Review Category : Poltics

Kerry on Iran Nuclear Negotiations: ‘Could Go Either Way’

Photo by Hasan Tosun/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(VIENNA) — Though progress has been made in recent days, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says that nuclear negotiations between Iran and the P5+1 countries “could go either way.”

Kerry and Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif met multiple times on Sunday, with Kerry telling reporters that it is “time to see whether or not we can close an agreement.” On Saturday, experts reached an agreement on lifting sanctions against Iran, but that details still remained to be approved by the foreign ministers.

With a new deadline set for Tuesday, Kerry said he wouldn’t settle for a bad deal. “If there’s absolutely intransigence…we’re prepared to walk away,” he said Sunday.

Though a deal is closer than it had been, Kerry acknowledged that “we’re not where we need to be.”

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Kerry on Iran Nuclear Negotiations: ‘Could Go Either Way’

Photo by Hasan Tosun/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(VIENNA) — Though progress has been made in recent days, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says that nuclear negotiations between Iran and the P5+1 countries “could go either way.”

Kerry and Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif met multiple times on Sunday, with Kerry telling reporters that it is “time to see whether or not we can close an agreement.” On Saturday, experts reached an agreement on lifting sanctions against Iran, but that details still remained to be approved by the foreign ministers.

With a new deadline set for Tuesday, Kerry said he wouldn’t settle for a bad deal. “If there’s absolutely intransigence…we’re prepared to walk away,” he said Sunday.

Though a deal is closer than it had been, Kerry acknowledged that “we’re not where we need to be.”

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Sen. Tom Cotton: Military Strikes Must ‘Remain an Option’ Over Iran Nuclear Program

ABC News(WASHINGTON) — As the deadline to reach a final agreement with Iran over its nuclear program rapidly approaches, Sen. Tom Cotton said the threat of military action should “remain an option” to ensure a strong deal.

“It’s never the preferred choice, but military force does have to remain an option if our diplomacy is going to be credible,” Cotton, R-Ark., told ABC’s George Stephanopoulos Sunday on This Week. “All of our allies in the region wish we would take a more forceful position and keep that military option on the table because it would result in a better deal.”

The freshman senator is one of the most vocal opponents of the current state of negotiations. He cast the lone dissenting vote against a bipartisan Senate bill in May that granted a 30-day Congressional review period for any deal, saying the bill would not limit President Obama enough.

He also wrote an open letter, co-signed by 46 Republican senators, directly to Iran’s Ayatollah in March saying that the deal might not hold up under future administrations.

On This Week, Cotton also responded to a video from Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif posted Friday that expressed optimism about the state of negotiations.

“That video that Javad Zarif, their foreign minister, posted over the weekend with his smug, condescending tone, shows just how far down the path we’ve gone towards Iran’s position,” Cotton said.

“Iran should have faced a simple choice. They dismantle their nuclear program entirely or they face economic devastation and military destruction of their nuclear facilities,” he said. “Because as that video shows, they think they’re negotiating from a position of strength, that they hold all the cards.”

Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., the ranking Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and the co-sponsor of the bill giving a Congressional vote on the deal, agreed that the objective of the negotiations should be preventing Iran from becoming a nuclear state, but said he still believes that a strong agreement is possible.

“All of that information will be made available to Congress so that we can properly evaluate and decide what action, if any, would be appropriate for us to take,” Cardin said on This Week.

Cardin also outlined what he considers to be critical terms for a strong agreement, including full inspections and a historical look at Iran’s nuclear development in order to properly leverage sanctions. But Cotton said those goals were not being met by the current talks.

“If we had anytime, anywhere inspections, if there was no sanctions relief until there was long-term demonstrable performance on Iran’s part, if they fully answered all the past work they’ve done to weaponize their nuclear program, then that might be a better deal, but that’s not the deal we’re going to reach,” Cotton said.

Negotiations continued today in Vienna, where after his third meeting of the day, Secretary of State John Kerry said the outcome of the talks is not yet clear.

“We are not yet where we need to be on several of the most difficult issues,” he said. “And the truth is that while I completely agree with Foreign Minister Zarif that we have never been closer, at this point, this negotiation could go either way.”

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Sen. Tom Cotton: Military Strikes Must ‘Remain an Option’ Over Iran Nuclear Program

ABC News(WASHINGTON) — As the deadline to reach a final agreement with Iran over its nuclear program rapidly approaches, Sen. Tom Cotton said the threat of military action should “remain an option” to ensure a strong deal.

“It’s never the preferred choice, but military force does have to remain an option if our diplomacy is going to be credible,” Cotton, R-Ark., told ABC’s George Stephanopoulos Sunday on This Week. “All of our allies in the region wish we would take a more forceful position and keep that military option on the table because it would result in a better deal.”

The freshman senator is one of the most vocal opponents of the current state of negotiations. He cast the lone dissenting vote against a bipartisan Senate bill in May that granted a 30-day Congressional review period for any deal, saying the bill would not limit President Obama enough.

He also wrote an open letter, co-signed by 46 Republican senators, directly to Iran’s Ayatollah in March saying that the deal might not hold up under future administrations.

On This Week, Cotton also responded to a video from Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif posted Friday that expressed optimism about the state of negotiations.

“That video that Javad Zarif, their foreign minister, posted over the weekend with his smug, condescending tone, shows just how far down the path we’ve gone towards Iran’s position,” Cotton said.

“Iran should have faced a simple choice. They dismantle their nuclear program entirely or they face economic devastation and military destruction of their nuclear facilities,” he said. “Because as that video shows, they think they’re negotiating from a position of strength, that they hold all the cards.”

Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., the ranking Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and the co-sponsor of the bill giving a Congressional vote on the deal, agreed that the objective of the negotiations should be preventing Iran from becoming a nuclear state, but said he still believes that a strong agreement is possible.

“All of that information will be made available to Congress so that we can properly evaluate and decide what action, if any, would be appropriate for us to take,” Cardin said on This Week.

Cardin also outlined what he considers to be critical terms for a strong agreement, including full inspections and a historical look at Iran’s nuclear development in order to properly leverage sanctions. But Cotton said those goals were not being met by the current talks.

“If we had anytime, anywhere inspections, if there was no sanctions relief until there was long-term demonstrable performance on Iran’s part, if they fully answered all the past work they’ve done to weaponize their nuclear program, then that might be a better deal, but that’s not the deal we’re going to reach,” Cotton said.

Negotiations continued today in Vienna, where after his third meeting of the day, Secretary of State John Kerry said the outcome of the talks is not yet clear.

“We are not yet where we need to be on several of the most difficult issues,” he said. “And the truth is that while I completely agree with Foreign Minister Zarif that we have never been closer, at this point, this negotiation could go either way.”

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Rick Perry on Donald Trump: ‘I Was Offended by His Remarks’

ABC News(NEW YORK) — Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry said he didn’t believe that his fellow 2016 contender Donald Trump “understands the challenge” of strengthening the U.S.-Mexico border, adding he was “offended” when Trump labeled Mexicans “rapists” during a speech last month.

“The fact is that I’ve said very clearly that Donald Trump does not represent the Republican Party,” Perry, the former governor of Texas, said Sunday on ABC News’ This Week. “I was offended by his remarks.”

Trump, a billionaire businessman who is also a Republican, lost business partners and has endured criticism from fellow candidates after he said in his presidential announcement speech last month that Mexico was not sending “their best” people to the United States.

“They are bringing drugs, they’re bringing crime, they are rapists, and some are good people,” he said.

Perry said his 14 years leading Texas, which has a long border with Mexico, better prepared him to address immigration and border control.

“To paint with that broad a brush that Donald Trump did, is, I mean– He’s going to have to defend those remarks,” Perry said. “I never will. And I will stand up and say that those are offensive, which they were.”

Responding to Perry’s comments, Trump tweeted Sunday that Perry “needs a new pair of glasses” — a hit on Perry’s relatively new, black-rimmed eyeglasses.

“Rick Perry failed at the border,” Trump wrote. “Now he is critical of me. He needs a new pair of glasses to see the crimes committed by illegal immigrants.”

Perry also distanced himself from his criticism during his 2012 presidential campaign of the repeal of the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy that prevented gay people from openly serving in the military.

“You don’t need to be in the pew every Sunday to know that there’s something wrong in this country when gays can serve openly in the military but our kids can’t openly celebrate Christmas or pray in school,” Perry said in a 2011 ad.

He suggested Sunday that, if elected president, he would not bring back “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” saying “the horse is out of the barn.”

“I have no reason to think that that’s going to be able to be done,” he said.

ABC US News | World News

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Obama Celebrates Military Families on July 4th: ‘Freedom Is Not Free’

The White House(WASHINGTON) — On the Fourth of July, President Obama reminded thousands of military families celebrating the holiday in his backyard that American freedom comes at a cost.

“Freedom is not free. It’s paid by all the folks who are here today and all the folks who are around the world,” the president said Saturday at an Independence Day party on the White House South Lawn.

“Without you, we could not enjoy the incredible blessings that we do in this greatest country on Earth,” Obama said, just moments before a pyrotechnics display exploded over the National Mall. “Michelle and I, Malia, Sasha — we could not be more privileged to have gotten to know so many of you, and to know all the sacrifices that you make on our behalf each and every day.”

According to the White House, the first family watched the fireworks from the South Portico.

The families — who had originally been invited to a barbecue earlier in the day that was cancelled because of rain — also enjoyed a concert by pop singer Bruno Mars, sponsored by the USO.

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Hillary Clinton Marches in Parade, Reporters Kept Behind Rope Line

iStock/Thinkstock(GORHAM, N.H.) — At the Fourth of July parade Hillary Clinton marched in Saturday in Gorham, New Hampshire, reporters following the candidate were kept — and at moments, dragged — behind an actual moving rope line.

The rope, which two Clinton staffers held on to on either side, was meant to give Clinton space as she walked down the parade route, but photos of reporters being dragged behind the rope as she marched have gone viral on Twitter.

The New Hampshire GOP released a statement critiquing Clinton, saying her use of the rope “insults the traditions of our First-in-the-Nation primary” and touted the Republican presidential candidates for marching in parades without “obstruction from their staff.”

Clinton’s campaign has not responded to ABC News’ request for comment regarding the use of the rope for reporters or to the GOP criticism.

Clinton, meanwhile, seemed to enjoy the parade herself, as she waved to and greeted voters — ignoring a group of loud protesters that trailed right behind her.

“Where were you at 3 a.m. when the phone rang? Name one accomplishment! Tell us about when you were poor!” shouted one man, holding up a sign that read “BENGHAZI.”

But Clinton didn’t let that rattle her.

“I’m just having a good time meeting everybody,” Clinton said when asked whether she had anything to say to them.

And even by the end, her sentiment hadn’t changed.

“It was fabulous,” she said. “I love parades, I love walking in parades, got such a great response … a lot of enthusiasm and energy to celebrate the Fourth of July.”

Following the event, Clinton made a stop at Dairy Bar, a relatively empty nearby restaurant, where she mingled with patrons. Clinton was asked by this reporter about her thoughts to the backlash against Donald Trump. But she dismissed the question in lieu of dessert.

“I’m going to sit down and have some pie,” she said.

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Hillary Clinton Marches in Parade, Reporters Kept Behind Rope Line

iStock/Thinkstock(GORHAM, N.H.) — At the Fourth of July parade Hillary Clinton marched in Saturday in Gorham, New Hampshire, reporters following the candidate were kept — and at moments, dragged — behind an actual moving rope line.

The rope, which two Clinton staffers held on to on either side, was meant to give Clinton space as she walked down the parade route, but photos of reporters being dragged behind the rope as she marched have gone viral on Twitter.

The New Hampshire GOP released a statement critiquing Clinton, saying her use of the rope “insults the traditions of our First-in-the-Nation primary” and touted the Republican presidential candidates for marching in parades without “obstruction from their staff.”

Clinton’s campaign has not responded to ABC News’ request for comment regarding the use of the rope for reporters or to the GOP criticism.

Clinton, meanwhile, seemed to enjoy the parade herself, as she waved to and greeted voters — ignoring a group of loud protesters that trailed right behind her.

“Where were you at 3 a.m. when the phone rang? Name one accomplishment! Tell us about when you were poor!” shouted one man, holding up a sign that read “BENGHAZI.”

But Clinton didn’t let that rattle her.

“I’m just having a good time meeting everybody,” Clinton said when asked whether she had anything to say to them.

And even by the end, her sentiment hadn’t changed.

“It was fabulous,” she said. “I love parades, I love walking in parades, got such a great response … a lot of enthusiasm and energy to celebrate the Fourth of July.”

Following the event, Clinton made a stop at Dairy Bar, a relatively empty nearby restaurant, where she mingled with patrons. Clinton was asked by this reporter about her thoughts to the backlash against Donald Trump. But she dismissed the question in lieu of dessert.

“I’m going to sit down and have some pie,” she said.

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Hillary Clinton Encourages Distraught Gay Child Depicted in Viral Photo

ABC News(WASHINGTON) — A Humans of New York photo showing what it says is a distraught young boy crying because he is gay has gone viral, with thousands of people commenting on Facebook offering advice and words of support.

“I’m homosexual and I’m afraid about what my future will be and that people won’t like me,” the caption reads.

The photo seems to have grabbed the attention and pulled at the heartstrings of even Hillary Clinton, who left her own message for the child as well.

“Prediction from a grown-up: Your future is going to be amazing,” she wrote. “You will surprise yourself with what you’re capable of and the incredible things you go on to do. Find the people who love and believe in you – there will be lots of them.”

The comment was signed “-H,” meaning it’s actually from her.

Clinton’s Deputy Communications Director Kristina Schake tweeted a screenshot of the comment.

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GOP Weekly Address: Let’s Come Together to Protect All That Makes America Great

US Congress(WASHINGTON) — In this week’s Republican address, Rep. Will Hurd of Texas discussed Republicans’ efforts to provide U.S. troops and intelligence professionals with the support they need to carry out their vital missions.

Hurd spoke of the importance of funding America’s military, despite claims that Senate Democrats have held the defense spending bill hostage in order to get more money for agencies that have abused their power.

“Too much is at stake right now to let our differences get in the way of our work to protect freedom,” Hurd said . “America’s men and women who serve our country make up the greatest force for good this world has ever known. They deserve our unwavering support on Independence Day and every other day.”

Hurd, who sits on the Committee on Homeland Security and chairs the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform’s Information Technology Subcommittee contends that using additional funding for “unrelated” agencies such as the Internal Revenue Service and Environmental Protection Agency would block efforts towards improving the nation’s defense.

“I hope they’ll reconsider because too much is at stake right now to let our differences get in the way of our work to protect freedom,” he said.

Read the full transcript of the Republican address:

Hello, I’m Will Hurd, and I’m proud to represent the 23rd District of Texas in Congress. I hope you and your family are having a great Independence Day weekend.

First, I want to wish the U.S. women’s soccer team the best of luck in the World Cup Final. We are so proud of all that you’ve accomplished together as a team. Your grit and determination is inspiring a new generation of American athletes to dream big.

Of course, we’re fortunate to live here in the United State of America, a country where you can work hard and be anything you want to be. Growing up in San Antonio, my parents – Mary Alice and Bob – instilled that lesson in me at an early age, along with the values of honesty and service to a greater good.

Before the people of Texas sent me to Congress, I spent nearly a decade as an undercover case officer in the CIA. I witnessed folks struggling for freedom overseas. And I saw firsthand why we can never take our liberty for granted.

Today we face enemies around the world that are more determined than ever. They have no intention of giving up their pursuit of nuclear weapons, or the violence, fear, and hate they use to cling to power. Our principles of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness — they represent everything our enemies want to destroy.

So as we celebrate this Independence Day, let’s recommit ourselves to supporting our troops, supporting our intelligence professionals, and winning this fight.

Already this year in the U.S. House of Representatives, we’ve passed measures to provide new mental health resources to our veterans and bolster cybersecurity while protecting privacy. And last month we passed a strong national defense bill that meets the president’s funding requests and authorizes a much-deserved pay raise for our troops.

Sadly, some members of the president’s party are trying to block this critical measure. They think that by playing political games, they can extract more funding for unrelated federal agencies like the IRS and the EPA. I hope they’ll reconsider because too much is at stake right now to let our differences get in the way of our work to protect freedom. America’s men and women who serve our country make up the greatest force for good this world has ever known. They deserve our unwavering support on Independence Day and every other day.

Thank you for listening, and God bless the United States of America.

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