Review Category : National News

Buzz Aldrin’s Surprise Paperwork from Moon Mission

David Livingston/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Even after a trip to the moon, Buzz Aldrin still had to clear customs.

The American astronaut has been sharing some of his travel documents from his 1969 moon landing mission. While some of the information on the forms is routine, other areas yield surprising insights about Aldrin’s historic trip.

Signing a customs form in Hawaii, Aldrin and fellow crew members Neil Armstrong and Michael Collins, claimed moon dust samples and moon rocks as the souvenirs from their nearly halfa-million-mile round trip journey. The area marked “any other condition on board which may lead to the spread of disease” was marked “to be determined.”

(The crew was kept in quarantine for three weeks after their return to Earth as a precautionary measure.)

Also intriguing: For such a long journey, Aldrin only claimed $33.31 in travel expenses for his trip — likely expenses from his time traveling on the ground before and after the trip. He noted in a “schedule of expenses” form he shared that “government meals and quarters” were furnished for the journey.

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Buzz Aldrin’s Surprise Paperwork from Moon Mission

David Livingston/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Even after a trip to the moon, Buzz Aldrin still had to clear customs.

The American astronaut has been sharing some of his travel documents from his 1969 moon landing mission. While some of the information on the forms is routine, other areas yield surprising insights about Aldrin’s historic trip.

Signing a customs form in Hawaii, Aldrin and fellow crew members Neil Armstrong and Michael Collins, claimed moon dust samples and moon rocks as the souvenirs from their nearly halfa-million-mile round trip journey. The area marked “any other condition on board which may lead to the spread of disease” was marked “to be determined.”

(The crew was kept in quarantine for three weeks after their return to Earth as a precautionary measure.)

Also intriguing: For such a long journey, Aldrin only claimed $33.31 in travel expenses for his trip — likely expenses from his time traveling on the ground before and after the trip. He noted in a “schedule of expenses” form he shared that “government meals and quarters” were furnished for the journey.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Children with Disabilities Handcuffed as a Means of Punishment, Lawsuit Alleges

iStock/Thinkstock(KENTON COUNTY, Ky.) — A deputy sheriff in Kentucky allegedly violated the rights of two children with disabilities by handcuffing them as a means of punishment, according to a federal lawsuit.

Kenton County Deputy Sheriff Kevin Sumner and Sheriff Chuck Korzenborn are named in the lawsuit, which was filed Monday in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky. The Kenton County Sheriff’s Department says it will not comment until it reviews the lawsuit.

The children have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, according to the lawsuit.

One of the incidents – involving an 8-year-old boy – was captured on video released by the American Civil Liberties Union. The third-grader could be seen crying out in pain in the video after the handcuffs were locked around his biceps. The video was recorded in the fall of 2014.

A second student, a 9-year-old girl, was also handcuffed twice in the fall of 2014, according to the lawsuit.

The children “experienced pain, fear, and emotional trauma, and an exacerbation of their disabilities” as a result of being handcuffed, according to the ACLU and attorneys for the children’s parents.

Kenyon Meyer, an attorney for the boy’s family, said the boy’s behavior is related to his ADHD.

“Handcuffs have no place in schools with little children who are having discipline issues,” Meyer said.

The ACLU is calling for an end to shackling children, saying it does more harm than good.

“Using law enforcement to discipline students with disabilities only serves to traumatize children,” Susan Mizner, disability counsel for the ACLU, said in a statement.

“It makes behavioral issues worse and interferes with the school’s role in developing appropriate educational and behavioral plans for them.”

The lawsuit seeks compensatory and punitive damages, as well as a declaration that handcuffing the children violated their rights.

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NY Air Guard Unit is Lifeline for Scientists in Greenland and Antarctica

Angel Canales/ABC News(NEW YORK) — Every year, a group of airmen from the New York Air National Guard embark on a unique mission to support science.

Since the mid-1970’s the 109th Airlift Wing has supported scientists logistically from around the world and brought them to remote locations in Greenland and Antarctica to conduct climate change research.

All of this is possible with a very special aircraft, the Lockheed LC-130, the largest plane in the world, which can land in snow and ice because it is equipped with skis.

Lt. Col Steve Yandik, a pilot and member of the unit for 25 years, said his group is the lifeline for scientists to conduct their research, bringing fuel, supplies and the scientists themselves to remote areas.

“The 109th’s mission is different in the fact that we’re not being shot,” he said. “We’re not in combat but the enemies we are facing here are Mother Nature, weather and extreme cold temperatures.”

The mission of the unit, based in Scotia, NY, is to support researchers from the National Science Foundation, an independent, federally-funded organization, in its projects in Greenland and the Antarctic.

In the Antarctic, researchers focus on astrophysics, biology, climate change, marine science and glaciology. In Greenland, researchers are looking at carbon emissions present in glacial ice.

Almost all the areas where the National Science Foundation conducts research are somewhat difficult to access.

In many cases the work could not be carried out without the air support provided by the ski-equipped planes the 109th flies, said Peter West from the National Science Foundation.

The unit can travel between 600 to 1,000 hours during a typical season in Greenland and can transport up to 2.5 million pounds of cargo that are essential to conduct the research.

“I like the challenge of flying on the snow,” Yandik said. “I like the fact that actually there’s some good coming out of it.”

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NY Air Guard Unit is Lifeline for Scientists in Greenland and Antarctica

Angel Canales/ABC News(NEW YORK) — Every year, a group of airmen from the New York Air National Guard embark on a unique mission to support science.

Since the mid-1970’s the 109th Airlift Wing has supported scientists logistically from around the world and brought them to remote locations in Greenland and Antarctica to conduct climate change research.

All of this is possible with a very special aircraft, the Lockheed LC-130, the largest plane in the world, which can land in snow and ice because it is equipped with skis.

Lt. Col Steve Yandik, a pilot and member of the unit for 25 years, said his group is the lifeline for scientists to conduct their research, bringing fuel, supplies and the scientists themselves to remote areas.

“The 109th’s mission is different in the fact that we’re not being shot,” he said. “We’re not in combat but the enemies we are facing here are Mother Nature, weather and extreme cold temperatures.”

The mission of the unit, based in Scotia, NY, is to support researchers from the National Science Foundation, an independent, federally-funded organization, in its projects in Greenland and the Antarctic.

In the Antarctic, researchers focus on astrophysics, biology, climate change, marine science and glaciology. In Greenland, researchers are looking at carbon emissions present in glacial ice.

Almost all the areas where the National Science Foundation conducts research are somewhat difficult to access.

In many cases the work could not be carried out without the air support provided by the ski-equipped planes the 109th flies, said Peter West from the National Science Foundation.

The unit can travel between 600 to 1,000 hours during a typical season in Greenland and can transport up to 2.5 million pounds of cargo that are essential to conduct the research.

“I like the challenge of flying on the snow,” Yandik said. “I like the fact that actually there’s some good coming out of it.”

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High Winds Cause NH Circus Tent to Collapse, 2 Dead

iStock/Thinkstock(LANCASTER, N.H.) — A deadly circus tent collapse for a New Hampshire fairground.

A circus tent collapsed at the Lancaster, New Hampshire fairgrounds on Monday night killing two and seriously injuring 15. Around 250 people were inside the tent during the time of the collapse.

After reports for severe thunderstorms in the area, high winds reportedly knocked over the tent during a circus performance.

New Hampshire Department of Safety Public Information Officer Mike Todd said the Emergency Operations Center had been activated, no one was trapped at the moment, and local authorities were on the scene.

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Memphis Cop Killing: Suspected Gunman in Custody

iStock/Thinkstock(MEMPHIS, Tenn.) — The man who is accused of killing a cop in Memphis this weekend is now in custody according to the Shelby County Sheriff.

Here is a closer look at how the original incident unfolded:

THE TRAFFIC STOP:

Saturday night, Memphis police officer Sean Bolton saw an illegally parked 2002 Mercedes-Benz, police said.

Bolton pulled in front of the car and shined his spotlight inside.

Bolton then went up to the car, where he engaged in a “brief struggle” with the car’s passenger, according to police.

THE SHOOTING:

The passenger, identified as Wilbourn, allegedly shot Bolton several times, police said. Wilbourn and the car’s driver fled after the shooting.

When officers responded to the scene and searched the suspect’s car, they determined “Bolton apparently interrupted some sort of drug transaction,” police said.

Officers found digital scales and a bag containing 1.7 grams of marijuana in the car, police said.

The car’s driver later turned himself in, police said, and was released without charges.

THE OFFICER:

Bolton, 33, was taken to a hospital in critical condition. He was later declared dead, police said.

Bolton had been a member of the Memphis Police Department since 2010. Bolton was also a Marine veteran who had served a tour in Iraq, police said.

“To lose a loved one or a family member is a horrific event,” Memphis police director Toney Armstrong said.

Armstrong added, “We lost not only an officer, but a great man, a dedicated servant to our community, and a family member.”

THE MANHUNT:

Wilbourn is still at-large on Monday, Memphis police told ABC News.

A murder warrant has been issued for his arrest, police said.

Police said Wilbourn is out on supervised release after being sentenced to 10 years for bank robbery.

Wilbourn is considered to be armed and dangerous, police said. A $10,000 reward has been announced for his arrest.

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Memphis Cop Killing: Suspected Gunman in Custody

iStock/Thinkstock(MEMPHIS, Tenn.) — The man who is accused of killing a cop in Memphis this weekend is now in custody according to the Shelby County Sheriff.

Here is a closer look at how the original incident unfolded:

THE TRAFFIC STOP:

Saturday night, Memphis police officer Sean Bolton saw an illegally parked 2002 Mercedes-Benz, police said.

Bolton pulled in front of the car and shined his spotlight inside.

Bolton then went up to the car, where he engaged in a “brief struggle” with the car’s passenger, according to police.

THE SHOOTING:

The passenger, identified as Wilbourn, allegedly shot Bolton several times, police said. Wilbourn and the car’s driver fled after the shooting.

When officers responded to the scene and searched the suspect’s car, they determined “Bolton apparently interrupted some sort of drug transaction,” police said.

Officers found digital scales and a bag containing 1.7 grams of marijuana in the car, police said.

The car’s driver later turned himself in, police said, and was released without charges.

THE OFFICER:

Bolton, 33, was taken to a hospital in critical condition. He was later declared dead, police said.

Bolton had been a member of the Memphis Police Department since 2010. Bolton was also a Marine veteran who had served a tour in Iraq, police said.

“To lose a loved one or a family member is a horrific event,” Memphis police director Toney Armstrong said.

Armstrong added, “We lost not only an officer, but a great man, a dedicated servant to our community, and a family member.”

THE MANHUNT:

Wilbourn is still at-large on Monday, Memphis police told ABC News.

A murder warrant has been issued for his arrest, police said.

Police said Wilbourn is out on supervised release after being sentenced to 10 years for bank robbery.

Wilbourn is considered to be armed and dangerous, police said. A $10,000 reward has been announced for his arrest.

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Second Longest Escalator in the Western Hemisphere Makes Debut

WJLA-TV(BETHESDA, Md.) — One Metro escalator in Bethesda, Maryland is not for the faint of heart.

With a rise of 106 feet and a length along the diagonal of 212 feet, it’s the second longest escalator in the Western Hemisphere, according to the Washington Metro Area Transit Authority (WMATA), which debuted the new moving staircase Monday after a nine-month renovation period.

The longest escalator is in the system’s Wheaton Station, according to the WMATA.

The ride down in Bethesda is just under three minutes.

“This is a significant improvement for our customers at Bethesda Station,” Metro said in a statement. “This first new entrance escalator will provide more reliable service for the thousands of passengers who travel through the station each day.”

The station, which services nearly 11,000 commuters each weekday, according to WMATA, is undergoing a multi-million dollar renovation, which includes the new escalators and improvements to lighting.

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Second Longest Escalator in the Western Hemisphere Makes Debut

WJLA-TV(BETHESDA, Md.) — One Metro escalator in Bethesda, Maryland is not for the faint of heart.

With a rise of 106 feet and a length along the diagonal of 212 feet, it’s the second longest escalator in the Western Hemisphere, according to the Washington Metro Area Transit Authority (WMATA), which debuted the new moving staircase Monday after a nine-month renovation period.

The longest escalator is in the system’s Wheaton Station, according to the WMATA.

The ride down in Bethesda is just under three minutes.

“This is a significant improvement for our customers at Bethesda Station,” Metro said in a statement. “This first new entrance escalator will provide more reliable service for the thousands of passengers who travel through the station each day.”

The station, which services nearly 11,000 commuters each weekday, according to WMATA, is undergoing a multi-million dollar renovation, which includes the new escalators and improvements to lighting.

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