Review Category : National News

Federal Judge Grants Stay on Trump Immigration Order for 2 Iraqis

Mohammed Elshamy/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — A federal court in Brooklyn Saturday night granted an emergency stay on President Trump’s executive order that bans immigration from seven predominantly Muslim countries for two Iraqi men who had valid visas to enter the United States but were detained Saturday when they arrived in New York.

Trump’s order calls for an immediate suspension of immigration from countries with ties to terror, including Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya, for a time period of 90 days. It also calls for the complete suspension of Syrian refugees for an indefinite period.

The ACLU, which had filed the challenge on behalf of the two men, contended that the stay applied nationally to all cases, but that was not clear from the ruling. ABC News was attempting to clarify whether that was the case.

The ruling does not appear to overturn administration policy, but does appear to apply to all of those people currently detained at airports across the country who were facing imminent deportation. The judge asked repeated questions of the federal prosecutors charged with defending the executive order, but they were unable to provide numbers of people who were facing the prospect of returning to a country where there lives would be in danger.

The order came as protests spread to airports across the country, after after at least 27 passengers were detained or sent home from four different airports, and hundreds of people around the world were barred from boarding U.S.-bound flights.

Hundreds of people turned out at John F. Kennedy International Airport to protest the president’s order, chanting “No hate, no fear, refugees are welcome here. No hate, no fear, Musims are welcome here.”

In New York, the protesters received statements of support from local politicians, including Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Sen. Chuck Schumer.

Hundreds also gathered outside the Brooklyn federal courthouse where the emergency hearing was called on the ACLU’s legal challenge brought on behalf of the two Iraqi men who were detained at JFK Airport this morning. The two men were targeted for their assistance or connections to the U.S. military and were approved for resettlement in the United States.

The two Iraqis who were detained at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City have been released, according to officials, but 10 people were still detained at the airport, the officials said. Other passengers were detained or sent home from Chicago O’Hare International Airport, Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, and Philadelphia International Airport, according to officials in those cities.

One of the Iraqis detained at JFK, Hameed Jhalid Darweesh, was released early Saturday and left with New York Reps. Nydia Velazquez and Jerry Nadler, who joined more than 100 protesters that assembled there. The other, Haider Sameer Abdulkhaleq, was released Saturday evening, shortly before the order from the federal court for the Eastern District of New York.

Darweesh expressed his gratitude for those who supported him while he was detained.

“America is the land of freedom,” Darweesh said. “The land of freedom, the land of the rights. This is what brought me to come here, and I’m very thankful.”

Neither Darweesh nor Abdulkhaleq are technically refugees according to the definition in the president’s executive order but appear to have come to the U.S. on visas, a Trump administration official tells ABC News.

In Seattle, members of Congress from Washington state, Washington Governor Jay Inslee, and Seattle Mayor Ed Murray all spoke out against the executive order.

The executive order contains a caveat that allows certain individuals to be admitted to the country if there is a national security interest in doing so, and these two may be eligible for such an exemption, which must be agreed upon by the State and Homeland Security Departments, but the process by which this happens is unclear.

At least one person was detained at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago on Saturday, and it is expected that she will return to Saudi Arabia, according to the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR).

Sahar Alghnimi, a Syrian woman who came to the U.S. on tourist visa to see her mother who had just undergone cancer surgery, was detained when she arrived from Saudi Arabia at 8:48 AM on Eithad Airlines, CAIR Chicago executive director Ahmed Rehab told ABC News.

Alghnimi had been to the U.S. several times before and has a valid visa, Rehab said.

In Philadelphia, two Syrian families were detained.

Mayor Jim Kenney issued a statement on Trump’s executive order, suggesting that the detentions were carried out by U.S. Customs and Border Patrol.

In Dallas, nine people have been detained, according to a media representative of CAIR.

Ripple effects from the executive order are also being felt in multinational technology companies.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai circulated a staff memo, obtained by Bloomberg News, in which he criticized Trump’s action and suggested that some of the firm’s employees and their families could be affected by it.

Likewise, several colleges advised foreign students and scholars who might be affected by Trump’s order to defer travel outside of the U.S. at least until there is more clarity on how the order may affect them.

Trump categorized the executive order as part of a vetting plan to prevent “radical Islamic terrorists” from reaching American soil.

The seven-page document calls for an immediate suspension of immigration from countries with ties to terror — Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya — for a time period of 90 days. But none of the countries on the list have had anything to do with terror incidents on U.S. soil since the 9/11 attacks, and Saudi Arabia — where 15 of the 9/11 hijackers were from — is not included.

It also calls for the complete suspension of Syrian refugees for an indefinite period. It also calls on the secretary of state to suspend the entire U.S program for admitting refugees for 120 days while authorities review the application and adjudication process.

Green card holders, who are legal residents of the United States, also fall under Trump’s executive order on immigration if they come from any of the seven Muslim-dominated countries from which immigration is temporarily banned, according to a senior administration official who spoke to ABC News.

Trump told the the Christian Broadcasting Network that Christian refugees would be given priority over Muslims in applications to come to the U.S.

“We are going to help them,” Trump said of Christians in Syria.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Protests Spread at Airports Nationwide Over Trump’s Executive Order

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Protests spread to airports across the country Saturday after after at least 27 passengers were detained or sent home from four different airports, and hundreds of people around the world were barred from boarding U.S.-bound flights following President Trump’s executive order on immigration.

One of at least two Iraqis detained at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City has been released, according to New York officials. In all, 11 people were still detained at the airport, the officials said. Other passengers were detained or sent home from Chicago O’Hare International Airport, Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, and Philadelphia International Airport, according to officials in those cities.

Hundreds of people turned out at JFK to protest the protest the president’s order, chanting “No hate, no fear, refugees are welcome here. No hate, no fear, Musims are welcome here.”

Hameed Jhalid Darweesh, the Iraqi freed from Kennedy Airport, left with New York Congressional Reps. Nydia Velazquez and Jerry Nadler, who joined more than 100 protesters that assembled there.

Court records confirm that a writ of habeas corpus was filed for Darweesh and Haider Sameer Abdulkhaleq, the other Iraqi, in the Eastern District of New York, where the airport is located, and that Donald Trump was named as a defendant.

Darweesh expressed his gratitude for those who supported him while he was detained.

“First of all, I want to thank the people that take care of me and support me. They leave their family, their business and come to support me. This is what pushed me to move, to leave my country and come here. And I’m very, very thankful to all of the people who have come to support me,” he said to reporters at the airport.

“America is the land of freedom,” Darweesh said. “The land of freedom, the land of the rights. This is what brought me to come here, and I’m very thankful.”

Neither Darweesh nor Abdulkhaleq are technically refugees according to the definition in the president’s executive order but appear to have come to the U.S. on visas, a Trump administration official tells ABC News.

The executive order contains a caveat that allows certain individuals to be admitted to the country if there is a national security interest in doing so, and these two may be eligible for such an exemption, which must be agreed upon by the State and Homeland Security Departments, but the process by which this happens is unclear.

At least one person was detained at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago on Saturday, and it is expected that she will return to Saudi Arabia, according to the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR).

Sahar Alghnimi, a Syrian woman who came to the U.S. on tourist visa to see her mother who had just undergone cancer surgery, was detained when she arrived from Saudi Arabia at 8:48 AM on Eithad Airlines, CAIR Chicago executive director Ahmed Rehab told ABC News.

Alghnimi had been to the U.S. several times before and has a valid visa, Rehab said.

In Philadelphia, two Syrian families were detained.

Mayor Jim Kenney issued a statement on Trump’s executive order, suggesting that the detentions were carried out by U.S. Customs and Border Patrol.

In Dallas, nine people have been detained, according to a media representative of CAIR.

Ripple effects from the executive order are also being felt in multinational technology companies.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai circulated a staff memo, obtained by Bloomberg News, in which he criticized Trump’s action and suggested that some of the firm’s employees and their families could be affected by it.

Likewise, several colleges advised foreign students and scholars who might be affected by Trump’s order to defer travel outside of the U.S. at least until there is more clarity on how the order may affect them.

Trump categorized the executive order as part of a vetting plan to prevent “radical Islamic terrorists” from reaching American soil.

The seven-page document calls for an immediate suspension of immigration from countries with ties to terror — Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya — for a time period of 90 days. But none of the countries on the list have had anything to do with terror incidents on U.S. soil since the 9/11 attacks, and Saudi Arabia — where 15 of the 9/11 hijackers were from — is not included.

It also calls for the complete suspension of Syrian refugees for an indefinite period. It also calls on the secretary of state to suspend the entire U.S program for admitting refugees for 120 days while authorities review the application and adjudication process.

Green card holders, who are legal residents of the United States, also fall under Trump’s executive order on immigration if they come from any of the seven Muslim-dominated countries from which immigration is temporarily banned, according to a senior administration official who spoke to ABC News.

Trump told the Christian Broadcasting Network that Christian refugees would be given priority over Muslims in applications to come to the U.S.

“We are going to help them,” Trump said of Christians in Syria.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Green Card Holders Fall Under Trump’s Executive Order

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Green card holders, who are legal residents of the United States, fall under President Trump’s executive order on immigration if they come from any of the seven Muslim-dominated countries from which immigration is temporarily banned, according to a senior administration official who spoke to ABC News.

People from these countries who hold green cards to live in the U.S. but who are currently outside of the country will need a waiver to re-enter the United States. The waivers will be issued on a case-by-case basis, the official told ABC News.

Green card holders currently in the U.S., who hail from any of the seven countries listed in Trump’s order, will need approval before leaving the country or risk being detained while re-entering the country, the official said.

The order signed by Trump on Friday, which he said is aimed at protecting the nation from terrorists, suspends for 90 days immigration to the U.S. from seven Muslim-majority nations — Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya. It also suspends for 120 days the entry of refugees into the U.S. and indefinitely bans Syrian refugees from coming into the country.The list of countries are: targeted countries includes Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen, which all have Muslim-majority populations.

As to people with green cards who are currently traveling or “in transit” back to the United States, the official said that the order has a hardship exemption. The official said administrators are still working out how to define “in transit” and “hardship.”

The Department of Homeland Security and the State Department are currently finalizing guidance that will be issued to airports and airlines regarding implementation of the order, the official added.

The official praised the work of the agencies and officials who put the order in place “quickly and professionally” as soon as it was issued and said all the relevant officials were briefed.

The official also said that the Trump team has been working on the order for “weeks,” starting during the transition period.

The order is already complicating travel for some. At least 27 people have been detained in four U.S. airports since the president signed the action.

Among those were two Iraqis held at Kennedy International Airport in New York City, one of whom was released later Saturday and allowed to enter the U.S..

In addition, seven U.S.-bound migrants — six from Iraq and one from Yemen — were prevented from boarding a flight in Egypt that was bound for Kennedy Airport, The Associated Press reported. Officials said the seven, escorted by representatives of the United Nations’ refugee agency, were stopped from boarding the plane after authorities at Cairo’s airport contacted their counterparts at the airport in New York.

Meanwhile, some colleges – including Princeton University, Rochester Institute of Technology in New York State and Stanford University’s center for international students are advising students from any of the seven countries covered by the executive order to consider delaying travel outside the U.S.

In addition, Bloomberg News obtained a staff memo circulated by Google Chief Executive Officer Sundar Pichai in which he criticized Trump’s action and suggested that employees who could be affected it return to the U.S.

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At Least 27 People Detained or Sent Out of US Following Trump’s Executive Order

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — At least 27 passengers have been detained or sent out of the U.S. from four different airports across the country on Saturday following President Trump’s executive order on immigration.

One of at least two Iraqis detained at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City has been released, according to New York officials. In all, 11 people were still detained at the airport, the officials said. Other passengers were detained or sent home from Chicago O’Hare International Airport, Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, and Philadelphia International Airport, according to officials in those cities.

Hameed Jhalid Darweesh, the Iraqi freed from Kennedy Airport, left with New York Congressional Reps. Nydia Velazquez and Jerry Nadler, who joined more than 100 protesters that assembled there.

Court records confirm that a writ of habeas corpus was filed for Darweesh and Haider Sameer Abdulkhaleq, the other Iraqi, in the Eastern District of New York, where the airport is located, and that Donald Trump was named as a defendant.

Darweesh expressed his gratitude for those who supported him while he was detained.

“First of all, I want to thank the people that take care of me and support me. They leave their family, their business and come to support me. This is what pushed me to move, to leave my country and come here. And I’m very, very thankful to all of the people who have come to support me,” he said to reporters at the airport.

“America is the land of freedom,” Darweesh said. “The land of freedom, the land of the rights. This is what brought me to come here, and I’m very thankful.”

Neither Darweesh nor Abdulkhaleq are technically refugees according to the definition in the president’s executive order but appear to have come to the U.S. on visas, a Trump administration official tells ABC News.

The executive order contains a caveat that allows certain individuals to be admitted to the country if there is a national security interest in doing so, and these two may be eligible for such an exemption, which must be agreed upon by the State and Homeland Security Departments, but the process by which this happens is unclear.

At least one person was detained at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago on Saturday, and it is expected that she will return to Saudi Arabia, according to the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR).

Sahar Alghnimi, a Syrian woman who came to the U.S. on tourist visa to see her mother who had just undergone cancer surgery, was detained when she arrived from Saudi Arabia at 8:48 AM on Eithad Airlines, CAIR Chicago executive director Ahmed Rehab told ABC News.

Alghnimi had been to the U.S. several times before and has a valid visa, Rehab said.

In Philadelphia, two Syrian families were detained.

Mayor Jim Kenney issued a statement on Trump’s executive order, suggesting that the detentions were carried out by U.S. Customs and Border Patrol.

In Dallas, nine people have been detained, according to a media representative of CAIR.

Ripple effects from the executive order are also being felt in multinational technology companies.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai circulated a staff memo, obtained by Bloomberg News, in which he criticized Trump’s action and suggested that some of the firm’s employees and their families could be affected by it.

Likewise, several colleges advised foreign students and scholars who might be affected by Trump’s order to defer travel outside of the U.S. at least until there is more clarity on how the order may affect them.

Trump categorized the executive order as part of a vetting plan to prevent “radical Islamic terrorists” from reaching American soil.

The seven-page document calls for an immediate suspension of immigration from countries with ties to terror — Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya — for a time period of 90 days.

It also calls for the complete suspension of Syrian refugees for an indefinite period. It also calls on the secretary of state to suspend the entire U.S program for admitting refugees for 120 days while authorities review the application and adjudication process.

Green card holders, who are legal residents of the United States, also fall under Trump’s executive order on immigration if they come from any of the seven Muslim-dominated countries from which immigration is temporarily banned, according to a senior administration official who spoke to ABC News.

Trump told the the Christian Broadcasting Network that Christian refugees would be given priority over Muslims in applications to come to the U.S.

“We are going to help them,” Trump said of Christians in Syria.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Some Colleges Warning Foreign Students on Travel After Trump’s Immigration Order

Barry Winiker via Getty Images(PRINCETON, N.J.) — Some colleges are advising foreign students and scholars who might be affected by President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration to defer travel outside of the U.S. at least until there is more clarity on how the order may affect them.

Princeton University, Stanford University’s center for international students and the Rochester Institute of Technology have each issued advice against immediate travel out of the country by members of their college communities.

“We have strongly advised students and scholars who might be affected and who have travel plans in the coming days to defer travel outside of the United States until there is some clarity and legal analysis of the situation or, if they must travel, to seek legal counsel before they do,” Princeton University Dean of Faculty Deborah Prentice wrote in an advisory to the university’s faculty Friday night.

President Trump’s executive order, which he said is aimed at protecting the nation from terrorists, suspends for 90 days immigration to the U.S. from seven Muslim-majority nations — Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya. It also suspends for 120 days the entry of refugees into the U.S. and indefinitely bans Syrian refugees from coming into the country.

Similar to Princeton, Stanford’s Bechtel International Center, which serves foreign students and scholars and their families, posted on Facebook on Friday its recommendation against travel by people from the seven countries covered in the executive order.

“We recommend that nationals of these countries do not travel,” the post said. “We share your concerns and we, along with several campus partners, are planning to host workshops next week. We will continue to update as this order, and possibly others, unfold.”

In New York State, the Rochester Institute of Technology said in a statement to ABC News that it is reviewing the president’s order.

“We currently have undergraduate and graduate students from more than 100 countries enrolled in our university,” the college’s international student services director, Jeffrey W. Cox, said. “Among those students, 45 are from the countries listed in the executive order. We have informally advised those students to not make any travel plans to leave the United States, even to neighboring Canada, during the next 30 days.”

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One Iraqi Released, One Still Held at New York Airport in Wake of Trump’s Executive Order

ABC News(NEW YORK) — One of at least two Iraqis detained at Kennedy International Airport in New York City in the wake of President Trump’s executive order on immigration has been released.

Hameed Jhalid Darweesh walked out of Kennedy Airport with New York Congressional Reps. Nydia Velazquez and Jerry Nadler.

Pleased to announce w/@NydiaVelazquez the release of Hameed Jhalid Darweesh from detention at JFK. pic.twitter.com/AeKDhIPp7k

— (((Rep. Nadler))) (@RepJerryNadler) January 28, 2017

Darweesh was one of at least two Iraqis held at the airport, and court records confirm that a writ of habeas corpus was filed for him and Haider Sameer Abdulkhaleq in the Eastern District of New York, where the airport is located, and that Donald Trump has been named as a defendant.

Velazquez said Darweesh was one of 12 people detained at the airport, but did not specify the nationalities of the other 10.

Darweesh expressed his gratitude for those who supported him while he was detained.

“First of all, I want to thank the people that take care of me and support me. They leave their family, their business and come to support me. This is what pushed me to move, to leave my country and come here. And I’m very, very thankful to all of the people who have come to support me,” he said to reporters at the airport.

“America is the land of freedom,” Darweesh said. “The land of freedom, the land of the rights. This is what brought me to come here, and I’m very thankful.”

Neither Darweesh nor Abdulkhaleq are technically refugees according to the definition in the president’s executive order but appear to have come to the U.S. on visas, a Trump administration official tells ABC News. The executive order contains a caveat that allows certain individuals to be admitted to the country if there is a national security interest in doing so, and these two may be eligible for such an exemption, which must be agreed upon by the State and Homeland Security Departments, but the process by which this happens is unclear.

At least one person was detained at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago today, and it is expected that she will return to Saudi Arabia, according to the Cuncil on American Islamic Relations.

Sahar Alghnimi, a Syrian woman who came to the U.S. on tourist visa to see her mother who had just undergone cancer surgery, was detained when she arrived from Saudi Arabia at 8:48 AM on Eithad Airlines, CAIR Chicago executive director Ahmed Rehab told ABC News.

Alghnimi had been to the U.S. several times before and has a valid visa, Rehab said.

In addition, seven U.S.-bound migrants — six from Iraq and one from Yemen — have been prevented from boarding a flight in Egypt that was bound for Kennedy Airport, according to reports.

Officials said the seven migrants, escorted by representatives of the United Nations refugee agency, were stopped from boarding the plane after authorities at Cairo’s airport contacted their counterparts at the airport in New York.

Ripple effects from the executive order are also being felt in multinational technology companies.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai circulated a staff memo, obtained by Bloomberg News, in which he criticized Trump’s action and suggested that some of the firm’s employees and their families could be affected by it.

Trump categorized the executive order as part of a vetting plan to prevent “radical Islamic terrorists” from reaching American soil.

The seven-page document calls for an immediate suspension of immigration from countries with ties to terror — Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya — for a time period of 90 days. It also calls for the complete suspension of Syrian refugees for an indefinite period. It also calls on the secretary of state to suspend the entire U.S program for admitting refugees for 120 days while authorities review the application and adjudication process.

Trump told the the Christian Broadcasting Network that Christian refugees would be given priority over Muslims in applications to come to the U.S.

“We are going to help them,” Trump said of Christians in Syria.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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One Person Held at New York Airport in Wake of Trump’s Executive Order is Released

ABC News(NEW YORK) — One of at least two Iraqis detained at Kennedy International Airport in New York City in the wake of President Trump’s executive order on immigration has been released.

Hameed Jhalid Darweesh walked out of Kennedy Airport with New York Congressional Reps. Nydia Velazquez and Jerry Nadler.

Pleased to announce w/@NydiaVelazquez the release of Hameed Jhalid Darweesh from detention at JFK. pic.twitter.com/AeKDhIPp7k

— (((Rep. Nadler))) (@RepJerryNadler) January 28, 2017

Darweesh was one of at least two Iraqis held at the airport, and court records confirm that a writ of habeas corpus was filed for him and Haider Sameer Abdulkhaleq in the Eastern District of New York, where the airport is located, and that Donald Trump has been named as a defendant.

Velazquez said Darweesh was one of 12 people detained at the airport, but did not specify the nationalities of the other 10.

Darweesh expressed his gratitude for those who supported him while he was detained.

“First of all, I want to thank the people that take care of me and support me. They leave their family, their business and come to support me. This is what pushed me to move, to leave my country and come here. And I’m very, very thankful to all of the people who have come to support me,” he said to reporters at the airport.

“America is the land of freedom,” Darweesh said. “The land of freedom, the land of the rights. This is what brought me to come here, and I’m very thankful.”

Neither Darweesh nor Abdulkhaleq are technically refugees according to the definition in the president’s executive order but appear to have come to the U.S. on visas, a Trump administration official tells ABC News. The executive order contains a caveat that allows certain individuals to be admitted to the country if there is a national security interest in doing so, and these two may be eligible for such an exemption, which must be agreed upon by the State and Homeland Security Departments, but the process by which this happens is unclear.

In addition, seven U.S.-bound migrants — six from Iraq and one from Yemen — have been prevented from boarding a flight in Egypt that was bound for Kennedy Airport, The Associated Press reports.

Officials said the seven migrants, escorted by representatives of the United Nations refugee agency, were stopped from boarding the plane after authorities at Cairo’s airport contacted their counterparts at the airport in New York.

Ripple effects from the executive order are also being felt in multinational technology companies.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai circulated a staff memo, obtained by Bloomberg News, in which he criticized Trump’s action and suggested that some of the firm’s employees and their families could be affected by it.

Trump categorized the executive order as part of a vetting plan to prevent “radical Islamic terrorists” from reaching American soil.

The seven-page document calls for an immediate suspension of immigration from countries with ties to terror — Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, Iraq, Iran and Libya — for a time period of 90 days. It also calls for the complete suspension of Syrian refugees for an indefinite period. It also calls on the secretary of state to suspend the entire U.S program for admitting refugees for 120 days while authorities review the application and adjudication process.

Trump told the the Christian Broadcasting Network that Christian refugees would be given priority over Muslims in applications to come to the U.S.

“We are going to help them,” Trump said of Christians in Syria.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Two Detained at New York Airport and Seven in Cairo in Wake of Trump’s Executive Order

ABC News(NEW YORK) — Two Iraqis have been detained at Kennedy International Airport in New York City in the wake of President Trump’s executive order Friday on the suspending the entry into the United States of immigrants from certain Muslim nations and all refugees.

Court records confirm that a writ of habeas corpus was filed for Hameed Khalid Darweesh and Haider Sameer Abdulkhaleq in the Eastern District of New York, where the airport is located, and that Donald Trump has been named as a defendant.

The two men are not technically refugees according to the definition in the president’s executive order but appear to be coming to the U.S. on visas, a Trump administration official tells ABC News. The executive order contains a caveat that allows certain individuals to be admitted to the country if there is a national security interest in doing so, and these two may be eligible for such an exemption, which must be agreed upon by the State and Homeland Security Departments, but the process by which this happens is unclear.

In addition, seven U.S.-bound migrants — six from Iraq and one from Yemen — have been prevented from boarding a flight in Egypt that was bound for Kennedy Airport, The Associated Press reports.

Officials said the seven migrants, escorted by representatives of the United Nations refugee agency, were stopped from boarding the plane after authorities at Cairo’s airport contacted their counterparts at the airport in New York.

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.

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‘Far Too Much Planning’ Went Into Florida Mass Shooting Plot: Police

Sumter County Sheriff’s Office(LADY LAKE, Fla.) — New details have emerged in the alleged mass shooting plot by two teenagers on a Florida middle school.

“Far too much planning” went into the alleged mass shooting plan for The Villages Charter Middle School in Lady Lake, Florida, said Sumter County Sheriff’s Capt. James “Chris” Haworth. Two boys — ages 13 and 14 — came up with the alleged plan after they researched the 1999 shooting at Columbine High School in Colorado, Haworth told ABC News.

Haworth described the amount of detail the students put into the alleged plot, which was planned for Friday, as “very specific” and “serious enough to the point that the other children were scared — scared enough to come forward and say something.”

The teens allegedly told fellow students to wear white on Friday if they didn’t want to get shot, Haworth said. But, in subsequent interviews with the teens, that request was revealed to be a ruse, Haworth said.

“They wanted them to wear white because the blood shows better on a white shirt,” Haworth said.

The teens told investigators that “they were going to drop a pencil, and that would be the initiating of the shooting,” Haworth said. Witnesses also indicated that some students were warned to not attend school on Friday, according to a police press release.

After school ended on Tuesday, it was reported to a school resource officer that rumors had been circulating among students about a planned mass shooting at the school for Friday, Haworth said.

On Tuesday, the 13-year-old student was allegedly overheard saying he was going to “shoot up the school on Friday,” according to a police affidavit released by the sheriff’s office.

Police intercepted one of the accused teens on their way into school on Wednesday, and after preliminary interviews, “It was quickly divulged that they had been, in fact, planning a school shooting,” Haworth said.

The accused 13-year-old confirmed to the school resource officer Wednesday that he and another 14-year-old student were plotting the shooting, Haworth said. During the interview with the school principal and resource officer, he said that he had made a dumb statement about the Columbine shooting the previous day, telling the 14-year-old, “Imagine if that was me shooting,” according to the police affidavit. He then told students around him not to come to school on Friday.

The 13-year-old also told the school resource officer that he had been suffering from depression and suicidal thoughts, saying, “I just want to die.”

The 14-year-old said he discussed the details of the alleged plan with the 13-year-old because he thought it was a joke, according to the police affidavit.

Haworth said the threat was not a joke and that police are taking it seriously because of how much detail went into the alleged plot and because the students had allegedly conducted research on the Columbine shooting.

“This was real,” Haworth said of the alleged plot.

After being questioned on Wednesday, the two students were taken into custody to be evaluated, Michelle Keszey, media manager at the Sumter County Sheriff’s Office, told ABC News. It is her understanding that the students went home following the evaluation, she said.

The two students were then arrested Thursday at their homes, Haworth said. Multiple firearms were found at the 14-year-old’s house in Wildwood, Florida, including a loaded semi-automatic handgun in the nightstand in his parent’s bedroom, a loaded semi-automatic gun in a family vehicle and an assortment of other guns in a safe, Haworth said.

A loaded semi-automatic rifle was also found in the 13-year-old’s home in Fruitland Park, Florida. No weapons were found on either of the students or in their bags or lockers when they were apprehended at school on Wednesday, police said in a release.

In an interview, the 14-year-old said that his father owns a gun, but added that it was locked up, according to the police affidavit. The teen also said that the two never discussed what guns they were going to use in the alleged plot.

A student told police that the 13-year-old had recently attended a tribute to the Holocaust and had showed up to school with swastikas on his hands and Nazi logos on his arms, according to the police affidavit.

Both teens are charged with conspiracy to commit murder and are currently at a juvenile assessment center in Ocala, Florida, Haworth said. The Florida State Attorney’s Office will determine whether they will be tried in juvenile or adult court, Keszey said. They have not yet entered a plea.

While it is still early in the investigation, there is nothing to indicate that the teens’ parents will be charged as well, Haworth said.

More than half of the school’s students were not in attendance Friday, Haworth said.

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Phoenix Police Release Body Camera Videos of Man’s Death After Taken Into Custody

Phoenix Police Department(PHOENIX) — The Phoenix Police Department has released footage from several police body cameras documenting the arrest of Muhammad Muhaymin earlier this month after which he was declared dead, as family members of the deceased say they are considering legal options.

The 43-year-old man died on Jan. 4 after a physical altercation with officers near the Maryvale Community Center in Arizona’s capital city, according to police.

The Phoenix Police Department on Thursday released six of the 14 videos from police body cameras. The other eight videos are “in the final stages of the redaction process” and are expected to be released soon, police said.

The incident began at approximately 9:30 a.m. local time when officers with the Phoenix Police Department were responding to a “fight call” at the community center. The officers observed Muhaymin “acting erratically” and refusing to leave the facility after he had “assaulted an employee,” police said.

The officers made contact with Muhaymin and attempted to arrest him when he began struggling with them, police said.

“Multiple officers were needed to subdue the man who continued to act violently even after he was restrained by officers and handcuffs,” Sgt. Jonathan Howard, a Phoenix Police Department spokesman, said in the initial statement in early January after the incident.

While struggling with officers on the ground in the parking lot outside the community center after his arrest, police said Muhaymin began showing signs of “medical distress.” Muhaymin was then transported to a local hospital, where he was subsequently pronounced dead. The incident remains under investigation, with the official cause and manner of Muhaymin’s death still pending, police said.

But several weeks after Muhaymin’s death, the man’s family is still seeking answers.

Muhaymin’s sister and the family’s attorney spoke to reporters outside the Phoenix Police Department headquarters on Thursday. Mussallina Muhaymin said her brother suffered from mental illness and police did not react appropriately.

“This should have never happened,” Mussallina Muhaymin told ABC affiliate KNXV-TV. “There’s no reason to justify this.”

The family’s attorney, David Chami, told reporters they are considering legal options.

“He lost his life. And it didn’t have to happen,” Chami said.

According to Sgt. Howard, all officers with the Phoenix Police Department are “trained to work with people with a wide variety of disabilities.” All officers involved in the Jan. 4 incident were up to date on their training, Howard told ABC News.

“We have a duty to protect the integrity of the investigation, however, in this particular case, we do not believe the release of the body worn camera video will jeopardize our ability to complete a thorough and accurate investigation,” Phoenix Police Department Chief Jeri Williams said in a statement Thursday. “As with any critical incident, we will always review and learn from what has transpired.”

In the footage from the released videos, Muhaymin is seen carrying a small dog without a leash and appears to be having a dispute with a staff member inside the community center. Muhaymin is heard telling the staff member and the responding officers that the animal is a service dog. But the staff member is heard telling police that the dog bit some of his employees and needs to be kept on a leash.

After escorting Muhaymin with his dog out of the facility, the officers inform him that he’s under arrest for an outstanding warrant and instruct him to put down his dog. The instruction seems to agitate him, at which point a scuffle ensues with the officers.

Muhaymin refuses to let go of the dog, telling the officers, “please, call my sister first” as he struggles with them. The police advise him during the altercation to stop fighting.

After officers successfully subdue him after several attempts, Muhaymin becomes ill and police say on the tape that he is vomiting once he is on the ground.

The officers call for medical assistance and attempt to resuscitate the man multiple times after he becomes unresponsive.

“I don’t think he’s breathing,” one officer says. “I don’t feel a pulse.”

The Phoenix Police Department on Thursday identified the officers involved in the incident as Oswald Grenier, Jason Hobel, Ronaldo Canilao, David Head, Susan Heimbigner, Kevin McGowan, James Clark, Dennis Leroux, Ryan Nielsen and supervisor Steven Wong. The officers each have between 12 and 23 years of experience.

Sgt. Howard of the Phoenix Police Department told ABC News the four primary officers who had the most contact with Muhaymin were, as standard practice, placed on immediate paid leave following the incident. All officers have since returned to duty, Howard said.

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