Review Category : Poltics

Obama Vents on ‘Biggest Frustration’: Gun Violence

Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) — President Obama says his “biggest frustration” in office has been the failure of policymakers to “keep guns out of the hands of people who can do just unbelievable damage.”

“We’re the only developed country on Earth where this happens. And it happens now once a week. And it’s a one-day story. There’s no place else like this,” Obama said during a Q&A at the White House hosted by the social media site Tumblr.

Obama’s comments came the same day that a teenage gunman shot and killed a student and injured a teacher inside a Troutdale, Oregon, high school before apparently killing himself, authorities said.

“Why aren’t we doing something about this?” Obama said of the recurring violence. “I have been in Washington for a while now and most things don’t surprise me. The fact that 20 6-year-olds were gunned down in the most violent fashion possible and this town couldn’t do anything about it was stunning to me.”

Obama has called the December 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., the “worst day” of his presidency. He launched a campaign to enact legislative reforms, including expanded background checks for gun purchases, but those efforts stalled under stiff opposition in Congress and from the National Rifle Association.

“Most members of Congress — and I have to say to some degree this is bipartisan — are terrified of the NRA,” Obama said.

“Until there is a fundamental shift in public opinion in which people say, ‘Enough; this is not acceptable; this is not normal,’” he said, “until that’s a view that people feel passionately about and are willing to go after folks who don’t vote reflecting those values — until that happens, sadly, not that much is going to change.”

Obama spoke in response to a question from Nick Dineen, a student at University of California at Santa Barbara and former resident adviser to George Chen, one of the victims of last month’s deadly campus shooting that left six students dead.

The president suggested the root cause of so many violent episodes was predominantly easy access to guns rather than mental health issues of the shooter.

“The United States does not have a monopoly on crazy people. And yet, we kill each other in these mass shootings at rates that are exponentially higher than anyplace else,” he said. “Well, what’s the difference? The difference is, is that these guys can stack up a bunch of ammunition in their houses and that’s sort of par for the course.”

Obama said Tuesday’s shooting in Oregon should, again, prompt “soul searching” nationwide.


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Sen. Ted Cruz Renounces Canadian Citizenship

United States Senate(WASHINGTON) — Ted Cruz renounced his Canadian citizenship, a spokesperson said on Tuesday.

Cruz, born in the Great White North, was a dual citizen of the United States and Canada. His office provided ABC News with a copy of the Canadian Renunciation Letter, which says he officially renounced his Canadian citizenship last month. The letter is signed by a Canadian minister and was opened at Cruz’s home in Houston.

Cruz first discovered his dual citizenship last year after the Dallas Morning News reported it. The Texas senator has considered himself a possible presidential contender in 2016, and said in August 2013 he would renounce his dual citizenship.

“Nothing against Canada,” Cruz said at the time, “but I’m an American by birth and, as a U.S. senator, I believe I should only be an American.”

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Obama Signs Two Bills into Law Alongside Republicans

Pete Souza/The White House(WASHINGTON) — Here’s something you don’t see every day: President Obama signing bills into law, surrounded by conservative Republicans at the White House.

That was the scene Tuesday morning as Obama put his signature on a $12 billion infrastructure bill, and a measure awarding one of the nation’s highest civilian honor to a Puerto Rican U.S. Army regiment known as the “Bourinqueneers.”

“Love signing bills,” the president said with a big grin. “Though they accomplish two very different things, these bills do what we want all our laws to do, and that’s serve the American people by honoring our past and building a stronger future.”

Obama said the Water Resources Reform and Development Act would “green light” 34 water infrastructure projects nationwide, modernizing facilities, restoring ecosystems and facilitating the shipping sector. The projects are expected to create thousands of jobs.

A second measure bestows the Congressional Gold Medal to a Puerto Rican regiment that has fought in every major conflict since World War I.

“Segregation that set them apart from their fellow soldiers — but their courage made them legendary,” Obama said.

“Only a handful of military units have ever received this award, and only one other Hispanic American has received this award, Roberto Clemente,” the president said. “That’s pretty good company. So this is a proud day for the Borinqueneers and their families.”

Both measures passed Congress with strong bipartisan support.

Lawmakers from both parties joined Obama for the bill signings, including Republican Sens. David Vitter of Louisiana and Marco Rubio of Florida, and Republican Reps. Bill Shuster of Pennsylvania and Rep. Bill Posey of Florida.

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Senators Briefed on Bergdahl Swap; GOP Criticism Continues

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Members of the Senate Armed Services Committee received a briefing on the Bowe Bergdahl prisoner exchange from Pentagon officials on Tuesday.

Following the briefing, Republican lawmakers continued to criticize the administration for agreeing to release five Taliban detainees without notifying Congress.

“I have every reason to believe if they want to go back to the fight, they will, and judging from their background, I think they will go back to the fight,” Sen. Jim Inhofe, ranking member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said.

“Nobody can look at this deal without being troubled that the safety and security of American citizens has been jeopardized and the safety and security of our soldiers has been jeopardized,” Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, said.

Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Ala., said the Pentagon officials offered no information in the briefing to indicate the U.S. Army sergeant’s life was in danger prior to the exchange.

And it wasn’t just Republicans expressing skepticism about the prisoner swap. Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., told reporters he’s convinced it was a “bad deal” to turn over five Taliban detainees.

”My main concern is these five released prisoners. Was it a good deal or a bad deal? In my mind, it’s still a bad deal. I can’t explain it back home to my fellow west Virginians,” Manchin said.

Tuesday’s Senate briefing comes one day before Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel will testify on the Bergdahl exchange before the House Armed Services Committee.

Sen. Carl Levin, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said Pentagon officials continue to defend their decision to secure Bergdahl’s release despite questions about his captivity.

“It is critically important that the American people know that the chairman of the joint chiefs and the vice chairman of the joint chiefs strongly recommended this agreement knowing full well the Bergdahl had left his unit and knowing full well how bad these Taliban people were,” Levin said. “Nothing has changed the firm determination that this was the right thing to do.”

The White House reached a deal on the prisoner exchange involving Sgt. Bergdahl one day before it occurred and nailed down the exact location just one hour before the swap, the Senate’s second highest ranking Democrat said Tuesday.

“They knew a day ahead of time that the transfer was going to take place. They knew an hour ahead of time where it was going to take place,” Durbin told a small group of reporters in the Capitol Tuesday.

Durbin argued the short time frame gave the administration little opportunity to notify Congress.

“Are you saying that once we decided to do the prisoner transfer we had to wait 30 days to notify Congress and wait 30 days? The president couldn’t do that. It was impossible, and it could have endangered the man’s life by waiting 30 days,” he said.

Levin offered a slightly longer timeline for the exchange agreement, saying the deal came together days before it actually occurred.

House Speaker John Boehner, who said he was never briefed on a potential exchange, predicted on Tuesday that the release of the five detainees will cost U.S. lives.

“We’re going to pay for this. There is not any doubt in my mind there are going to be costs, lost lives associated with what came out of this,” the Ohio Republican said at a news conference.

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Republicans Rip Hillary Clinton’s Leadership at State Department

Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Congressional Republicans were unimpressed by former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s primetime interview with ABC News, knocking the perceived frontrunner for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination and questioning her ability to serve as president.

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., who also is considered a presidential contender, said Clinton’s actions surrounding the Sept. 11, 2012 terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya, demonstrated that she is incapable of being commander in chief.

“Ultimately, that’s a deal killer for her. I don’t think she can win the presidency because, frankly, people want a commander in chief who can defend our troops and who will defend our embassies,” Paul said. “This wasn’t a one-night thing. This was a six-months request for security that was denied.”

During the interview with ABC News that aired Monday, Clinton hesitated to acknowledge that Libya was in the top 10 most dangerous countries for State Department employees, telling Diane Sawyer that Libya “would be in the top 25″ but “there were places where we had much more concerns” that spread the State Department’s resources for diplomatic security thin.

“How many countries are there more dangerous than Libya? Could be maybe five, six countries that dangerous, and you don’t read the ambassador’s cables?” Paul asked. “It’s inexcusable. That was her 3 a.m. moment and she failed.”

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, said he also was “not satisfied” with Clinton’s explanation in which she cited ”systemic problems” at the State Department that she believed made it hard to know diplomatic security was inadequate in time to take action to prevent the deadly attack.

“If you’re the secretary, you’re responsible for the decisions that your department makes,” Boehner said during a news conference Tuesday at the Capitol. “Simple as that.”

As for Clinton’s assertion that she and President Bill Clinton were “dead broke” when they left the White House, an apparent gaffe that forced her to backtrack on Tuesday, Paul invited Hillary Clinton to visit his state to get a first-hand look at how his constituents are struggling to make ends meet.

“Most people would think $8 million is a lot of money, and I think that [book deal] was signed while they were in the White House,” Paul said. “There’s a lot of Americans struggling. If she wants to come to eastern Kentucky, to my state, and see the miners who are out of work and the despair in their faces, and talk about her personal plight as being a poor spouse of the president, she’s welcome to take that message around the country.”

On Tuesday, Clinton worked to smooth over her remarks, telling Good Morning America’s Robin Roberts that she and the former president owed $12 million in legal fees when they left the White House in January 2001.

“Now their net worth is between $100-200 million,” Paul said. “The sad song of her reporting her personal financial difficulties — and the fact she hasn’t driven herself in a car in 17 years — doesn’t sound like she’s going to connect well with the middle class.”

Asked what he thinks of being identified as Clinton’s favorite Republican, Sen. John McCain of Arizona joked, “I hope that doesn’t get back to Arizona.”

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Republicans Rip Hillary Clinton’s Leadership at State Department

Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Congressional Republicans were unimpressed by former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s primetime interview with ABC News, knocking the perceived frontrunner for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination and questioning her ability to serve as president.

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., who also is considered a presidential contender, said Clinton’s actions surrounding the Sept. 11, 2012 terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya, demonstrated that she is incapable of being commander in chief.

“Ultimately, that’s a deal killer for her. I don’t think she can win the presidency because, frankly, people want a commander in chief who can defend our troops and who will defend our embassies,” Paul said. “This wasn’t a one-night thing. This was a six-months request for security that was denied.”

During the interview with ABC News that aired Monday, Clinton hesitated to acknowledge that Libya was in the top 10 most dangerous countries for State Department employees, telling Diane Sawyer that Libya “would be in the top 25″ but “there were places where we had much more concerns” that spread the State Department’s resources for diplomatic security thin.

“How many countries are there more dangerous than Libya? Could be maybe five, six countries that dangerous, and you don’t read the ambassador’s cables?” Paul asked. “It’s inexcusable. That was her 3 a.m. moment and she failed.”

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, said he also was “not satisfied” with Clinton’s explanation in which she cited ”systemic problems” at the State Department that she believed made it hard to know diplomatic security was inadequate in time to take action to prevent the deadly attack.

“If you’re the secretary, you’re responsible for the decisions that your department makes,” Boehner said during a news conference Tuesday at the Capitol. “Simple as that.”

As for Clinton’s assertion that she and President Bill Clinton were “dead broke” when they left the White House, an apparent gaffe that forced her to backtrack on Tuesday, Paul invited Hillary Clinton to visit his state to get a first-hand look at how his constituents are struggling to make ends meet.

“Most people would think $8 million is a lot of money, and I think that [book deal] was signed while they were in the White House,” Paul said. “There’s a lot of Americans struggling. If she wants to come to eastern Kentucky, to my state, and see the miners who are out of work and the despair in their faces, and talk about her personal plight as being a poor spouse of the president, she’s welcome to take that message around the country.”

On Tuesday, Clinton worked to smooth over her remarks, telling Good Morning America’s Robin Roberts that she and the former president owed $12 million in legal fees when they left the White House in January 2001.

“Now their net worth is between $100-200 million,” Paul said. “The sad song of her reporting her personal financial difficulties — and the fact she hasn’t driven herself in a car in 17 years — doesn’t sound like she’s going to connect well with the middle class.”

Asked what he thinks of being identified as Clinton’s favorite Republican, Sen. John McCain of Arizona joked, “I hope that doesn’t get back to Arizona.”

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Hillary Clinton Fans Wait Through Night for Book Signing

Elizabeth Kreutz/ABC News(NEW YORK) — Hillary Clinton drew a Harry Potter-sized line of fans waiting to get an autographed copy of her new memoir Hard Choices at a New York City bookstore Tuesday.

Hundreds of Clinton fans have camped out for hours, many overnight, outside the Union Square Barnes and Noble store to get one of the coveted wristbands, which would allow them access to her first book tour stop Tuesday. By the time people were allowed to go inside the store around 8:30 a.m., the line was wrapped around an entire city block — up Park Avenue, around 18th Street, and all the way to Broadway.

At the front of the line was Sean Brennan from Queens, New York, who arrived at 2:30 p.m. Monday with a camping chair, umbrella and snack pack of apples and peanut butter. Brennan, 41, who started a nonprofit called the Brain Food Garden Project, said he didn’t expect to be the first in line, but that he’s definitely ready for Clinton.

By the time Brennan got inside the store, he was showing his fatigue.

“Ok, I’m ready,” he sighed. “I’m ready to go home, curl up with the book, and go to bed.”

He estimated that he would finish half of the 650-page memoir before falling asleep.

Also outside, is the Ready for Hillary Bus, which is making its debut Tuesday, and plans to travel with her on the book tour from town to town.

Inside the bookstore, people were corralled by ropes wrapping around the store’s top floor. There’s also a giant wall filled from floor to ceiling with copies of Hard Choices.

There are a lot of restrictions for those who put in the effort to get a book signed by Clinton. Barnes and Noble staff has been distributing strict guidelines for the signing. According to the rules, Clinton will only sign one book per person, she will not personalize it or sign other memorabilia, and there will be “NO posed photography with the author.”

Personal items like bags had to be left on the second floor and there is a security checkpoint on the third floor before finally reaching Clinton on the fourth floor.

The guidelines suggest the wait could be a long one and states they “strongly recommend consuming food or beverages…prior to entering the store” and using restrooms before getting inside.

If you have second thoughts about wanting Clinton’s autograph, it may be too bad.

The instructions are clear: “Once you are cleared and enter the 4th floor, you are not permitted to exit until your book is signed.”

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Five Races to Watch in Tuesday’s Congressional Primaries

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Primary season continues and on Tuesday, six states are voting across the country, including Virginia, South Carolina, Maine, Nevada and North Dakota, along with a run-off election in Arkansas.

Here are five races to watch this primary Tuesday:

TEA PARTY BRAWL TURNS INTO MORE OF A SNOOZE: Incumbent Sen. Lindsey Graham, who is seeking a third term, will be facing six competitors in Tuesday’s South Carolina GOP Senate primary. Despite being opposed by tea party groups, he is expected to cruise to victory on Tuesday against Columbia pastor Det Bowers, State Senator Lee Bright, businessman Richard Cash, attorney Bill Connor, attorney Benjamin Dunn, and businesswoman Nancy Mace, who also happens to be the first female graduate of the Citadel.

WHY IT MATTERS: Unlike in Mississippi, where an establishment Republican has a difficult primary, none of Graham’s challengers were able to coalesce the anti-Graham vote. Graham has also swamped his opponents in fundraising, raking in cash early in case he did have a more vigorous opponent. The reason to watch Tuesday night is while none of Graham’s opponents are expected to win the majority of votes in the primary, the fact that there are six of them could make it difficult for him to receive the 50 percent needed to move on to the general election. If not, he will be forced into a runoff election with the candidate who receives the second-greatest percentage of votes. Even if that does happen it will be in two weeks, making it difficult for one opponent to quickly make their case against Graham.

CANTOR JABBED FROM THE RIGHT: House Majority Leader Eric Cantor is in a primary fight in Virginia’s seventh congressional district and he is expected to win easily, but not without getting a little dinged. His opponent, Dave Brat, is an economics and ethics professor at Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Virginia, and is running from Cantor’s right. The conservative Republican also served under two governors on the Joint Advisory Board of Economists in the state, including under Democratic Gov. Tim Kaine.

WHY IT MATTERS: Brat is in favor of tighter border security and has attacked Cantor repeatedly on the issue of immigration. It’s definitely a long shot, but he does have some big-name conservative backing: Ann Coulter and Laura Ingraham have both endorsed Brat. In an interview with ABC News last month, Brat said Cantor has lost touch with his constituents, “veering from the Republican creed. Years ago he had a good conservative track record, but now he’s veered off. He’s not following what folks in his district want him to do and it’s hurting the country.”

MAINE’S SECOND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT: In Maine, Democratic Rep. Michael H. Michaud is running for governor and there are primaries Tuesday on both sides of the aisle. Emily Cain and Troy Jackson, both state senators, are facing off in the Democratic primary election. Cain, backed by Emily’s List, is currently the frontrunner, having outraised Jackson by a large margin. In the GOP primary, former Maine State Treasurer Bruce Poliquin is facing former State Senator Kevin Raye. Raye is considered the frontrunner and is the more moderate candidate, which Poliquin has been hitting Raye on. The district, in the northern part of the state, voted for Obama with 53 percent of the vote in 2012.

VIRGINIA’S EIGHTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT: A batch of newcomers — Don Beyer, Lavern Chatman, Adam Ebbin, William Euille, Partick Hope, Derek Hyra and Mark Levine — are in a crowded Democratic primary to represent a section of Northern Virginia including the Washington, D.C., suburbs of Alexandria and Arlington. Democratic Rep. Jim Moran is retiring, leaving this race wide open. Beyer, currently the frontrunner, has served as both the lieutenant governor of Virginia and ambassador to Switzerland under the Obama administration. Beyer has received the endorsement of a few Obama advisers, including David Axelrod. Chatman, who has received the endorsement of Oprah Winfrey, formerly served as the president of the Northern Virginia Urban League. Levine is a radio talk show host and former chief legislative counsel to retired Rep. Barney Frank. Ebbin has served as a Virginia state senator since 2012 and is the first openly gay member of the Virginia General Assembly. Hope also serves in the Virginia General Assembly, representing Virginia’s 47th state district in the House of Delegates. Euille has served as the mayor of Alexandria since 2003. Hyra is an associate professor of Urban Affairs and Planning at Virginia Tech. Most of the candidates describe themselves as liberal or progressive and it’s likely the winner on Tuesday will be the victor in November.

NEVADA’S FOURTH DISTRICT GOP PRIMARY: The most competitive congressional primary election in Nevada is in the Fourth District. State Assemblyman Crescent Hardy will be taking on African American tea-party candidate Niger Innis in the GOP primary. The winner of this primary will go on to run against Democratic incumbent Rep. Steven Horsford. While Nevada’s top two Republicans, Gov. Brian Sandoval and U.S. Sen. Dean Heller, have backed Hardy, the state’s Republican Party endorsed Innis, who is the son of Roy Innis, leader of CORE or Congress for Racial Equality, the historic civil rights group. Innis is a nationally recognized conservative, but only moved to Nevada in 2007.

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Protégé of Sarah Palin, Condi Rice Guns for Senate Seat in Alaska

ABC News(WASHINGTON) — He once worked for Sarah Palin and has been dubbed a “protégé” of Condoleezza Rice. Now, Dan Sullivan is fighting to become a high-profile conservative brand name of his own, trying to unseat Democratic Sen. Mark Begich of Alaska in one of the most closely watched political races of the year.

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin appointed Sullivan attorney general in 2009. Before that, he worked within President George W. Bush’s inner circle as a senior adviser to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. Now, Sullivan has the task of convincing GOP primary voters that he is Alaskan enough, among other things, to win a spot on the ballot in November.

“Alaska in many ways is a mindset,” said Sullivan, who some have accused of being a carpetbagger born in Ohio, without legitimate Alaskan roots. “I moved to Alaska 17 years ago, was married 20 years ago, my kids and family were raised in Alaska…I’ve dedicated my life to my great state and my family has and we love it up there.”

While Sullivan describes both Palin and Rice as “great bosses,” he insists that he stands on his own.

“You know protégé, look I learned a lot from her [Condoleezza Rice], I learned a lot from Sarah Palin,” he said.

Rice has come to Sullivan’s aid with an endorsement in the race, but Palin has yet to do the same. The former governor and vice presidential candidate’s silence in the race is likely due in part to the fact that she endorsed Sullivan’s Tea Party opponent, Joe Miller, in the last Alaskan Senate race in 2010.

When asked if he expects Palin’s public support, Sullivan made clear that it would be welcome.

“One of the things that Governor Palin has been associated with is different elements of the Republican Party, Tea Party — less government, more economic freedom, fighting the federal government’s overreach,” he said. “Those are critical issues for my campaign.”

Even without Palin’s endorsement, Sullivan is considered the leading Republican contender in the race and is currently the frontrunner against Miller and Lt. Gov. Mead Treadwell in August’s Republican primary.

Miller has said that if he doesn’t win in the primary against Sullivan, he has not ruled out running as an Independent in the general election. Sullivan, however, said he would not consider doing the same if he loses.

“This election is about things that are much bigger than one individual or one individual’s ambition,” he said. “The focus is to unite the party…but then get behind whoever wins the primary to go on to help get the broader goal that all Republicans in Alaska agree on, which is to beat Mark Begich in November.”

If he does make it to the Senate, Sullivan said he plans to align himself more closely with the “newer generation” of Republican senators, such as Sen. Ted Cruz, than the established party line.

“I do really like the newer generation of senators,” Sullivan said. “To me, getting back to limited government, less government, more freedom, is very important. Ultimately, I’m going to be the senator for Alaska based on Dan Sullivan’s principles.”

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Why Hillary Clinton Wouldn’t Attack Palin ‘for Being a Woman’

US State Department(NEW YORK) — Hillary Clinton elaborated Tuesday on why she rebuffed the Obama campaign’s request that she attack Sarah Palin during the 2008 presidential race to blunt Palin’s appeal to women.

Clinton made her comments in an exclusive interview this morning on Good Morning America with ABC’s Robin Roberts after Palin cited Clinton’s new book Hard Choices to suggest it was the Democrats “who fired the first shot in the real ‘war on women.’”

Clinton admitted she was asked by the Obama campaign to “go out and criticize” Palin when she was selected as John McCain’s running mate during the 2008 campaign, but she said, “‘For what? For being a woman? No let’s wait until we know where she stands. I don’t know anything about her, do you know anything about her?’ And nobody of course did.”

“I think it’s fair to say that I made it clear I’m not going to go attack somebody for being a woman or a man. I’m going to try and look at the issues, where they stand, what their experience is, what they intend to do and then that’s fair game,” Clinton said.

In responding to Palin’s tweet she tried to clarify saying, “That’s not exactly what I said.”

“What I said was that in beginning the process of working with Senator Obama after I ended my campaign, we had as I describe in the book, an awkward but necessary meeting to clear the air on a couple of issues and one of them was the sexism that unfortunately was present in that ’08 campaign,” Clinton said.

In Clinton’s book, she writes that she declined a request by the Obama campaign to attack Palin. “I was not going to attack Palin just for being a woman appealing for support from other women. I didn’t think it made political sense, and it didn’t feel right. So I said no,” Clinton said in her book.

In response, Palin tweeted “Look who fired the 1st shot in the real ‘war on women’. Hint: it wasn’t the GOP. See this excerpt from Hillary’s book.”

Roberts also asked the potential 2016 presidential candidate about running for president as a woman now compared to in 2008. “I think it’s different for women across the board because, not just in the political sphere that we continue to have these obstacles to women’s full participation. It’s true in the corporate sphere, in journalism, and academia, across the board. But I think that over the last six to seven years there has been a much greater awareness in the American public about the double standard.”

“So I really believe that there is a great discussion going on now and whether it’s somebody running for president or climbing the corporate ladder, or broadcasting or anything else, there is much greater awareness and that is all to the good,” she said.

In the final seconds of the interview, Clinton sat for a lightening round and revealed her favorite Republican in Congress: Sen. John McCain, Palin’s running mate in 2008.

“Despite my problems with him, John McCain because he and I have traveled a lot and we argue a lot and he goes off on somethings that I disagree with, but I admire him and I’ve spent a lot of time with him,” she said.

And in an answer that covers both sports and politics, Clinton weighed in on who she thinks will win game three of the NBA finals, the Miami Heat or the San Antonio Spurs.

“So you’ve got to go with Texas or Florida? That’s tough,” Roberts told Clinton, but there was no hesitation with Clinton naming the all important battleground of the Sunshine State.

“Florida,” she laughed. “When you pose it like that!”

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