Review Category : National News

Ferguson Police Detail Moments Before Michael Brown Was Shot

Ferguson Police Department(FERGUSON, Mo.) — Police reports detailing the moments before a police officer shot unarmed teenager Michael Brown claim that Brown stole $48.99 worth of cigars from a convenience store and manhandled a store employee who tried to stop him.

The description of the alleged theft was included in a packet of police reports distributed by the Ferguson Police Department Friday when they identified Officer Darren Wilson as the cop who shot Brown. The packet of information gave a detailed description of the alleged theft and the suspect, but it included no details of Brown’s confrontation with Wilson.

Anthony Rothert, the legal director for the Missouri branch of the ACLU, had sued Tuesday for the release of the incident report describing Brown’s shooting.

“I think it’s fair to say that releasing some records, but not releasing others when they’re equally public record seems to be an intentional effort to distract the public,” Rothert told ABC News. “They’re hiding it for whatever reason…That leaves the public to imagine why that’s being hidden.”

“They’ve given us the wrong incident report,” Rothert said.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon appeared to be surprised by the release of the robbery report.

“New facts are out…those are not the full picture of everything,” Nixon said. “They’re pieces of information.”

Among the 19 pages of reports in the police packet released Friday was a report written by the police officer who responded to the 911 call regarding the store robbery. That officer watched a store surveillance video of the theft. He also responded to a report of Wilson’s fatal confrontation with Brown.

“It is worth mentioning that this incident (the store robbery) is related to another incident,” the officer wrote. “In that incident Brown was fatally wounded…I responded to that scene and observed Brown. After viewing Brown and reviewing the video, I was able to confirm that Brown is the primary suspect in this incident.”

Below is a moment by moment description of what happened on Aug. 9 according to reports by the Ferguson police department and statements made on Friday by Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson:

11:48 a.m. — Wilson was on a “sick call” where an ambulance had been summoned. Details of the sick call were not released.

11:51 a.m. — Police receive a 911 call from a convenience store on W. Florissant Avenue that reported “stealing in progress.”

The officer’s report said that the suspect identified throughout the report as Brown ordered several boxes of Swisher Sweet cigars. As the boxes were stacked on the counter, the suspect handed one of the boxes to his friend identified as Dorian Johnson. When the store employee asked to be paid, the suspect “reached across the counter and grabbed numerous packs of Swisher Sweets and turned to leave the store,” the report states.

The employee came out from behind the counter and tried to lock the door and stop the suspect from leaving. The suspect “grabbed REDACTED by the shirt and forcefully pushed him back in to a display rack,” the officer’s report states. The suspect left the store, but returned “and advances on REDACTED. Brown towers over REDACTED appearing to intimidate him,” the officer wrote.

During the confrontation between the suspect and the store employee, Johnson put back on the counter the box of cigars that he had been holding.

11:52 a.m. — A police dispatcher gave a description of the robbery suspect over the radio. The suspect is described as wearing a white T-shirt, long khaki shorts, yellow socks, flip-flop type shoes and a red Cardinals baseball cap. Wilson left the sick call after hearing the report of the robbery.

11:54 a.m. — A police officer arrived at the store, but the suspects were gone. The officer is told the suspects walked north on W. Florissant Avenue, but the officer did not see them.

12:01 p.m. — Officer Wilson encountered Brown. In previous statements, Chief Jackson said Wilson was pushed back into his car and that he and Brown struggled before Wilson fired at Brown.

12:04 p.m. — A second officer arrived “at the scene of the shooting,” Jackson said.

12:05 p.m. — A police supervisor arrived on the scene.

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Kidnapped Amish Girls Showed Up Cold, Hungry on Stranger’s Doorstep

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The two Amish girls who were abducted from their family’s roadside vegetable stand showed up days later on the doorstep of Jeff and Pam Stinson barefoot, cold, wet and hungry Thursday night, the Stinson’s family friend told ABC News Friday.

The Stinsons opened their door to the two girls, Delila Miller, 6, and Fannie Miller, 12, who asked the couple to drive them back home. The Stinsons said they recognized the girls because they had bought produce from them before and were aware of news reports about their abduction.

According to police, the sisters were abducted Wednesday night in Oswegatchie, New York, a rural town located near the Canadian border, when they went out to sell vegetables to a car at the stand. They were then dropped off later near the Stinson’s house, authorities said.

Police are still searching for a suspect or suspects. Authorities held a news conference Friday about the abduction but refused to give details about the incident other than to say that they are still investigating and the Miller girls appeared to be healthy.

When the girls arrived on their doorstep, the Stinsons fed them watermelon and grape juice and the girls were so hungry they couldn’t stop eating the watermelon, the Stinson’s family friend said.

Jeff Stinson knew exactly where the two girls lived because he had bought corn from the elder girl before at their vegetable stand.

At one point on the return home, the girls ducked in the back seat because they saw the kidnapper’s red car pulled over by the side of the road, the friend said.

An Amber Alert had been issued Wednesday night after a witness reported seeing a vehicle pull up to the stand, the girls go out to wait on them, and then the driver of the car put something in the backseat. When the car drove away, the witness told police the children were gone.

The sisters were dropped off in the town of Richville, about 36 miles from where they were abducted, District Attorney Mary Rain said. The girls walked to the closest home and the man who opened the door, Jeff Stinson, immediately knew who the girls were because of news reports.

“The girls walked up to a stranger’s house, thank goodness they had enough courage to do that, knocked on the door, and that person took them home,” Rain said.

The two young girls have been reunited with their family. They “seem to be healthy,” but were “cold and wet,” Rain told ABC News, adding that they are being interviewed by authorities.

Rain said the sisters were still wearing Amish attire when they were found. She also said that more than one person may have been involved in the girls’ abduction.

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Redhead Sent Home from School for ‘Disruptive’ Hair

Kim Boyd(MUSCLE SHOALS, Ala.) — Personal style is designed to make a statement. Still, Hayleigh Black never expected that hers would land her in the principal’s office.

No sooner had she arrived for her first day back at school this year than the 16-year-old was told to go home. According to the Muscle Shoals school system in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, her red hair was too disruptive to remain in the building.

Black has dyed her hair a variant of vibrant red for almost three years, as smiling school photos show. Her mother, Kim Boyd, told ABC News that school administrators have never taken issue with it before.

But last week, Black was told that her hair was “distracting” fellow classmates. Citing the student handbook, which rules against “distracting” or “disruptive” hair styles, the principal insisted she leave the building.

“This is a rule that we’ve known about. We’ve always abided by it,” said Boyd. “I told the principal, I said, ‘You were her assistant principal last year. How come you never sent her home last year?’ It’s the same color as always.”

While she said the principal did not offer her an explanation, Muscle Shoals superintendent Brian Lindsey told ABC News that his decision is in accordance with policy.

“The principal is just following the policy. Several girls were sent home for hair color,” Lindsey said. “Most everyone complied and came back and are back in class.”

“The policy was put in place years ago,” he added, and it “very rarely ever comes up as an issue.”

Lindsey said the rule aims to “provide a safe environment conducive to learning.”

Black, who was determined not to miss any more class time, stripped her hair hours after the incident. Her mother, however, reported that the disciplinary action has taken its toll.

“She’s been a little down,” Boyd said. “She misses her hair color. I’m upset for her. I just felt very angered that my child — a good student, no problems ever — is having her feet knocked out from under her on the first day of school.”

Boyd hoped the school would reverse its decision and allow Black to return to her preferred tint.

“She’s a kid,” said Boyd. “I dyed my hair when I was her age. I was excited it was that, [that] it wasn’t a tattoo that she wanted or piercings, or something. There are so many girls that do it and there could be worse things. As long as she’s a good student, hair is the least of my worries.”

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Redhead Sent Home from School for ‘Disruptive’ Hair

Kim Boyd(MUSCLE SHOALS, Ala.) — Personal style is designed to make a statement. Still, Hayleigh Black never expected that hers would land her in the principal’s office.

No sooner had she arrived for her first day back at school this year than the 16-year-old was told to go home. According to the Muscle Shoals school system in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, her red hair was too disruptive to remain in the building.

Black has dyed her hair a variant of vibrant red for almost three years, as smiling school photos show. Her mother, Kim Boyd, told ABC News that school administrators have never taken issue with it before.

But last week, Black was told that her hair was “distracting” fellow classmates. Citing the student handbook, which rules against “distracting” or “disruptive” hair styles, the principal insisted she leave the building.

“This is a rule that we’ve known about. We’ve always abided by it,” said Boyd. “I told the principal, I said, ‘You were her assistant principal last year. How come you never sent her home last year?’ It’s the same color as always.”

While she said the principal did not offer her an explanation, Muscle Shoals superintendent Brian Lindsey told ABC News that his decision is in accordance with policy.

“The principal is just following the policy. Several girls were sent home for hair color,” Lindsey said. “Most everyone complied and came back and are back in class.”

“The policy was put in place years ago,” he added, and it “very rarely ever comes up as an issue.”

Lindsey said the rule aims to “provide a safe environment conducive to learning.”

Black, who was determined not to miss any more class time, stripped her hair hours after the incident. Her mother, however, reported that the disciplinary action has taken its toll.

“She’s been a little down,” Boyd said. “She misses her hair color. I’m upset for her. I just felt very angered that my child — a good student, no problems ever — is having her feet knocked out from under her on the first day of school.”

Boyd hoped the school would reverse its decision and allow Black to return to her preferred tint.

“She’s a kid,” said Boyd. “I dyed my hair when I was her age. I was excited it was that, [that] it wasn’t a tattoo that she wanted or piercings, or something. There are so many girls that do it and there could be worse things. As long as she’s a good student, hair is the least of my worries.”

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Public Reacts with Skepticism to Ferguson Police Announcement

iStock/Thinkstock(FERGUSON, Mo.) — The announcement by Ferguson, Missouri police on Friday that an officer named Darren Wilson was the one who shot unarmed teen Michael Brown and that the shooting happened after a nearby robbery were met overwhelmingly with anger and skepticism.

Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson announced the name in a news conference Friday morning, nearly a week after the officer shot Brown on Saturday afternoon.

Jackson prefaced the name announcement by describing a “strong-arm” robbery that had occurred a few minutes before the shooting at a nearby convenience store. A police report released to members of the media at the news conference described Brown as the suspect involved in the robbery, in which he allegedly took a box of cigars and grabbed and shoved a store clerk before leaving.

“This is the first reference we’ve heard that this was a strong-arm robbery,” Laura Keys, who had come to the news conference to listen to the announcement, told ABC News. “Not a theft, but a strong-arm robbery. When I hear ‘strong-arm robbery’ I think that you went in and attacked people, ran off, used a weapon of some sort. So was Michael Brown’s weapon his height? Was it his race, his skin tone?”

Others gathered at the news conference began yelling “No justice, no peace,” a rallying cry of the protesters demanding justice from the Ferguson police since Brown was fatally shot.

Online, Internet users expressed widespread skepticism about the Ferguson Police Department’s announcement about Wilson and the circumstance surrounding the robbery.

The witnesses have yet to change their story but the police been all over the place! #Ferguson #JusticeForMikeBrown

— J. Sims (@JRocc205) August 15, 2014

I don’t believe that Darren Wilson ish one bit.

— Derail (@CainMcCoy) August 15, 2014

“That whole group needs to be gone,” Keys, the bystander at the news conference, told ABC News. “The police chief, the mayor, they all need to be gone and that is what I’m calling for.”

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Ferguson, Missouri, Police Release Name of Officer in Fatal Shooting

ABC News(FERGUSON, Mo.) — Police have announced the name of the officer who shot and killed an unarmed teen in Ferguson, Missouri — an incident that led to days of clashes in the streets of the St. Louis suburb.

Darren Wilson was revealed Friday as the officer who shot Michael Brown, 18, and officials have moved the six-year police veteran and his family from the town as a safety precaution.

Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson said earlier that at the time of the shooting on Saturday, the officer was on a routine patrol when he encountered Brown and a friend walking in the street. Authorities have said that a scuffle ensued after the officer asked the teens to move to the side. Witnesses have said Brown’s hands were raised when he was shot multiple times.

“We’re learning and we’re moving forward. This all starts now to heal, to just make things better,” Jackson told ABC News.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon said early Friday morning that he thinks releasing the name of the officer involved Saturday’s shooting will help in Ferguson’s healing process.

“I was pleased to hear the chief indicate this would be a day in which, finally, that initial name would come out, and we’ll work to make sure that his family [is safe] and there’s security around that,” Nixon told ABC News. “I think those kind of concrete steps of transparency leading to justice are vitally important now to heal the old wounds that have been made a fresh by this difficult and horrific situation.”

Ferguson faced five consecutive nights of unrest or violence following the weekend shooting death of Michael Brown, 18. Brown, who was unarmed, had his hands raised when he was fatally wounded, at least two witnesses said.

Peaceful protests followed Thursday after Nixon swapped local and county officers — many wearing riot gear — for state highway patrol troopers. Capt. Ron Johnson, the leader of the highway patrol, walked side-by-side with demonstrators Thursday.

“This is my community. A lot of people I saw walking in this march are people that I know,” Johnson said. “So the old saying, ‘I’ve got a dog in this fight,’ [is true]. I’ve got a big dog in this fight.”

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Ferguson, Missouri, Police Release Name of Officer in Fatal Shooting

ABC News(FERGUSON, Mo.) — Police have announced the name of the officer who shot and killed an unarmed teen in Ferguson, Missouri — an incident that led to days of clashes in the streets of the St. Louis suburb.

Darren Wilson was revealed Friday as the officer who shot Michael Brown, 18, and officials have moved the six-year police veteran and his family from the town as a safety precaution.

Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson said earlier that at the time of the shooting on Saturday, the officer was on a routine patrol when he encountered Brown and a friend walking in the street. Authorities have said that a scuffle ensued after the officer asked the teens to move to the side. Witnesses have said Brown’s hands were raised when he was shot multiple times.

“We’re learning and we’re moving forward. This all starts now to heal, to just make things better,” Jackson told ABC News.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon said early Friday morning that he thinks releasing the name of the officer involved Saturday’s shooting will help in Ferguson’s healing process.

“I was pleased to hear the chief indicate this would be a day in which, finally, that initial name would come out, and we’ll work to make sure that his family [is safe] and there’s security around that,” Nixon told ABC News. “I think those kind of concrete steps of transparency leading to justice are vitally important now to heal the old wounds that have been made a fresh by this difficult and horrific situation.”

Ferguson faced five consecutive nights of unrest or violence following the weekend shooting death of Michael Brown, 18. Brown, who was unarmed, had his hands raised when he was fatally wounded, at least two witnesses said.

Peaceful protests followed Thursday after Nixon swapped local and county officers — many wearing riot gear — for state highway patrol troopers. Capt. Ron Johnson, the leader of the highway patrol, walked side-by-side with demonstrators Thursday.

“This is my community. A lot of people I saw walking in this march are people that I know,” Johnson said. “So the old saying, ‘I’ve got a dog in this fight,’ [is true]. I’ve got a big dog in this fight.”

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Philadelphia Breach Raises Fresh Questions About Security in Federal Buildings

iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(PHILADELPHIA) — A disgruntled ex-cop carrying a loaded gun bypassed metal detectors at a federal building in Philadelphia and entered the FBI’s office there this week after flashing a fake police badge and his inactive ID card, according to sources and court records obtained by ABC News.

The FBI ultimately took the man’s gun after becoming suspicious, but “he could’ve shot up half the office by that point,” as one law enforcement expert put it after reading the court records.

“This latest report of a security breach at a federal building is concerning,” the chairman of the Senate Homeland Security Committee, Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., told ABC News in a statement. “After our committee’s close review of the security practices and procedures at federal facilities in the wake of the tragic shooting at the Washington Navy Yard [last year], it became clear that the quality of the physical security at our federal buildings is in need of improvement, and this incident underscores that finding.”

A Justice Department spokesperson, meanwhile, insisted the man who allegedly breached security on Monday never posed a threat.

Just before 5 p.m. on Monday, Melvin “Tony” Ramos entered the William J. Green Jr. Federal Building in Philadelphia, which houses offices of the FBI, Secret Service, Drug Enforcement Administration and Internal Revenue Service, among other federal agencies, according to the court records.

After showing a badge and a police ID card to an officer of the Federal Protective Service, which helps secure federal buildings, Ramos was allowed to bring his loaded semi-automatic handgun into the building and up to the FBI office on the eighth floor, where he said he wanted to file a complaint with the FBI, according to the court documents.

Ramos, who allegedly repeatedly identified himself as an officer with the University of Pennsylvania Police Department, was again allowed to keep his gun while two FBI agents interviewed him, court documents say.

But Ramos had not been an employee of the University of Pennsylvania police department for nearly a year, having left his job on medical leave before being terminated on Sept. 11, 2013, a university spokesman told ABC News.

Ramos never turned in his police ID card, and the police department never retrieved it.

The university spokesman would not say what type of medical leave Ramos had taken. On Monday, though, Ramos allegedly told the FBI agents that he suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder.

“During the interview, Ramos seemed agitated, frequently answered questions by digressing to unrelated matters, and referenced the suicide of another UPPD police officer multiple times,” say documents filed by the FBI in federal court. “Agents began to believe that Ramos may no longer be a police officer.”

They took his gun — with one round in the chamber and 14 rounds in the magazine — and called university police, which informed the FBI that the badge Ramos used to enter the federal building in Philadelphia was “not authentic” and was apparently a replica of a badge for the city police, not the university police, according to court documents.

The two badges do not look alike, according to the FBI.

The Federal Protective Service has received heightened scrutiny in the wake of September’s massacre in the Washington Navy Yard when a civilian contractor with the Navy used his valid credentials to enter a government building and gun down 12 people. Four others were injured.

The Federal Protective Service was not involved with security at the Navy Yard, but the deadly incident renewed questions over security at other federal buildings across the country and whether the Federal Protective Service was fit to protect the 9,600 federal buildings under its jurisdiction. The U.S. Senate and House of Representatives held several hearings on the matter.

A government review of the agency last year found significant “challenges” in “some aspects of guards’ training,” noting that, “Screener training is essential to helping prevent unauthorized individuals and items from entering federal facilities.”

Current and former law enforcement officials, however, told ABC News the blame for the security lapse on Monday should sit with the university police for failing to retrieve Ramos’ ID, not the Federal Protective Service guard.

“No one’s going to be an expert on identifying every badge,” said one former official, speaking on the condition of anonymity. “[Ramos allegedly] used a genuine ID, and that’s where things went bad.”

A current federal law enforcement official agreed, adding that the seemingly “valid” ID card would have had the effect of validating the fake badge Ramos was allegedly holding.

The former official said the FBI deserves credit for recognizing holes in Ramos’ alleged story and securing his gun.

Still, another current official said the whole incident “does seem alarming, and this could’ve been a very bad outcome.”

Several sources said officials at the federal building in Philadelphia are examining their security procedures in the wake of Monday’s incident, but changes are unlikely due to the high volume of law enforcement officers working in the building.

“We should always strive to figure out how to better respond to evolving security threats,” Sen. Carper said in his statement. “I look forward to receiving more information from Federal Protective Service and others about plans to address this incident and prevent similar incidents in the future.”

Ramos has been arrested and charged with bringing a firearm into a federal facility and making false statements to federal law enforcement. A hearing to discuss his competency for trial is expected in the coming days.

The University of Pennsylvania and its police department “are cooperating fully with the FBI in their investigation,” the university spokesman said.

A federal public defender representing Ramos declined to comment for this article. An FBI spokeswoman also declined to comment.

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Philadelphia Breach Raises Fresh Questions About Security in Federal Buildings

iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(PHILADELPHIA) — A disgruntled ex-cop carrying a loaded gun bypassed metal detectors at a federal building in Philadelphia and entered the FBI’s office there this week after flashing a fake police badge and his inactive ID card, according to sources and court records obtained by ABC News.

The FBI ultimately took the man’s gun after becoming suspicious, but “he could’ve shot up half the office by that point,” as one law enforcement expert put it after reading the court records.

“This latest report of a security breach at a federal building is concerning,” the chairman of the Senate Homeland Security Committee, Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., told ABC News in a statement. “After our committee’s close review of the security practices and procedures at federal facilities in the wake of the tragic shooting at the Washington Navy Yard [last year], it became clear that the quality of the physical security at our federal buildings is in need of improvement, and this incident underscores that finding.”

A Justice Department spokesperson, meanwhile, insisted the man who allegedly breached security on Monday never posed a threat.

Just before 5 p.m. on Monday, Melvin “Tony” Ramos entered the William J. Green Jr. Federal Building in Philadelphia, which houses offices of the FBI, Secret Service, Drug Enforcement Administration and Internal Revenue Service, among other federal agencies, according to the court records.

After showing a badge and a police ID card to an officer of the Federal Protective Service, which helps secure federal buildings, Ramos was allowed to bring his loaded semi-automatic handgun into the building and up to the FBI office on the eighth floor, where he said he wanted to file a complaint with the FBI, according to the court documents.

Ramos, who allegedly repeatedly identified himself as an officer with the University of Pennsylvania Police Department, was again allowed to keep his gun while two FBI agents interviewed him, court documents say.

But Ramos had not been an employee of the University of Pennsylvania police department for nearly a year, having left his job on medical leave before being terminated on Sept. 11, 2013, a university spokesman told ABC News.

Ramos never turned in his police ID card, and the police department never retrieved it.

The university spokesman would not say what type of medical leave Ramos had taken. On Monday, though, Ramos allegedly told the FBI agents that he suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder.

“During the interview, Ramos seemed agitated, frequently answered questions by digressing to unrelated matters, and referenced the suicide of another UPPD police officer multiple times,” say documents filed by the FBI in federal court. “Agents began to believe that Ramos may no longer be a police officer.”

They took his gun — with one round in the chamber and 14 rounds in the magazine — and called university police, which informed the FBI that the badge Ramos used to enter the federal building in Philadelphia was “not authentic” and was apparently a replica of a badge for the city police, not the university police, according to court documents.

The two badges do not look alike, according to the FBI.

The Federal Protective Service has received heightened scrutiny in the wake of September’s massacre in the Washington Navy Yard when a civilian contractor with the Navy used his valid credentials to enter a government building and gun down 12 people. Four others were injured.

The Federal Protective Service was not involved with security at the Navy Yard, but the deadly incident renewed questions over security at other federal buildings across the country and whether the Federal Protective Service was fit to protect the 9,600 federal buildings under its jurisdiction. The U.S. Senate and House of Representatives held several hearings on the matter.

A government review of the agency last year found significant “challenges” in “some aspects of guards’ training,” noting that, “Screener training is essential to helping prevent unauthorized individuals and items from entering federal facilities.”

Current and former law enforcement officials, however, told ABC News the blame for the security lapse on Monday should sit with the university police for failing to retrieve Ramos’ ID, not the Federal Protective Service guard.

“No one’s going to be an expert on identifying every badge,” said one former official, speaking on the condition of anonymity. “[Ramos allegedly] used a genuine ID, and that’s where things went bad.”

A current federal law enforcement official agreed, adding that the seemingly “valid” ID card would have had the effect of validating the fake badge Ramos was allegedly holding.

The former official said the FBI deserves credit for recognizing holes in Ramos’ alleged story and securing his gun.

Still, another current official said the whole incident “does seem alarming, and this could’ve been a very bad outcome.”

Several sources said officials at the federal building in Philadelphia are examining their security procedures in the wake of Monday’s incident, but changes are unlikely due to the high volume of law enforcement officers working in the building.

“We should always strive to figure out how to better respond to evolving security threats,” Sen. Carper said in his statement. “I look forward to receiving more information from Federal Protective Service and others about plans to address this incident and prevent similar incidents in the future.”

Ramos has been arrested and charged with bringing a firearm into a federal facility and making false statements to federal law enforcement. A hearing to discuss his competency for trial is expected in the coming days.

The University of Pennsylvania and its police department “are cooperating fully with the FBI in their investigation,” the university spokesman said.

A federal public defender representing Ramos declined to comment for this article. An FBI spokeswoman also declined to comment.

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Ferguson, Missouri, Police to Release Name of Officer in Fatal Shooting

ABC News(FERGUSON, Mo.) — Police in Ferguson, Missouri, plan to release the name Friday of the officer who shot and killed an unarmed teen — a shooting that sparked days of clashes in the streets of the St. Louis suburb.

Chief Thomas Jackson told ABC News that authorities will meet later this morning to figure out the best way to release the officer’s name. Police previously declined to identify the officer amid safety concerns.

“We’re learning and we’re moving forward. This all starts now to heal, to just make things better,” Jackson told ABC News.

Nixon thinks releasing the name of the officer involved in the shooting on Saturday will help in Ferguson’s healing process.

“I was pleased to hear the chief indicate this would be a day in which, finally, that initial name would come out, and we’ll work to make sure that his family [is safe] and there’s security around that,” Nixon told ABC News. “I think those kind of concrete steps of transparency leading to justice are vitally important now to heal the old wounds that have been made a fresh by this difficult and horrific situation.”

Ferguson faced five consecutive nights of unrest or violence following the weekend shooting death of Michael Brown, 18. Brown, who was unarmed, had his hands raised when he was fatally wounded, at least two witnesses said.

Peaceful protests followed Thursday after Nixon swapped local and county officers — many wearing riot gear — for state highway patrol troopers. Capt. Ron Johnson, the leader of the highway patrol, walked side-by-side with demonstrators Thursday.

“This is my community. A lot of people I saw walking in this march are people that I know,” Johnson said. “So the old saying, ‘I’ve got a dog in this fight,’ [is true]. I’ve got a big dog in this fight.”

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