Review Category : Poltics

Five Topics Obama Faces in Kenya and Ethiopia

File photo. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)(NAIROBI, Kenya) — With a trip to Africa this weekend, President Obama becomes the first sitting U.S. president to visit Kenya and Ethiopia. While much of his schedule is official business, it will be a highly personal visit for Obama, whose father was Kenyan, and a moment of pride for the Kenyan people, who have been clamoring for a presidential visit since 2009.

But it won’t be all pomp and pageantry. Obama will confront several thorny issues throughout this trip, from gay rights to defending unmet expectations for his grand U.S.-African initiatives. Here’s a look at five:

Gay Rights in Africa

As the first sitting president to support same-sex marriage, gay rights are an important part of Obama’s legacy. But in many countries around the world, same-sex relations are illegal and often dangerous.

That’s the case in Ethiopia and Kenya, where political and religious leaders have warned Obama not to address the issue. Protesters have even taken to the streets of Kenya’s capital, Nairobi, to demonstrate against gay rights and admonish the president for his support of them.

Will the president listen? In an interview with the BBC, Obama indicated he’s willing to discuss the sensitive subject while in Kenya as he did during a trip to Senegal in 2013.

“In a press conference, I was very blunt about my belief that everybody deserves fair treatment, equal treatment in the eyes of the law and the state,” the president said of his trip to Senegal. “And that includes gays, lesbians, transgender persons.”

“I am not a fan of discrimination and bullying of anybody on the basis of race, on the basis of religion, on the basis of sexual orientation or gender. And I think that this is actually part and parcel of the agenda that’s also going to be front and center, and that is how are we treating women and girls,” he added.

Terror Alert from Al-Shabaab

Security conditions in the region will be high on the agenda at a time when Kenya deals with the growing threat posed by Somali-based group al-Shabaab, which shares ties with al Qaeda.

The group has conducted two big attacks in recent years — at the Garissa University in eastern Kenya earlier this year and at the upscale Westgate Mall in Nairobi, which re-opened last weekend for the first time since the 2013 attack. It has also carried out a string of kidnappings, car bombings and shootings throughout the country.

Kenya has become a target because it sent troops to Somalia alongside the African Union force fighting to exterminate al-Shabaab. Both Ethiopia and Kenya have become important U.S. allies in the fight against terrorists, and the White House says counterterror strategy will be an important topic during the president’s trip.

There are also general security concerns around events the president will attend. One week before the scheduled visit, the State Department alerted U.S. citizens that large public events like the Global Entrepreneurship Summit where the president will speak may be a “target for terrorists.”

Undemocratic Heads of State?

The administration has touted both Kenya and Ethiopia as important partners, but Obama is meeting with two heads of state with questionable records, at best.

Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta was indicted on crimes against humanity by the International Criminal Court for fomenting and funding violence after the candidate he supported lost the presidential election in 2007, a time of civil unrest and widespread ethnic violence. The charges have since been withdrawn, but Kenyatta faces allegations of corruption and suppressing freedom of the press.

Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn and his party won 100 percent of the vote in parliamentary elections this spring, raising concerns in the United States about their openness and fairness. The dominant ruling party has tried to shut down dissent by allegedly jailing and even torturing political opponents, protesters and journalists.

The president’s National Security Adviser Susan Rice told reporters Wednesday that the president would address these issues. “We raise them directly and clearly, both in public and in private,” she said. “And we will do that as we always do when we visit Kenya and Ethiopia.”

Restricted Press Freedom

In both Kenya and Ethiopia, journalists do not enjoy the same freedom as reporters in the United States, and some media rights groups are urging Obama to push both governments to lift restrictions on the press.

The Committee to Protect Journalists released a report last week chronicling how the Kenyan government and large media corporations have curtailed a free press.

“Kenyan reporters, editors and publishers are exposed to threats of being hurt, prosecuted, imprisoned or simply having crucial advertising withdrawn,” the report says. “Media are manipulated by dominant corporations, and news outlets are subject to the whims of their politician-owners or publishers who want to cozy up to power.”

Before the trip, Rice said the administration has been vocal about the need for a free press in the two countries, particularly in Ethiopia, saying it has “a long way to go.”

“Obviously, in Ethiopia in particular, we have consistently expressed concern about the treatment of journalists, among other issues. We noted that recently, the Ethiopian government did release five journalists, which is a welcome step, but they have a long way to go. And I think we have been very clear in our dialogue with them on this, and other issues related to democracy and governance that we believe they can and should do more and better.

Personal Duty vs. Presidential Responsibility

Unlike his 2006 trip to Kenya, the president will not visit Kogelo, the village where his father, Barack Obama Sr., was born and buried. The White House cited time and logistical concerns that are keeping the president from touring the village. The lack of a visit from the president will likely disappoint the villagers hoping he would make the trek to area where his family is from.

Instead, Obama will spend his time in Nairobi in full presidential mode: meeting with President Kenyatta and delivering remarks at the Global Entrepreneurship Summit. But the president does have plans to meet privately with some of his family members while in Nairobi, and they may accompany him to some of his official obligations.

“I’ll be honest with you, visiting Kenya as a private citizen is probably more meaningful to me than visiting as president because I can actually get outside of a hotel room or a conference center,” the president in a news conference White House earlier this month.

“And just the logistics of visiting a place are always tough as president, but it’s obviously symbolically important.”

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Donald Trump: What He Is Doing at the US-Mexico Border

Robin Marchant/Getty Images(LAREDO, Texas) — Unlike Des Moines, Iowa and Manchester, New Hampshire, Laredo, Texas isn’t a typical stop on the presidential campaign trail.

Unless you are Donald Trump.

The town on the U.S.-Mexico border will become the center of attention Thursday when the Republican presidential candidate stops by for a visit.

But the border union that was expected to host Trump announced on Thursday morning that they’re backing out. Trump was going to meet with the union and tour the border.

“Our intention to meet with Mr. Trump was to provide a ‘Boots on the Ground’ perspective to not only Mr. Trump, but to the media that would be in attendance at this event,” the National Border Patrol Council Local 2455 wrote in a statement. “Just to be clear, an endorsement was never discussed for any presidential candidate.”

Still, Trump says the trip is on. He is scheduled to land around 1 p.m. A campaign spokesperson tells ABC News that Trump plans to meet with the mayor and police department of Laredo, Texas.

The billionaire business mogul whose controversial comments about Mexican immigrants have been the talk of the campaign in recent weeks will receive a briefing from Hector Garza, president of the local chapter of the National Border Patrol Council, according to Trump’s campaign.

Trump’s visit to the town, where the population is over 90 percent Hispanic, will begin with a town hall meeting in which law enforcement officers will give The Donald their own views on the situation at the border. Trump also plans to hold a news conference.

Since first receiving backlash last month for saying in his announcement speech that Mexico is sending criminals and rapists into the United States, Trump has discussed immigration at length in interviews and in speeches.

Trump will not be the first candidate in the GOP field to visit the border, however.

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry made a number of trips to the border during his time as governor of Texas; Cruz visited the border in June, receiving a briefing from U.S. Border Patrol; Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker made a similar trip earlier this year, in March.

ABC US News | World News

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Donald Trump: What He Is Doing at the US-Mexico Border

Robin Marchant/Getty Images(LAREDO, Texas) — Unlike Des Moines, Iowa and Manchester, New Hampshire, Laredo, Texas isn’t a typical stop on the presidential campaign trail.

Unless you are Donald Trump.

The town on the U.S.-Mexico border will become the center of attention Thursday when the Republican presidential candidate stops by for a visit.

But the border union that was expected to host Trump announced on Thursday morning that they’re backing out. Trump was going to meet with the union and tour the border.

“Our intention to meet with Mr. Trump was to provide a ‘Boots on the Ground’ perspective to not only Mr. Trump, but to the media that would be in attendance at this event,” the National Border Patrol Council Local 2455 wrote in a statement. “Just to be clear, an endorsement was never discussed for any presidential candidate.”

Still, Trump says the trip is on. He is scheduled to land around 1 p.m. A campaign spokesperson tells ABC News that Trump plans to meet with the mayor and police department of Laredo, Texas.

The billionaire business mogul whose controversial comments about Mexican immigrants have been the talk of the campaign in recent weeks will receive a briefing from Hector Garza, president of the local chapter of the National Border Patrol Council, according to Trump’s campaign.

Trump’s visit to the town, where the population is over 90 percent Hispanic, will begin with a town hall meeting in which law enforcement officers will give The Donald their own views on the situation at the border. Trump also plans to hold a news conference.

Since first receiving backlash last month for saying in his announcement speech that Mexico is sending criminals and rapists into the United States, Trump has discussed immigration at length in interviews and in speeches.

Trump will not be the first candidate in the GOP field to visit the border, however.

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry made a number of trips to the border during his time as governor of Texas; Cruz visited the border in June, receiving a briefing from U.S. Border Patrol; Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker made a similar trip earlier this year, in March.

ABC US News | World News

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Nominee for Top Marine Post: Arming Recruiters ‘Most Extreme’ Response to Chattanooga

Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — A week after four Marines and a Navy sailor were killed by a lone gunman in Chattanooga, Tennessee, the nominee to take over as the Marines’ highest-ranking officer expressed skepticism about arming military recruiters across the country.

“I’m not going to discount it, but I think that’s probably at the end and the most extreme measure we could take to do what we need to do, which is protect those service members out there doing their mission,” Lt. Gen. Robert Neller told the Senate Armed Services Committee Thursday.

Just Wednesday, Pentagon spokesman Jeff Davis said the Department of Defense does not support arming all military personnel because of “safety concerns, the prohibitive costs for use of force and weapons training, qualification costs, as well as compliance with multiple weapons-screening laws.”

Neller, however, offered a different reasoning, worrying that it could create a potential rift between recruiters and their communities.

“I have some concerns about the second- and third-order effects of that,” Neller said, “particularly on the recruiters and their access and the things they need to do.”

Neller said that despite the “potential consequences,” however, he agreed that it’s an approach that should be under consideration.

The committee’s chairman, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., pounced on Neller’s response, calling his answer “disappointing.”

“You know what happened in that recruiting station don’t you?” McCain asked. “The guy walked up to the door and shot and killed four Marines. Shouldn’t we have had those Marines be able to defend themselves?”

Neller noted that the four Marines and sailor were killed at the Naval Operations Support Center, while only one person was wounded at the recruitment center, but said he agreed the Marines should have been able to protect themselves.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., a GOP presidential candidate, asked Neller whether he thought things would have been different if the recruiters had been armed, to which Neller responded, “I don’t know.”

“I think they would have been, and … [that’s] the answer I don’t ever want to have again: ‘I don’t know,’” Graham said. “I think it’s time, in my view, to get real with where we stand as a nation. They’re coming after us here and everywhere else, and we better get ready to be able to defend our people.”

Earlier in the day, Secretary of Defense Ash Carter made his first public comments on whether or not to arm military recruiters to a group of U.S. troops on an unannounced visit to Iraq.

“Should people in recruiting offices be armed or not?” Carter asked. “I’ll tell you, I don’t know the answer to that yet. I’m waiting to hear back from the services about that. We need to recruit, but we can’t put people at unnecessary risk, as well.”

Carter is set to receive a set of recommendations over security measures he requested in the wake of the Chattanooga attack by Friday, though the Pentagon has not said whether those recommendations will be made public.

Neller is in line to replace Gen. Joseph Dunford as Marine commandant, as Dunford moves to replace Gen. Martin Dempsey as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Donald Trump Supporters: Here’s What Makes Them Tick

ABC News(NEW YORK) — GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump maintained his grip on the headlines this week, surging to 24 percent support in the race for the Republican nomination, according to the latest ABC News/Washington Post poll.

The bump in the polls comes even as some criticized Trump for questioning whether Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., is a war hero, and releasing the personal cellphone number of fellow GOP presidential candidate Lindsey Graham.

So who are the faces behind the real estate mogul’s 11-point lead in the polls?

ABC News reached out to the actual people who participated in our poll — and we asked them why they are supporting Trump.

These conversations with voters suggest that Trump’s campaign has given a voice to real frustration and public anger, drawing support that crosses party lines and cites a range of policy concerns.

The student

It all started with a school project for Brittany Clements, a 20-year-old college student from Hershey, Pennsylvania. Trump’s charity work stuck out to her while she was researching him for class, and she thinks it’s interesting that he’s funding his own campaign. She identifies as a Republican and is also interested in fellow business-savvy GOP competitor Carly Fiorina. Overall, she cites her support for Trump as stemming from the belief that “putting someone in that hasn’t had the experience and doesn’t have the skills isn’t a good idea.”

Graham ‘a weasel’

If James Hollingsworth were in Trump’s shoes, he would have given out Sen. Lindsey Graham’s cell phone number, too. “I don’t like the man. He’s a weasel and he ain’t never done anything for South Carolina,” said the retiree, who lives in Graham’s home state. Hollingsworth also defended Trump’s comments on Sen. John McCain, saying his words were twisted. “[Trump] is for the American people. He’s not for these rich folks,” he said. “They was born into politics, into money, and they ain’t had to get their hands dirty.” Still, Hollingsworth is making up his mind. His alternative? Bernie Sanders.

Job hunter

Kobe Miles just wanted a fast food job. But the 21-year-old recently returned home to Michigan from California where he had searched for work, unable to land “the simplest job – a cook at McDonalds.” That’s when Miles said he was drawn to Trump’s immigration views. “There was a hiring sign and I asked if they were hiring and they said no,” he added. “The workers you could all tell that they were pretty much… of some Latin descent.” The independent says he backs Trump, despite what he admits are some “pretty harsh” comments from the GOP contender because he has “some pretty good views about the country right now.”

The crossover

Trump’s supporters are even crossing party lines: Patricia Gregory, 81, is actually a Democrat – but she plans to vote for Trump. Gregory, from Tallahassee, Florida, told ABC News that both her father and uncle were captured while serving in World War II, but she agrees with Trump that “being captured does not make you a hero.” “I just really am in favor of Donald Trump,” she said. “I feel like we need somebody strong at the helm.” Her second choice candidate – Jeb Bush.

Trump a ‘no BS kind of guy’

Spencer Hunsucker says he has worked with undocumented immigrants in his job as an electrician in Terre Haute, Indiana – and he’s throwing his support behind Donald Trump. “I think [Trump] made some valid points,” the 31-year-old independent said of Trump’s announcement speech. Hunsucker also says that Trump’s financial success could make a difference. “He is no BS kind of guy. He’s very straightforward. And he might be able to help with the nation’s debt,” he told ABC News. “I think he would cut out a lot of wasteful spending that we have.”

Not taking ‘any bull’

Trump’s outsider status is what makes the difference for David Runious, 47. “I like Trump. I think he’s a hardass. I think we need a hardass in there,” the Louisiana auto repairman said. “I don’t think he’s going to take any bull,” Runious continued. “All the working people are tired of taking care of the nonworking people.” And even though Runious voted for John McCain in 2008, he says Trump’s comments on the Arizona Senator are “kind of the truth.” His backup plan? Another Washington outsider: Ben Carson.

‘A snowball’s chance in hell’

Anthony DiMario is a fan of Trump – even though he says Trump has a “snowball’s chance in hell of getting elected on either side…or as an independent.” The 62-year-old small business owner wouldn’t go so far as to say he supports Trump as the Republican nominee, but he would “probably vote for him, just to see how far” his candidacy could go. DiMario, an independent from Baltimore, Maryland, says Trump will start “running this country as a corporation and not a political fighting arena.”

It’s the economy, stupid.

The most important thing for Darwin Fortney? The economy. The 66-year-old from Pawhuska, Oklahoma is a Democrat — but still a Trump supporter. He believes Trump is “for the people” and has a better grasp on the economy than the other candidates because of his business background. He went on to say that Trump “says some good things and says some bad things just like everyone else.” And if Trump drops out, Fortney says his vote would “go to Sanders!”

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Today on the Trail — 7/23/15

ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Where will the 2016 presidential candidates be on Thursday?

Read below to find out their campaign schedules:

Hillary Clinton

The Democratic frontrunner is in South Carolina Thursday. At 10am ET, she held a discussion with mayors and local officials in West Columbia. At 2:15pm, she will hold an economic forum in Greenville.

Rick Perry

The Texas governor is also in South Carolina Thursday. At 11:30am ET, he will be at Fat Jacks Grillin’ and Chillin’. At 2:00pm, Perry will speak at the Americans for Peace and Prosperity national security forum in Hilton Head. At 4:00pm, he will host a meet and greet with local veterans in Beaufort and at 6:00pm he attends the Beaufort Water Festival.

Jeb Bush

The governor of Florida is spending another day in the first primary state of New Hampshire, holding a town hall in Gorham at 1:45pm ET. It’s part of his “Taking on Mt. Washington” series.

Scott Walker and Mike Huckabee

The two governors — from Wisconsin and Arkansas, respectively — are in California to speak at the annual meeting of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC).

John Kasich

Ohio’s governor spends another day in New Hampshire, holding town halls in Wolfeboro at 11:30am ET and North Conway at 5:00pm.

Carly Fiorina

Florin has a packed day in Iowa, beginning a five-day tour of the first caucus state.

Martin O’Malley

The Maryland governor is in Washinton, D.C., holding a discussion on Wall Street reform at the Truman Center for National Policy at 11am ET.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

ABC/’Washington Post’ Poll: Immigration Critics Drive Trump Surge

ABC News(NEW YORK) — Donald Trump’s visit to the U.S.-Mexico border marks the extent to which negative views on immigration fuel his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination – and the limits they may impose.

About half of potential GOP voters in the latest ABC News/Washington Post poll oppose a path to legal status for undocumented immigrants, and Trump wins support from 34 percent in this group, a remarkable tally in a 16-candidate race. Among those who favor providing legal status for undocumented immigrants, by contrast, Trump’s support drops sharply, to 13 percent.

See PDF with full results, charts and tables here.

The results pose two challenges for Trump and other sharp critics of immigration policy: First, the issue divides rather than unites potential Republican voters. Second, a pathway to legal status is far more popular beyond the party’s confines, making the positon a hard sell in the general election.

In all, this poll, produced for ABC by Langer Research Associates, finds that Americans by a broad 60-37 percent support allowing undocumented immigrants to live and work in this country after paying a fine and meeting other requirements. Indeed, among supporters, two-thirds say these immigrants should be able to apply for citizenship, not just permanent residency.

Support for legalization reflects generally favorable views of immigrants. Fifty-seven percent of Americans say immigrants mainly strengthen rather than weaken U.S. society. (Thirty-three percent say they weaken it.) Even more, 74 percent, say undocumented Mexican immigrants are “mainly honest people trying to get ahead,” while just 16 percent say that they are “mainly undesirable people like criminals,” as implied by Trump.

There are sharp political divisions. Majorities of liberals (80 percent), Democrats (74 percent), moderates (60 percent) and independents (58 percent) support a path to legal status. A slim majority of Republicans (51 percent) and a plurality of conservatives (49 percent) oppose it.

That said, opponents of legal status are passionate; 82 percent of them feel strongly about it. Moreover, while legalization is consistent with immigration reform passed in the Democratic-led Senate in 2013, Americans are evenly split over which party they trust more to deal with the issue, 40 percent pick the GOP, 37 percent the Democrats. While partisans tend to favor their own side, independents break for the Republicans by 43-27 percent.

2016 Election

Democratic and Democratic-leaning independents are broadly in favor of legalization; leaned Republicans, as noted, are sharply divided, making the issue a key contrast among candidates in their primary contest.

Among leaned Republicans who are registered to vote, 52 percent oppose legalization – and Trump’s 34 percent support in this group puts him 20 points ahead of his closest competitor. Among those favoring legalization (44 percent of leaned Republicans), though, he is essentially tied with other candidates – including Scott Walker, Jeb Bush, Mike Huckabee and Marco Rubio.

Dems

Differences are far more muted on the Democratic side. Bernie Sanders receives 17 percent backing among supporters of legalization vs. 7 percent among opponents. Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden receive roughly equal levels of support regardless of views on immigration.

That said, among the relatively few leaned Democrats who oppose legal status (26 percent), 45 percent are dissatisfied with their choice of candidates, vs. only 19 percent for legal status supporters. There’s no such satisfaction gap on the GOP side.

General

Opinions on legal status also inform general election preferences. Immigration policy views produce mirror images in a matchup between Clinton and Bush: She prevails among supporters of legal status by 62-33 percent; he leads among opponents, 58-33 percent.

Adding Trump as an independent candidate shows potential vulnerabilities for Bush on the immigration front, while leaving support for Clinton nearly unchanged. Among those who oppose legal status, Trump and Bush are tied at 34 percent each. Supporters of legalization overwhelmingly stick with Clinton, 60-25-11 percent.

Groups

There are other notable group differences in views on the issue. Education is clearly related to immigration attitudes. Among adults with a high school degree or less, just fewer than half say immigrants mainly strengthen American society and 54 percent support a path to legal status. Those jump to 71 and 69 percent, respectively, among college graduates.

Support for legalization also dips among whites (53 percent), while peaking among Hispanics (86 percent) and those under 30 (72 percent). In those same two groups – Hispanics and under-30s – majorities support the citizenship option, vs. permanent residency or no legal status.

Additionally, while seniors are less likely than those younger than age 65 to say immigrants mainly strengthen society and are honest, 61 percent support legalization nonetheless.

Methodology

This ABC News/Washington Post poll was conducted by landline and cellular telephone July 16-19, 2015, in English and Spanish, among a random national sample of 1,002 adults. Results have a margin of sampling error of 3.5 points for the full sample, including design effect. Partisan divisions are 30-21-39 percent, Democrats-Republicans-independents.

The survey was produced for ABC News by Langer Research Associates of New York, N.Y., with sampling, data collection and tabulation by Abt-SRBI of New York, N.Y.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Rick Perry Calls Donald Trump a ‘Cancer on Conservatism’

Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — In the harshest criticism yet leveled by a fellow presidential candidate, Rick Perry launched a sharply-worded broadside against Donald Trump Wednesday.

“Let no one be mistaken Donald Trump’s candidacy is a cancer on conservatism and it must be clearly diagnosed, excised, and discarded,” Perry said during a speech in Washington, D.C. “It cannot be pacified or ignored for it will destroy a set of principles that has lifted more people out of poverty than any force in the history of the civilized world and that is the cause of conservatism.”

Trump has taken aim against a number of political figures including questioning the war hero status of Arizona Sen. John McCain and calling South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham an “idiot.”

Perry stated Trump was “born into privilege,” and “couldn’t have endured for five minutes what John McCain endured for five-and-a-half years,” causing the audience of roughly 50 to burst into applause

Trump also drew fire for his remarks about Mexican immigrants last month.

“Donald Trump the candidate is a sore of division, wrongly demonizing Mexican Americans for political sport,” Perry said. “It is wrong to paint with a broad brush Hispanic men and women in this country who have fought and died for freedom from the Alamo to Afghanistan.”

Perry also likened Trump to the defunct “Know-Nothing” party that carried strong anti-immigrant and anti-Catholic sentiments. Perry said he, “scapegoats Hispanics to appeal to our worst instincts.”

At an event hosted by the Opportunity and Freedom PAC, one of the super PACs backing his campaign, Perry, the former Texas governor, added Trump: “offers a barking carnival act that can best be described as Trumpism: a toxic mix demagoguery and mean-spiritedness and nonsense that will lead the Republican Party to perdition if pursued.”

While Perry said Trump’s ability to generate ratings creates a “sore of division,” it won’t keep him from the stage of the first Republican presidential debate scheduled for August 6 in Cleveland. A new ABC News/Washington Post poll shows Trump is leading the GOP pack, leaving Perry on the cusp of not making it to the debate. The debate will only feature the 10 most popular Republican candidates. Perry told reporters following his remarks that he isn’t worried.

The former Texas governor did offer some advice to the mogul-turned-candidate, who will be making a trip to the U.S.-Mexico border Thursday.

“I hope he can find the border because I’m not sure that he’s ever been there before,” Perry joked. “But in all seriousness, he owes an apology to the men and women of the Texas National Guard. …if there’s one bit of advice that I would give to Mr. Trump as he goes to Texas, it is to recognize the fact that it is not the state of Texas or any state’s responsibility to be securing the border.”

ABC US News | World News

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Donald Trump’s Personal Financial Disclosure Report Released

ABC News(NEW YORK) — It’s the form that makes Donald Trump put his money where his mouth is.

After much speculation, election officials released Trump’s 92-page personal financial disclosure report on Wednesday. Although the Federal Election Commission’s documents neither confirm nor disprove Trump’s claim that he has a net worth of $10 billion, they do provide information on his assets, income and even how many job titles he has.

Here’s what we learned:

1. Actual worth

Although Trump has described his net worth as $10 billion, that cannot be confirmed by the disclosure report, mainly because his assets and incomes are provided in ranges or minimums.

For example, he has real estate assets valued at “over $50,000,000” in several locations, mainly real estate buildings and golf clubs. No information, however, is provided as to how much over $50,000,000, making it virtually impossible to numerically define his net worth. Experts estimate he’s worth at least $1.4 billion in assets.

2. Water sales

Trump’s own personal brand of bottled water — called Trump Ice — brought in $280,000.

3. Merry-Go-Round

Trump made $589,000 from admissions to the carousel in New York’s Central Park, which Trump took over in 2010. It’s officially known as Trump Carousel LLC.

4. Job titles

Trump currently has 487 job titles — most of them president or chairman positions at various businesses. Of those, 338 of those businesses are named after Trump.

The businesses he is involved in are scattered across the world, from Palm Beach to a golf club in Doonbeg, Ireland and a resort in Turnberry, Scotland. The majority are in his hometown of New York City.

5. Speaking fees

He’s an expensive get: Trump has made over $1.75 million in speaking fees for just seven speeches.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Today on the Trail — 7/22/15

ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Where will the 2016 presidential candidates be on Wednesday?

Read below to find out their campaign schedules:

Jeb Bush

The Florida governor continues his trip in South Carolina Wednesday, where he visited the Carolina Pregnancy Center in Spartanburg and is holding a town-hall at Newberry Hall in Aiken in the afternoon. Later, he’ll travel to New Hampshire to participate in an Americans for Prosperity town-hall in Manchester at 7 pm ET.

Scott Walker

Wisconsin’s governor traveled to Tennessee, where he visited Puckett’s Grocery & Restaurant in Nashville.

John Kasich

The governor from Ohio was off to New Hampshire, where he held a town-hall at Portsmouth Country Club in Greenland Wednesday morning. He will hold another town-hall at Waukewan Golf Club in Center Harbor at 6 pm ET.

Rick Perry

The Texas governor is in Washington, D.C., for a policy forum hosted by one of the super PACs backing his campaign, Opportunity and Freedom PAC, at The Willard at 2 pm ET.

Carly Fiorina

Fiorina will be in Iowa, where she’ll attend an event for state Sen. Ken Rozenbloom at Tassel Ridge Winery in Leighton at 6:30 pm ET.

George Pataki

The former New York governor will attend a Stop Iran Now rally in New York City’s Times Square at 5:30 pm ET.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →