Review Category : National News

No ‘Definitive, Visual Evidence’ in Cop Shooting of Keith Lamont Scott, Chief Says

NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department Thursday said it plans to show video of Tuesday’s fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott to the man’s family. But Police Chief Kerr Putney said the footage he has reviewed does not provide “definitive, visual evidence that would confirm that a person is pointing a gun.”

“I did not see that in the videos that I reviewed,” Putney said at a news conference Thursday. “So what I can tell you, though, is when taken in the totality of all the other evidence, it supports what we’ve heard and the version of the truth that we gave about the circumstances that happened that led to the death of Mr. Scott.”

While the police department is working to accommodate the Scott family’s request to see the body-cam footage, Putney reiterated that he has no plans to publicly release the videos, arguing that it would jeopardize the integrity of the investigation.

“We release it when we believe it is a compelling reason, but I’m not going to jeopardize the investigation,” the police chief told reporters.

Police say Scott, 43, was holding a handgun, which investigators recovered from the scene, and posed a threat because he was not obeying police orders to not exit his vehicle and drop the weapon. Scott’s family, however, has said he was not armed and was holding a book while waiting for his son to be dropped off from school.

This is a breaking news story. Please check back for updates.

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NYC Bombing Suspect’s Wife Back in US, Somewhat Cooperative, Official Says

Obtained by ABC News(NEW YORK) — The wife of New York and New Jersey bombing suspect Ahmad Rahami is back in the U.S. after being questioned by the FBI and local authorities in the United Arab Emirates. A senior law enforcement official said the woman, Asia Bibi Rahami, has been cooperative “to a certain degree.”

The official said that information provided by Asia Rahami could be of “immense value” in clarifying the motive for her husband’s alleged bombings and attempted bombings.

The FBI told ABC News Wednesday that Asia Rahami voluntarily submitted to questioning while in transit through the U.A.E.

Ahmad Rahami is still believed to be in a New Jersey hospital, where he was taken after being shot by police Monday. Rahami is suspected of planting two bombs in New York City — one of which exploded, injuring 31 people — and several others in New Jersey. One of the bombs in New Jersey exploded but didn’t kill or injure anyone, and the rest failed to detonate before police recovered them. He has been charged with a litany of crimes related to the bombings, in addition to attempted murder charges for allegedly opening fire on police Monday just before he was apprehended.

A journal that officials say was found on Rahami contained anti-American writings and praise for well-known terrorist figures including al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, American-born al-Qaeda cleric Anwar al-Awlaki and ISIS spokesperson Abu Muhammad al-Adnani.

Authorities are still trying to determine whether Rahami acted alone. Investigators are also attempting to identify two men who were spotted on a surveillance video purportedly taking a suitcase that house one of the bombs on New York’s 27th street. The men are considered “witnesses” and are not in danger of being arrested, officials said Wednesday.

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Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts Considering Curfew After 2nd Night of Violence

Sean Rayford/Getty Images(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts said she’s considering imposing a curfew Thursday after two nights of violent protests have rocked the North Carolina city.

“We certainly are going to talk about that today. We did sign a statement last night to declare a state of emergency, which gives us that authority,” Roberts said in an interview Thursday on ABC News’ Good Morning America.

“I will be consulting with our city manager and our police chief and other leaders in our response team to see if that might be a good idea for tonight.”

The city unraveled into chaos after a police officer fatally shot a black man at an apartment complex Tuesday. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department Chief Kerr Putney said the man, identified as 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott, was holding a handgun, which investigators recovered from the scene, and posed a threat because he was not obeying police orders to not exit his vehicle and drop the weapon.

Scott’s family, however, has said he was not armed and was holding a book while waiting for his son to be dropped off from school.

Protests broke out after news of Scott’s death. At least 16 police officers were injured while trying to quell angry demonstrators Tuesday night, and multiple police vehicles were damaged. At least one person was arrested, according to Putney.

The protests continued for the second day and the scene grew violent again as night fell on Charlotte. The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department said four of its officers sustained injuries Wednesday night, all non-life threatening.

One person was shot during the protests and is on life support, city officials announced on Twitter. Earlier, the city tweeted that the person had died and that the shooting was “civilian on civilian.”

In addition to declaring a state of emergency, the unrest also prompted North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory to call in the National Guard. Charlotte Mayor Roberts said she spoke with President Obama on Wednesday, who offered to provide federal resources to help keep the city safe.

During the interview with GMA Thursday morning, Roberts called on Charlotte citizens to have peaceful protests and work together. Still, officials are getting ready for the worst, she said.

“This is not the Charlotte that I grew up in, the Charlotte that I know,” Roberts said. “We are preparing for this evening and we know that a peaceful protest and many folks who do want to express their view peacefully turned into something else last night.”

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Charlotte Rocked by Second Night of Violence, One Protester Shot as State of Emergency Declared

iStock/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — The city of Charlotte woke up Thursday for the second day to the aftermath of violent protests and a shooting, as a prayer vigil in honor of a black man shot and killed by police on Tuesday turned chaotic, resulting in another person being shot amid reports of vandalism and looting.

The scene grew tense after 8 p.m. Wednesday as demonstrators marched in a commercial area in uptown Charlotte. As the night wore on, police clad in riot gear fired tear gas and rubber bullets at demonstrators, who threw bottles and rocks at police and passing cars, blocked an interstate highway, surrounded and jumped on vehicles, looted businesses and stormed the entrance of a Hyatt hotel, injuring two of its employees.

The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department said four of its officers sustained injuries, all non-life threatening.

The person who was shot during the protests on Wednesday is on life support, the City of Charlotte announced on Twitter. Earlier, the city tweeted that the person had died and that the shooting was “civilian on civilian.”

The unrest prompted the governor of North Carolina, Pat McCrory, to declare a state of emergency and call in the National Guard.

“Upon a recent request of Chief Putney, the National Guard and State Highway Patrol are sending in resources to further help the Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department,” the governor said in a statement. “Any violence directed toward our citizens or police officers or destruction of property should not be tolerated. I support and commend the law enforcement officials for their bravery and courage during this difficult situation.”

Charlotte mayor Jennifer Roberts said officials from the White House and the Department of Justice were also making their way to Charlotte, ABC affiliate WSOC reported.

The North Carolina NAACP State Conference also announced in a statement that it “will be in Charlotte to talk with the family, key members of the community and City leaders” on Thursday, followed by a press conference in the afternoon.

NC NAACP statement on officer involved Shooting in Charlotte #KeithLamontScott pic.twitter.com/yIyqxB4ruP

— NC NAACP (@ncnaacp) September 22, 2016

Roy Cooper, North Carolina’s attorney general, said in statement, “Violence will not bring justice … We must come together as a community to get answers and find a better path forward.”

WSOC reported that looters hit a Charlotte Hornets team store, which the NBA team confirmed. The Hyatt House hotel in the city’s downtown also said protesters broke the property’s windows and attacked two employees.

The protesters’ wrath extended into cyberspace, as well: WSOC reported that the city of Charlotte’s website had been hacked Wednesday evening.

Before midnight, protesters descended onto Interstate 277, which they blocked. According to WSOC, protesters also threw objects at passing vehicles.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department spokeswoman Cindy Wallace said Wednesday night of the shot protester, “Officers responded to North College Street and East Trade Street to an ADW [assault with a deadly weapon] call for service at approximately 8:31 p.m. One person was located with an apparent gunshot wound and transported to CMC Main [Carolinas Medical Center]. This is all the information I have at this time.”

The wife of the man fatally shot by police at an apartment complex Tuesday — Keith Lamont Scott — issued a statement Wednesday afternoon addressing the protesters, and urging them to exercise restraint against law enforcement officers.

“As a family, we respect the rights of those who wish to protest, but we ask that people protest peacefully,” the statement read. “Please do not hurt people or members of law enforcement, damage property or take things that do not belong to you in the name of protesting.”

Hundreds of protesters Wednesday night shouted slogans, including “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” and “Black Lives Matter” while filling the streets of downtown Charlotte.

The EpiCentre, a shopping complex in the uptown area of Charlotte at the center of the street confrontations, announced it will not open on Thursday.

Citing, “ongoing civil unrest,” Bank of America, whose corporate headquarters are in Charlotte, told its employees not to come to work in its uptown offices, the Charlotte Observer reported.

Public transportation will be operating normally Thursday morning after experiencing disruptions overnight.

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ISIS Figure Referenced in NYC Bomber’s Purported Journal

House of Representatives(NEW YORK) — In a bloody page in the journal purportedly found on Ahmad Rahami when he was captured, the New York and New Jersey bombing suspect appears to praise major terrorist figures, including the main spokesman for ISIS.

A reference to “Brother Adnani,” presumably referring to the late Abu Muhammad al-Adnani, is the first public evidence that ISIS, as well as al-Qaeda, may have inspired Rahami’s alleged violent acts.

“I looked for guidance and [praise be to God] guidance came. Sheikh Anwar[,] Brother Adnani … said it clearly attack the kuffar [unbelievers] in their backyard,” the page says. “Sheikh Anwar” is likely a reference to influential American-born al-Qaeda cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, who was killed in a U.S. drone strike five years ago.

Elsewhere in the journal, Rahami purportedly praised al-Qaeda founder Osama bin Laden and 2009 Fort Hood shooter Nadal Hasan, according to a criminal complaint filed against Rahami late Tuesday, which doesn’t mention al-Adnani.

The Pentagon said al-Adnani was killed in a U.S. airstrike in Syria in late August. Before his death, he served as the primary spokesman for ISIS and often encouraged Western Muslims to conduct attacks in their home countries.

“If you can kill a disbelieving American or European … then rely on Allah and kill them in any manner or way, however it may be,” Adnani said in an audio message two years ago.

ISIS has not released any claim of responsibility for the bombings in New York, where 31 people were injured, and New Jersey, where no one was hurt.

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Charlotte Protest Turns Violent as Police Fire Tear Gas at Bottle-Throwing Protesters

iStock/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — A prayer vigil in honor of Keith Lamont Scott turned into a violent protest Wednesday night in Charlotte, North Carolina, as riot gear-wearing police fired small canisters of tear gas at bottle-throwing protesters.

Scott is the armed man fatally shot by Charlotte-Mecklenburg police at an apartment complex Sunday in the North Carolina.

Picture outside Omni Hotel. Apparently people protesting tried to flood lobby. Tear gas used in the area. @wsoctv pic.twitter.com/y9O0K1me62

— Tina Terry (@TinaTerryWSOC9) September 22, 2016

Scott’s wife issued a statement Wednesday afternoon addressing the protesters, and urging them to exercise restraint against law enforcement officers.

“As a family, we respect the rights of those who wish to protest, but we ask that people protest peacefully,” the statement read. “Please do not hurt people or members of law enforcement, damage property or take things that do not belong to you in the name of protesting.

Hundreds of protesters Wednesday night shouted slogans, including “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” and “Black Lives Matter” while filling the streets of downtown Charlotte.

WATCH LIVE: @PaulBoydWSOC9 at Epicentre where police are now in riot gear, talking to security expert about marchhttps://t.co/VLi10w3PLy pic.twitter.com/rIEj8swFTw

— WSOCTV (@wsoctv) September 22, 2016

After protesters rushed riot gear-wearing police, they responded by firing tear gas at the protesters to disperse the crowd.

This story is breaking. Please check back for updates.

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Sacramento Police Release Video in Fatal Cop Shooting of 50-Year-Old Joseph Mann

Sacramento Police Department(SACRAMENTO. Calif.) — The Sacramento Police Department has released video in connection to an officer-involved shooting of a man in July, which resulted in his death.

On July 11, emergency dispatchers received a 911 call at 9:25 a.m. indicating a man had a gun in his waistband and a knife in his hand, police said in a news release. Another witness called in at 9:30 a.m. describing the same thing.

Three minutes later, Joseph Mann, 50, was “squaring off” with officers, the knife still in his hand, according to the news release. Police described him as “hostile” and said he was throwing things at them.

At 9:36 a.m., officers fired 18 shots, 14 of which struck Mann, Sacramento Police Department Public Information Officer Bryce Heinlein told ABC News today.

A gun was never found on Mann, Heinlein said, but authorities found a knife at the scene, police said.

Mann was pronounced dead at a hospital, Heinlein said. The officers who discharged their weapons are on modified duty, meaning they are not on patrol but working in the office, police said.

Dashcam video shows Mann zig-zagging in the street and performing karate moves in the middle of the street. Officers are heard yelling at Mann to “get on the ground,” and he walks away, turning around twice to look at the officers as he moves away from them.

An officer then announces over the loudspeaker of his patrol car: “Sir, with the black backpack, stop, put your hands in the air, and drop the knife.”

“We will not hurt you. Drop the knife,” the officer later says over the loudspeaker.

Mann then stops in the middle of the street and crouches while the officer continues to tell him to drop the knife, the video shows.

More squad cars with their sirens on arrive at the scene, and Mann begins to run. He stops behind a building, appearing to lean over to catch his breath, and continues to run as police yell at him to drop the knife.

Two officers on foot can then be seen with their guns out, pointing them in Mann’s direction. Several gunshots can be heard, but neither the officers nor Mann are visible. Several officers can then be seen running over to Mann.

In surveillance video taken from a nearby building, Mann can be seen falling as two officer point their guns at him.

The Sacramento County coroner would not release the autopsy or toxicology records because it has classified Mann’s death as a homicide, the coroner’s office told ABC News.

Last month, attorneys filed a federal civil lawsuit on behalf of Mann’s family against the city of Sacramento and the two officers who discharged their weapons, saying that police should not have used lethal force because Mann displayed “overt signs of being in the midst of mental crisis” during the incident.

The lawsuit says Mann’s civil rights were violated when officers used deadly force against him and deprived family members of their constitutional right to a familial relationship with him.

Mann’s family is seeking both survival and wrongful death damages as well as the “reasonable value” for funeral and burial expenses and loss of financial support.

The officers “violated their training” and engaged in “poor tactics,” which effectively squandered their ability to bring the situation to a conclusion without the use of deadly force, the lawsuit alleges.

The Sacramento Police Department declined to comment on the lawsuit because it is pending litigation. The Sacramento Police Officers Association and office of Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment.

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Tulsa Police Officer Shares Her Side of the Story in Terence Crutcher’s Shooting

Tulsa Police Department(TULSA, Okla.) — Tulsa police officer Betty Shelby, identified as the officer who shot 40-year-old Terence Crutcher on Friday night, has offered her side of the story in the fatal encounter.

In dashcam and helicopter video released by police, Crutcher appears to have his hands up moments before he is shot by Shelby. Shelby’s attorney, Scott Wood, maintains that Crutcher refused to follow more than two dozen commands and that he reached into the open window of the car before Shelby perceived a threat and shot him.

The Crutcher family’s attorneys Benjamin L. Crump and Damario Solomon-Simmons said the window was up, evidenced by the blood spattered on it when he was shot.

The Department of Justice is investigating Shelby’s use of force.

Here is Shelby’s side of the story, according to her attorney and the police department.

Shelby Was Responding to a Different Incident

At about 7:36 p.m. Friday, dispatchers received a 911 call about an abandoned SUV in the middle of a street, with the driver’s door open and the engine still running, Tulsa Police Chief Chuck Jordan said Monday. The caller said a man was running from the vehicle, saying it was “going to blow.”

Shelby and another officer were on their way to a domestic violence call when she came across the SUV, Jordan said.

On her way to that call, Shelby saw Crutcher standing in the middle of the road, looking down at the ground, Wood said, adding that she would have stopped and checked up on him had she not been on the other call.

She then saw the SUV parked in the middle of the street, obstructing traffic in both directions, Wood said. The engine was running when she got there, which she found odd because she assumed it was either disabled or broken down, he said.

The Encounter Started More Than a Minute Before What Is Shown on the Released Video

Wood said “it’s important to remember” that Shelby was on the scene with Crutcher for about a minute and a half before the start of the video clip released by police on Monday.

When Shelby approached the car, the doors were closed, and the windows were open, Wood said. She looked into the passenger’s side to make sure no one was on the floor of the car, and as she was getting ready to move to the driver’s side, she turned around and saw Crutcher walking toward her, Wood said.

Wood said that Shelby then said to Crutcher, “Hey, is this your car?”

Crutcher didn’t respond, simply dropping his head while continuing to look at Shelby, “kind of under his brow,” Wood said. Crutcher then began to put his hand into his left pocket, Wood said, adding that Shelby told Crutcher, “Hey, please keep your hands out of your pocket while you’re talking to me. Let’s deal with his car.”

Crutcher did not respond, Wood said, so Shelby ordered him again to get his hand out of his pocket. He then pulled his hand away and put his hands up in the air, even though he was not instructed to do so, which Shelby found strange, Wood said.

Shelby tried to get Crutcher to talk to her, but he simply mumbled something unintelligible and stared at her, Wood said. He then turned and walked to the edge of the roadway and turned to look at her, his hands still in the air, Wood said. He put his hands down and started to reach into his pocket again, Wood said, and she ordered him again to get his hands out of his pocket.

At this point, Shelby, a drug recognition expert, believed Crutcher was “on something,” Wood said, possibly PCP.

Shelby then radioed in that she had a subject “who is not following commands.”

“You can kind of hear a degree of stress in her voice when she says that,” Wood said.

Shelby then pulled out her gun and had Crutcher at gunpoint as she commanded him to get on his knees, Wood said. She pulled out a gun instead of a Taser because she thought he had a weapon, and she was planning to arrest him for being intoxicated in public and possibly obstructing the investigation, Wood said.

Shelby ordered Crutcher to stop multiple times as Crutcher walked toward the SUV with his hands up, Wood said.

But those orders cannot be heard in the audio from the dashcam video, which starts as another patrol car pulls up to the scene, showing Crutcher walking toward the SUV with his hands up as Shelby follows him, apparently with her weapon drawn and pointing at Crutcher.

Crutcher Allegedly Attempted to Reach Into the SUV

As the video from the helicopter begins, Crutcher was “angling” toward his car while Shelby repeatedly commanded him to stop, Wood said. His hands were still in the air.

“As a police officer, you have to wonder — why would someone ignore commands at gunpoint to get to a certain location?” Wood said.

Crutcher’s arms came down, and he turned to face the car, Wood said, and he reached into the driver’s side window with his left hand. That’s when Shelby fired one shot and a fellow officer, Tyler Turnbough, deployed a Taser, Wood said.

Shelby believed that when Crutcher attempted to reach into the car, he was retrieving a weapon, Wood said. In her interview with homicide detectives, she said, “I was never so scared in my life as in that moment right then,” according to Wood.

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Terence Crutcher’s Family Calls for National Day of Justice in Tulsa

iStock/Thinkstock(TULSA, Okla.) — The last time Tiffany Crutcher spoke with her twin brother Terence was through a text message last week. Terrance, who had just enrolled in classes at Tulsa Community College, told his sister he loved her and that he was going to make her proud.

“But because of a serious error in judgment, he won’t get that chance,” Crutcher said at a news conference in New York City Wednesday.

Crutcher, 40, was fatally shot by a police officer after his SUV stalled on the road in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on Friday. Dash-cam video of the incident released on Monday appears to show the black man with his hands raised in the air moments before the white officer fired her weapon.

Now, the Crutcher family is calling for a National Day of Justice in Tulsa next week.

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NYC Top Cop Defends FBI’s Handling of Bombing Suspect in 2014

WABC-TV(NEW YORK) — A top New York Police Department official on Wednesday offered an unwavering defense of the FBI over how the agency handled its review two years ago of Ahmad Rahami, who is now a suspect in an apparently al-Qaeda-inspired bombing spree around New York and New Jersey.

Rahami “was handled to the extent that the law, the system and the guidelines that we operate under would allow,” NYPD Deputy Commissioner John Miller told a House panel.

His comments come one day after the FBI acknowledged it conducted a low-level review of Rahami two years ago, but found no reason to believe he posed a threat at the time.

A neighbor prompted the 2014 inquiry, after he told authorities who were inquiring into a dispute at the Rahami home that he had heard the father call his son a “terrorist” and that Rahami’s associates overseas may have been trying to procure explosives.

“He seems like many suspects who came into contact with the system at various times,” Miller, who heads his department’s counterterrorism and intelligence efforts, told the House Homeland Security Committee. “People have somewhat of a misconception about our ability to put someone under surveillance [and] leave them there indefinitely.”

Miller noted that Rahami didn’t raise any more flags after the FBI’s 2014 review.

“It’s not realistic to say every time someone comes on the radar, you’re going to be able to follow them … for an extended period of time, while you have investigations that are on the front burner involving people who are demonstrably dangerous,” Miller added.

Nevertheless, Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., suggested the FBI could inform local police about even low-level assessments they conduct so “street cops” can be told to “keep your eyes and ears open on this guy in case you hear something about him.”

Miller said he thought federal guidelines and his own department’s guidelines would allow such a move.

The FBI first became aware of Rahami in the summer of 2014, when local law enforcement contacted the agency’s New Jersey field office about him, sources said.

“The FBI conducted internal database reviews, interagency checks, and multiple interviews — none of which revealed ties to terrorism,” the statement said.

The FBI also interviewed Rahami’s father, who told agents his son had traveled to Pakistan and was interacting with “bad people,” according to sources, and added that his son had injured and beaten members of his immediate family.

However, Rahami’s father later told the FBI he didn’t mean to suggest his son was a terrorist, but that he was hanging out with “undesirables,” the U.S. official said.

The FBI never interviewed Rahami himself and a grand jury declined to file charges against him.

The FBI’s ability to assess potential terrorists came under intense scrutiny earlier this year after Florida native Omar Mateen opened fire in Orlando’s Pulse nightclub in June, killing 49 people and injuring scores more.

In May 2013 the FBI had obtained sufficient information to open a preliminary investigation into Mateen — coworkers told authorities that Mateen had made terrorism-related comments at work. But after 10 months of investigation, including two interviews with Mateen, the FBI determined there wasn’t enough information to indicate he was “possibly a terrorist,” as FBI Director James Comey said after the Orlando attack.

Two months later, in July 2014, the FBI took another look at Mateen because his name “surfaced” in a separate terrorism investigation, Comey told reporters. Mateen was interviewed again, but authorities found no reason to continue tracking him.

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