Review Category : National News

FAA Implements No-Fly Zone over Trump Tower Through Inauguration Day

Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images(NEW YORK) — The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has established a no-fly zone, effective immediately, over midtown Manhattan, New York until Jan. 21, 2017, the day after President-elect Donald Trump is scheduled to be inaugurated as the 45th president of the United States.

The FAA’s order cites “VIP Movement” as the reason, and the zone is a 2,999-foot floor and 2-mile wide radius around what appears to be Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue.

A spokesperson for the FAA was not immediately able to answer if or how the local New York City airports would be affected by the change.

The Notice To Airmen, or NOTAM, includes several exceptions, including United States Secret Service aircraft.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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FAA Implements No-Fly Zone over Trump Tower Through Inauguration Day

Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images(NEW YORK) — The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has established a no-fly zone, effective immediately, over midtown Manhattan, New York until Jan. 21, 2017, the day after President-elect Donald Trump is scheduled to be inaugurated as the 45th president of the United States.

The FAA’s order cites “VIP Movement” as the reason, and the zone is a 2,999-foot floor and 2-mile wide radius around what appears to be Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue.

A spokesperson for the FAA was not immediately able to answer if or how the local New York City airports would be affected by the change.

The Notice To Airmen, or NOTAM, includes several exceptions, including United States Secret Service aircraft.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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President Trump Won’t ‘Intimidate’ Women Accusing Him of Misconduct, Lawyer Says

ABC News(NEW YORK) — Three of the women accusing Donald Trump of unwanted sexual advances will not be “intimidated” by Trump’s ascension to the most powerful office in the world and remain ready to counter-sue the president-elect should he make good on campaign threats, an attorney for the women told ABC News.

“Right now they have no present intention to sue him first, but if he sues them then we will defend them vigorously,” celebrity attorney Gloria Allred, a Hillary Clinton supporter, said in her first post-election interview. “Whether the president of the United States decides that he wants to spend his time in lawsuits or serving the American people as president of the United States, is a question that only Mr. Trump can answer. We’ll have to wait and see.”

Allred said she was speaking on behalf of three women who have accused Trump of unwanted advances: former Apprentice contestant Summer Zervos, adult film performer Jessica Drake and former Miss USA contestant Temple Taggart. Several other women also came forward late in the 2016 campaign to accuse the mogul-turned-politician of kissing or groping without consent.

In one of his final speeches as the Republican presidential candidate last month, Trump said the allegations against him were all lies and said, “All of these liars will be sued after the election is over.”

Allred said she took that threat seriously.

“So we’ll have to wait and see. We are prepared to defend these brave women, if and when it is necessary to do so,” she said.

Beyond allegations of sexual impropriety, Trump is facing a litany of legal and regulatory issues that are unprecedented for a president-elect.

He or his associated organizations are facing dozens of lawsuits. Some of the most high profile are three suits against Trump University, which former students and New York’s Attorney General say was a “fraud.” Trump, who is scheduled to appear in court later this month to defend the for-profit program, has said he could have settled the suits, but he doesn’t settle “when we are right.”

The same New York AG, Eric Schneiderman, also previously announced an investigation into the Trump Foundation following media reports that the charity’s funds may have been misused.

The office of the president does not protect the nation’s leader from any litigation regarding “unofficial” actions that took place before his or her election, the Supreme Court ruled in 1997, but the ruling included concerns over how “disruptive” potential cases could be for the nation.

Samuel Issacharoff, a professor of constitutional law at NYU who worked on the Obama campaigns, said he expects courts may delay or choose not to proceed with some suits that directly involve Trump.

“It is possible that there is one that is teed up for trial later this month that may not involve much more effort on his part, that a court could allow to go forward,” Issacharoff said, presumably referring to one of the Trump University cases. “But President-elect Trump is President-elect Trump, and he is somebody who has not run any aspect of government before. It is in all of our interests that he get up to speed as quickly as possible. It can’t possibly be that he spends the next few months in litigation-related matters.”

There’s also the matter of Trump’s international businesses and moves he will have to make to avoid conflicts of interest. The Trump Organization has stakes in existing and prospective real estate projects around the globe.

Presidents in the past have placed business interests in a blind trust to avoid the appearance of a conflict, but Trump has said he’ll simply allow his children to make all the decisions. The family refers to that arrangement as a blind trust, but experts told ABC News it most likely would not fill the bill.

“I don’t see how you have a blind trust when you know what’s in the blind trust,” said Richard Painter, a University of Minnesota law professor who served as an ethics adviser to Republican President George W. Bush. “The appearance is that a foreign government or other foreign organization has influence over the president of the United States through financial dealings with his family, and that would be unacceptable.”

An earlier ABC News investigation found Trump has numerous connections to Russian interests in the U.S. and abroad — involving hundreds of millions of dollars, according to Sergei Millian, a Russian businessman who says he once helped market Trump’s U.S. condos in Russia and other former Soviet states. Trump, who has praised Russian President Vladimir Putin, to the dismay of fellow Republicans, said in July that the Trump team “will be looking at” lifting sanctions on Russia — a move that could benefit the Trump family.

Trump Organization attorney Alan Garten has downplayed Trump’s links to Russia and said that no one in the organization could recall Millian’s name.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Two Police Officers Ambushed and Shot in Pennsylvania; One Killed

Stockbyte/Thinkstock(CANONSBURG, Pa.) — A manhunt is underway in western Pennsylvania for the person who shot two police officers — killing one of them — in an early morning ambush-style attack, state police said.

The shooting happened in the town of Canonsburg, about 18 miles southwest of Pittsburgh, after the officers responded to a call about a domestic incident at 3:14 a.m. The officers were ambushed upon arrival “as soon as they approached the front of the residence,” a Pennsylvania State Police spokesperson said at a press conference Thursday morning.

The injured officers were transported to local hospitals, and one of them has since died, according to state police. Their names have not been released.

State police described the incident as “an active situation” and did not provide any details on a possible suspect or whether anyone has been arrested. Some residents in the neighborhood have been asked to vacate their homes, while others have been ordered to stay inside. Canon-McMillan School District is closed for the day, and another local school has a delayed opening due to the shooting, according to state police.

Authorities said there was an “active PFA” or protection from abuse order at the residence where the officers were dispatched.

It was not immediately known what led to the shooting. The investigation is ongoing.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Tens of Thousands Protest Trump Election Victory, 124 Arrested

Spencer Platt/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Tens of thousands of demonstrators took to the streets in cities across the country Wednesday to protest Donald Trump’s election victory, in mostly peaceful gatherings that nonetheless resulted in at least 124 arrests and reports of damage, vandalism and injuries in several locations.

NEW YORK CITY

A massive gathering of protesters descended upon Trump Tower in midtown Manhattan Wednesday night, marching from Union Square.

Protesters chanted, “My body, my choice,” “Not my president,” and “Hey, hey, ho, ho, Donald Trump has got to go.”

At Union Square, hundreds chanted “He’s Not My President” and carried signs that read “Defeat Fascism.” Another group of protesters gathered at Columbus Circle near Trump International Hotel & Tower.

At least 65 people were arrested during Wednesday night’s demonstrations, according to WABC. Sources also tell WABC that at least 10,000 people took part in NYC demonstrations.

#TrumpTower protests causing massive gridlock throughout Midtown. #BREAKING #abc7ny pic.twitter.com/deOVCWgUk7

— Josh Einiger (@JoshEiniger7) November 10, 2016

The majority of the arrests took place in front of Trump Tower, where several people climbed light poles and had to be taken down. Police closed 5th Avenue at 57th Street due to the unrest and did not allow demonstrators to march to Trump Tower.

CHICAGO

In Chicago, hundreds of protesters marched through the city’s downtown and gathered outside the city’s Trump Tower to express their anger that Trump was elected.

“You saw all of the hate was coming with him, and you were just hoping that that would never come to fruition, and it has,” anti-Trump protester Will Rossi told Chicago’s ABC7.

Anti-Trump demonstrators take to to the streets in downtown Chicago, protesting the election: https://t.co/F2TSClngjj pic.twitter.com/Ls5dMavL3w

— ABC 7 Chicago (@ABC7Chicago) November 9, 2016

WASHINGTON, D.C.

Protesters also filled the streets in Washington, D.C., and gathered outside the newly-opened Trump hotel.

Folks protesting trump headed toward the #WhiteHouse pic.twitter.com/OqZZxoXDdv

— Ben Bell (@BenjaminBell) November 10, 2016

At trump hotel in #dc pic.twitter.com/CTt4UFvGyT

— Ben Bell (@BenjaminBell) November 10, 2016

Students at American University protested on campus.

SEATTLE

In Seattle, about 100 protesters gathered in the Capitol Hill neighborhood.

Protesters marched through downtown, carrying signs that read “Black Lives Matter”, “Misogyny has to go,” “Love Trumps Hate,”and “The people united, will never be defeated.” They also chanted “Not My President,” as Seattle Police officers on bicycles closely watcher over the marchers.

HAPPENING NOW: 100s are protesting Donald Trump’s victory in Seattle #KOMONews pic.twitter.com/PwXf37xibH

— KOMO News (@komonews) November 10, 2016

LOS ANGELES

Hundreds of people took to the streets of downtown Los Angeles to express their disgust with president-elect Trump.

The Los Angeles Police Department reported 13 arrests just after midnight local time.

Many protesters gathered at City Hall, where they burned a piñata of Trump. Another protester wrote “F*** Trump” on city bus.

Protesters also descended upon the 101 freeway in downtown Los Angeles, forcing its shutdown.

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA

About 7,000 protesters took to the street of the northern California city to protest president-elect Trump, according to the Oakland Police Department.

The protests were mostly peaceful, except for splinter groups that vandalized the city’s downtown area, setting objects on fire and breaking windows, according to the Oakland P.D.’s public information officer, Johnna Watson.

Two officers were injured and two patrol cars were burned, Watson said. One officers was treated and released and one who was still in hospital before midnight.

The Oakland Police Department made 30 arrests and handed out 11 citations during the protest, on charges of assault on an officer, vandalism, unlawful assembly, failure to disperse, and possession of a firearm.

Three Oakland police officers were injured.

According to ABC affiliate KGO-TV, protesters chanted “not our president” and carried signs that read “Donald Trump is a rapist” and “Secede #CalExit.”

#Oakland protesters moving east on Broadway. Massive crowd upset about President Elect #Trump #Election2016 #abc7now pic.twitter.com/NHuFkfu8Tv

— Katie Utehs (@KatieUtehs) November 10, 2016

KGO-TV also reported that a “splinter group” of protesters set fires and lit fireworks in the city’s downtown.

BOSTON

Thousands of anti-Donald Trump protesters expressed their anger over Trump being elected on Boston Common Wednesday night, before heading to the Statehouse and Copley Square, ABC affiliate WCVB reported.

Protesters chanted “Not My President,” “No Fascist,” “We Will Not Be Silenced,” and “No KKK,” while carrying signs that read “He Will Never Be My President.”

Thousands of people protest Donald Trump’s win in Boston https://t.co/oj722zOXFi pic.twitter.com/iMi7ITRWli

— WCVB-TV Boston (@WCVB) November 10, 2016

Meaghan Schaefer, a 19-year-old student at Emerson College, told WCVB, “We were so close to seeing the first woman become president and she lost to a man who has no political experience, who doesn’t represent the majority in this country.”

And at the University of Massachusetts, students gathered at the Goodell Building for Workplace Learning and Management with chants of, “Trump must go!”

PORTLAND, OREGON

About 2,000 protesters blocked Interstate 5 twice during protests Wednesday night, according to ABC affiliate KATU.

Protesters also forced a delay for trains on two light-rail lines.

The crowd of anti-Trump protesters burned American flags and chanted, “That’s not my president.”

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA

Hundreds of protesters shut down several streets in Virginia’s capital city Wednesday night as they marched chanting, “No Trump. No KKK. No fascist USA,” “Not My President,” according to ABC affiliate WRIC.

Some protesters also marched onto I-95 south in downtown Richmond, shutting down the interstate in both directions.

Virginia State Police said in a statement, “State troopers have responded to the location to guide the protesters off the interstate — for their safety and the motoring public’s safety. Due to it being dark outside with limited lighting, and the blind curves and ramps along this particular stretch of I-95, this is an extremely dangerous situation for any pedestrian traffic.”

Ten people were arrested, Virginia State Police said in a statement: “At approximately midnight, a total of 10 protesters were taken into custody without further incident and charged with unlawful assembly and for being pedestrians on an interstate. The six females and four males arrested range in age of 20 to 26 years of age.”

#BREAKING – Protesters converge around the on-ramp to 676 in Center City. Police block the ramp, and protesters move on. pic.twitter.com/KJ77nkF6GJ

— Action News on 6abc (@6abc) November 10, 2016

DALLAS, TEXAS

According to Dallas police, about 300 protesters gathered at the city’s Victory Park for anti-Trump rally organized by the Next Generation Action Network.

“As we wrap our minds around this failed attempt at democracy that we as a country have witnessed in this election, and brace ourselves as Americans for a new Republican commander-in-chief with a majority Republican House and Senate; we are even more strengthened in our resolve to fight,” read a statement from the group before the protest, according to ABC affiliate WFAA. “Most everything out of the Trump campaign has been divisive and contrary to those values written in the U.S. Constitution.”

Dallas police estimates 300 plus people at Victory Park in Anti-Trump rally: https://t.co/CEUi1QUjtz pic.twitter.com/csV47k4ysi

— WFAA-TV (@wfaachannel8) November 10, 2016

ELSEWHERE IN THE US

Anti-Trump protests were also held in Atlanta; St. Paul, Minnesota; and Pittsburgh.

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Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Thousands Across the US Protest Donald Trump’s Presidential Victory

Spencer Platt/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Thousands of protesters took to the streets of several U.S. cities and college campuses Wednesday to express their disdain for president-elect Donald Trump.

NEW YORK CITY

A massive gathering of protesters descended upon Trump Tower in midtown Manhattan Wednesday night, marching from Union Square.

Protesters chanted, “My body, my choice,” “Not my president,” and “Hey, hey, ho, ho, Donald Trump has got to go.”

At Union Square, hundreds chanted “He’s Not My President” and carried signs that read “Defeat Fascism.” Another group of protesters gathered at Columbus Circle near Trump International Hotel & Tower.

At least 65 people were arrested during Wednesday night’s demonstrations, according to WABC. Sources also tell WABC that at least 10,000 people took part in NYC demonstrations.

#TrumpTower protests causing massive gridlock throughout Midtown. #BREAKING #abc7ny pic.twitter.com/deOVCWgUk7

— Josh Einiger (@JoshEiniger7) November 10, 2016

The majority of the arrests took place in front of Trump Tower, where several people climbed light poles and had to be taken down. Police closed 5th Avenue at 57th Street due to the unrest and did not allow demonstrators to march to Trump Tower.

CHICAGO

In Chicago, hundreds of protesters marched through the city’s downtown and gathered outside the city’s Trump Tower to express their anger that Trump was elected.

“You saw all of the hate was coming with him, and you were just hoping that that would never come to fruition, and it has,” anti-Trump protester Will Rossi told Chicago’s ABC7.

Anti-Trump demonstrators take to to the streets in downtown Chicago, protesting the election: https://t.co/F2TSClngjj pic.twitter.com/Ls5dMavL3w

— ABC 7 Chicago (@ABC7Chicago) November 9, 2016

WASHINGTON, D.C.

Protesters also filled the streets in Washington, D.C., and gathered outside the newly-opened Trump hotel.

Folks protesting trump headed toward the #WhiteHouse pic.twitter.com/OqZZxoXDdv

— Ben Bell (@BenjaminBell) November 10, 2016

At trump hotel in #dc pic.twitter.com/CTt4UFvGyT

— Ben Bell (@BenjaminBell) November 10, 2016

Students at American University protested on campus.

SEATTLE

In Seattle, about 100 protesters gathered in the Capitol Hill neighborhood.

Protesters marched through downtown, carrying signs that read “Black Lives Matter”, “Misogyny has to go,” “Love Trumps Hate,”and “The people united, will never be defeated.” They also chanted “Not My President,” as Seattle Police officers on bicycles closely watcher over the marchers.

HAPPENING NOW: 100s are protesting Donald Trump’s victory in Seattle #KOMONews pic.twitter.com/PwXf37xibH

— KOMO News (@komonews) November 10, 2016

LOS ANGELES

Hundreds of people took to the streets of downtown Los Angeles to express their disgust with president-elect Trump.

The Los Angeles Police Department reported 13 arrests just after midnight local time.

Many protesters gathered at City Hall, where they burned a piñata of Trump. Another protester wrote “F*** Trump” on city bus.

Protesters also descended upon the 101 freeway in downtown Los Angeles, forcing its shutdown.

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA

About 7,000 protesters took to the street of the northern California city to protest president-elect Trump, according to the Oakland Police Department.

The protests were mostly peaceful, except for splinter groups that vandalized the city’s downtown area, setting objects on fire and breaking windows, according to the Oakland P.D.’s public information officer, Johnna Watson.

Two officers were injured and two patrol cars were burned, Watson said. One officers was treated and released and one who was still in hospital before midnight.

The Oakland Police Department made 30 arrests and handed out 11 citations during the protest, on charges of assault on an officer, vandalism, unlawful assembly, failure to disperse, and possession of a firearm.

Three Oakland police officers were injured.

According to ABC affiliate KGO-TV, protesters chanted “not our president” and carried signs that read “Donald Trump is a rapist” and “Secede #CalExit.”

#Oakland protesters moving east on Broadway. Massive crowd upset about President Elect #Trump #Election2016 #abc7now pic.twitter.com/NHuFkfu8Tv

— Katie Utehs (@KatieUtehs) November 10, 2016

KGO-TV also reported that a “splinter group” of protesters set fires and lit fireworks in the city’s downtown.

BOSTON

Thousands of anti-Donald Trump protesters expressed their anger over Trump being elected on Boston Common Wednesday night, before heading to the Statehouse and Copley Square, ABC affiliate WCVB reported.

Protesters chanted “Not My President,” “No Fascist,” “We Will Not Be Silenced,” and “No KKK,” while carrying signs that read “He Will Never Be My President.”

Thousands of people protest Donald Trump’s win in Boston https://t.co/oj722zOXFi pic.twitter.com/iMi7ITRWli

— WCVB-TV Boston (@WCVB) November 10, 2016

Meaghan Schaefer, a 19-year-old student at Emerson College, told WCVB, “We were so close to seeing the first woman become president and she lost to a man who has no political experience, who doesn’t represent the majority in this country.”

And at the University of Massachusetts, students gathered at the Goodell Building for Workplace Learning and Management with chants of, “Trump must go!”

PORTLAND, OREGON

About 2,000 protesters blocked Interstate 5 twice during protests Wednesday night, according to ABC affiliate KATU.

Protesters also forced a delay for trains on two light-rail lines.

The crowd of anti-Trump protesters burned American flags and chanted, “That’s not my president.”

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA

Hundreds of protesters shut down several streets in Virginia’s capital city Wednesday night as they marched chanting, “No Trump. No KKK. No fascist USA,” “Not My President,” according to ABC affiliate WRIC.

Some protesters also marched onto I-95 south in downtown Richmond, shutting down the interstate in both directions.

Virginia State Police said in a statement, “State troopers have responded to the location to guide the protesters off the interstate — for their safety and the motoring public’s safety. Due to it being dark outside with limited lighting, and the blind curves and ramps along this particular stretch of I-95, this is an extremely dangerous situation for any pedestrian traffic.”

Ten people were arrested, Virginia State Police said in a statement: “At approximately midnight, a total of 10 protesters were taken into custody without further incident and charged with unlawful assembly and for being pedestrians on an interstate. The six females and four males arrested range in age of 20 to 26 years of age.”

#BREAKING – Protesters converge around the on-ramp to 676 in Center City. Police block the ramp, and protesters move on. pic.twitter.com/KJ77nkF6GJ

— Action News on 6abc (@6abc) November 10, 2016

DALLAS, TEXAS

According to Dallas police, about 300 protesters gathered at the city’s Victory Park for anti-Trump rally organized by the Next Generation Action Network.

“As we wrap our minds around this failed attempt at democracy that we as a country have witnessed in this election, and brace ourselves as Americans for a new Republican commander-in-chief with a majority Republican House and Senate; we are even more strengthened in our resolve to fight,” read a statement from the group before the protest, according to ABC affiliate WFAA. “Most everything out of the Trump campaign has been divisive and contrary to those values written in the U.S. Constitution.”

Dallas police estimates 300 plus people at Victory Park in Anti-Trump rally: https://t.co/CEUi1QUjtz pic.twitter.com/csV47k4ysi

— WFAA-TV (@wfaachannel8) November 10, 2016

ELSEWHERE IN THE US

Anti-Trump protests were also held in Atlanta; St. Paul, Minnesota; and Pittsburgh.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Five Shot in Downtown Seattle, Gunman at Large

iStock/Thinkstock(SEATTLE) — Five people were shot Wednesday night outside a 7-11 convenience store in downtown Seattle, leaving two of the injured in critical condition.

The male suspect escaped on foot and is being sought by police.

The victims consist of four men and one woman. They are between the ages of 20 and 50, according to a spokeswoman at Seattle’s Harborview Medical Center, where the injured were transported. The hospital tweeted that two males were in critical condition, two other males were in serious condition, and the female had been upgraded from critical to serious.

Police said two victims sustained life-threatening injuries after a man fired into a crowd outside the 7-11.

Seattle Fire crews treating 5 patients with gunshot wounds. 2 of the 5 with life-threatening injuries. Medics transporting to HMC. pic.twitter.com/HTtHejkTpc

— Seattle Fire Dept (@SeattleFire) November 10, 2016

A 7-11 store manager who was working at time of the shooting told ABC television affiliate KOMO she heard a string of shots ring out around 6:45 p.m.

“I told everybody to just get down,” Sharon Keith said. “I looked out and there were multiple people down and bleeding.”

Merner said the shooting did not appear to be related to nearby anti-Donald Trump protests, one of several that broke out in cities across the country.

“As far as we know, it seems to be a personal argument,” he said.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Five Shot in Downtown Seattle

iStock/Thinkstock(SEATTLE) — Five people were shot and one critically injured during a shooting Wednesday night in downtown Seattle.

Police said the shooting did not appear to be related to nearby anti-Donald Trump protests, one of several that broke out in cities across the country.

The victims included four men and one woman. One was critically injured in the gunplay, when someone fired into a crowd, police said.

According to cops, the shooting appeared to stem from an argument.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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How Trump’s Electoral College Victory May Not Be a Mandate

ABC News(WASHINGTON) — For the sixth time in the last seven presidential elections, it appears that the Democratic candidate for president may be the winner of the popular vote. But for the second time in the previous five elections, the Democratic candidate will not win the presidency due to the Electoral College.

Ballots are still being tallied, but Hillary Clinton was ahead in the popular vote by about 200,000, with 92 percent of the expected vote in. Both candidates had more than 59 million votes each. Donald Trump had a significant advantage in the Electoral College — leading Clinton 279-228, according to ABC News projections.

If Trump does not win the popular vote, it may limit the extent to which Republicans can claim his election as a referendum on the state of the nation. Both candidates garnered less than 50 percent of the vote.

Before the 2000 election — when President George W. Bush lost the popular vote to Al Gore — the scenario was relatively rare, occurring in 1824, 1876 and 1888. The result appears to indicate a growing split in the U.S. population in which politically like-minded citizens are clustering together geographically.

In areas where Hillary Clinton performed best, like the liberal northeast and West Coast states, she won large margins in heavily-populated cities where she ran up her popular vote total without the benefit of garnering additional electoral votes.

The former secretary of state won in the three largest cities in the country, New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, by a combined 3 million votes, enough to swing more than 10 lesser-populated states — including important battlegrounds like Michigan, Wisconsin, North Carolina and Florida — were their populations more-evenly distributed.

While Trump’s election comes as a surprise to many observers — an upset the level of which the country has not experienced since President Harry S. Truman defended the Oval Office from New York Gov. Thomas E. Dewey against long odds in 1948 — to call the outcome indicative of the country’s ideological preferences as a whole may not be accurate.

In fact, the idea that the candidate who receives the most votes is not necessarily the winner was considered foreign to the president-elect himself as recently as four years ago.

“The electoral college is a disaster for democracy,” tweeted Trump on Election Night in 2012 after former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney was defeated by President Barack Obama.

In additional Twitter posts that evening which have since been deleted, Trump — apparently under the false belief that Romney was on track to win the popular vote — decried Obama’s claim to the presidency, saying, “He lost the popular vote by a lot and won the election. We should have a revolution in this country!”

Trump added, “More votes equals a loss…revolution!”

But the New York real estate mogul is not the only Republican who will have to reconcile statements standing in contradiction to the current electoral reality — GOP senators now face a dilemma over their position on the current Supreme Court vacancy.

Following the death of Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia in February and President Obama’s nomination of U.S. Court of Appeals judge Merrick Garland to fill the ninth seat, Republican senators refused to hold confirmation hearings. Instead, led by Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell, and supported by the Republican National Committee, the senators made clear their intention to wait for a nominee selected by the next president, under the guise that the American people themselves would choose whom they wish to make the nomination.

“The American people are perfectly capable of having their say on this issue, so let’s give them a voice,” said McConnell in March. “Let’s let the American people decide.”

Critics of the Republicans’ plan pointed out that Obama was reelected in 2012 to make such a decision as ascribed to him by Article II of the U.S. Constitution. Now, they will also be able to note that the American people did, in fact, decide, and — by that popular vote margin — a greater number selected Hillary Clinton to appoint the next justice than any other presidential candidate, including the president-elect.

Speaking to reporters Wednesday in the aftermath of Trump’s victory, McConnell only addressed the popular vote total in broad terms and not in connection to the court.

“The election is over, we know who won, and we’re going to move on from there and do the best we can for the American people,” McConnell said.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Thousands Across the US Protest President-Elect Donald Trump

Spencer Platt/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Thousands of protesters took to the streets of U.S. cities and college campuses Wednesday to express their disdain for president-elect Donald Trump.

A massive gathering of protesters descended upon Trump Tower in midtown Manhattan Wednesday night, marching from Union Square.

#TrumpTower protests causing massive gridlock throughout Midtown. #BREAKING #abc7ny pic.twitter.com/deOVCWgUk7

— Josh Einiger (@JoshEiniger7) November 10, 2016

At Union Square, hundreds chanted “He’s Not My President” and carried signs that read “Defeat Fascism.” Another group of protesters gathered at Columbus Circle near Trump International Hotel & Tower.

They’re shouting “Not my president.” #Trump #breaking pic.twitter.com/9JfSKiaauu

— Josh Einiger (@JoshEiniger7) November 9, 2016

In Chicago, hundreds of protesters marched through the city’s downtown and gathered outside the city’s Trump Tower to express their anger that Trump was elected.

“You saw all of the hate was coming with him, and you were just hoping that that would never come to fruition, and it has,” anti-Trump protester Will Rossi told Chicago’s ABC7.

Anti-Trump demonstrators take to to the streets in downtown Chicago, protesting the election: https://t.co/F2TSClngjj pic.twitter.com/Ls5dMavL3w

— ABC 7 Chicago (@ABC7Chicago) November 9, 2016

Educational institutions were also hotbeds of protest today. High school and college students from California to Washington, D.C., held protests to show their opposition to Donald Trump’s election as president.

Students at American University in Washington, D.C., protested on campus.

Meanwhile, high school students in Berkeley, California, gathered to recite speeches and sing civil rights songs, according to a statement from the school district.

Students at the University of Connecticut organized protests and sit-ins across campus in defiant response to Trump’s presidential victory.

University of Massachusetts students gathered at the Goodell Building for Workplace Learning and Management with chants of, “Trump must go!”

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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