Review Category : National News

Slain Cleveland Boy’s Toy Gun ‘Indistinguishable’ from Real Gun: Cops

File photo. (blackred/Getty Images)(CLEVELAND) — The toy gun a 12-year-old was brandishing when he was fatally shot by police was “indistinguishable” from a real weapon, Cleveland police said on Monday.

Tamir Rice was shot and killed on Saturday at a recreation center after reports that he had a pistol and was waving it around. It turned out to be an “airsoft” gun and the orange tip at the end of the gun to indicate it was a toy had been removed, police said.

“Guns are not toys, and we need to teach our kids that,” Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams said at a press conference Monday. “Our community needs to understand that.”

Police said they have offered to show Rice’s family surveillance video of what happened when he was shot. They declined, but representatives for the family viewed the footage. That video will eventually be released to the public, police said.

The officer was within 10 feet of the boy when he was shot, police said.

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Slain Cleveland Boy’s Toy Gun ‘Indistinguishable’ from Real Gun: Cops

File photo. (blackred/Getty Images)(CLEVELAND) — The toy gun a 12-year-old was brandishing when he was fatally shot by police was “indistinguishable” from a real weapon, Cleveland police said on Monday.

Tamir Rice was shot and killed on Saturday at a recreation center after reports that he had a pistol and was waving it around. It turned out to be an “airsoft” gun and the orange tip at the end of the gun to indicate it was a toy had been removed, police said.

“Guns are not toys, and we need to teach our kids that,” Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams said at a press conference Monday. “Our community needs to understand that.”

Police said they have offered to show Rice’s family surveillance video of what happened when he was shot. They declined, but representatives for the family viewed the footage. That video will eventually be released to the public, police said.

The officer was within 10 feet of the boy when he was shot, police said.

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University of Virginia’s Campus Reeling over Sexual Assault Allegations

Lance King/Getty Images(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) — Students at the University of Virginia on Monday praised the school’s decision to suspend all fraternities and sororities in the wake of a report about a shocking sexual assault at a frat party.

The Greek life at the school was suspended by university President Teresa Sullivan after rape accusations were detailed in a Rolling Stone article. The report sparked weekend protests on the Charlottesville campus.

Tommy Reid, the president of the school’s inter-fraternity council, said that ending sexual assault on campus can’t be done by frat brothers alone.

“It’s much larger and much more complicated than the Greek system itself. I think it’s important to understand the temporary ban in itself gives our community time to take a breath to sit back and talk and be active and develop what we consider to be actionable and long term solutions,” he said.

“The culture here is not just a UVA issue. This is a pervasive national epidemic,” Ashley Brown, the leader of One Less, a group that helps sexual assault survivors, said Monday morning.

The Rolling Stone expose involves a first-year student’s allegation in which she says she was “gang-raped” at a Phi Kappa Psi frat party. The victim claims the attack happened in 2012. That year, the university was crowned by Playboy as the nation’s top party school.

The student, identified as “Jackie” in the article, said she felt obligated to stay silent and was even told by a roommate to “remember where your loyalty lies.”

Alexandria Pinkelton, a friend of the student, said she was proud of her friend’s determination. “One of her goals with doing this article is to try to spread awareness,” she said.

The national leadership of Phi Kappa Psi decried the situation in a statement, saying, “We do not condone violence under any circumstances.”

Sullivan suspended all campus fraternities and sororities in the wake of the scandal. In addition, Sullivan stated that the school’s board of visitors will be meeting on Tuesday “to discuss the University’s policies and procedures regarding sexual assault as well as the specific, recent allegations.”

“I write you in great sorrow, great rage, but most importantly, great determination,” Sullivan wrote in a statement sent to the University of Virginia community. “Meaningful change is necessary, and we can lead that change for all universities.”

The current situation feels too familiar for Liz Seccuro, who has claimed she was raped in the same frat house as a freshman in 1984. The school has done little to improve its culture in the ensuing decades because it’s too worried about its reputation, Seccuro said.

“For 30 years, to have no progress made is inexplicable and heartbreaking,” Seccuro said.

According to the Rolling Stone article, 38 students reported sexual assault to university officials in the last academic year, but of those 38 only four resulted in sexual misconduct board meetings.

The university is one of 86 schools under federal investigation or compliance review for their handling of sexual misconduct.

Attorney Wendy Murphy has filed lawsuits against nine schools, including the University of Virginia.

“I’ve seen UVA behave badly for a long, long time, and this is the first time they’ve faced such a significant public scandal. It’s long overdue,” Murphy said.

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University of Virginia’s Campus Reeling over Sexual Assault Allegations

Lance King/Getty Images(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) — Students at the University of Virginia on Monday praised the school’s decision to suspend all fraternities and sororities in the wake of a report about a shocking sexual assault at a frat party.

The Greek life at the school was suspended by university President Teresa Sullivan after rape accusations were detailed in a Rolling Stone article. The report sparked weekend protests on the Charlottesville campus.

Tommy Reid, the president of the school’s inter-fraternity council, said that ending sexual assault on campus can’t be done by frat brothers alone.

“It’s much larger and much more complicated than the Greek system itself. I think it’s important to understand the temporary ban in itself gives our community time to take a breath to sit back and talk and be active and develop what we consider to be actionable and long term solutions,” he said.

“The culture here is not just a UVA issue. This is a pervasive national epidemic,” Ashley Brown, the leader of One Less, a group that helps sexual assault survivors, said Monday morning.

The Rolling Stone expose involves a first-year student’s allegation in which she says she was “gang-raped” at a Phi Kappa Psi frat party. The victim claims the attack happened in 2012. That year, the university was crowned by Playboy as the nation’s top party school.

The student, identified as “Jackie” in the article, said she felt obligated to stay silent and was even told by a roommate to “remember where your loyalty lies.”

Alexandria Pinkelton, a friend of the student, said she was proud of her friend’s determination. “One of her goals with doing this article is to try to spread awareness,” she said.

The national leadership of Phi Kappa Psi decried the situation in a statement, saying, “We do not condone violence under any circumstances.”

Sullivan suspended all campus fraternities and sororities in the wake of the scandal. In addition, Sullivan stated that the school’s board of visitors will be meeting on Tuesday “to discuss the University’s policies and procedures regarding sexual assault as well as the specific, recent allegations.”

“I write you in great sorrow, great rage, but most importantly, great determination,” Sullivan wrote in a statement sent to the University of Virginia community. “Meaningful change is necessary, and we can lead that change for all universities.”

The current situation feels too familiar for Liz Seccuro, who has claimed she was raped in the same frat house as a freshman in 1984. The school has done little to improve its culture in the ensuing decades because it’s too worried about its reputation, Seccuro said.

“For 30 years, to have no progress made is inexplicable and heartbreaking,” Seccuro said.

According to the Rolling Stone article, 38 students reported sexual assault to university officials in the last academic year, but of those 38 only four resulted in sexual misconduct board meetings.

The university is one of 86 schools under federal investigation or compliance review for their handling of sexual misconduct.

Attorney Wendy Murphy has filed lawsuits against nine schools, including the University of Virginia.

“I’ve seen UVA behave badly for a long, long time, and this is the first time they’ve faced such a significant public scandal. It’s long overdue,” Murphy said.

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University of Virginia’s Campus Reeling over Sexual Assault Allegations

Lance King/Getty Images(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) — Students at the University of Virginia on Monday praised the school’s decision to suspend all fraternities and sororities in the wake of a report about a shocking sexual assault at a frat party.

The Greek life at the school was suspended by university President Teresa Sullivan after rape accusations were detailed in a Rolling Stone article. The report sparked weekend protests on the Charlottesville campus.

Tommy Reid, the president of the school’s inter-fraternity council, said that ending sexual assault on campus can’t be done by frat brothers alone.

“It’s much larger and much more complicated than the Greek system itself. I think it’s important to understand the temporary ban in itself gives our community time to take a breath to sit back and talk and be active and develop what we consider to be actionable and long term solutions,” he said.

“The culture here is not just a UVA issue. This is a pervasive national epidemic,” Ashley Brown, the leader of One Less, a group that helps sexual assault survivors, said Monday morning.

The Rolling Stone expose involves a first-year student’s allegation in which she says she was “gang-raped” at a Phi Kappa Psi frat party. The victim claims the attack happened in 2012. That year, the university was crowned by Playboy as the nation’s top party school.

The student, identified as “Jackie” in the article, said she felt obligated to stay silent and was even told by a roommate to “remember where your loyalty lies.”

Alexandria Pinkelton, a friend of the student, said she was proud of her friend’s determination. “One of her goals with doing this article is to try to spread awareness,” she said.

The national leadership of Phi Kappa Psi decried the situation in a statement, saying, “We do not condone violence under any circumstances.”

Sullivan suspended all campus fraternities and sororities in the wake of the scandal. In addition, Sullivan stated that the school’s board of visitors will be meeting on Tuesday “to discuss the University’s policies and procedures regarding sexual assault as well as the specific, recent allegations.”

“I write you in great sorrow, great rage, but most importantly, great determination,” Sullivan wrote in a statement sent to the University of Virginia community. “Meaningful change is necessary, and we can lead that change for all universities.”

The current situation feels too familiar for Liz Seccuro, who has claimed she was raped in the same frat house as a freshman in 1984. The school has done little to improve its culture in the ensuing decades because it’s too worried about its reputation, Seccuro said.

“For 30 years, to have no progress made is inexplicable and heartbreaking,” Seccuro said.

According to the Rolling Stone article, 38 students reported sexual assault to university officials in the last academic year, but of those 38 only four resulted in sexual misconduct board meetings.

The university is one of 86 schools under federal investigation or compliance review for their handling of sexual misconduct.

Attorney Wendy Murphy has filed lawsuits against nine schools, including the University of Virginia.

“I’ve seen UVA behave badly for a long, long time, and this is the first time they’ve faced such a significant public scandal. It’s long overdue,” Murphy said.

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University of Virginia’s Campus Reeling over Sexual Assault Allegations

Lance King/Getty Images(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) — Students at the University of Virginia on Monday praised the school’s decision to suspend all fraternities and sororities in the wake of a report about a shocking sexual assault at a frat party.

The Greek life at the school was suspended by university President Teresa Sullivan after rape accusations were detailed in a Rolling Stone article. The report sparked weekend protests on the Charlottesville campus.

Tommy Reid, the president of the school’s inter-fraternity council, said that ending sexual assault on campus can’t be done by frat brothers alone.

“It’s much larger and much more complicated than the Greek system itself. I think it’s important to understand the temporary ban in itself gives our community time to take a breath to sit back and talk and be active and develop what we consider to be actionable and long term solutions,” he said.

“The culture here is not just a UVA issue. This is a pervasive national epidemic,” Ashley Brown, the leader of One Less, a group that helps sexual assault survivors, said Monday morning.

The Rolling Stone expose involves a first-year student’s allegation in which she says she was “gang-raped” at a Phi Kappa Psi frat party. The victim claims the attack happened in 2012. That year, the university was crowned by Playboy as the nation’s top party school.

The student, identified as “Jackie” in the article, said she felt obligated to stay silent and was even told by a roommate to “remember where your loyalty lies.”

Alexandria Pinkelton, a friend of the student, said she was proud of her friend’s determination. “One of her goals with doing this article is to try to spread awareness,” she said.

The national leadership of Phi Kappa Psi decried the situation in a statement, saying, “We do not condone violence under any circumstances.”

Sullivan suspended all campus fraternities and sororities in the wake of the scandal. In addition, Sullivan stated that the school’s board of visitors will be meeting on Tuesday “to discuss the University’s policies and procedures regarding sexual assault as well as the specific, recent allegations.”

“I write you in great sorrow, great rage, but most importantly, great determination,” Sullivan wrote in a statement sent to the University of Virginia community. “Meaningful change is necessary, and we can lead that change for all universities.”

The current situation feels too familiar for Liz Seccuro, who has claimed she was raped in the same frat house as a freshman in 1984. The school has done little to improve its culture in the ensuing decades because it’s too worried about its reputation, Seccuro said.

“For 30 years, to have no progress made is inexplicable and heartbreaking,” Seccuro said.

According to the Rolling Stone article, 38 students reported sexual assault to university officials in the last academic year, but of those 38 only four resulted in sexual misconduct board meetings.

The university is one of 86 schools under federal investigation or compliance review for their handling of sexual misconduct.

Attorney Wendy Murphy has filed lawsuits against nine schools, including the University of Virginia.

“I’ve seen UVA behave badly for a long, long time, and this is the first time they’ve faced such a significant public scandal. It’s long overdue,” Murphy said.

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University of Virginia’s Campus Reeling over Sexual Assault Allegations

Lance King/Getty Images(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) — Students at the University of Virginia on Monday praised the school’s decision to suspend all fraternities and sororities in the wake of a report about a shocking sexual assault at a frat party.

The Greek life at the school was suspended by university President Teresa Sullivan after rape accusations were detailed in a Rolling Stone article. The report sparked weekend protests on the Charlottesville campus.

Tommy Reid, the president of the school’s inter-fraternity council, said that ending sexual assault on campus can’t be done by frat brothers alone.

“It’s much larger and much more complicated than the Greek system itself. I think it’s important to understand the temporary ban in itself gives our community time to take a breath to sit back and talk and be active and develop what we consider to be actionable and long term solutions,” he said.

“The culture here is not just a UVA issue. This is a pervasive national epidemic,” Ashley Brown, the leader of One Less, a group that helps sexual assault survivors, said Monday morning.

The Rolling Stone expose involves a first-year student’s allegation in which she says she was “gang-raped” at a Phi Kappa Psi frat party. The victim claims the attack happened in 2012. That year, the university was crowned by Playboy as the nation’s top party school.

The student, identified as “Jackie” in the article, said she felt obligated to stay silent and was even told by a roommate to “remember where your loyalty lies.”

Alexandria Pinkelton, a friend of the student, said she was proud of her friend’s determination. “One of her goals with doing this article is to try to spread awareness,” she said.

The national leadership of Phi Kappa Psi decried the situation in a statement, saying, “We do not condone violence under any circumstances.”

Sullivan suspended all campus fraternities and sororities in the wake of the scandal. In addition, Sullivan stated that the school’s board of visitors will be meeting on Tuesday “to discuss the University’s policies and procedures regarding sexual assault as well as the specific, recent allegations.”

“I write you in great sorrow, great rage, but most importantly, great determination,” Sullivan wrote in a statement sent to the University of Virginia community. “Meaningful change is necessary, and we can lead that change for all universities.”

The current situation feels too familiar for Liz Seccuro, who has claimed she was raped in the same frat house as a freshman in 1984. The school has done little to improve its culture in the ensuing decades because it’s too worried about its reputation, Seccuro said.

“For 30 years, to have no progress made is inexplicable and heartbreaking,” Seccuro said.

According to the Rolling Stone article, 38 students reported sexual assault to university officials in the last academic year, but of those 38 only four resulted in sexual misconduct board meetings.

The university is one of 86 schools under federal investigation or compliance review for their handling of sexual misconduct.

Attorney Wendy Murphy has filed lawsuits against nine schools, including the University of Virginia.

“I’ve seen UVA behave badly for a long, long time, and this is the first time they’ve faced such a significant public scandal. It’s long overdue,” Murphy said.

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Ferguson Grand Jury Still at Work

Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(ST. LOUIS) — A grand jury in St. Louis County, Missouri, is expected to reconvene on Monday, trying to decide whether to indict a white police officer in the August shooting death of an unarmed black teen.

The weekend was marked by protests in the city of Ferguson, with security tight and tensions running high ahead of the grand jury’s decision. Many people were expecting the grand jury to come to a decision over the weekend.

While the jurors debate possible criminal charges against officer Darren Wilson, additional law enforcement — including the National Guard and more than 100 FBI agents — is stationed in Ferguson ahead of the grand jury’s decision.

The Saint Louis County Police Department switched its officers to 12-hour shifts in recent days. Metal and concrete barricades have been erected in areas around the St Louis County government buildings in Clayton, Missouri, where the grand jury has been meeting. The justice center there also houses the prosecutor’s office, the St. Louis County Police Department headquarters and the circuit courts.

A handful of arrests were made during the weekend. Some stores in the St. Louis suburb remain closed, with business owners boarding up windows in fear.

“We look abandoned here, pretty much imprisoned,” business owner Triondus Sleet said. “It’s sad.”

Wilson could be charged with murder or manslaughter — or nothing — for the Aug. 9 shooting death of Michael Brown. If cleared, a police union rep said he should be able to return to work.

“It would be my hope though that if, one day, he decides to stay in law enforcement, that he’s able to do that,” said Detective Gabe Crocker, president of the St. Louis County Police Association. “Especially if he’s cleared, that means he didn’t do anything wrong, according to the grand jury.”

President Obama, in an exclusive interview with ABC News, urged for calm no matter what decision the grand jury reaches, a sentiment also expressed by Brown’s mother and father.

“Using any event as an excuse for violence is contrary to rule of law and contrary to who we are,” Obama said.

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Rising Temperatures Bring Fear of Floods in Western New York

John Normile/Getty Images(BUFFALO, N.Y.) — The worst is over for the Buffalo, New York, area as far as the snow is concerned.

Now comes the danger of epic floods with temperatures rising and the threat of rain with some suburbs still covered in seven or eight feet of snow.

At a news briefing Sunday, Governor Andrew Cuomo told reporters, “Flooding in my opinion is worse than dealing with snow. It’s not water, it’s a toxic brew…It has all sorts of sewage in it.”

The chief worry in Buffalo-area towns like Hamburg or the city of Lackawanna is that rapid melting will turn basements and living rooms into swimming pools even as some homes had their roofs collapse under the weight of unprecedented autumn snowfall.

To that end, a frantic snow clean-up continues with the governor calling on trucks and equipment from other parts of the state, including Albany and New York City.

Meanwhile, emergency shelters have been set up by the Red Cross for possible evacuations should residents have to get out of their homes quickly. Cuomo ordered over 50 boats and “swift-water” rescue teams to be at the ready for calls as waters rise.

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Rising Temperatures Bring Fear of Floods in Western New York

John Normile/Getty Images(BUFFALO, N.Y.) — The worst is over for the Buffalo, New York, area as far as the snow is concerned.

Now comes the danger of epic floods with temperatures rising and the threat of rain with some suburbs still covered in seven or eight feet of snow.

At a news briefing Sunday, Governor Andrew Cuomo told reporters, “Flooding in my opinion is worse than dealing with snow. It’s not water, it’s a toxic brew…It has all sorts of sewage in it.”

The chief worry in Buffalo-area towns like Hamburg or the city of Lackawanna is that rapid melting will turn basements and living rooms into swimming pools even as some homes had their roofs collapse under the weight of unprecedented autumn snowfall.

To that end, a frantic snow clean-up continues with the governor calling on trucks and equipment from other parts of the state, including Albany and New York City.

Meanwhile, emergency shelters have been set up by the Red Cross for possible evacuations should residents have to get out of their homes quickly. Cuomo ordered over 50 boats and “swift-water” rescue teams to be at the ready for calls as waters rise.

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