by several of the integrated sensors as it approached and transited through the SFRA (special flight rules area). However, the aircraft’s flight parameters fell below the threshold necessary to differentiate aircraft from weather, terrain, birds and other slow-flying objects so as to ensure that the systems and those operating them focus on that which poses the greatest threat,” Adm. Gortney’s testimony states.

Gortney acknowledges that, “Identifying low-altitude and slow-speed aerial vehicles from other objects is a technical and operational challenge.”

The testimony from the U.S. Capitol Police, U.S. Park Police, Secret Service and sergeant at arms largely confirms what is known publicly about the incident based on ABC News’ reporting and the statements of the Tampa Bay Times. A Tampa Bay Times reporter called the Secret Service and the Capitol Police at around 1 p.m., approximately 20 minutes before the gyrocopter landed.

The reporter, according to testimony from U.S. Capitol Police Chief Kim Dine, called the Capitol Police and advised them that video of the flight could be seen on a live stream. At 1:07 p.m., the Capitol Police “went to the provided website but did not find the live feed noted by the individual from the Tampa Bay Times.”

The Capitol Police also attempted to “validate any prohibited airspace overflight information” with the National Capitol Region Coordination Center, where other government agencies like NORAD and the FAA could share information.

The aircraft landed at 1:23 p.m.

The review by authorities is ongoing and agencies are working to develop short- and long-term approaches to handling the threat posed by low- and slow-flying aircraft.

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Cleveland Kidnapping Survivors Talk About Whether They Can Forgive Ariel Castro

Heidi Gutman/ABC(NEW YORK) — Cleveland kidnapping survivors Amanda Berry and Gina DeJesus talked publicly for the first time about moving on after their escape from the Cleveland home where Ariel Castro held them captive for years, and whether or not they can find forgiveness.

“I thought about that a lot, and I’m like, ‘Should I forgive him?’ …and in the situation I feel like, no, I could never forgive him,” Berry told ABC News’ Robin Roberts in an exclusive interview that will air Tuesday night at 10 p.m. ET.

“Taking 10 years of my life…not being able to see how my family was,” Berry said. “I don’t think I will ever forgive him.”

Berry and DeJesus, along with fellow kidnapping victim Michelle Knight, escaped from Castro’s home in May 2013. The three women were abducted between 2002 and 2004, when they were in their teens and early 20s, and confined for over a decade. Castro had a child with Berry, who gave birth to their daughter during her captivity.

While Berry was a prisoner in Castro’s home, her mother, who spent years searching for her and even went on the Montel Williams Show to plead for her safe return, died of a heart attack. Losing her mother is another thing Berry said she will never forgive Castro for.

“He took my mom from me. I’ll never see her again. I’ll never get to hug her again,” Berry said.

But DeJesus said she feels differently. She said she has forgiven Castro for what he did.

“I think that you have to forgive in order to move on with your life,” she said.

Castro, 53, pleaded guilty in July 2013 to 937 charges relating to kidnapping, torturing and imprisoning the three women. On Sept. 3, 2013, he was found dead in his prison cell after committing suicide by hanging.

When DeJesus first heard the news that Castro had committed suicide, she said she felt he “took the easy way out.”

“I wish he wouldn’t [have] killed himself because I wanted him to suffer,” DeJesus added.

A few days after Castro was sentenced, a demolition crew destroyed the house on Seymour Avenue. It took less than an hour for the structure to come down. Berry said she cried tears of happiness when the house where she had been held prisoner for 10 years was gone.

“Everything bad that happened in that house, and now it’s gone, like maybe it kind of took something away, some of the pain,” she said. “We would never go there again.”

Bonded forever by their experience, Berry and DeJesus said they have remained good friends. They talk about how they are rebuilding their lives now in their upcoming memoir, Hope: A Memoir of Survival in Cleveland, released on April 27.

“We’re the only ones that really know what we went through,” Berry said.

“It’s the trust and, I think, it’s the goodness,” DeJesus added.

Since their escape, the young women rarely appear in public, but say they have been relishing their freedom and are moving on. DeJesus is now in school and got her driver’s license. Berry has been caring for her daughter and also hopes to finish school.

“I can walk outside when I want. I can take my daughter to school. I can go to my friend’s house. I can eat what I want, I can watch what I want,” Berry said, laughing. “We just have a bright future, and [will] see what comes.”

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Baltimore Cops ‘Could Have Been Better Prepared,’ Former NYPD Commissioner Says

Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images(BALTIMORE) — In the wake of Monday’s violence in Baltimore that prompted the declaration of a state of emergency and deployment of the National Guard, former New York City Police Department Commissioner Ray Kelly said the city’s local law enforcement could have been better prepared.

With about 500 National Guard personnel already supporting local law enforcement and plans to increase their presence to 2,000, here is what Kelly, an ABC News consultant, told ABC News Tuesday about the police’s role in Baltimore this week:

1. How well was local law enforcement prepared for Monday’s violence?

Kelly: “Quite frankly…[they] could have been better prepared. The activities over the weekend perhaps should have alerted them to the fact that there was potential for disorder. Hindsight is 20/20.”

2. Could their response have been better?

Kelly: “I think the response could have been different….[I] don’t know how it would have turned out, but I think we could have seen more pro-activity on the part of the police officers last night.”

3. What do you think about bringing in the National Guard?

Kelly: “I think it’s wise, what the governor did. It has a potential downside because national guardsmen are not trained as police officers, are not from the community for the most part, and don’t know the people in Baltimore. And we’ll have to see. Obviously the city government asked for help, and the governor responded. In fact, had to respond.”

4. What about the role of the federal government?

Kelly: “The federal government is doing an investigation, the Justice Department is looking at potential civil rights violations in the Freddie Gray matter. They are not positioned, generally speaking, are not authorized to deploy any resources in a law enforcement-type mode.”

5. Was it a good idea Baltimore closed schools?

Kelly: “I thought the schools should have remained open because it would have kept some potential demonstrators, or violent demonstrators, off the streets. Because if you looked at the video from yesterday, you saw that many of the people engaged in disorderly conduct were people of high school age.”

6. Do you think it will get worse or better in Baltimore this week?

Kelly: “I believe it will get better and I think the focus and the resources that the governor put in will have a significant impact.”

7. Was it a good idea to keep Wednesday’s Baltimore Orioles game closed from the public?

Kelly: “I think it’s generally speaking wise to do that. You have 30,000 to 40,000 people coming out….Fans, before they go there, they don’t know what’s going on in the city….You just have sort of a vague notion based on what the media says, so who knows what the attendance would have been like anyway.”

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Aurora Shooting Trial: Cop Gets Emotional About Moment He Found Dead 6-Year-Old

iStock/Thinkstock(CENTENNIAL, Colo.) — A veteran police officer got choked up on the stand in Colorado Tuesday as he testified about the moment he carried a 6-year-old victim out of the Aurora movie theater after the July 2012 shooting.

Sgt. Michael Hawkins was one of the 10 witnesses who testified in court Tuesday as part of the trial against shooter James Holmes, who faces the death penalty for killing 12, the youngest of whom was Veronica Moser-Sullivan.

“At the point that I was running out with her, I became aware of her bleeding all over me … and I looked down at her and I realized that she was probably gone,” Hawkins said, pausing because he was overcome with emotion.

The court also heard the 911 call made by Kaylin Bailey, who was 13 at the time of the shooting and had babysat Veronica earlier in the day. Bailey is heard crying as the operator tries to walk her through CPR, but she told the court that she wasn’t able to get to Veronica because the girl’s pregnant mother was covering the child.

Veronica Moser-Sullivan died as a result of the shooting, and her mother Ashley Moser was paralyzed from the waist down and miscarried.

Tuesday marked the second day of the Holmes trial with the prosecution calling Hawkins and nine survivors to the stand, many telling how at first they thought the canister they saw flying across the movie theater was part of a prank.

The first witness to take the stand was Katie Medley, a nine-months pregnant woman who went to the midnight showing of the Batman movie with her husband Caleb and friend Ashley. After the initial string of shots and when she was crouching down on the floor, she said she saw him walk past her row and thought that he may have left the theater.

“I decided to slowly stand up and I saw that Caleb was actually breathing. … He was choking on all of his blood,” Katie Medley said, telling how she tried clearing the blood with a bottle of water before police told them to get out.

“I told Ashley that we had to make a decision, that we had to stay or go but because I was so pregnant I had to,” Medley said, adding how she thought her baby was “going to be the last piece of him to survive.”

“One of the hardest things I ever had to do was calling my parents and Caleb’s parents,” she said. “They were all expecting me to call to say I was in labor and instead I got to tell them all that Caleb had been shot and was probably dead.”

Katie Medley was scheduled to be induced into labor on what would have been two days after the shooting, and doctors followed through with that timeline, though her labor took up to 40 hours.

While she was in labor, Caleb was in his third brain surgery, she said, noting that he first held their son Hugo, who is now 3 years old, was while he was in a medically induced coma that lasted nearly a month.

Katie Medley said that her husband can understand everything anyone says but he has great difficulty communicating back. One of the shotgun pellets went through his right eye and damaged the right side of his brain that has impaired his speech as well as the strength of his left side, she said. He lost his eye and uses a wheelchair.

Holmes was in court but remained expressionless throughout. During the opening statements on Monday, Holmes’ defense team admitted that he was responsible for the attack but entered a plea of not guilty by reason of insanity. If he is found not guilty on those grounds, he would be committed indefinitely to a state mental institution.

But if he were later deemed sane, he could, theoretically, be released, though legal experts say that is unlikely.

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Baltimore Rioters Not Just ‘Thugs’ and ‘Criminals’

Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images(BALTIMORE) — Officials have called them “thugs” and “criminals,” the 200-some people arrested in Baltimore after violence erupted in the streets Monday afternoon, but ABC News contributor and former FBI agent Steve Gomez has a broader interpretation of what motivated people to throw objects at police, set cars on fire and loot businesses.

They “are what we call opportunists,” Gomez said. “They recognize that there’s a lot of frustration … and they took their opportunity.”

“These people are clearly wanting to make a statement,” he added.

Fifteen structure fires and 144 vehicle fires were reported Monday, according to Howard Libit, director of strategic planning and policy at the mayor’s office. The violence followed the funeral for Freddie Gray, the Baltimore man who officials say died earlier this month from injuries he sustained after being arrested by police.

President Obama on Tuesday said the rioters need to be treated as criminals.

“They’re not protesting, they’re not making a statement. They’re stealing,” Obama said at a news conference in Washington. “They’re destroying and undermining businesses and opportunities in their own communities.”

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake on Monday called the group “thugs who only want to incite violence and destroy our city.”

Police Capt. Eric Kowalczyk declined to speculate Monday on the reason for the violence, but called the group “criminals.”

“Right now it is a group of lawless individuals with no regard” for safety, he added.

Gomez, who was an agent with the FBI during the 1992 riots in Los Angeles, said the demonstrators in California had a similar goal.

“They were trying to make a statement that they are tired of the way the system is treating them, their community,” he said. “They’re not just going to protest and exert their first amendment right… They’re going to take it a step further to really get some notice.”

“[It’s the] same thing in Baltimore,” he added. “Whether they are thugs, gang members, or people that are frustrated… they want to take it a step further… they want to be heard and are willing to get arrested for it.”

Baltimore resident William Tyler cited a lack of opportunity in the area.

“It’s a lot anger that’s been piled up,” Tyler, 41, said. “They don’t know how to talk.”

“I have kids. They need to learn to do what I didn’t, to go to school,” said Tyler, who was carrying his 3-year-old child on his shoulders through a crowd in Baltimore Tuesday. “If we don’t do that, this is what they do. We have parents who are doing nothing.

“I take the blame,” Tyler said. “I should have told them, showed them. This is not us.”

Looking forward, Gomez said, “I don’t think that they’re going to listen to anybody other than their parents or someone in their family that they respect.”

“If there is a sports figure from Baltimore,” he added, “That’s the kind of person that could potentially come in and work with community leaders… could maybe get these rioters to slow down and to change their way of expressing themselves.”

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Aurora Shooting Victim’s Harrowing Injury Recounted in Court

iStock/Thinkstock(CENTENNIAL, Colo.) — A woman who was nine months pregnant on the night of the movie theater shooting in Aurora, Colorado, took the stand Tuesday as the first witness in the trial, recalling in chilling detail how she had to make an agonizing decision when she saw that her husband was gravely injured.

Katie Medley said that she and her friend Ashley ducked to the ground when she saw the shooter come into the theater but couldn’t understand why her husband Caleb was sitting up in his seat as shots were being fired.

“I looked up and … that’s when I saw blood pouring from his face and I knew he had been shot in the head,” Medley testified in Arapahoe County Court Tuesday morning. “I remember he wasn’t breathing and I told Ashley ‘Caleb’s dead, he’s dead, he’s been shot in the head.'”

Caleb Medley survived the gunshot, but he was gravely injured.

After Katie Medley testified for roughly an hour, Caleb Medley was called to testify from his wheelchair. His speech was seriously impaired due to the shooting and he used an alphabet board and interpreter to answer questions from the attorneys.

He was asked just three questions from prosecutors — his name, the fact that he is married to Katie Medley, and whether he was at the theater on the night of the shooting — before being released from the stand. The defense did not have any questions for either of the Medleys.

Katie Medley used her time on the stand to detail the shooting and the months of operations and rehabilitation that her husband had to go through.

Some of the most chilling moments came when she described how she saw the shooter, now known to be James Holmes, who is facing the death penalty for the attack, throw two canisters into the air from the side door and then start shooting while wearing a mask and a Kevlar vest, which she thought made him look “like a SWAT officer.”

After the initial string of shots and when she was crouching down on the floor, she said she saw him walk past her row and thought that he may have left the theater.

“I decided to slowly stand up and I saw that Caleb was actually breathing. … He was choking on all of his blood,” Katie Medley said.

She described how she poured a bottle of water on his face to try to clear the blood but had to make a heartbreaking decision when police officers started shouting at her to leave the theater.

“I told Ashley that we had to make a decision, that we had to stay or go but because I was so pregnant I had to,” Medley said, adding how she thought her baby was “going to be the last piece of him to survive.”

Medley testified that she slipped in the blood on the floor as she ran out of the theater. The next time she saw her husband was when she was sitting on the curb outside the theater and first responders brought him out to be treated.

“I could see that he was still bleeding but they had to lay him on his face because of all the blood that was pouring because they didn’t want him to aspirate,” Medley said.

“One of the hardest things I ever had to do was calling my parents and Caleb’s parents,” she said. “They were all expecting me to call to say I was in labor and instead I got to tell them all that Caleb had been shot and was probably dead.”

He was rushed to a hospital and she went to the same hospital later to be checked out since she felt that something had nicked her during the shooting but she was fine. Prior to the attack, she was scheduled to be induced two days after the shooting and they followed through with that timeline, though her labor took up to 40 hours.

While she was in labor, Caleb was in his third brain surgery, she said, noting that he first held their son Hugo, who is now 3 years old, was while he was in a medically induced coma that lasted nearly a month.

Katie Medley said that her husband can understand everything anyone says but he has great difficulty communicating back. One of the shotgun pellets went through his right eye and damaged the right side of his brain that has impaired his speech as well as the strength of his left side, she said. He lost his eye and uses a wheelchair.

Tuesday marked the second day of the trial against Holmes. He is accused of killing 12 people and injuring 70 others during the July 2012 attack.

During the opening statements on Monday, Holmes’ defense team admitted that he was responsible for the attack but entered a plea of not guilty by reason of insanity. If he is found not guilty on those grounds, he would be committed indefinitely to a state mental institution. But if he were later deemed sane, he could, theoretically, be released, though legal experts say that is unlikely.

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Child Kidnappings: How to Keep Your Kids Safe

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Right now, 40,773 children are missing across America, according to the FBI.

While anyone can be kidnapped, teen and tween girls are the most vulnerable group, said the National Center of Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC).

Kidnappers are not always who you think they will be. They are usually relatives or they know the child.

A car is used in most abductions. Perpetrators typically strike between the hours of 2 p.m. and 7 p.m., according to an NCMEC study, and most often lure children by offering them a ride, giving them candy, asking questions, offering money or using a cute animal.

Parents should supervise their children and talk to them early and regularly about their safety, say experts.

The NCMEC suggests telling your children:

  • It’s OK to be rude if someone is making you uncomfortable. Say “no,” walk away and tell a trusted adult.
  • Always go places with a friend and stay with the group.
  • You should never approach or get into a vehicle without my permission. If someone is following you in a vehicle, turn and run in the other direction. Tell me or another trusted adult what happened right away.
  • When you are home alone, do not open the door for anyone.
  • Tell me where you are and where you are going.
  • If we are separated and you need help, ask a police officer, a store clerk or a parent with children.
  • If someone grabs you, kick, yell and pull away.

If you think you have seen a missing child or if your child is missing, immediately contact the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children 24 hours a day, seven days a week: 1-800-843-5678 or 1-800-THE-LOST.

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Mom Smacks Son for Taking Part in Violence in Baltimore

Andrew Burton/Getty Images(BALTIMORE) — A Baltimore woman took action when she saw her son hanging out with violent demonstrators Monday.

The woman, identified by ABC News affiliate WMAR as the boy’s mother, was watching television when she saw her son throwing rocks at police, the station reported.

She went to find him in the crowd and the confrontation turned physical. The woman was caught on camera grabbing the boy and smacking him in the face.

“Are you kidding me?” she’s heard saying. The station did not identify her by name.

Fifteen officers were injured Monday when violent groups threw bricks, rocks and other objects at police.

About 75 to 100 school-age children were involved in the violence, police said, as they urged parents to bring their children home.

At a news conference Monday, Police Commissioner Anthony Batts referenced one mother who grabbed her son and smacked him on the head, although it is unclear whether this is the same mother caught on video.

“I wish I had more parents that took charge of their kids out there tonight,” Batts said.

Baltimore City Public Schools are closed Tuesday in the wake of the violence.

A citywide curfew will be in effect from 10 p.m. Tuesday until 5 a.m. Wednesday. The 10 p.m. curfews will last for one week, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said, and could be extended as necessary.

A 9 p.m. curfew is already in effect for children 14 and younger.

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