Review Category : National News

At Least 2 Dead in Georgia as Tornado Outbreak Continues

@RyanMooreMS(ADEL, Ga.) — A tornado outbreak in the Southeast continued Sunday morning with at least two people dead from a twister hitting a southernmost area of Georgia on the Florida border.

The coroner in Brooks County, Georgia, told ABC News that two people are confirmed to have died.

The National Weather Service reported a tornado near Adel, Georgia, which is in the county just north of Brooks, shortly before 4 a.m. ET.

That tornado was one of 16 reported so far this weekend, with 11 of them in Georgia, ABC News meteorologist Daniel Manzo said.

The fatalities in south Georgia follow the deaths of four people in the area of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, on Saturday morning after a large tornado touched down there, leaving destroyed homes, collapsed buildings, downed power lines, and residents trapped in their homes, authorities said.

Further north in Choctaw County, Mississippi, on Saturday at least four people were injured and at least 20 homes damaged from a possible tornado, the National Weather Service reported.

“At 3:45 a.m. CST, a confirmed tornado was located over West Hattiesburg, moving northeast at 50 mph,” read a National Weather Service warning of severe weather issued at 3:46 a.m.

William Carey University in downtown Hattiesburg also reported damage to its campus. A Facebook Live post gave a tour of damage to the university.

Ryan Moore, a reporter with ABC affiliate WDAM-TV in Hattiesburg, tweeted several photos of the devastation, writing that multiple structures were damaged.

Damage alone Duke & Arledge Streets. Multiple structures damaged. #mswx pic.twitter.com/57rSpOrC55

— Ryan Moore (@RyanMooreMS) January 21, 2017

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At Least 4 Dead as Tornadoes Batter the Southeast

iStock/Thinkstock(HATTIESBURG, Miss.) — Four people are confirmed dead in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, after at least 5 tornadoes touched down there and in three other southeastern states on Saturday morning.

Authorities in Hattiesburg confirmed that four people died after a large tornado hit the area, leaving a trail of destroyed homes, collapsed buildings, downed power lines, and residents trapped in their homes.

Further north in Choctaw County, four people were injured and at least 20 homes damaged from a possible tornado, the National Weather Service reported. Two tornadoes were also reported in Georgia and two in Alabama.

“At 3:45 a.m. CST, a confirmed tornado was located over West Hattiesburg, moving northeast at 50 mph,” read a National Weather Service warning of severe weather issued at 3:46 a.m.

“To repeat, a tornado is on the ground. TAKE COVER NOW! Move to a basement or an interior room on the lowest floor of a sturdy building. Avoid windows. If you are outdoors, in a mobile home, or in a vehicle, move to the closest substantial shelter and protect yourself from flying debris,” the statement urged. “Flying debris will be dangerous to those caught without shelter. Mobile homes will be damaged or destroyed. Damage to roofs, windows, and vehicles will occur. Tree damage is likely.”

Glen Moore, director of Forrest County Emergency Management, told ABC News his agency received reports of multiple people trapped in houses, destroyed homes and collapsed buildings.

William Carey University in downtown Hattiesburg also reported damage to its campus. A Facebook Live post gave a tour of damage to the university.

Ryan Moore, a reporter with ABC affiliate WDAM-TV in Hattiesburg, tweeted several photos of the devastation, writing that multiple structures were damaged.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Politicians, Activists Rally Crowd at Women’s March in Washington

ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Activists and politicians are participating in the Women’s March on Washington this morning, the biggest of hundreds of marches taking place today.

The rally featured speeches from women’s rights activist Gloria Steinem, Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards, actress Ashley Judd and director Michael Moore among others.

A group of largely women senators and other politicians took the stage together at one point, including Kirsten Gillibrand, Claire McCaskill, and newly elected Senators Kamala Harris and Tammy Duckworth, who addressed the group as did Rep. Maxine Waters. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz and Sen. Cory Booker were also on stage.

With the timing and sheer number of people involved, it comes as little surprise that there are various causes attached to the march, which was largely billed as a demonstration in support of women’s rights and civil rights but for many has clear political undertones connected to the inauguration of Donald Trump.

While crowd estimates are fluctuating and have not been confirmed, the DC Metro system posted on Twitter that there have been 275,000 trips as of 11:00 a.m. this morning. By comparison, 193,000 trips had been taken by the same time on Friday ahead of the inauguration.

Steinem thanked the crowd for showing up en masse, declaring, “We have people power and we will use it.”

“Thank you for understanding that sometimes we have to put our bodies where our beliefs are. Sometimes pressing send is not enough,” she said to the crowd, many of whom wore bright pink knitted hats.

Steinem suggested that the size and energy of today’s gathering in Washington was a positive outgrowth of Trump’s election and inauguration.

“This is the upside of the downside. This is an outpouring of energy and true democracy like I have never seen in my very long life. It is wide in age, it is deep in diversity,” Steinem said.

She praised “our great leaders” Barack and Michelle Obama, Sen. Bernie Sanders, and Hillary Clinton “who told the whole world that women’s rights are human rights and human rights are women’s rights,” quoting Clinton’s speech at a United Nations conference in 1995.

Steinem then turned her focus to President Trump.

The new president’s “Twitter finger must not become a trigger finger,” she said.

Shortly before Steinem took the podium, actress America Ferrera was one of the first speakers at the rally ahead of the march, calling for supporters to “fight, oppose” the Trump administration.

“Marchers, make no mistake. We are — every single one of us — under attack. Our safety and freedoms are on the chopping block,” she said.

Some of the homemade signs at the rally were related to Hillary Clinton, Trump’s campaign rival. One read “Still With Her” using a play on Clinton’s campaign slogan, and another read “Lock Him Up,” playing on a chant that some Trump supporters directed at Clinton during the campaign. Several “Stronger Together” posters from the Clinton campaign were spotted as well.

While she wasn’t there in person, Clinton gave her support via Twitter.

Thanks for standing, speaking & marching for our values @womensmarch. Important as ever. I truly believe we’re always Stronger Together.

— Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) January 21, 2017

“We have to get busy folks. We’ve got our work cut out for us,” Moore said.

The rally and ensuing march come the day after Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States.

The inauguration drew hundreds of thousands of attendees on Friday in spite of wet weather, and today’s drier forecast may make the travel to Washington easier for today’s marchers.

A number of high-profile speakers are expected to address those at the rally, including Gloria Steinem, Planned Parenthood’s president Cecile Roberts, and director Michael Moore.

The demonstration in Washington is one of a series of similar women’s marches that are scheduled in major cities across the country and around the world.

Washington, D.C., police are expected to be out in full force, as they were on Friday when some protests against Trump turned violent, leading to the arrest of more than 200 people.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Celebrities Show Support for Women’s Marches Around the World

Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Celebrities are joining the hundreds of thousands of demonstrators at Women’s Marches around the globe.

For those who couldn’t physically attend, many have shared their sentiments of solidarity on social media.

The Women’s March on Washington, along with sister marches on six different continents, are focused on promoting equal rights for women and minorities.

The demonstrations, organized in part to protest the agenda of President Donald Trump, are being held just one day after he was sworn into office.

From Katy Perry to Padma Lakshmi, here are the celebs contributing to the cause:

On way 2D.C. March🌼There r Marches ALL OVER THE🌎
After March we wi’ll Join Organizations‼️WE WONT SIT &🐝NOTHING‼️#WhyIMarch #WomensMarch

— Cher (@cher) January 21, 2017

Couldn’t be more proud….I am here, we are here!!! #WomensMarch pic.twitter.com/HibJJlcTTC

— Zendaya (@Zendaya) January 21, 2017

I’m with them. #womensmarch

— Tony Bennett (@itstonybennett) January 21, 2017

“Good Morning Womens.”
-Sebastian, into his tape recorder#WomensMarch pic.twitter.com/IEOvHwlknl

— Lin-Manuel Miranda (@Lin_Manuel) January 21, 2017

Streets are packed! Metro subway jammed!!! Amazing. #WomensMarch

— Michael Moore (@MMFlint) January 21, 2017

March strong today and be safe!! 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸 #WomensMarch

— Andy Cohen (@Andy) January 21, 2017

“I do not weep at the world. I am too busy sharpening my oyster knife.” Zora Neale Hurston #WomensMarch pic.twitter.com/wQuSIw2vIn

— Ava DuVernay (@ava) January 21, 2017

Thank you to everyone at today’s #WomensMarch for showing Trump what a crowd looks like.
Peace.

— Ricky Gervais (@rickygervais) January 21, 2017

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Meet Mothers, Daughters and Grandmothers Marching Together in Washington, DC

Lori Feehan(WASHINGTON) — Among the hundreds of thousands of women expected to descend upon the nation’s capital Saturday morning for the Women’s March on Washington are public figures hailing from the worlds of entertainment, politics and activism.

But one category of participants will be families taking to the streets together: Multiple generations of women walking hand-in-hand for a common goal.

And that goal, according to the march’s statement of its mission and principles, is to “send a bold message” that women’s rights are human rights and more broadly to unify movements working for a variety of causes, including reproductive rights, environmental protection, the end of police brutality, and for greater rights for LGBT individuals, immigrants, minorities, workers and the disabled.

ABC News spoke to seven families who plan to attend the march.

Raised by generations of strong women before them, the women say they want to continue the standard of activism set by their relatives.

These are the stories of the mothers, daughters and grandmothers who will be marching together:

Lori Feehan, 63, and Pamela Zakielarz, 30: Marching to Continue Social Progress

Lori Feehan, a retired pharmaceutical executive from Charleston, South Carolina, grew up in the early 1970s when “things were very different” for women’s rights and other social issues, she told ABC News.

“Reproductive choice was really hard to come by,” she said. “There was no real birth control that was reliable. Abortions were coat hangers. Women’s careers were limited. There was no tolerance for gay people or anyone who was different.”

She continues, “It was a completely different time. Knowing where we are and how far we’ve come, I don’t want to see us roll back.”

Feehan admitted that she takes for granted what she says are “the improvements that we’ve made in society,” but said she’s “scared for that now.”

Feehan’s daughter Pamela Zakielarz, a high school counselor in Havertown, Pennsylvania, said her mother is her role model, having watched her work her way up to a high-level leadership role in corporate America in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s, when the corporate world was largely dominated by men.

“She helped pave the way for me and my sister and women across America to be treated as leaders and as equals,” Zakielarz said.

Zakielarz said she would like to facilitate a “platform for strong, powerful, meaningful voices for the rights of women … I want to keep making progress. I want to keep moving forward. I’m really concerned. Why would we want to go backwards? So many women and some men had to sacrifice to get us to the place that we are.”

Her mother said she thinks some people may have have grown complacent.

“I feel that in recent years a lot of us have sat back and just assumed that things would keep going forward, and that we can relax,” she said. “We can’t.”

Cecily Helgessen, 49, and Scarlett Helgessen, 10: Marching to Continue the Family Tradition of Activism

For Cecily Helgessen, the granddaughter of Polish immigrants, activism runs in her blood.

“Marching with my daughter will be a wonderful extension of the women I was raised by,” the Manhattan-based nurse practitioner told ABC News.

Helgessen’s grandmother and namesake, “the original Cecily Helgessen,” was a young teen when women were given the right to vote in 1920, and was “very active in the league for women voters,” Helgessen said.

Her mother, Stephanie Helgessen, marched alongside Martin Luther King, Jr. in Selma, Alabama, and to this day, she continues to search for a familiar face whenever she comes across historical photos from that 1965 day.

“It’s meant so much for me to have that as my dialogue and as my standard for how I live and the lens that I see the rest of the world through,” she said.

Helgessen said she hopes the march will help teach her 10-year-old daughter Scarlett Helgessen, “how to have a voice and how to be an activist.”

“She is coming of age, where gender identity and professional and personal development [are] taking a huge part of her life,” Helgessen said, adding that when they’re marching, she wants “her to know that she is part of a huge village of women.”

Scarlett told ABC News that she’s “super excited” to be joining her mother in the march.

The “first thing” she’s going to do when she gets there is to “talk to other people,” she said.

“What’s the point of going to D.C. if you don’t meet any other people or talk to them about why they’re there and why they came to march?” Scarlett asked.

For Scarlett, the opportunities for her future are endless. When asked what she’d like to be when she grows up, she toggled among a lawyer, softball player — and president.

Gerri Ard, 74, Amy Ard, 43, Marian Waller, 9, and Joseph Waller, 7: Marching to Reinforce Their Values

Amy Ard, a 43-year-old doula from Silver Spring, Maryland, said that her mother taught her to be kind, compassionate and consideration and she wants to pass those values on to her kids.

“In this atmosphere, we value kind words to one another and respecting people,” as well as “justice and equality,” she said.

Immigration is one of the issues closest to Amy’s heart.

“I care about the kids who go to school with my kids, who are afraid of being deported,” she said. “I hope the people who don’t look like my family know they have allies.”

Amy’s mother Gerri Ard, a retired public school teacher, was living in Atlanta at the height of the civil rights movement in the 1960s.

“I’ve been in Atlanta for a long time, and civil rights has been part of my life for as long as I can remember,” she said.

Chimed in Amy, “For a lot of my mom’s friends in the South, this is a familiar feeling.”

Gerri will be putting on her marching shoes for the first time since the civil rights movement, and she’s thrilled to do so alongside her daughter and grandchildren, Marian and Joseph, this time around.

“I just think that it will be a very special thing for the four of us to do this together,” Gerri said.

Sarah Towne, 31; Laura Towne, 58; Isaac Towne, 4; Margaret Hardy, 1: Marching for Future Americans

Laura Towne, a 58-year-old writer who lives in Fuquay Varina, a small town just south of Raleigh, North Carolina, has never marched before, she told ABC News. While she describes herself as “not very vocal,” she said the aftermath of the election made her want to do more than just sit back.

Laura is marching with her daughter, a 31-year-old Ph.D. candidate in public administration and policy at American University in Washington D.C., and her grandchildren, 4-year-old Isaac Towne and 1-year-old Margaret Hardy.

“That’s one of the main reasons why I’m going,” she said. “…My grandchildren are our future. I wanted to be able to tell them when they grow up, ‘Look, you were in this event. You were in this march to unite people and support America.’ It’s very American to be able to do this.”

For Sarah Towne, the march isn’t just able women’s issues, but for “all issues and all people with a variety of opinions and diverse backgrounds,” she told ABC News.

Although her children are young, Sarah said she never thought twice about bringing them to the historic march.

“Even though they’re 4 and 1 and won’t understand it, I hope they’ll get it when they’re older,” she said. “I hope they can look back on the moment and say, ‘I was there. I was there with my family.'”

Rachel Greenburg, 28 and Michele Greenburg, 59: Marching for the Disenfranchised

For Michele Greenburg, a forensic social worker from Larchmont, New York, deciding to attend the march was easy: All she needed was a tiny push from her daughter, Rachel Greenburg, a social worker for a Manhattan-based nonprofit called Cities of Service.

As a teenager, Michele marched for women’s rights in the 1970s, but the movement did not resonate with her as much back then, she told ABC News. She said she took Roe v. Wade, for granted, and she assumed “the best of people” when it comes to social justice and immigration issues. But, the results of the 2016 presidential election sparked a sense of civic duty in her.

“Especially since I work with the disenfranchised and people who don’t have access to different things for their own rights, with this election, it just galvanized me to say ‘You can’t just sit back and hope that someone else will do this anymore,'” she said.

For Rachel, her privileged background is what led her to choose a career as a social worker, she told ABC News.

“I was born into an upper-class family,” she said. “It was important for me to see the intersectionality — race combined with gender combined with class.”

Rachel said it “scared” her to see “our country turn so backward and to see so many people’ rights in jeopardy.” She feels an “immense amount of pride” to march with her mother, she said.

“We’re both trained social workers, and our code of ethics is to fight for others [who] may not be given the same voice,” she said.

Sharon Krauss, 63, and Halina Cain, 18: Marching for a Female Empowerment

Sharon Krauss, a public defender in Los Angeles, is traveling across the country with her daughter, Halina Cain, because she was “inspired” by the election, she told ABC News.

On Election Day, all the women in Krauss’ office wore pantsuits as they high-fived each other and took “a thousand” pictures. “There was so much hope” that a woman would be elected to the White House, she said.

When President-elect Donald Trump shocked the country with his presidential victory, Krauss said, “I kept thinking, this country just told my daughter she can never be president.”

Cain, who recently just turned 18, was unable to cast a ballot that day and expressed to her mother that she was “very unhappy,” Krauss said.

When the mother and daughter heard about the march, they “immediately” began checking flights to Washington, D.C., watching the seat availability quickly disappear with each passing day.

“As a mother, you want to teach your daughter — you want to tell her there [are] no barriers,” Krauss said. “You want to tell her she can do anything and that she can reach for the stars.”

“I feel that maybe she will believe that if she goes there and sees 200,000 other women marching,” Krauss said.

Krauss said it will be “thrilling” to be alongside her daughter while she stands up for “something she believes in.”

“She was disappointed in not being able to share her voice at the ballot box, but she’s certainly going to be sharing it on Saturday,” Kraus said. “I can’t even imagine how amazing that’s going to feel.”

Ellen Shrader, 56, Amelia Combs, 28, and Malia Combs, 6: Marching to Be a Part of History

For Amelia Combs, a stay-at-home mom in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, attending the Women’s March on Washington is “kind of like coming full circle,” she told ABC News. Her grandparents, active in the civil rights movement, marched on Washington in 1963, she said.

“I come from a line of people coming from the civil rights movement,” she said. “It’s incredible to me to be able to bring my bi-racial daughter [Malia] to a march that will be just as important in history.”

Malia Combs, 6, was born to a white mother and black father. She has cerebral palsy and has started to “question her herself and her abilities, her differences, her disability and how that affects her,” Combs said.

“It’s about … letting my daughter feel like she is part of something that is bigger than herself,” Amelia Combs said. “I wanted her to come see that it doesn’t matter what we look like, how we sound, how we walk, how we talk. We are all important. Our voices all matter, and we need to be heard.”

Ellen Shrader, a retired labor and delivery nurse, was only two-years-old at the time of the momentous 1963 march and didn’t attend with her parents, she told ABC News. She hopes her granddaughter can “carry on the torch” of activism in the family.

“I thought it would be a nice legacy to be able to take my daughter and my granddaughter because, I thought that when I’m long gone, she will remember this.”

Shrader said that her grandchildren inspired her take a larger part in activism.

“It’s really amazing when you have a 6-year-old in your life, because they’re so full of questions — about everything, she said. “And I just tell her, ‘Look what women can do. Look what it means to support one another, and even support people you don’t know.”

Shrader said she was hoping Clinton would win the election so Malia could have “a female president she could connect with.”

“She’s only known a black president who looks like her,” Shrader said. She said she wanted that sense of connection to continue with America’s 45th president.

Malia told ABC News that she’s “most excited” about “being a part of history” and sharing that moment with her family.

This trip is Malia’s first to the Washington. On Saturday, Malia will be wearing a T-shirt that says, “I’m not strong for a girl. I’m just strong,” she said.

And because nothing says a strong girl can’t be fashionable as well, Malia will be pairing her special T-shirt with her “very comfortable” fuzzy black shoes.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Women’s March Heads to Washington Day After Trump’s Inauguration

CRISTINA ALDEHUELA/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Washington is preparing for its second big day in a row as upwards of 200,000 people are expected to gather in the capital for the Women’s March.

The rally and ensuing march come the day after Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States.

The inauguration drew hundreds of thousands of attendees on Friday in spite of wet weather forecasts, and today’s drier forecast should stop any such problems for those who are traveling to Washington for the event today.

A number of high-profile speakers are expected to address those at the rally, including Gloria Steinem, Planned Parenthood’s president Cecile Roberts, and director Michael Moore.

The march and rally in Washington is one of a series of similar marches that are scheduled in major cities across the country.

D.C. police will be out in full force, as they were on Friday where there were some protests that broke out during the inauguration, which became violent at times. More than 200 people were arrested for various reasons on Friday.

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Multiple Deaths as Tornado Hits Mississippi

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — At least one large tornado touched down in Mississippi early Saturday morning, leaving at least three dead and a trail of destroyed homes, collapsed buildings, downed power lines, and residents trapped in their homes, authorities said.

The city of Hattiesburg tweeted that four people are confirmed to have died while Forrest County Emergency Management told ABC News that three deaths are confirmed so far.

“At 3:45 a.m. CST, a confirmed tornado was located over West Hattiesburg, moving northeast at 50 mph,” read a National Weather Service warning of severe weather issued at 3:46 a.m.

“To repeat, a tornado is on the ground. TAKE COVER NOW! Move to a basement or an interior room on the lowest floor of a sturdy building. Avoid windows. If you are outdoors, in a mobile home, or in a vehicle, move to the closest substantial shelter and protect yourself from flying debris,” the statement urged. “Flying debris will be dangerous to those caught without shelter. Mobile homes will be damaged or destroyed. Damage to roofs, windows, and vehicles will occur. Tree damage is likely.”

Glen Moore, director of Forrest County Emergency Management, told ABC News his agency received reports of multiple people trapped in houses, destroyed homes and collapsed buildings.

William Carey University in downtown Hattiesburg also reported damage to its campus.

Ryan Moore, a reporter with ABC affiliate WDAM-TV in Hattiesburg, tweeted several photos of the devastation, writing that multiple structures were damaged.

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Trump Vows to End ‘American Carnage’ After Being Sworn in as 45th President

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Hewing closely to the fiery rhetoric that defined his campaign, Donald Trump during his inaugural address painted a bleak picture of life for some in the United States, promising to end what he called the “American carnage,” turn the Washington establishment on its head, give voice to the “forgotten” and work tirelessly to put “America first.”

During the campaign, Trump frequently told rally-goers about what he described as the horrors of the inner cities, the tragedy of the education system and the extent to which the United States was being taken advantage of around the globe, offering his leadership as an alternative.

“Mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities, rusted-out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation. An education system flush with cash but which leaves our young and beautiful students deprived of all knowledge,” he told the crowd. “And the crime and the gangs and the drugs that have stolen too many lives and robbed our country of so much unrealized potential. This American carnage stops right here and stops right now.”

As he also promised on the campaign trail, the buck stops with him.

“From this day forward, a new vision will govern our land. From this day forward, it’s going to be only America first. America first. Every decision — on trade, on taxes, on immigration, on foreign affairs — will be made to benefit American workers and American families,” Trump said in his roughly 16-minute inauguration speech, the shortest since President Jimmy Carter’s in 1977.

“This moment is your moment. It belongs to you,” he said. “It belongs to everyone gathered here today and everyone watching all across America.”

He pledged to give voice to “the forgotten men and women” and called for a return of power to the American people from the politicians in Washington.

“I will fight for you with every breath in my body, and I will never let you down,” he said.

And he sent a warning to lawmakers that he views as ineffectual.

“In America, we understand that a nation is only living as long as it is striving. We will no longer accept politicians who are all talk an no action, constantly complaining but never doing anything about it. The time for empty talk is over. Now arrives the hour of action.”

Trump closed his speech with his oft-repeated campaign slogan.

“Together we will make America strong again. We will make America wealthy again. We will make America proud again. We will make America safe again. And, yes, together, we will make America great again,” he exclaimed.

After the inauguration ceremony, the Trumps escorted the Obamas to a waiting helicopter, which will take the former president and first lady to Joint Base Andrews, after which they headed to California.

Trump then signed several documents, including the waiver allowing retired Marine Gen. James Mattis to serve in his Cabinet, while surrounded by his family and political leaders. From there, the group went to the Statuary Hall in the Capitol for a luncheon before the parade.

While making brief remarks at the end of the luncheon, Trump said he was “very, very honored” that Bill and Hillary Clinton attended the inauguration, prompting a standing ovation for the pair.

“I have a lot of respect for those two people. Thank you for being here,” he said.

The Trump family left the Capitol in a motorcade en route to the White House. They got out of the vehicle twice, walking for short stretches and waving to the crowds lining the street.

Trump faces a divided nation that is still reeling from the long and contentious presidential race. Hillary Clinton, Trump’s general election rival, attended Friday’s ceremony and was seated just a few rows behind Trump and members of his family.

Trump and Vice President Mike Pence were sworn in by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Immediately after his swearing-in, Trump embraced members of his family and waved to the crowd on the National Mall.

Earlier in the day Trump participated in traditional inauguration customs, such as attending a church service at St. John’s Episcopal Church.

Trump chose to wear his trademark red tie, and Melania Trump donned a custom-designed Ralph Lauren sky blue cashmere mock turtleneck dress with a matching cropped cashmere jacket and long suede gloves.

A Pointed Message

Pastor Robert Jeffress of First Baptist Dallas led the service Friday morning at St. John’s.

Jeffress is a familiar face to Trump and his eagle-eyed supporters; he appeared with Trump at many rallies on the campaign trail.

“I’m not going to lecture the new president,” Jeffress said during an interview with Fox News on Thursday night.

Jeffress said he intends to “encourage” Trump by comparing him “to another great leader God chose.”

“[God] told Nehemiah to build a giant wall around Jerusalem to protect the citizens, so I’m going to use Nehemiah’s story as an example of why God blesses leaders,” Jeffress said.

The service was closed to the media, but the Trump team’s social media and senior adviser, Dan Scavino Jr., shared two tweets from the service.

‘I told you – that you would be the 45th President of the United States, long before the first primary vote…’
Pastor @robertjeffress

— Dan Scavino Jr. (@DanScavino) January 20, 2017

‘History in the making….’
Pastor @robertjeffress #InaugurationDay pic.twitter.com/NpTRqS88mD

— Dan Scavino Jr. (@DanScavino) January 20, 2017

Pence also posted pictures, including this one:

We begin this historic and humbling day as we do every day, with a moment of reflection and prayer. #InaugurationDay pic.twitter.com/sfJkGktFpe

— Mike Pence (@mike_pence) January 20, 2017

Rundown of the Day

The day’s events followed the pattern of past inaugurations. The Trumps stayed overnight at Blair House, across the street from the White House.

Before the inaugural ceremony, the Trumps sat down for tea with the Obamas; Melania Trump presented them with a box from jeweler Tiffany & Co. Also at the White House were Mike Pence, Karen Pence, Vice President Joe Biden, Jill Biden, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, House Speaker Paul Ryan, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi.

Trump’s Cabinet-level picks and former presidents were in attendance for the inauguration.

Bill Clinton and Hillary Clinton arrived at the Capitol together. Hillary Clinton, who won the popular vote by roughly 3 million ballots, wore white, a color that holds special significance for the suffragist movement.

Mixing Tradition With Personal Touches

Trump chose two Bibles for his swearing-in: his childhood Bible and President Abraham Lincoln’s Bible. The only other president to use Lincoln’s Bible was Barack Obama in 2009 and 2013.

Jackie Evancho, a 16-year-old “America’s Got Talent” alum, sang the national anthem.

An abnormal facet of the day was the sizable number of congressional Democrats who announced they would skip the inauguration. The latest count had one-third of House Dems boycotting the ceremony. There was no modern precedent for a political boycott of that scale.

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At Least 217 Arrested, Limo Torched Amid Trump Inauguration Day Protests in Washington

ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Violence flared on some streets of Washington, D.C., on Friday amid Donald Trump’s inauguration — with people smashing car and store windows, clashing with police and even torching a limo, leading to more than 200 arrests.

The capital’s interim police chief, Peter Newsham, said in a Periscope video posted on Twitter earlier Friday that the problems were caused by one group, “and it’s a very, very small percentage of the number of folks that came here to peacefully assemble in our city.”

Police said they responded using pepper spray and other control devices.

At least 217 people have been arrested, according to the Metropolitan Police Department said and were charged with rioting.

Six Metropolitan Police Department officers suffered minor non-life-threatening-injuries, Newsham said at a news conference early this evening. He added that three of the six injured officers suffered head injuries from flying objects.

Thousands of protesters fanned out across downtown Washington in the morning, including some who tried to block security checkpoints to the inauguration festivities.

Protests also cropped up in other parts of the country today, including San Francisco and outside Trump Tower in New York City.

Dramatic video published on social media showed men and women using signs and sticks to shatter glass at a Starbucks and a bank. Police then attempted to chase down the suspected vandals.

Police said in a statement that an organized group marched through the northwestern part of the city around 10:30 a.m. and that “members of the group acting in a concerted effort engaged in acts of vandalism and several instances of destruction of property.”

The statement said that the group damaged vehicles, destroyed the property of multiple businesses and ignited small, isolated fires and that police vehicles were among those damaged.

The #DisruptJ20 coalition, named after the date of the inauguration, which promised that its participants would attempt to shut down the inauguration events, tangled with Bikers for Trump, a group clad in leather biker gear that backs the president.

Video on social media showed the two groups exchanging words and blows just before the start of inauguration festivities.

After the inauguration, protesters started a fire on the street, burning what appeared to be garbage and a plastic newspaper stand.

Later in the afternoon, protesters set on fire what appeared to be a stretch limo. Images on social media showed the words “We the people” spray-painted on a door of the vehicle. Smoke from the blaze could be seen streaming into the overcast sky.

Several verbal encounters took place between the president’s supporters and protesters. One Bikers for Trump member chastised protesters, according to a report by the Associated Press.

“Get a job,” said Rahm, a Bikers for Trump member from Philadelphia. “Stop crying, snowflakes. Trump won.”

Outside the International Spy Museum, protesters in Russian-style hats ridiculed Trump’s praise of Russian President Vladimir Putin, marching with signs calling Trump “Putin’s puppet” and “Kremlin employee of the month,” the AP reported.

At the inauguration ceremony, protesters could be seen being removed from the crowd.

Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Missouri, responded to the protests on Twitter, writing, “Nothing is more unAmerican than protesters who are not peaceful. Disgusting.”

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At Least 95 Arrested, Limo Torched Amid Trump Inauguration Day Protests in Washington

ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Violence flared on some streets of Washington, D.C., on Friday amid Donald Trump’s inauguration — with people smashing car and store windows, clashing with police and even torching a limo.

Police said they responded using pepper spray and other control devices. At least 95 people were arrested, the Metropolitan Police Department said this afternoon.

Thousands of protesters fanned out across downtown Washington in the morning, including some who tried to block security checkpoints to the inauguration festivities. Protests also cropped up in other parts of the country Friday, including San Francisco and outside Trump Tower in New York City.

The capital’s interim police chief, Peter Newsham, said in a Periscope video posted on Twitter that the problems were caused by one group, “and it’s a very, very small percentage of the number of folks that came here to peacefully assemble in our city.”

Dramatic video published on social media showed men and women using signs and sticks to shatter glass at a Starbucks and a bank. Police then attempted to chase down the suspected vandals.

Police said in a statement that an organized group marched through the northwestern part of the city around 10:30 a.m. and that “members of the group acting in a concerted effort engaged in acts of vandalism and several instances of destruction of property.”

The statement said that the group damaged vehicles, destroyed the property of multiple businesses and ignited small, isolated fires and that police vehicles were among those damaged.

The #DisruptJ20 coalition, named after the date of the inauguration, which promised that its participants would attempt to shut down the inauguration events, tangled with Bikers for Trump, a group clad in leather biker gear that backs the president.

Video on social media showed the two groups exchanging words and blows just before the start of inauguration festivities.

After the inauguration, protesters started a fire on the street, burning what appeared to be garbage and a plastic newspaper stand.

Later in the afternoon, protesters set on fire what appeared to be a stretch limo. Images on social media showed the words “We the people” spray-painted on a door of the vehicle. Smoke from the blaze could be seen streaming into the overcast sky.

At the inauguration ceremony, protesters could be seen being removed from the crowd.

Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., responded to the protests on Twitter, writing, “Nothing is more unAmerican than protesters who are not peaceful. Disgusting.”

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →