Review Category : National News

Former President George H.W. Bush Released from Hospital

ABC News(HOUSTON) — Former President George H.W. Bush was released from Houston Methodist Hospital Monday after a 12-day stay.

“[President Bush] is thankful for the many prayers and kind messages he received during his stay, as well as the world-class care that both his doctors and nurses provided,” read a statement from the president’s spokesman.

Bush, who at 92 is the nation’s oldest living former president, was hospitalized Jan. 18 and received treatment for shortness of breath and pneumonia. He was joined by his wife and the former first lady, Barbara Bush, who was hospitalized for bronchitis the same day as her husband and released on Jan. 23.

The 41st president began his hospital stay in the intensive care unit where doctors inserted a breathing tube and ventilator to assist his breathing. He was moved out of intensive care a week ago.

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Accused Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooter Enters Not Guilty Plea

Broward County Sheriff’s Office(FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.) — Esteban Santiago, the Iraq war veteran accused of killing five people and injuring six others at an airport in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, entered a not guilty plea to all 22 charges against him at a federal court appearance Monday morning.

The most serious charge against Santiago, 26, is performing an act of violence at an airport that caused death.

The Jan. 6 shooting took place at a baggage claim at the Fort Lauderdale–Hollywood International Airport and targeted “newly-arrived passengers retrieving their luggage,” according to federal prosecutors.

Santiago purchased a one-way ticket from Alaska to Fort Lauderdale two days before his Jan. 5 flight, and his only checked baggage was a gun, FBI agent Michael Ferlazzo said in court earlier this month.

According to court documents, Santiago picked up his bag from the Fort Lauderdale baggage claim and then loaded the gun inside a bathroom.

Santiago was seen on video apparently pulling the gun out of his waistband. According to the charges against him, he then allegedly opened fire at numerous people, aiming at their heads and bodies until he was out of ammunition.

The five people killed in the attack were in Fort Lauderdale for cruise vacations.

Federal prosecutors said Monday they would need 20 days for a trial.

If convicted of the most serious charge — violence at an international airport causing death — Santiago faces the possibility of the death penalty.

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Accused Fort Lauderdale Airport Shooter Expected to Enter Plea

Broward County Sheriff’s Office(FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.) — The man accused of killing five people and injuring six others at an airport in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, earlier this month is expected to enter a plea at an appearance in federal court Monday morning.

Among the 22 counts against Iraq war veteran Esteban Santiago, 26, is performing an act of violence at an airport that caused death.

The Jan. 6 shooting took place at a baggage claim at the Fort Lauderdale–Hollywood International Airport and targeted “newly-arrived passengers retrieving their luggage,” according to federal prosecutors.

Santiago purchased a one-way ticket from Alaska to Fort Lauderdale two days before his Jan. 5 flight, and his only checked baggage was a gun, FBI agent Michael Ferlazzo said in court earlier this month.

According to court documents, Santiago picked up his bag from the Fort Lauderdale baggage claim then loaded the gun inside a bathroom.

Santiago was seen on video pulling the gun out of his waistband. According to the charges against him, he then allegedly opened fire at numerous people, aiming at their heads and bodies until he was out of ammunition.

The five people killed in the attack were in Fort Lauderdale for cruise vacations.

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Activists Set for More Protests as Last of Airport Detainees Cleared

Alex Milan Tracy/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Activists across the country are gearing up this week to continue a wave of protests that broke out over the weekend in response to President Donald Trump’s immigration ban.

The planned gatherings come as a Department of Homeland Security official confirmed to ABC News early Monday that no more individuals were being detained at U.S. airports over the president’s executive order.

The DHS official said there were 735 encounters at U.S. ports of entry related to the executive order as of Sunday evening. More than half of the people caught up in the order, 394, were legal permanent residents, all but two of whom entered the country.

One of the legal permanent residents who did not enter the country was at a Canadian border crossing and got tired of waiting and left, the official said, while the second was discovered to have a criminal record and was not admitted. A total of 348 individuals were recommended by DHS to be denied boarding at foreign airports.

As of Monday morning, demonstrators planned about 10 gatherings this week at major U.S. airports, according to GroundGame, an organizing platform that tracks protests via social media. There were also a handful of demonstrations scheduled in the United Kingdom and Canada.

Thousands of protesters turned out over the weekend to voice their opinions on President Trump’s executive order, which restricts entry into the U.S. for people from seven predominantly Muslim countries: Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen. The policy, announced on Friday, also indefinitely bans Syrian refugees seeking asylum.

Passengers were detained or sent home from at least 10 different airports and hundreds of would-be travelers around the world were barred from boarding U.S.-bound flights, airport officials said.

The protests were mostly peaceful, although there were reports of at least one fight involving a small group of counter-protesters in Portland. According to witnesses, one counter-protester was punched in the face at the Port of Portland on Sunday, ABC News affiliate KATU reported.

Airport police equipped with riot gear quickly surrounded the man and carried him away, the report said. He was taken to a local hospital to be treated for a head injury.

In New York, hundreds of people rallied at John F. Kennedy International Airport on Sunday to protest the president’s order, chanting “No hate, no fear, refugees are welcome here. No hate, no fear, Muslims are welcome here.”

The protesters there received statements of support from local politicians, including Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Sen. Chuck Schumer.

Others took to social media to back the demonstrations with posts using the “OccupyAirports” and “NoBanNoWall” hashtags.

Separately, more than one million people signed an online petition urging U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May to cancel Trump’s upcoming state visit to the U.K.

“Donald Trump should be allowed to enter the U.K. in his capacity as head of the U.S. Government, but he should not be invited to make an official State Visit because it would cause embarrassment to Her Majesty the Queen,” the petition says.

The U.K. Parliament considers all petitions that get more than a million signatures for a debate, according to its official website.

Dozens of people who had been detained while trying to enter the country over the weekend were released on Sunday, according to ABC News research.

Federal lawsuits filed in New York, Massachusetts, Virginia and Washington challenged the law, with experts expecting more to come.

In a statement on its website, the Department of Homeland Security said it was complying with emergency judicial rulings issued earlier that temporarily halted parts of Trump’s order.

“We are committed to ensuring that all individuals affected by the executive orders, including those affected by the court orders, are being provided all rights afforded under the law,” the statement said.

President Trump defended his policy on Sunday, insisting to his 23 million followers that the policy was not a Muslim ban.

“This is not about religion — this is about terror and keeping our country safe,” he said in a statement.

In a tweet, he said, “Our country needs strong borders and extreme vetting, NOW. Look what is happening all over Europe and, indeed, the world — a horrible mess!”

Our country needs strong borders and extreme vetting, NOW. Look what is happening all over Europe and, indeed, the world – a horrible mess!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 29, 2017

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EXCLUSIVE: US Diplomats Consider Filing ‘Dissent’ over Immigration Ban

Alex Milan Tracy/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Dozens of Foreign Service officers and other career diplomats stationed around the world are so concerned about President Donald Trump’s new executive order restricting Syrian refugees and other immigrants from entering the United States that they are contemplating taking the rare step of sending a formal objection to senior State Department officials in Washington.

In recent days, drafts of a so-called “dissent” memo have been circulating among diplomats and associates abroad expressing concern that the new restrictions — which President Trump said would help “keep America safe” — are un-American and will actually paralyze efforts to stop terrorist attacks inside the U.S. homeland.

“This ban … will not achieve its stated aim to protect the American people from terrorist attacks by foreign nationals admitted to the United States,” warned one early draft reviewed by ABC News.

Instead, the executive order will expand anti-American sentiment and “immediately sour relations” with key allies in the fight against terrorism, particularly many of the countries whose citizens are now blocked from traveling to the United States, according to the early draft.

President Trump’s order indefinitely blocks Syrian refugees from coming to the United States, and it temporarily suspends immigration from six other countries still struggling to defeat terrorists within their borders — Iraq, Yemen, Somalia, Iran, Libya and Sudan.

The governments of those largely Muslim countries see the White House move as an attack on Islam. By “alienating” such allies, the U.S. government will lose access to valuable intelligence and counterterrorism resources, the draft said.

The draft also suggested Trump’s “knee jerk” executive order was based on misguided notions about terrorism inside the United States, noting that “the overwhelming majority” of terrorist attacks inside the U.S. homeland have not been committed by recent immigrants, but by native-born or naturalized U.S. citizens “who have been living in the United States for decades, if not since birth.”

“Given the near-absence of terror attacks committed in recent years” by visa-holders from Syria, Iraq, Yemen, Somalia, Iran, Libya or Sudan, “this ban will have little practical effect in improving public safety,” the draft concluded.

In fact, the executive order “calls back to some of the worst times in our history,” such as the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II.

“Decades from now we will look back and realize we made the same mistakes,” the draft warned.

On Sunday, as law enforcement agencies were still scrambling to figure out how to implement the executive order and as protests broke out in cities across the country, the White House defended its action, saying the move was necessary “to ensure that the people that we’re letting into our country are coming here with peaceful purposes and not to do us harm.”

“The safety of the American citizens, the safety of our country has got to be paramount,” White House spokesman Sean Spicer told ABC News anchor Martha Raddatz on This Week.

Asked what message the executive order sends to Muslims worldwide, Spicer said: “What it sends is that we’ll protect our country and people.”

He said it’s “important to note” that there are “46 other countries with Muslim populations that are not part of this.”

The draft memo reviewed by ABC News is separate from — and was more broadly circulated than — a memo sent over the weekend by the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad to the State Department, as reported by the Wall Street Journal. The embassy’s memo warned that President Trump’s order could upend delicate military, political and business ties in the midst of a global fight against ISIS, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Any new memo expressing concern over President Trump’s executive order would be sent to senior State Department officials through the “dissent channel,” which was created during the Vietnam War to help ensure that diplomats could document policy concerns and relay opposing views to high-level department officials.

Using it is considered so serious that then-Secretary of State Warren Christopher offered this warning to State Department officials in 1995: “Because the Dissent Channel is not a routine channel and its messages are handled at the highest levels of the Department, authors should ensure not only that their views are well-grounded and well-argued, but that other channels are not available to them.”

In its first 24 years, more than 200 messages were sent through the channel, according to Christopher.

Just last year, according to the New York Times, more than 50 diplomats filed a “dissent” memo with the Obama administration, expressing concern over U.S. policy in Syria and calling for military strikes against the Syrian regime.

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Friends Wait for Detained Iranian Student at JFK: ‘She Is Very Strong’

ABC News(NEW YORK) — The atmosphere at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York remained fraught on Sunday, as those affected by President Donald Trump’s executive order limiting immigration sought clarity on the controversial move.

Mehdi Namazi, a Ph.D. student at Stony Brook University, told ABC station WABC in New York that his friend Vahideh Rasekhi, an Iranian doctoral student and colleague, was one of those affected by the order. She arrived in the U.S. at just after 1 a.m., Namazi said.

Namazi said that his friend’s exact whereabouts were unknown at the time amid confusion over the order. “Talking to her is awkward because they won’t [let] them talk to anyone. She could only text a few times,” he told WABC.

“Her situation was very stressful,” he said. “They put her [on] a plane… Her phone had to be off while she was detained.”

Namazi added: “It’s shocking for her right now, she is very strong.”

Several colleges have advised foreign students and scholars who might be affected by the order to defer travel outside of the U.S. at least until there is more clarity on how the order may affect them.

A senior Department of Homeland Security official said late Saturday night that 375 travelers had been impacted by the executive order, which calls for an immediate suspension of immigration from countries with ties to terror, including Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya, for a period of 90 days.

Of those 375 travelers, 109 were in transit to the U.S. and denied entry, 173 were denied entry to the U.S. prior to boarding their flights at a foreign port and 81 were granted waivers because of their legal permanent resident or special immigrant visa status.

Protests that erupted at JFK Saturday afternoon over the detention of some travelers ultimately spread throughout the country, causing chaos at major airports across the country that continued Sunday.

“People are of course crying,” Namazi said of the atmosphere at JFK Sunday. “There is a girl here and her parents are detained. They are seniors and they are sick and they [can’t] speak English. They can’t [have] lawyers.”

Stephen Rooke, a volunteer attorney who rushed to the airport in response to the confusion, told WABC that he had stayed there overnight together with other attorneys to help those in need.

“Many of the attorneys here are used to working in a firm and having a lot more time,” Rooke told WABC. “This is a true emergency response effort and I am overwhelmed with the quality of the legal support we have here and all the volunteers stepping in overnight to file emergency orders.

“Hopefully we can get to a point where individuals still detained will be released,” he added.

Namazi called volunteer attorneys like Rooke “angels from heaven” because of the work they’ve put in trying to assist those detained.

Six people were still being detained at JFK as of Sunday morning.

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Protests Build Across the Country Against President Trump’s Immigration Order

Spencer Platt/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — President Trump defended his executive order restricting the entry into the U.S. of people from seven Muslim-dominated countries, saying the move was not about religion but about keeping the country safe, even as protests against the order grew Sunday.

Crowds turned out at dozens of airports and in cities across the country this weekend to protest the order, which lawyers and advocates for immigrants and refugees said has created an emergency, with people still being detained at airports across the country despite a federal court ruling issuing a stay on the order.

Trump issued a statement Sunday, saying the countries chosen for the “extreme vetting” had been “identified by the Obama administration as sources of terror.”

“To be clear, this is not a Muslim ban, as the media is falsely reporting. This is not about religion – this is about terror and keeping our country safe,” the statement reads.

Massive crowds packed Boston’s Copley Square, Battery Park in New York City and outside the White House, with demonstrations at airports from coast to coast to protest the order, which suspended immigration from countries with ties to terror — Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya — for 90 days. The order also indefinitely suspends Syrian refugees from entering the U.S.

The order has been criticized by Democratic elected officials and 16 attorneys general released a statement condemning the order as unconstitutional.

“We are confident that the Executive Order will ultimately be struck down by the courts. In the meantime, we are committed to working to ensure that as few people as possible suffer from the chaotic situation that it has created,” said the statement, issued jointly by attorneys general of California, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia and Washington.

A number of Republicans have also criticized the order, including Sens. John McCain and Lindsey Graham, who issued a joint statement Sunday.

Large crowds that gathered outside the White House started marching along Pennsylvania Avenue toward the Capitol this afternoon, chanting, “No hate, no fear. Refugees are welcome here,” and “No Ban. No wall.”

According to immigrant and refugee advocacy groups, a number of people were being held Sunday at airports across the country, some facing imminent deportation, despite the stay on deportations issued by the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York.

Among the people held after the ruling, according to Becca Heller, the director of the International Refugee Assistance Project, were: A 2-year-old U.S. citizen with green card-holding parents and a 66-year-old woman traveling from Iraq to visit her son, an active-duty U.S. service member who flew up to North Carolina to help her. A lot of people were being handcuffed, Heller said.

In one dramatic case late last night, an Iranian Fulbright scholar whose friends were waiting for her at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York was forced to board a Ukraine International Airlines flight just before midnight -– hours after a federal court in Brooklyn issued a stay on the order, according to Heller. Only after high-level intervention did the plane turn around on the tarmac and let the woman deplane, Heller said.

The International Refugee Assistance Project encouraged anyone with a green card to reroute their flight through Boston if they don’t want to be detained, after a ruling there said people couldn’t be deported or detained. The New York ruling said people couldn’t be deported, but it allowed detention.

The advocates and lawyers said the haphazard implementation of the order has resulted in what Heller called “rogue” Customs and Border Protection officers pressuring green card holders to cancel them. She said that CBP officers repeatedly told them they were awaiting more information from Washington; finally, they stopped talking and “told us to just call President Trump,” Heller said.

The groups said they’re examining rulings in Boston, New York, and Virginia, to see whether there is overlap and whether they complement each other, and determine whether the rulings applied nationwide. In the case of the New York ruling, they said that the order did, but in the case of Boston, it was unclear, as it appeared it would, although it contained local references.

Thousands of attorneys have turned out en masse across the country, they said, including more than 4,000 people who signed up to help with the IRAP and many more showing up own their own, too. The executive director of the National Immigration Law Center said about 2,000 lawyers had formed a group dedicated to providing support on a regular basis.

Protesters at airports across the country reacted with jubilation Saturday night at the news that in response to a legal challenge issued by the ACLU a federal court in Brooklyn had granted an emergency stay on the president’s executive order that bans immigration from Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya.

Following the court’s decision, the Department of Homeland Security said in a press release that it “will continue to enforce all of the president’s Executive Orders in a manner that ensures the safety and security of the American people.”

The statement noted that Trump’s executive orders remain “in place,” despite the emergency stay.

“The president’s Executive Orders remain in place — prohibited travel will remain prohibited, and the U.S. government retains its right to revoke visas at any time if required for national security or public safety,” the release said.

The ACLU contended that the stay applied nationally to all cases, but that was not necessarily clear from the ruling, and an atmosphere of confusion still surrounds the orders, and how they will be applied going forward.

On Sunday, the spontaneous protests that were sparked by news of travelers being detained were expected to continue in a more planned fashion at airports across the country.

The protests started Saturday at John F. Kennedy International Airport, where hundreds of people chanted “No hate, no fear, refugees are welcome here,” angered at the detention of a number of people arriving from the countries listed in Trump’s order, including the two Iraqi men whose cases were taken by the ACLU.

As the day went on, the protests spread to other major airports like Washington Dulles International Airport and Los Angeles International Airport.

The two Iraqis who were detained at JFK were both released later in the day, drawing widespread media attention.

One of the men, Hameed Jhalid Darweesh, expressed his gratitude for those who supported him while he was detained.

“America is the land of freedom,” Darweesh said. “The land of freedom, the land of the rights. This is what brought me to come here, and I’m very thankful.”

Neither Darweesh nor the other Iraqi were technically refugees according to the definition in the president’s executive order at the time of their detention, but appear to have come to the U.S. on visas, a Trump administration official tells ABC News.

A senior Department of Homeland Security official said that 375 travelers were affected by the executive order Saturday at airports across the country.

Within that group, 109 people were in transit and then denied entry to the U.S., 173 were denied entry to the U.S. before boarding their flights in a foreign port, and 81 were granted waivers because of their legal permanent resident or special immigrant visa status.

The number of people being held at U.S. airports is expected to dwindle Sunday, but passengers at airports across the world may be kept from boarding flights to the U.S.

Trump said the executive order was part of a vetting plan to prevent “radical Islamic terrorists” from reaching American soil.

The seven-page document calls for an immediate suspension of immigration from countries with ties to terror — Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya — for a time period of 90 days. But none of the countries on the list have had anything to do with terror incidents on U.S. soil since the 9/11 attacks, and Saudi Arabia — where 15 of the 9/11 hijackers were from — is not included.

It also calls for the complete suspension of Syrian refugees for an indefinite period. It also calls on the secretary of state to suspend the entire U.S program for admitting refugees for 120 days while authorities review the application and adjudication process.

White House spokesman Sean Spicer said Sunday on “This Week” that the seven countries had been identified by the Obama administration as needing further scrutiny, and said other countries could be added to the list at a later date.

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Lawyers Around the Country Work to Counter Trump’s Immigration Order

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Legal professionals worked amid chanting protesters at airports around the country this weekend, trying to help people detained following President Donald Trump’s executive order restricting the entry into the U.S. of people from seven Muslim-dominated countries.

Images posted on social media Saturday and Sunday showed lawyers working on their laptops on the floor of airport terminals and holding up signs offering free legal help to those in need.

LITERALLY on the ground. Volunteer lawyers are working pro-bono on a Saturday preparing habeus corpus petitions for detainees at JFK. pic.twitter.com/ddUeQBi7AY

— NYC Mayor’s Office (@NYCMayorsOffice) January 28, 2017

Thank you to all the #immigrationlawyer ‘s who are in #JFKTerminal4 and other #JFK terminals. We love you. #MuslimBan #NoBanNoWall pic.twitter.com/yrK70Cb0wA

— Miss Rohani (@RoOnTheGo22) January 29, 2017

Both organized groups like the American Civil Liberties Union and individual lawyers volunteered to help people who were detained or told they could not enter the U.S. as a result of Trump’s executive order.

Atlanta attorney Sarah Collins said she went to the city’s airport at around 1 p.m. Saturday after getting a call from colleagues concerned about the response to the executive order. She said she was there late into the night filing petitions to get people released and went back this afternoon to help make sure people traveling to the U.S. had no problems.

Mirriam Masumi, a defense attorney from the Washington, D.C., area, said that three people came up to her asking for help at Dulles International Airport in a two-hour period on Sunday morning.

“We’re here all day to help whoever needs the help,” Masumi said. The group of attorneys at Dulles said that everyone detained was released but as many as 30 people were in “secondary inspection,” according to Customs and Border Protection. The CBP agents were not allowing the lawyers to speak with any of those people.

Volunteer attorney Stephen Rooke was working to help people detained at JFK, including a Ph.D. student from Stony Brook University.

“This is a true emergency response effort and I am overwhelmed with the quality of the legal support here and all the volunteers stepping in overnight to file emergency orders,” he said.

Some, like Harvard lecturer Ian Samuel, turned to social media to offer their help. Samuel tweeted Saturday that he would provide legal support for federal employees who don’t want to enforce the order and said he got dozens of responses from other law professors and others offering their help. He called this “the most active weekend for lawyers in a while” and said it was wonderful to see how organizations like the ACLU had mobilized.

“Every immigration lawyer I know got up Sunday morning and drove to the nearest airport,” Samuel said on Sunday.

Samuel said it’s hard to tell what will happen next because information about how the order should be enforced is unclear, and said the recent court orders were more an emergency measure to help people detained at the time.

On Sunday, 16 attorneys general put out a statement condemning the order as unconstitutional.

“We are confident that the Executive Order will ultimately be struck down by the courts. In the meantime, we are committed to working to ensure that as few people as possible suffer from the chaotic situation that it has created,” said the statement, issued jointly by attorneys general of California, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia and Washington.

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Protests Build Across the Country Against Trump’s Immigration Order

Spencer Platt/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Crowds turned out at dozens of airports and in cities across the country Sunday, as protests grew over President Trump’s executive order restricting the entry into the U.S. of people from seven Muslim-dominated countries, an order that lawyers and advocates for immigrants and refugees said has created an emergency, saying people are still being detained despite a federal court ruling issuing a stay on the order.

Massive crowds packed Boston’s Copley Square, Battery Park in New York and outside the White House, with demonstrations at airports from coast to coast to protest the order, which suspended immigration from countries with ties to terror — Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya — for 90 days, and completely suspended the acceptance of Syrian refugees for an indefinite period.

According to immigrant and refugee advocacy groups, a number of people were being held today at airports across the country, some facing imminent deportation, despite the stay on deportations issued by the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York.

Among the people held after the ruling, according to Becca Heller, the director of the International Refugee Assistance Project, were: A 2-year-old U.S. citizen with green card-holding parents and a 66-year-old woman traveling from Iraq to visit her son, an active-duty U.S. service member who flew up to North Carolina to help her. A lot of people were being handcuffed, Heller said.

In one dramatic case late last night, an Iranian Fulbright scholar whose friends were waiting for her at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York was forced to board a Ukraine International Airlines flight just before midnight -– hours after a federal court in Brooklyn issued a stay on the order, according to Heller. Only after high-level intervention did the plane turn around on the tarmac and let the woman deplane, Heller said.

The International Refugee Assistance Project encouraged anyone with a green card to reroute their flight through Boston if they don’t want to be detained, after a ruling there said people couldn’t be deported or detained. The New York ruling said people couldn’t be deported, but it allowed detention.

The advocates and lawyers said the haphazard implementation of the order has resulted in what Heller called “rogue” Customs and Border Protection officers pressuring green card holders to cancel them. She said that CBP officers repeatedly told them they were awaiting more information from Washington; finally, they stopped talking and “told us to just call President Trump,” Heller said.

The groups said they’re examining rulings in Boston, New York, and Virginia, to see whether there is overlap and whether they complement each other, and determine whether the rulings applied nationwide. In the case of the New York ruling, they said that the order did, but in the case of Boston, it was unclear, as it appeared it would, although it contained local references.

Thousands of attorneys have turned out en masse across the country, they said, including more than 4,000 people who signed up to help with the IRAP and many more showing up own their own, too. The executive director of the National Immigration Law Center said about 2,000 lawyers had formed a group dedicated to providing support on a regular basis.

Protesters at airports across the country reacted with jubilation Saturday night at the news that in response to a legal challenge issued by the ACLU a federal court in Brooklyn had granted an emergency stay on the president’s executive order that bans immigration from Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya.

Following the court’s decision, the Department of Homeland Security said in a press release that it “will continue to enforce all of the president’s Executive Orders in a manner that ensures the safety and security of the American people.”

The statement noted that Trump’s executive orders remain “in place,” despite the emergency stay.

“The president’s Executive Orders remain in place — prohibited travel will remain prohibited, and the U.S. government retains its right to revoke visas at any time if required for national security or public safety,” the release said.

The ACLU contended that the stay applied nationally to all cases, but that was not necessarily clear from the ruling, and an atmosphere of confusion still surrounds the orders, and how they will be applied going forward.

Today, the spontaneous protests that were sparked by news of travelers being detained were expected to continue in a more planned fashion at airports across the country.

Protests are scheduled today in New York, Washington, Boston, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Seattle, Chicago and other cities.

The protests started Saturday at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport, where hundreds of people chanted “No hate, no fear, refugees are welcome here,” angered at the detention of a number of people arriving from the countries listed in Trump’s order, including the two Iraqi men whose cases were taken by the ACLU.

As the day went on, the protests spread to other major airports like Washington Dulles International Airport and Los Angeles International Airport.

The two Iraqis who were detained at JFK were both released later in the day, drawing widespread media attention.

One of the men, Hameed Jhalid Darweesh, expressed his gratitude for those who supported him while he was detained.

“America is the land of freedom,” Darweesh said. “The land of freedom, the land of the rights. This is what brought me to come here, and I’m very thankful.”

Neither Darweesh nor the other Iraqi were technically refugees according to the definition in the president’s executive order at the time of their detention, but appear to have come to the U.S. on visas, a Trump administration official tells ABC News.

A senior Department of Homeland Security official said that 375 travelers were affected by the executive order Saturday at airports across the country.

Within that group, 109 people were in transit and then denied entry to the U.S., 173 were denied entry to the U.S. before boarding their flights in a foreign port, and 81 were granted waivers because of their legal permanent resident or special immigrant visa status.

The number of people being held at U.S. airports is expected to dwindle today, but passengers at airports across the world may be kept from boarding flights to the U.S.

Trump said the executive order was part of a vetting plan to prevent “radical Islamic terrorists” from reaching American soil.

The seven-page document calls for an immediate suspension of immigration from countries with ties to terror — Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya — for a time period of 90 days. But none of the countries on the list have had anything to do with terror incidents on U.S. soil since the 9/11 attacks, and Saudi Arabia — where 15 of the 9/11 hijackers were from — is not included.

It also calls for the complete suspension of Syrian refugees for an indefinite period. It also calls on the secretary of state to suspend the entire U.S program for admitting refugees for 120 days while authorities review the application and adjudication process.

White House spokesman Sean Spicer said today on “This Week” that the seven countries had been identified by the Obama administration as needing further scrutiny, and said other countries could be added to the list at a later date.

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US Judge Grants Stay on Deportations Under Trump Immigration Order, But Overall Ban Remains

Mohammed Elshamy/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — A federal court in Brooklyn Saturday night granted an emergency stay on President Trump’s executive order that bans immigration from seven predominantly Muslim countries for two Iraqi men who had valid visas to enter the United States but were detained Saturday when they arrived in New York.

Trump’s order calls for an immediate suspension of immigration from countries with ties to terror, including Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya, for a time period of 90 days. It also calls for the complete suspension of Syrian refugees for an indefinite period.

The ACLU, which had filed the challenge on behalf of the two men, contended that the stay applied nationally to all cases, but that was not clear from the ruling. ABC News was attempting to clarify whether that was the case.

WATCH: ACLU Executive Director Anthony D. Romero coming out of the court where the ACLU just argued and won block of Trump’s Muslim ban. pic.twitter.com/kvWDgWiUIn

— ACLU National (@ACLU) January 29, 2017

The ruling does not appear to overturn administration policy, but does appear to apply to all of those people currently detained at airports across the country who were facing imminent deportation. The judge asked repeated questions of the federal prosecutors charged with defending the executive order, but they were unable to provide numbers of people who were facing the prospect of returning to a country where there lives would be in danger.

The order came as protests spread to airports across the country, after at least 55 passengers were detained or sent home from at least six different airports so far, and hundreds of people around the world were barred from boarding U.S.-bound flights.

Hundreds of people turned out at John F. Kennedy International Airport to protest the president’s order, chanting “No hate, no fear, refugees are welcome here. No hate, no fear, Muslims are welcome here.”

In New York, the protesters received statements of support from local politicians, including Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Sen. Chuck Schumer.

Hundreds also gathered outside the Brooklyn federal courthouse where the emergency hearing was called on the ACLU’s legal challenge brought on behalf of the two Iraqi men who were detained at JFK Airport this morning. The two men were targeted for their assistance or connections to the U.S. military and were approved for resettlement in the United States.

The two Iraqis who were detained at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City have been released, according to officials, but 10 people were still detained at the airport, the officials said. Other passengers were detained or sent home from the following airports (figures as of 10:30 p.m. ET): Chicago O’Hare International Airport (1 passenger), Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (9 passengers), Philadelphia International Airport (6 passengers), Washington Dulles International Airport (approximately 20 people), Los Angeles International Airport (at least 7 people), according to officials in those cities.

One of the Iraqis detained at JFK, Hameed Jhalid Darweesh, was released early Saturday and left with New York Reps. Nydia Velazquez and Jerry Nadler, who joined more than 100 protesters that assembled there. The other, Haider Sameer Abdulkhaleq, was released Saturday evening, shortly before the order from the federal court for the Eastern District of New York.

Darweesh expressed his gratitude for those who supported him while he was detained.

“America is the land of freedom,” Darweesh said. “The land of freedom, the land of the rights. This is what brought me to come here, and I’m very thankful.”

Neither Darweesh nor Abdulkhaleq are technically refugees according to the definition in the president’s executive order but appear to have come to the U.S. on visas, a Trump administration official tells ABC News.

In Seattle, members of Congress from Washington state, Washington Governor Jay Inslee, and Seattle Mayor Ed Murray all spoke out against the executive order.

The executive order contains a caveat that allows certain individuals to be admitted to the country if there is a national security interest in doing so, and these two may be eligible for such an exemption, which must be agreed upon by the State and Homeland Security Departments, but the process by which this happens is unclear.

At least one person was detained at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago Saturday, and it is expected that she will return to Saudi Arabia, according to the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR).

Sahar Alghnimi, a Syrian woman who came to the U.S. on tourist visa to see her mother who had just undergone cancer surgery, was detained when she arrived from Saudi Arabia at 8:48 AM on Eithad Airlines, CAIR Chicago executive director Ahmed Rehab told ABC News.

Alghnimi had been to the U.S. several times before and has a valid visa, Rehab said.

In Philadelphia, two Syrian families were detained.

Mayor Jim Kenney issued a statement on Trump’s executive order, suggesting that the detentions were carried out by U.S. Customs and Border Patrol.

In Dallas, nine people have been detained, according to a media representative of CAIR.

Ripple effects from the executive order are also being felt in multinational technology companies.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai circulated a staff memo, obtained by Bloomberg News, in which he criticized Trump’s action and suggested that some of the firm’s employees and their families could be affected by it.

Likewise, several colleges advised foreign students and scholars who might be affected by Trump’s order to defer travel outside of the U.S. at least until there is more clarity on how the order may affect them.

Trump categorized the executive order as part of a vetting plan to prevent “radical Islamic terrorists” from reaching American soil.

The seven-page document calls for an immediate suspension of immigration from countries with ties to terror — Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya — for a time period of 90 days. But none of the countries on the list have had anything to do with terror incidents on U.S. soil since the 9/11 attacks, and Saudi Arabia — where 15 of the 9/11 hijackers were from — is not included.

It also calls for the complete suspension of Syrian refugees for an indefinite period. It also calls on the secretary of state to suspend the entire U.S program for admitting refugees for 120 days while authorities review the application and adjudication process.

Green card holders, who are legal residents of the United States, also fall under Trump’s executive order on immigration if they come from any of the seven Muslim-dominated countries from which immigration is temporarily banned, according to a senior administration official who spoke to ABC News.

Trump told the the Christian Broadcasting Network that Christian refugees would be given priority over Muslims in applications to come to the U.S.

“We are going to help them,” Trump said of Christians in Syria.

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