Review Category : National News

Threatened Feminist Cancels College Appearance, Citing Concealed Weapons Allowance

Image Source Pink/Thinkstock(LOGAN, Utah) — An avowed feminist blogger openly critical of the portrayal of women in video games cancelled a speaking engagement at Utah State University Tuesday night because of the school’s policy that allows people with the proper permits to carry concealed firearms.

Anita Sarkeesian tweeted she feared for her safety after receiving “multiple specific threats made stating intent to kill me & feminists at USU.”

Although Sarkeesian says she’s received death threats before, she felt compelled to cancel her appearance because “police wouldn’t take steps to prevent concealed firearms at the event. Requested pat downs or metal detectors after mass shooting threat but because of Utah’s open carry laws police wouldn’t do firearm searches.”

The Salt Lake Tribune reported that an email sent to the USU threatened “the deadliest school shooting in American history” if Sarkeesian showed up.

On Wednesday, the school said it would have provided extra security personnel and not permitted backpacks inside the auditorium where Sarkeesian was scheduled to speak. However, a spokesperson added that it would not question her decision to back out.

Meanwhile, Sarkeesian said the incident would not discourage her from continuing to speak out. “The whole game industry must stand up against the harassment of women,” she argued.

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Nurse Who Contracted Ebola Called CDC Before Flight, Official Says

Jeff Swensen/Getty Images(ATLANTA) — A Dallas nurse who treated an Ebola patient contacted federal health officials before boarding a passenger flight Monday due to a slightly elevated temperature, but was allowed to board the flight because she was not exhibiting additional symptoms of Ebola, ABC News has learned.

Amber Vinson’s temperature was 99.5 degrees – below the 100.4 reading for a fever, according to a federal official from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A fever is one of the symptoms of Ebola. Other symptoms include diarrhea, vomiting and abdominal pain. She was not asked to avoid boarding the flight.

CDC officials believe that Vinson was not exhibiting further symptoms on the Oct. 13 flight.

“The patient was not showing any other symptoms while on board the plane – no vomiting or diarrhea. The only symptom Amber was showing was the fever,” CDC spokesman Tom Skinner told ABC News.

Airline officials concurred, stating that Vinson’s only symptom at the time was the slightly elevated temperature.

Vinson’s temperature continued to rise after the plane landed, authorities said. By late Tuesday, she was placed in isolation, with tests confirming her diagnosis as the second health care worker at a Texas hospital to contract Ebola and CDC workers scrambling to contact passengers who traveled beside Vinson.

The nurse was flown Wednesday to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, the facility that successfully treated two missionaries who were diagnosed with Ebola while performing aid work in Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly and nurse Nancy Writebol. A third individual, an unidentified World Health Organization worker, was admitted to Emory on Sept. 9.

Following the diagnosis, the airline and other organizations are taking extra precautions. Frontier Airlines placed six crew members – two pilots and four flight attendants – on paid leave for 21 days “out of an abundance of caution,” CEO David Siegel said in a statement.

“This was over and above CDC guidance that stated that our flight crews were safe to fly,” Siegel said.

The jet that carried Vinson and 131 others to Texas is in a hanger in Denver, the airline said, ready for its fourth cleaning. The plane’s seat covers and carpet were removed around the area where Vinson was sitting, and the environmental filters were replaced, the airline said. Cleanings were also scheduled at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport.

Additionally, Ebola screenings begin Thursday at four new airports: Dulles International Airport in Washington, D.C., O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J., and Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

Extra precautions are also being taken for people who shared flights with Vinson. Three Texas schools – North Belton Middle School, Sparta Elementary and the Belton Early Childhood School – will be closed Thursday after two students were on Flight 1143 Tuesday, school officials announced.

Two Cleveland schools, Solon Middle School and Parkside Elementary School, will also be closed Thursday. A staff member there flew on a Frontier Airline plane that may have carried Vinson to Texas the previous day, school officials said.

Employees from the Cleveland Clinic and MetroHealth on an Oct. 10 flight with Vinson were placed on paid leave.

Additionally, the military advised a Texas family to remain in isolation for 21 days – the length of time it could take for symptoms to appear – after a military member stationed at Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base in Ft. Worth, Texas traveled on the same Frontier Airlines flight as Vinson.

“No members of this local family are exhibiting any symptoms and are being isolated purely as a precautionary measure,” authorities with the Eagle Mountain-Saginaw Independent School District, where one of the family members is a student, said in a statement.

Speculation, frustration and concern follow the diagnoses of Vinson and co-worker Nina Pham, 26, who also contracted Ebola while caring for patient Thomas Eric Duncan, who died Oct. 8.

The causes of the latest Ebola cases remain unclear, but they reveal lapses in federal and local Ebola protocols. During a Wednesday news conference, CDC Director Thomas Frieden conceded that Vinson “should not have traveled on a commercial airline.”

When Vinson first traveled to Ohio, there had been no reported cases from health workers in Dallas, Frieden said. However, once Dallas nurse Nina Pharm tested positive, Vinson should not have been using public transportation, he said.

“Because at that point she was in a group of individuals known to have exposure to Ebola, she should not have traveled on a commercial airline,” Frieden said.

“From this moment forward, we will ensure that no individual monitored for exposure undergoes travel in any way other than controlled movement,” he said, referring to non-public transportation, such as a personal car or chartered flight.

President Obama echoed those sentiments in a Wednesday speech, acknowledging shortcomings of the federal response to Dallas and vowing that his administration would respond in a “much more aggressive way” to cases of Ebola.

“We want a rapid response team, a SWAT team essentially, from the CDC to be on the ground as quickly as possible, hopefully within 24 hours, so that they are taking the local hospital step by step through what needs to be done,” he said.

Procedures at the Texas hospital where Duncan was treated – and Pham and Vinson work – will face attention from lawmakers in Washington, D.C. Thursday. Dr. Daniel Varga from Texas Health Resources is scheduled to deliver prepared remarks to the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Subcommittee on Oversight and investigations.

The hospital “made some mistakes,” Varga admits. Duncan was initially incorrectly diagnosed, he says.

“A lot is being said about what may or may not have occurred to cause Ms. Pham to contract Ebola,” Varga says in his remarks. “She is known as an extremely skilled nurse, and she was using full protective measures under the CDC protocols, so we don’t yet know precisely how or when she was infected. But it’s clear there was an exposure somewhere, sometime. We are poring over records and observations, and doing all we can to find the answers.”

The CDC and Texas Health Dallas are doing a thorough analysis of how the exposure occurred, Varga said. Following Duncan’s diagnosis, the hospital system has changed its screening process, with additional focus on travel history, Varga said.

Brantly has not been asked to donate blood to Vinson. The doctor – who contracted Ebola while caring for sick patients in Liberia – donated platelets to patients Ashoka Mukpo, Dr. Richard Sacra and Pham after beating the virus. But he couldn’t donate blood to Duncan because their blood types didn’t match.

Mukpo, a journalist and aid worker who contracted the disease while in Liberia, expressed support for the two nurses.

“Wishing for a speedy recovery for those two Dallas nurses,” he wrote on Twitter. “This thing is not easy but you’re both going to make it. Thanks for your bravery.”

Ebola has killed more than 4,000 people, mostly in the West African countries of Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, according to recent figures by the World Health Organization.

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High School Football Player Charged With Rape Quits Team

iStock/Thinkstock(HOQUIAM, Wash.) — A high school football player accused of rape has decided to quit the team despite school officials defending his right to play, saying he is “innocent until proven guilty,” his attorney told ABC News Wednesday.

Tyler Smith, 18, was arrested last month and faces two counts of rape from an incident alleged to have happened during the summer, and another in 2012, according to court documents.

“He’s not going to play for the rest of the year,” Smith’s attorney Scott Campbell said. “You show up at practice, there’s a news truck there. It’s something he and his family decided.”

“He felt like it was a distraction for his team and the school and he didn’t want that,” Campbell said.

Hoquiam High School and the district’s superintendent were allowing Smith to stay on as the team’s defensive tackle, despite outrage from other students’ parents, ABC affiliate KOMO reported. Hoquiam School District Superintendent Mike Parker said he backed the coach’s decision to let Smith play.

“We felt that he’s innocent until proven guilty,” Parker told the station. “As bad as the crime might be, as repulsive as the crime might be, we’re trusting that the court system will sort that out for us.”

Smith is accused of raping one girl this past summer and another victim in 2012. The teen admitted to police that one of the victims said no, but stated, “Yeah, but I thought she was saying ‘no’ for pleasure and not to stop having sex,” according to the charging documents.

Smith declined an interview with ABC News through his attorney.

Smith pleaded not guilty when he was arraigned last month. He is due back in court on Oct. 27 and his trial is scheduled for Dec. 2.

His case comes as professional and college football players are also in the spotlight for abuse allegations.

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Second Nurse With Ebola Arrives at Emory

Photo by Jessica McGowan/Getty Images(ATLANTA) — A Dallas health care worker found to be infected with Ebola was transferred Wednesday to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta after she became the second person to contract the disease while working in the Dallas facility.

Amber Vinson, 29, was one of the nurses who was very involved with the care for Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan, who died of Ebola at the Dallas hospital.

Her transfer came as the ability of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital and any local hospital to handle the disease has been called into question. Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said that some of the makeshift protective measures that health care workers at the Dallas hospital were taking increased “the risk of contamination.”

“By putting on more layers…it becomes much harder to put them on and much harder to take them off,” he said in a Wednesday press conference.

“Some health care workers [were] putting on three or four layers of protective equipment in the belief that this would be more protective,” he said, adding that some were using tape to close parts of their gear.

“We see a lot of variability in the use of protective equipment,” Frieden said.

Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person to exhibit Ebola symptoms in the U.S. and who is now referred to as the “index patient,” was initially turned away from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital before returning days later in an ambulance after his symptoms had progressed.

The nurses’ union at the Dallas hospital have detailed what they claim were violations of the CDC’s safety protocols, including a lack of proper protective wear to overall ignorance on how the disease spreads. The union said Duncan’s contaminated and highly contagious blood test was sent through the hospital’s standard testing system, potentially infecting others.

Two new Ebola infections at the Dallas hospital have highlighted concerns over whether hospitals are prepared to handle the lethal virus or if all Ebola patients should be sent to specialized facilities.

“I think it is too much to expect a hospital can become an Ebola treatment unit simply by reading guidelines,” said Dr. Richard Besser, ABC’s medical correspondent and a former CDC director.

One question that has been raised is why Duncan was not transported from Dallas to one of the two other hospitals with specialized isolation units — one in Omaha, Nebraska, and the other at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia — which have successfully treated Ebola patients.

No health care workers at the Omaha or Atlanta facilities have reported infections after treating three Ebola patients at Emory University Hospital and Ashoka Mukpo, the American reporter currently in treatment at Nebraska Medical Center.

“I feel very strongly that the approach that has been taken is wrong. Patients with Ebola should be treated in special facilities that have been training to take care of patients with deadly contagious diseases,” Besser said.

“Given that patients from Liberia have been safely transported to these units, it should be possible to safely transport patients to these units from any hospital in America,” he said.

Prior to announcing the transfer of one of the health care workers, Frieden said that the CDC’s protocol moving forward would be to dispatch emergency response teams to any hospital where there is an infected patient. From there, they said the team may decide to send the patients to a different facility, but that is not the first step.

Frieden and other officials have warned that there is a real possibility that more health care workers were infected during their treatment of Duncan. On Tuesday, Frieden said that 76 people could have been exposed to Duncan after his second visit to the hospital.

“It may get worse before it gets better, but it will get better,” Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said at a press conference Wednesday.

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Marriage Licenses Issued to Same-Sex Couples in Idaho

Ivonne Wierink/Hemera/Thinkstock(BOISE, Idaho) — Same-sex couples in Idaho began receiving marriage licenses on Wednesday, after a federal appeals court ordered the state to issue licenses to same-sex couples.

The Idaho Statesman reports that Gov. Butch Otter and Attorney General Lawrence Wasden ended their opposition to the appeals court ruling on Tuesday. The appeals court had overturned the state’s ban on same-sex marriages on Oct. 7. However, the following day, Gov. Otter appealed to Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy to stay the ruling.

Kennedy initially issued the stay, preventing the appeals court ruling from going into effect until the state could determine a course of action, the Statesman reports. After receiving arguments from attorneys from both the same-sex marriage attorneys and the state, the Supreme Court lifted the stay.

Gov. Otter said on Monday that he would continue to challenge the order. On Tuesday, however, he issued a new statement, according to the Statesman, that said while he still felt “the federal courts are mistaken in abandoning the sanctity of traditional marriage and in undermining the will of Idaho voters and each state’s right to define marriage,” he would respect the rule of law. Also on Tuesday, Wasden instructed all of the state’s counties to comply beginning Wednesday morning.

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Denver Police Warn Parents About Pot-Laced Candy Ahead of Halloween

Hemera/Thinkstock(DENVER) — Denver Police are warning parents to be on the lookout for pot-laced candy this Halloween — even releasing a video to show parents how similar pot-laced Sour Patch Kids candies, gummy candies and gum drops can look like the real thing.

“A kid is not going to be able to tell the difference,” said Denver Police spokesman Ron Hackett. “My daughter is 7 years old. She could care less if it’s growing mold. She’s going to eat it.”

The video shown by police features Patrick Johnson, the owner of the Urban Dispensary, who explains why parents need to be vigilant about monitoring what candy their children get.

“Edibles account for somewhere between 20 and 30 percent of our gross sales here in the shop,” Johnson says in the video. “There’s really no way to tell the difference between candy that is infused and candy that’s not.”

Johnson advises parents to check candy brands and throw out any suspicious or unknown brands after their child goes trick-or-treating.

Dr. G. Sam Wang, a pediatric emergency room doctor at the Children’s Hospital of Colorado in Denver, told ABC News he’s worried about the first Halloween since recreational marijuana dispensaries have been widely accessible in Colorado.

“In our emergency department in the past couple years, we’ve seen an increase of kids with edible exposures,” Wang said. “Halloween hasn’t happened yet. It is one of those things that we are concerned about and keeping our eyes open for.”

Police also have been concerned that kids might be able to sneak a few pieces of pot-laced candy that parents may have intended for themselves, Hackett said.

“We kind of wanted to get ahead of anything coming out like that,” Hackett said. “We found that the adults were being irresponsible with them. They were taking them incorrectly and taking more than they should.”

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Second Ebola Nurse Flew to Cleveland to Prepare for Her Wedding

Akron Public Schools(CLEVELAND) — The Dallas nurse who traveled to Ohio before being diagnosed with Ebola had flown to Cleveland to prepare for her wedding, Cleveland officials said Wednesday.

Amber Vinson, 29, a nurse at the Dallas hospital where an Ebola patient died, was identified Wednesday as the second health care worker at the hospital to contract the deadly disease.

“She flew into Cleveland to prepare for her wedding. She came in to visit her mother and her mother’s fiance,” said Toinette Parrilla, director of Cleveland Department of Public Health.

Vinson stayed at her relatives’ home while visiting Ohio and those relatives are employees of Kent State University, the school said in a statement.

“She did not step foot on our campus,” Kent State President Beverly Warren said in a statement.

Vinson arrived in Cleveland on Friday, Oct. 10, and returned to Dallas on the evening of Monday, Oct. 13. She was diagnosed with a fever, which is considered to be the first symptom of the disease, on Tuesday Oct. 14. She was tested and her diagnosis was confirmed late Tuesday.

The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention addressed the fact that while she was not ordered into protective custody by the time she traveled, he did suggest that it was a mistake for her to do so.

“Because at that point she was in a group of individuals known to have exposure to Ebola, she should not have traveled on a commercial airline,” CDC Director Tom Frieden said Wednesday.

The CDC reiterated, however, that they released her flight data out of an abundance of caution since she would not be contagious until she began showing symptoms.

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins said Wednesday morning that she was dealing with her diagnosis “with grit and grace.”

Vinson will be transferred from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. Emory successfully treated both missionaries who were the first two Americans to be diagnosed with Ebola, Dr. Kent Brantley and nurse Nancy Writebol. They are also treating a third individual, a World Health Organization worker who has never been identified, who was admitted to Emory on Sept. 9.

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Dallas Ebola Patient Being Transferred to Emory

Emory University Hospital(DALLAS) — A Dallas health care worker found on Wednesday to be infected with Ebola will be transferred to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta after she became the second person to contract the disease while working in the Dallas facility.

The transfer was announced Wednesday by Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell during a press briefing.

The announcement came as the ability of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital — and any local hospital — to handle the outbreak has been questioned.

“I think it is too much to expect a hospital can become an Ebola treatment unit simply by reading guidelines,” said Dr. Richard Besser, ABC News’ medical correspondent and a former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person to exhibit Ebola symptoms in the U.S. and who is now referred to as the “index patient,” was initially turned away from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital before returning days later in an ambulance after his symptoms had progressed.

The nurses’ union at the Dallas hospital have detailed what they claim were violations of the CDC’s safety protocols, including a lack of proper protective wear, to overall ignorance on how the disease spreads. The union said Duncan’s contaminated and highly contagious blood test was sent through the hospital’s standard testing system, potentially infecting others.

One question that has been raised is why Duncan was not transported from Dallas to one of the two other hospitals with specialized isolation units — one in Omaha, Nebraska, and the other at Emory University in Atlanta — which have successfully treated Ebola patients.

No healthcare workers at either facility have reported infections after treating three Ebola patients at Emory University Hospital and Ashoka Mukpo, the American reporter currently in treatment at Nebraska Medical Center.

“I feel very strongly that the approach that has been taken is wrong. Patients with Ebola should be treated in special facilities that have been training to take care of patients with deadly contagious diseases,” Besser said.

“Given that patients from Liberia have been safely transported to these units, it should be possible to safely transport patients to these units from any hospital in America,” he said.

Prior to announcing the transfer of one of the health care workers, CDC Director Tom Frieden said that the agency’s protocol moving forward would be to dispatch emergency response teams to any hospital where there is an infected patient. From there, they said the team may decide to send the patients to a different facility, but that is not the first step.

Frieden and other officials have warned that there is a real possibility that more health care workers were infected during their treatment of Duncan. On Tuesday, Frieden said that 76 people could have been exposed to Duncan after his second visit to the hospital.

“It may get worse before it gets better, but it will get better,” Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said at a press conference Wednesday.

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Second Ebola Nurse Violated Guidelines by Flying on Plane

iStock/Thinkstock(DALLAS) — A second Texas nurse who has tested positive for Ebola violated infection control guidelines by flying on a commercial jetliner from Cleveland to Dallas the night before she arrived at the hospital with a fever, officials said Wednesday.

The nurse, who has been identified as Amber Vinson, 29, was part of the team at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital who took care of Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man who died of Ebola on Oct. 8. She is the second member of the hospital staff to contract the virus and a Dallas official warned Wednesday that additional cases among the hospital’s health care workers are a “very real possibility.”

“Because at that point she was in a group of individuals known to have exposure to Ebola, she should not have traveled on a commercial airline,” said Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “From this moment forward, we will ensure that no individual monitored for exposure undergoes travel in any way other than controlled movement,” he said referring to non-public transportation, such as a personal car or chartered flight.

Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell said Wednesday that the newest Ebola patient would be transferred from Dallas to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, which has successfully treated other Ebola patients.

President Obama was supposed to visit New Jersey and Connecticut on Wednesday, but he canceled the trip to hold a cabinet meeting in the White House to coordinate a response to the Ebola outbreak.

The CDC is reaching out to the 132 passengers who flew with the woman on Frontier Airlines Flight 1143 on Monday evening, landing in Dallas at 8:16 p.m. The health care worker had no symptoms during the flight, the CDC said, but officials are identifying and notifying passengers because she arrived at the hospital with a fever the following morning.

Once the Frontier Airlines flight landed in Dallas, the plane was cleaned for the evening before flying out the next day, according to a statement from Frontier Airlines, which said its procedures are “consistent with CDC guidelines.” It was cleaned again in Cleveland the following night.

Both nurses who became infected had contact with Duncan in his first days in the Dallas hospital — on Sept. 28, 29 and 30 — when he was having “substantial amounts” of vomiting and had diarrhea, according to Frieden. He said officials will be assessing other health workers who had extensive contact with Duncan on these days.

“The fight against Ebola in Dallas is a two-front fight now,” Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins said, speaking at a Wednesday morning press conference.

Authorities said they are now tracking 75 people following the second hospital worker’s diagnosis. She reported a fever Tuesday and was isolated at the hospital, authorities said.

The preliminary Ebola test was run late Tuesday at the state public health laboratory in Austin, and results were received at about midnight, authorities said. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has begun confirmation testing.

The woman was put into isolation within 90 minutes, and she is dealing with her diagnosis “with grit and grace,” Jenkins said.

Authorities said this may not be the last case to be found among the hospital’s staff.

“We are preparing contingencies for more and that is a very real possibility,” Jenkins said.

Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings also suggested additional people may get sick.

“It may get worse before it gets better, but it will get better,” the mayor said.

Dr. Daniel Varga of Texas Health Resources defended practices at the hospital, which has faced criticism amid the Ebola diagnoses.

“It’s clear there was an exposure somewhere, sometime in our treatment of Duncan. Let’s be clear we’re a hospital that serves this community extremely well,” Varga said at the press conference. “We’re the first to diagnose and treat this insidious disease that has attacked two of our own.”

City workers went to the neighborhood of the second patient early Wednsday morning to knock on doors to alert people to the news and to be alert to possible symptoms. They handed out flyers and later began robo calls to the area, Varga said.

Rawlings said the community remains vigilant.

“The only way that we are going to beat this is person by person, moment by moment, detail by detail,” Rawlings said. “While Dallas is anxious about this … We are not fearful.”

Health officials interviewed the patient, hoping to track down any contacts or potential exposures in the community, the CDC said in a statement.

“While this is troubling news for the patient, the patient’s family and colleagues and the greater Dallas community, the CDC and the Texas Department of State Health Services remain confident that wider spread in the community can be prevented with proper public health measures including ongoing contact tracing, health monitoring among those known to have been in contact with the index patient and immediate isolations if symptoms develop,” the CDC said in a statement.

Authorities visited the patient’s apartment Wednesday morning to begin decontamination efforts.

The workers donned hazmat suits, trying to protect themselves from exposure.

The new diagnosis comes days after nurse Nina Pham, 26, who also treated Duncan, was diagnosed with Ebola. Duncan was diagnosed with Ebola Sept. 30 and died Oct. 8.

Burwell admitted that the reasons for the hospital workers becoming infected aren’t clear.

“Those are people that came in contact because we don’t understand exactly how the breach in protocol occurred,” Burwell told ABC News Wednesday. “We are taking the precaution of making sure that anyone within that treatment phase will be tracked and monitored in a more serious way.”

Ebola has killed more than 4,000 people, mostly in the West African countries of Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, according to recent figures by the World Health Organization.

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Second Nurse Infected with Ebola Was on Jetliner Before Diagnosis

iStock/Thinkstock(DALLAS) — A second Texas nurse who has tested positive for Ebola was on a commercial jetliner from Cleveland to Dallas the night before she arrived at the hospital with a fever and was later diagnosed with the deadly virus, officials said Wednesday.

Amber Joy Vinson was part of the team at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital who took care of a Liberian man who died of Ebola. She is the second member of the hospital staff to contract the virus and a Dallas official warned Wednesday that additional cases among the hospital’s health care workers is a “very real possibility.”

“The fight against Ebola in Dallas is a two-front fight now,” Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins said, speaking at a morning press conference.

Authorities said they are now tracking 75 people following the second hospital worker’s diagnosis. The unidentified health care worker reported a fever Tuesday and was isolated at the hospital, authorities said.

The preliminary Ebola test was run late Tuesday at the state public health laboratory in Austin, and results were received at about midnight, authorities said. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has begun confirmation testing.

The woman was put into isolation within 90 minutes, and she is dealing with her diagnosis “with grit and grace,” Jenkins said.

Authorities said this may not be the last case to be found among the hospital’s staff.

“We are preparing contingencies for more and that is a very real possibility,” Jenkins said.

Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings also suggested additional people may get sick.

“It may get worse before it gets better, but it will get better,” the mayor said.

Dr. Daniel Varga of Texas Health Resources defended practices at the hospital, which has faced criticism amid the Ebola diagnoses.

“It’s clear there was an exposure somewhere, sometime in our treatment of Duncan. Let’s be clear we’re a hospital that serves this community extremely well,” Varga said at the press conference.

“We’re the first to diagnose and treat this insidious disease that has attacked two of our own.”

City workers went to the neighborhood of the second patient early this morning to knock on doors to alert people to the news and to be alert to possible symptoms. They handed out flyers and later began robo calls to the area, Varga said.

Rawlings said the community remains vigilant.

“The only way that we are going to beat this is person by person, moment by moment, detail by detail,” Rawlings said. “While Dallas is anxious about this … We are not fearful.”

Health officials interviewed the patient, hoping to track down any contacts or potential exposures in the community, the CDC said in a statement.

“While this is troubling news for the patient, the patient’s family and colleagues and the greater Dallas community, the CDC and the Texas Department of State Health Services remain confident that wider spread in the community can be prevented with proper public health measures including ongoing contact tracing, health monitoring among those known to have been in contact with the index patient and immediate isolations if symptoms develop,” the CDC said in a statement.

Authorities visited the patient’s apartment Wednesday morning to begin decontamination efforts.

The workers donned hazmat suits, trying to protect themselves from exposure.

The new diagnosis comes days after nurse Nina Pham, 26, who also treated Duncan, was diagnosed with Ebola. Duncan was diagnosed with Ebola Sept. 30 and died Oct. 8.

CDC Director Thomas Frieden had previously suggested that Pham may not be the only person who became infected while treating Duncan. “It is possible that other individuals could have been infected,” Frieden said.

Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell admitted that the reasons for the hospital workers becoming infected aren’t clear.

“Those are people that came in contact because we don’t understand exactly how the breach in protocol occurred,” Burwell told ABC News Wednesday. “We are taking the precaution of making sure that anyone within that treatment phase will be tracked and monitored in a more serious way.”

Ebola has killed more than 4,000 people, mostly in the West African countries of Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, according to recent figures by the World Health Organization.

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