Review Category : Poltics

President Obama Shares How a President Stays Healthy and Active

Mark Wilson/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — First Lady Michelle Obama’s #GimmeFive challenge calls for individuals to come up with five healthy habits that they can work into their everyday lives. On Friday, President Obama called for his wife to complete the challenge herself.

“Give me five, FLOTUS style,” Obama says.

The commander in chief even shared his own five habits that he says shows “even a president can stay active and healthy.”

Obama says he gets a workout in at the start of each day, drinks plenty of water, takes the stairs — “when Secret Service lets me take the stairs” — eats plenty of fruits and vegetables, and even takes part in walk-and-talk meetings instead of sitting down.

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Obama Honors Police Officers Killed in Line of Duty

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — President Obama honored police officers who died in the line of duty last year at the National Peace Officers Memorial Service in Washington, D.C, Friday.

“We are here to honor heros who lost their lives in the line of duty. Men and women who put themselves in the way of danger so that the rest of us could live in safety,” the president said, speaking on the West Front of the Capitol.

“Today we honor 131 who made that ultimate sacrifice,” he added.

Obama thanked officers for risking their lives and talked about ways to help reduce that risk.

“We can do everything we have to do to combat the poverty that plagues too many communities in which you have to serve. We can work harder as a nation to heal the rifts that still exist in some places between law enforcement and the people you risk your lives to protect,” he said.

“We cannot erase every darkness and danger from the duty that you’ve chosen,” the president noted. “We can offer you the support you need to be safe. We can make the communities you care about and protect safer as well.”

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Romney to Face Evander Holyfield in the Boxing Ring Friday Night

(SALT LAKE CITY) — A former Republican presidential candidate and a former heavyweight champion are getting ready to face-off in the boxing ring. Mitt Romney and Evander Holyfield will fight Friday night in Salt Lake City at the Rail Event Center.

Romney and Holyfield met face-to-face for a Thursday night weigh-in. Romney and Holyfield weighed-in at 236 pounds and 179 pounds, respectively.

The event will be hosted by CharityVision, a charitable organization dedicated to restoring sight to people in poor countries.

In an interview, Romney told the New York Times ahead of Friday’s boxing match, “I’m staying far away from his ears,” a reference to the incident when Mike Tyson bit Holyfield’s ear during a match.

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Jeb Bush on Disagreeing with Family: ‘I Have a Hard Time with That’

Charles Sykes/NBC(FLAGSTAFF, Ariz.) — Jeb Bush seems to have a talking point to explain why he hesitated so long to say, in hindsight, that the Iraq war was a mistake: He won’t “go out of [his] way” to disagree with his brother.

Bush said those words both at a press gaggle after the town hall where he finally gave his Iraq answer and in a speech to the RNC’s spring meeting in Flagstaff, Arizona, Thursday night.

He also said he has a hard time disagreeing with his family in public.

“There’s a lot of people out there [in the room] from the press, and there’s a lot of interest in finding the ways that we’re different and all this,” Bush said. “But I’m not going to go out of my way to say that, you know, my brother did this wrong or my dad did this wrong. It’s just not gonna happen. I have a hard time with that. I love my family a lot.”

Earlier on Thursday, Bush had seemingly concluded a nearly week-long drama over whether he would have invaded Iraq if he had been president in 2003, given what is now known: that history did not bear out the intelligence purporting Saddam Hussein possessed weapons of mass destruction, one of the main points President George W. Bush cited in making a case to Congress and the U.S. public for supporting an invasion in 2003.

Earlier in the day, speaking to reporters after a town-hall-style meeting at a brewery in Tempe, Arizona, Bush also said he would not “go out of my way” to disagree with his brother.

“I am loyal to him,” Bush said.

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President Obama Touts Gulf Alliance Despite Differences on Iran

Photo by Kevin Dietsch – Pool/Getty Images(CAMP DAVID, Md.) — President Obama stopped short of saying the Persian Gulf nations he hosted at Camp David support negotiations with Iran over its nuclear program, but indicated that they understood it was in their own interest.

His comments came at the end of a marathon day of meetings with representatives from six Gulf countries that are skeptical of a deal that could make Iran a more powerful regional player that might be more capable of challenging the Sunni Gulf nations.

“I’m pleased that here at Camp David, we agree that a comprehensive, verifiable solution that fully addresses the regional and international concerns about Iran’s nuclear program is in the security interests of the international community, including our GCC [Gulf Cooperation Council] partners,” he said.

Most of the nations present at Thursday’s summit, including Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, are embroiled in their own disputes with Iran, including a proxy war playing out in Yemen that pits neighboring Saudi Arabia against the Iran-backed Houthi rebels who have taken over the country.

The administration stressed that the summit was convened to discuss the broad strokes of a U.S.-Gulf security relationship going forward, but the key issue on all parties’ minds was the Iran talks — and White House officials briefed the Gulf representatives on negotiations during a morning meeting.

The president said the U.S. pledged to defend its Gulf allies in the event of “external threats” to their territorial integrity, although his remarks fell short of a formal mutual defense treaty that some Gulf nations had expressed a desire for prior to the meeting.

“The United States stands ready to work with our GCC partners to urgently determine what actions may be appropriate, using the means at our collective disposal, including the potential use of military force for the defense of our GCC partners,” Obama said.

Earlier in the day, Saudi Foreign Minister Adel al-Jubeir also praised the day’s discussions, telling reporters the summit was “unprecedented” and that he hoped it would lead to Gulf states taking their relationship with the U.S. “to an entirely different level going forward over the next decades.”

The president also commented on several domestic issues during a news conference after the day’s meetings, praising the Senate for passing a bill to give him “fast track” authority to negotiate a trade deal without interim input from Congress.

He also rejected the idea that he was in a personal feud with Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., over their disagreements on the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal. As he did so, he paused for dramatic effect and chuckled before saying the senator’s name — likely an indirect reference to the fact that Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, had called Obama “disrespectful” for referring to Warren by her first name.

“The issue with respect to myself and…Elizabeth…has never been personal,” he said.

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President Obama’s On-Camera Condolences on Amtrak Crash Come After Qatari Leader’s

Photo by Kevin Dietsch – Pool/Getty Images(CAMP DAVID, Md.) — President Obama expressed his condolences for the victims of Tuesday’s Amtrak crash in Philadelphia — but not until after the leader of a foreign nation did so first.

The president’s statement came at the beginning of a news conference that capped off a day of meetings with representatives from six Gulf states on the Iran nuclear negotiations and related regional issues at the Camp David presidential retreat outside of Washington.

“I offer my prayers for those who grieve,” Obama said. “A speedy recovery for the many who were injured as they work to recover. And we will cooperate, obviously, at every level of government to make sure that we get answers in terms of precisely what happened.”

He also made a call for maintaining a commitment to spending on infrastructure improvements around the country, given congressional negotiations on transportation funding happening back in Washington.

While the president issued a written statement on Tuesday after the crash, he passed up two prior opportunities to comment on it on camera — first during a bilateral meeting in the Oval Office with a Saudi delegation Wednesday, then during a joint statement with the Qatari emir — before he finally did so.

Earlier Thursday, the emir of Qatar, Tamim Al Thani, offered his condolences during a joint statement he made with Obama.

“I wanted to say something important…on behalf of all Gulf countries,” he said. “We want to send our deepest condolences to the president and the American people on the tragic train accident in Philadelphia.”

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House Passes Iran Nuclear Review Legislation

Image Source Pink/Image Source/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The House approved bipartisan legislation on Thursday that will empower Congress with the opportunity to review any final international agreement on Iran’s nuclear program before the president could potentially waive or suspend sanctions imposed by Congress on Iran.

By a vote of 400-25, the House overwhelmingly passed the Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act of 2015, which now heads to the White House for the president’s signature.

Nineteen Republicans and six Democrats opposed the measure.

President Obama has signaled he will sign the bill.

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Like Jeb Bush, Marco Rubio Has Evolved on Iraq Question

ABC/Donna Svennevik(WASHINGTON) — Over the course of the last few days, likely Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush has showcased an evolving position on whether he would have authorized the invasion of Iraq in 2003 “knowing what we know now” about faulty intelligence at the time.

But, as it turns out, it is also a question that has vexed one of his possible rivals for the Republican presidential nomination, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio.

Asked on Wednesday whether he would have supported the invasion of Iraq in 2003 had he known the country did not possess weapons of mass destruction, Rubio added his voice to the chorus of Republican presidential hopefuls who have said “no” this week.

“Not only would I not have been in favor of it, President Bush would not have been in favor of it — and he said so,” Rubio told Charlie Rose after a speech at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York.

“I don’t think the Congress would have voted in favor of the authorization” had they not relied on faulty intelligence, he added.

But Rubio’s comments this week appear to differ from his assertions on Fox News’ The Five in March.

When asked a somewhat different question, whether it was “a mistake to go to war in Iraq,” Rubio responded, “No, I don’t believe it was.”

“The world is a better place because Saddam Hussein doesn’t run Iraq,” he said. “We don’t know what the world would look like if Saddam Hussein was still there. But I doubt it would look better…it would be worse, or just as bad for different reasons.”

His response this March was very similar to what Rubio said during a Florida U.S. Senate debate in October 2010.

Asked by the moderators whether America was “safer and better off for having gone to war in Iraq,” Rubio answered: “I think the answer ultimately is yes. First of all, the world is better off because Saddam Hussein is no longer in charge in Iraq.”

Rubio’s allies argue that the senator’s comments don’t actually contradict one another. Condemning the war’s justifications and appreciating its outcomes are not mutually exclusive, they say.

Meanwhile, Bush — who has not yet declared his candidacy but is expected to do so in the near future — has answered the question five different ways in just four days.

When asked in an interview that aired on Monday by Fox News’ Megyn Kelly, “Knowing what we know now, would you have authorized the invasion” of Iraq in 2003, Bush initially responded: “I would have and so would have Hillary Clinton, just to remind everybody, and so would almost everybody that was confronted with the intelligence they got.”

Subsequently, Bush said he misheard the initial question. And at a town hall meeting in Arizona on Thursday, he came full circle.

“If we’re all supposed to answer hypotheticals,” Bush said, “I would not, have engaged, I would not have gone into Iraq.”

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Jeb Bush Comes Full Circle on Iraq Question: ‘I Would Not Have Gone Into Iraq’

William Thomas Cain/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — In the space of just four days, likely Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush has come full circle on whether he would have made the decision to invade Iraq in 2003 as his brother, then President George W. Bush, did.

“If we’re all supposed to answer hypotheticals,” Bush said at a town hall meeting in Tempe, Arizona, today. “I would not, have engaged, I would not have gone into Iraq.”

Bush said he was “reluctant to say what I’m about to say now” because as governor of Florida he contacted families to offer condolences when their children died in Iraq. “It’s very hard for me to say that their lives were lost in vain, and they weren’t.”

It all started with a question posed by Fox News‘ Megyn Kelly in an interview that aired on Monday: “Knowing what we know now, would you have authorized the invasion” of Iraq in 2003?

“I would have and so would have Hillary Clinton, just to remind everybody, and so would almost everybody that was confronted with the intelligence they got,” Bush said.

But over the last few days he has sought to refine that answer.

In an interview on The Sean Hannity Show on Tuesday he acknowledged: “I interpreted the question wrong, I guess” and added “I don’t know what that decision would have been. That’s a hypothetical.”

And Wednesday, at a town hall meeting in Nevada, he said this: “The problem with hypotheticals is two-fold. One, when I was governor I got to — I felt it a duty, I didn’t have to — to call all the family members of people who lost their lives and I don’t remember the total number but it was easily over 100. And I felt it a duty to do that because I admired the sacrifice of their families. And I admired the men and women — mostly men — that made the ultimate sacrifice. So, going back in time and talking about hypotheticals — what would have happened what could have happened, I think, does a disservice for them.”

But speaking to reporters after the event he hinted at the position he took today: “Of course, given the power of looking back and having that — of course anybody would have made different decisions. There’s no denying that.”

Many of Bush’s potential GOP rivals, including Sens. Rand Paul and Marco Rubio, Gov. Chris Christie and Carly Fiorina, have also answered the same question in recent days, and so far, all have said they would not have made the decision to invade if they had known about the fault intelligence.

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Jeb Bush Comes Full Circle on Iraq Question: ‘I Would Not Have Gone Into Iraq’

William Thomas Cain/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — In the space of just four days, likely Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush has come full circle on whether he would have made the decision to invade Iraq in 2003 as his brother, then President George W. Bush, did.

“If we’re all supposed to answer hypotheticals,” Bush said at a town hall meeting in Tempe, Arizona, today. “I would not, have engaged, I would not have gone into Iraq.”

Bush said he was “reluctant to say what I’m about to say now” because as governor of Florida he contacted families to offer condolences when their children died in Iraq. “It’s very hard for me to say that their lives were lost in vain, and they weren’t.”

It all started with a question posed by Fox News‘ Megyn Kelly in an interview that aired on Monday: “Knowing what we know now, would you have authorized the invasion” of Iraq in 2003?

“I would have and so would have Hillary Clinton, just to remind everybody, and so would almost everybody that was confronted with the intelligence they got,” Bush said.

But over the last few days he has sought to refine that answer.

In an interview on The Sean Hannity Show on Tuesday he acknowledged: “I interpreted the question wrong, I guess” and added “I don’t know what that decision would have been. That’s a hypothetical.”

And Wednesday, at a town hall meeting in Nevada, he said this: “The problem with hypotheticals is two-fold. One, when I was governor I got to — I felt it a duty, I didn’t have to — to call all the family members of people who lost their lives and I don’t remember the total number but it was easily over 100. And I felt it a duty to do that because I admired the sacrifice of their families. And I admired the men and women — mostly men — that made the ultimate sacrifice. So, going back in time and talking about hypotheticals — what would have happened what could have happened, I think, does a disservice for them.”

But speaking to reporters after the event he hinted at the position he took today: “Of course, given the power of looking back and having that — of course anybody would have made different decisions. There’s no denying that.”

Many of Bush’s potential GOP rivals, including Sens. Rand Paul and Marco Rubio, Gov. Chris Christie and Carly Fiorina, have also answered the same question in recent days, and so far, all have said they would not have made the decision to invade if they had known about the fault intelligence.

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