Review Category : Top Stories

What We Know About the Videos Charlotte Police Haven’t Released

iStock/Thinkstock(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — Varying interpretations have emerged of the videos that are said to show the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina, after both law enforcement and the victim’s family viewed the footage.

The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department said its officers were searching for a suspect who had an outstanding warrant when they encountered Scott, a 43-year-old black man, in a vehicle outside an apartment complex around 4 p.m. Tuesday. Police said Scott was not the suspect that officers sought but that he was holding a handgun, which investigators recovered from the scene, and posed a threat because he was not obeying police orders to remain inside his car and drop the weapon.

An officer subsequently fired his gun, hitting Scott, who police said was treated immediately and later pronounced dead. Police have identified the officer involved in the shooting as Brentley Vinson, who has been employed with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department since July 21, 2014, and is currently assigned to the metro division. He has been placed on paid administrative leave while the investigation into Scott’s death is ongoing, according to Police Chief Kerr Putney. Vinson is African-American.

Vinson was not wearing a body camera at the time, but the other officers who responded to the incident were, police said. A dashboard camera also recorded the incident. Police have not publicly released any footage but Scott’s family have reviewed the video that shows the moment when police fatally shot the man, the family’s attorney told ABC News on Thursday.

What Police Say About the Videos

The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department said the footage shows Scott with a gun in his hand during his interaction with police officers before he was shot and killed. Police also told ABC News that the gun seen in pictures taken at the scene is the weapon they recovered.

However, Police Chief Putney admitted that the videos he reviewed do not provide “definitive visual evidence that would confirm that a person is pointing a gun.”

“I did not see that in the videos that I reviewed,” he told reporters Thursday. “So what I can tell you, though, is when taken in the totality of all the other evidence, it supports what we’ve heard and the version of the truth that we gave about the circumstances that happened that led to the death of Mr. Scott.”

Putney also said the video evidence alone does not establish whether the shooting was justified.

“We have yet to make a case solely on video,” he said at a news conference today. “However, it can be compelling.”

According to Putney, officers in the videos gave Scott “loud, clear, verbal commands” before Officer Vinson shot him.

“The officers gave loud, clear, verbal commands, which were also heard by many of the witnesses,” the police chief said at a news conference Wednesday. “Mr. Scott exited his vehicle armed with a handgun as the officers continued to yell at him to drop it.”

What the Family Says About the Videos

Scott’s family has said he was holding a book, not a gun, while waiting for his son to be dropped off from school. After reviewing the footage, the family’s attorney said in a statement that it’s “impossible” to detect what Scott is holding and at no point did Scott appear or act aggressively.

“After watching the videos, the family again has more questions than answers,” Justin Bamberg, a lawyer representing Scott’s family, said in the statement Thursday. “When told by police to exit his vehicle, Mr. Scott did so in a very calm, non-aggressive manner. While police did give him several commands, he did not aggressively approach them or raise his hands at members of law enforcement at any time. It is impossible to discern from the videos what, if anything, Mr. Scott is holding in his hands.”

When Bamberg spoke with ABC News today, he said there appears to be an object in Scott’s left hand. But Scott was right-handed, Bamberg said, which raises the question as to why he would be holding a gun in his non-dominant hand if he were to shoot someone.

And even if Scott were in fact holding a gun, it’s questionable as to whether he should have been shot and killed, Bamberg told ABC News.

Attorneys for the Scott family provided ABC News with a cellphone video of Scott’s encounter with police. The video was taken by a woman identified as Scott’s wife, Rakeyia Scott, who can be heard pleading with police to not shoot her husband as officers order the man to “drop the gun.”

In the video, Rakeyia Scott yells back at police, insisting her husband is harmless and doesn’t have a weapon.

“He doesn’t have a gun,” she says. “He has a T.B.I. [traumatic brain injury]. He’s not going to do anything to you guys. He just took his medicine.”

Police continue to yell at Scott to “drop the gun” and, moments later, multiple gunshots ring out. The actual shooting is not shown on the video as Rakeyia Scott points her cellphone at the ground and screams, “Did you shoot him?” She then runs closer to the scene, angling the cellphone camera this time at the spot where her husband was shot. Scott’s body is seen lying in the street surrounded by several officers.

The cellphone video is the first footage of Scott’s encounter with police to be publicly released.

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California Cops Buy Bike for Teen Who Walks 2 Hours to Work Every Day

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A police officers’ association in California bought a bicycle for a local teenager after one cop discovered that he walks four hours to and from work every day.

Corporal Kirk Keffer of the Benicia Police Department found Jourdan Duncan, 19, walking home late one night last week, and offered to give him a ride, the Benicia Police Officers’ Association said in a statement on its website.

Duncan shared his story with Keffer, telling the cop that he was saving money for college and did not have a car or bicycle. He walks from Vallejo, where he lives, to Benicia in order to get to work, according to the association. The two towns are about 8 miles apart.

Keffer then shared the youth’s story with the rest of the police officers’ association and on Monday evening, they surprised Duncan with a new bicycle, purchased by the association.

“You never know someone’s story until you talk to them. A young man’s work ethic and determination moved our officers to help him with his future,” the Benicia Police Department said in a Facebook post.

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New African-American Museum Tells ‘Essential Part’ of American Story, President Obama Says

ZACH GIBSON/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — President Obama said Saturday that the nation’s new African-American history museum opening in Washington, D.C., tells “an essential part of our American story.”

“This national museum helps to tell a richer and fuller story of who we are,” Obama said at the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. “It helps us better understand the lives, yes, of the president but also the slave, the industrialist but also the porter, the keeper of the status quo but also the activist seeking to overthrow that status quo.”

The Obamas have visited the museum twice ahead of its official opening. On Sept. 14, the first family got a private sneak preview of the museum, and then visited again this week where the president and first lady told Good Morning America‘s Robin Roberts of the museum’s significance to children across the country.

“What I think you want is for this generation of kids to come away thinking, ‘Yeah, everybody can do everything,’ that if you’re a little white boy or a little white girl, little black boy, little black girl, a Latino, Asian, if you grow up and you are gay or straight, if you are disabled, that you’re empowered,” he said.

Also to be in attendance at the opening Saturday are former President George W. Bush and former First Lady Laura Bush. It was Bush who in 2003 signed into law a bill to move forward with the building of the museum. Construction broke ground on the National Mall in 2012.

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Seattle-Area Mall Shooting That Killed 5 Shows ‘No Evidence’ of Terrorism: FBI

iStock/Thinkstock(BURLINGTON, Wash.) — The FBI said Saturday that there is no indication of a terrorism link in a shooting at a Seattle-area mall that killed 5.

“We have no indication this was a terrorism act,” an assistant special agent in the FBI’s Seattle office said at a press conference Saturday morning on the shooting. “There is no evidence to support that.”

Authorities are still searching for the gunman who was last seen armed with a rifle after four women and a man were fatally shot Friday night at a shopping mall about 65 miles north of Seattle, Washington State Patrol said.

The victims were shot in the makeup department at Macy’s at Cascade Mall in Burlington, Washington, before 7 p.m. local time, police said.

In addition to the four women who died earlier, a male who had sustained life-threatening injuries died at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, several hours after he had been transported there, Sgt. Mark Francis, a public information officer with the Washington State Patrol, announced early Sunday morning.

Police initially said four people were dead, but then revised the figure to three, before updating it back to four fatalities. And police initially said one female sustained non-life threatening injuries, but that was incorrect. Francis said the numbers fluctuated as authorities searched the mall.

Authorities described the “one lone shooter” as a “Hispanic male” wearing a black shirt, who was last seen walking toward Interstate 5. His motive is unknown.

A helicopter, search teams and K-9 units scoured the area around the mall for the suspect.

Sgt. Francis tweeted a photo of the suspect, writing “Here is the shooter. We believe just one shooter … Armed with rifle.”

Mall employees and shoppers said they hid in stores and fitting rooms.

“Out of nowhere I just hear somebody yell and then after that, I turn around and just look at the Macy’s and I just hear shots,” Armando Patino, who was working at the mall’s T-Mobile store, told ABC affiliate KOMO. “I hear one shot and then stand kinda still and like two three other people start running out saying gun.”

Patino added, “I turn around and run to the store. Some people didn’t know where to go. I just moved them into the [T-Mobile] store. We went in the back where we have a door and everything and we just stayed there until they told us to evacuate.”

Stephanie Bose, an assistant general manager at Johnny Carino’s Italian restaurant near Macy’s store at the mall, told The Associated Press she immediately locked the doors to the restaurant after hearing about the shooting from an employee’s boyfriend.

“He was trying to go to the mall and people were screaming,” she said. “It was frantic.”

And Tari Caswell, a shopper in the Macy’s women’s dressing room told the Skagit Valley Herald she heard “what sounded like four balloons popping,” s

She added, “Then I heard seven or eight more, and I just stayed quiet in the dressing room because it just didn’t feel right. And it got very quiet. And then I heard a lady yelling for help, and a man came and got me and another lady, and we ran out of the store.”

Washington Governor Jay Inslee said in a statement Friday night, “We urge residents to heed all safety and detour warnings. Stay close to your friends and loved ones as we await more information and, hopefully, news of the suspect’s capture.”

Law enforcement officers performed an initial sweep of the mall to ensure it had been evacuated, followed by a secondary search.

Sgt. Francis said police began receiving calls of an active shooter before 7 p.m.

In addition to state and local law enforcement, both the FBI and the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives are involved in the investigation.

The FBI tweeted it has “no information to suggest additional attacks planned in WA state.”

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Death Toll in Seattle-Area Mall Shooting Rises to 5, Gunman at Large

iStock/Thinkstock(BURLINGTON, Wash.) — A gunman who was last seen armed with a rifle remained at large Saturday morning after four women and a man were fatally shot Friday night at a shopping mall about 65 miles north of Seattle, Washington State Patrol said.

The victims were shot in the makeup department at Macy’s at Cascade Mall in Burlington, Washington, before 7 p.m. local time, police said.

In addition to the four women who died earlier, a male who had sustained life-threatening injuries died at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, several hours after he had been transported there, Sgt. Mark Francis, a public information officer with the Washington State Patrol, announced early Sunday morning.

Police initially said four people were dead, but then revised the figure to three, before updating it back to four fatalities. And police initially said one female sustained non-life threatening injuries, but that was incorrect. Francis said the numbers fluctuated as authorities searched the mall.

Authorities described the “one lone shooter” as a “Hispanic male” wearing a black shirt, who was last seen walking toward Interstate 5. His motive is unknown.

A helicopter, search teams and K-9 units scoured the area around the mall for the suspect.

Sgt. Francis tweeted a photo of the suspect, writing “Here is the shooter. We believe just one shooter … Armed with rifle.”

Mall employees and shoppers said they hid in stores and fitting rooms.

“Out of nowhere I just hear somebody yell and then after that, I turn around and just look at the Macy’s and I just hear shots,” Armando Patino, who was working at the mall’s T-Mobile store, told ABC affiliate KOMO. “I hear one shot and then stand kinda still and like two three other people start running out saying gun.”

Patino added, “I turn around and run to the store. Some people didn’t know where to go. I just moved them into the [T-Mobile] store. We went in the back where we have a door and everything and we just stayed there until they told us to evacuate.”

And Tari Caswell, a shopper in the Macy’s women’s dressing room told the Skagit Valley Herald she heard “what sounded like four balloons popping.”

She added, “Then I heard seven or eight more, and I just stayed quiet in the dressing room because it just didn’t feel right. And it got very quiet. And then I heard a lady yelling for help, and a man came and got me and another lady, and we ran out of the store.”

Washington Governor Jay Inslee said in a statement Friday night, “We urge residents to heed all safety and detour warnings. Stay close to your friends and loved ones as we await more information and, hopefully, news of the suspect’s capture.”

Law enforcement officers performed an initial sweep of the mall to ensure it had been evacuated, followed by a secondary search.

Sgt. Francis said police began receiving calls of an active shooter before 7 p.m.

In addition to state and local law enforcement, both the FBI and the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives are involved in the investigation.

The FBI tweeted it has “no information to suggest additional attacks planned in WA state.”

ABC News’ Benjamin Stein, Devin Villacis, Jessica Rooney, Matthew Fuhrman and Neal Karlinsky contributed to this report.

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

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Three Dead, Two Injured in Seattle-Area Mall Shooting, Gunman on the Loose, Police Say

iStock/Thinkstock(BURLINGTON, Wash.) — A gunman armed with a rifle is on the loose after 3 women were fatally shot Friday night at a shopping mall about 65 miles north of Seattle, Washington State Patrol said.

The shooting occurred at Cascade Mall in Burlington, Washington, before 7 p.m. local time.

In addition to the three women fatally shot, one male sustained life-threatening injuries and one female sustained non-life threatening injuries, said Sgt. Mark Francis, a public information officer with Washington State Patrol. Police initially said four people were dead.

The male victim with life threatening injuries was airlifted to Harborview Medical Center in Seatlle and “most likely will pass away,” Sgt. Francis said during a press conference.

Sgt. Francis said four of the victims were found in the women’s Macy’s store. “We believe all five were [found at Macy’s] but it has not been confirmed if the fifth was yet,” he said.

As of 10:00 p.m. local time, police were still hunting for the suspect.

Sgt. Francis described the shooter as a “Hispanic male wearing grey,” who who last seen walking toward Interstate 5.

In a subsequent tweet, Sgt. Francis tweeted a photo of the suspect, writing “Here is the shooter. We believe just one shooter … Armed with rifle.”

Law enforcement officers performed an initial sweep of the mall to ensure it had been evacuated. A secondary search is underway.

Sgt. Francis said police began receiving calls of an active shooter before 7 p.m.

In addition to state and local law enforcement, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, also said it was responding.

About 20 minutes after Sgt. Francis tweeted the number of fatalities, he tweeted, “EMS starting to enter to attend to injured inside Mall w/ police escort and after initial clearance.”

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

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Four Dead in Seattle-Area Mall Shooting, Gunman on the Loose, Say Police

iStock/Thinkstock(BURLINGTON, Wash.) — A gunman is on the loose after four people were fatally shot Friday night at a shopping mall about 65 miles north of Seattle, Washington State Patrol said.

The shooting occurred at Cascade Mall in Burlington, Washington.

“4 confirmed deceased in the mall, shooter(s) left scene b4 police arrived, unknown # of shooter, possibly just 1, police clearing mall now,” Sgt. Mark Francis, a public information officer with Washington State Patrol tweeted at 8:03 p.m. local time.

About 20 minutes after Sgt. Francis tweeted the number of fatalities, he tweeted, “EMS starting to enter to attend to injured inside Mall w/ police escort and after initial clearance.”
Sgt. Francis described the shooter as a “Hispanic male wearing great,” who who last seen walking toward Interstate 5.

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

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Maryland Teen Who Was Pepper-Sprayed by Police Shares Her Side of the Story

ABC News(BALTIMORE) — The 15-year-old girl who was pepper-sprayed by Maryland police has spoken out, sharing her account of what happened Sunday afternoon at a press conference with her mother and attorney Thursday night. Although the teen appeared at the evening press conference, her name has not been released and Ficker has asked that the media refrain from trying to identify her.

The teen said she “stood her ground” when the officers told her she was being detained and that she was “a little dizzy” and everything was “blurry” after she says she was knocked out from colliding with a car.

According to the teen’s attorney, Robin Ficker, she was riding her bike in the street when a car hit her, causing her to “flip over.” She was knocked unconscious from the fall and regained consciousness about two minutes later, Ficker said.

However, on police bodycam video released by Hagerstown police yesterday, a motorist is heard telling police that the teen hit the side of his vehicle with her bicycle.

At another press conference earlier on Thursday, Hagerstown Police Chief Victor Brito told reporters that when his officers arrived, “the juvenile had to be detained” because she began to be “assaultive” while officers attempted to question her about the traffic accident, but that his officers used the “appropriate amount of force.”

According to Ficker, the teen got back on her bike and an officer grabbed her and held her tightly as another officer put her in handcuffs. Another cop pulled out a Taser when a bystander approached but the Taser was not deployed, he claims.

In the video released by police, officers can be heard telling the bystander to “get back” multiple times. An officer can then be seen telling the girl to get her hands behind her back as he tries to handcuff her, reminding her that she’s “being detained right now.”

Ficker also claims that police then “flung her” into the cement, and the girl hit a window sill that was protruding from a wall. He also says she was dragged and put into the back of the police car. Police never informed the teen about what was happening, Ficker said, refuting police claims that the teen was asked if she was “OK.”

The teen was “never” slammed, Brito said, but was “placed” against the wall. The video shows her being carried horizontally by two police officers, prior to being put in the patrol car. Brito said the officers asked the girl repeatedly to “calm down.” On the tape, while asking for the name of the mother, one officer tells her, “You help me, I’ll help you.” Brito says that police recognized that the girl was a minor and tried to use their “best adult tone” with her.

Once she was placed into the police car, Ficker claims she was then pepper-sprayed four times, one time right in her mouth, and not given water. The teen said the spraying had caused her to start choking. Brito said the teen was only sprayed once and that she was able to wash her face with water when she arrived at the station, which he said is protocol.

Police slammed the car door and never put her seat belt on, Ficker said. The video shows police closing the car door after the teen was sprayed.

She was later taken to the hospital by her father, where she was diagnosed with a possible concussion and other injuries, Ficker said.

“What happened Sunday should never happen to anyone’s daughter,” Ficker said, adding that the girl is an honor student and soccer player.

The teen’s mother also spoke to reporters, condemning police for their treatment of a “disoriented teen” and calling the officers’ actions “excessive.”

She said her daughter acted the way she did because she was “confused and scared.” She said her daughter could have handled the situation better, but wasn’t in the right state of mind.

The teen was charged with disorderly conduct, two counts of second-degree assault, possession of marijuana, and failure to obey a traffic device, police said. The matter was referred to the Department of Juvenile Services. She will not enter a plea, Ficker said, adding that he hopes the Department of Juvenile Services will drop the charges.

The Hagerstown Police Department said it released the videos because it “wanted to share” the perspective from the bodycam footage “to provide a better understanding of that full incident.”

“Officers in this country are placed in difficult situations,” Brito said Thursday. “It’s their job to act in the interest of the community. The last thing we wanted to do is use any force to bring situation under control.”

Brito said the officers acknowledged that the teen was a juvenile and did not use excessive force against her. According to Brito, the teen was warned “multiple times” to stop kicking officers before they pepper-sprayed her.

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Charlotte and Tulsa: How Aftermaths of the Two Deadly Police-Involved Shootings Differ

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Two deadly police-involved shootings in one week left two black, middle-aged men dead in two cities 1,000 miles apart.

While there may be similarities in these cases, the aftermaths of these shootings played out very differently. Here’s a look how videos of the incidents have been handled, and how the communities reacted in Charlotte, North Carolina, and Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Charlotte

Police say 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott, a black man, was fatally shot by Brentley Vinson, a black officer with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police, on Tuesday afternoon. Police said Scott “posed an imminent deadly threat to the officers, who subsequently fired their weapon, striking the subject.”

Scott’s family has said he wasn’t armed but police told ABC News there is video, yet to be made public, that shows Scott had a gun in his hand. Police said a gun was recovered from the scene.

However, Police Chief Putney admitted that the videos he reviewed do not provide “definitive visual evidence that would confirm that a person is pointing a gun.”

“I did not see that in the videos that I reviewed,” he told reporters Thursday. “So what I can tell you, though, is when taken in the totality of all the other evidence, it supports what we’ve heard and the version of the truth that we gave about the circumstances that happened that led to the death of Mr. Scott.”

Police showed dashboard and body camera footage to Scott’s family per their request, attorneys for the family told ABC News on Thursday. But officials have not released any footage to the public. As protesters demand the release of the video, Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts said this morning, “I do believe the video should be released. … The question is on the timing.”

“We want those eyewitnesses to tell us without being led or have their memories changed by what they heard or saw,” Roberts told reporters.

Meanwhile, attorneys for Scott’s family provided cell phone video to ABC News today showing the moments leading up to and after the shooting.

Scott’s death prompted violent protests in the city this week that left one protester dead and numerous law enforcement officers injured, authorities said. A suspect was arrested in the protester’s death, police said.

John Barnett, who leads a community task force in Charlotte called THUG (True Healing Under God), told ABC News he thinks the Charlotte protests became so violent because the youth who are participating were impatient.

“Young people … don’t have patience for justice or waiting for a video,” he said. “I can wait, I can endure two or three weeks, I understand the investigation process. Young people they want the video. Then when they get the video … what is the response they’re gonna have? It’s not gonna be a positive one. They can’t wait. They’re tired.”

Barnett said he believes the actions of protesters stem from years of shootings of unarmed black teens and men. “We didn’t get any justice for Trayvon Martin. … We didn’t get any justice for Michael Brown,” Barnett said, referring to the 17-year-old who was shot and killed by George Zimmerman, and the 18-year-old who was shot and killed by Police Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri. A grand jury decided not to indict Wilson.

“We were totally upset when … Zimmerman went free. When O.J. Simpson was set free from all murder charges, white America was angry, mad and wanted to retaliate. They just didn’t act on it,” Barnett said. “When it happened to Trayvon Martin, when it happened to Walter Scott in South Carolina … we’ve had multiple O.J. experiences. And now the young people are doing something about it. They’re acting on it.”

During this week’s violent protests, Barnett said he took to the streets of Charlotte and tried to defuse the situation.

“The last three nights I’ve been going up to the youth whispering in their ear,” he said. “I grab them real softly … target them one by one — you can’t get them as [a] group — [and say] ‘The way you’re screaming and acting right now, that’s not what you call a peaceful protest. If you throw this water bottle at this officer you can get [charged with] assault on an officer.'”

“When you’re mad, you don’t think. Definitely don’t think about repercussions,” he said.

He said he whispers quickly, and one by one. “And it works,” he said. “Some [of them] want somebody whispering in their ear. But you can’t scream at them — that’s what the police are doing.”

Going forward, Barnett said, “we need to have a strong dialogue, and physical action, on race relations. … Race relations is still something we don’t want to talk about.”

He also suggests dialogue with police. “Get police to create a board — when something happens [like an officer-involved shooting] the board comes to us and tells us a timeframe [for the investigation]. With Scott, they haven’t told us a timeframe.”

Tulsa

Days before the deadly Charlotte shooting, a police officer in Tulsa was involved in a deadly shooting.

Betty Shelby, a white Tulsa police officer, is accused of fatally shooting an unarmed black man, 40-year-old Terence Crutcher, last Friday night. Police released video on Monday from a police dashboard camera and from a police helicopter circling overhead. Shelby was charged early this morning with first-degree manslaughter. And in the community, protests was peaceful.

The Tulsa County District Attorney’s Office said, “Despite the heightened tensions felt by all — which seemingly beg for an emotional reaction — our community has consistently demonstrated a willingness to respect the judicial process. It is the shared responsibility of all who have the ability to control their reactions to do just that.”

Marq Lewis of the community activist group We The People Oklahoma told ABC News today that he believes the authorities’ willingness to release video, and the community’s experience with organizing rallies, contributed to the peaceful demonstration in the city.

“We had immediate transparency with the video,” being released by police, he said. “That’s a huge thing.” In Charlotte, where police have yet to release video, “that creates a sense of untrust,” he said.

Also, “we organize our rallies,” Lewis said. He said they make sure there are undercover cops there. “We tell the police department we’re having a rally and they have a police presence. We welcome the police. They understand our agenda but we work with them.”

“We have a great community of leaders here,” Lewis said, adding that they “focus our energy on our specific groups, making sure the message is the same — arrest Shelby. But we also want peace.”

“That’s why it’s important for us to talk directly to the police chief, the mayor, let them understand — we are not here to cause problems, we all love our city,” he said. “None of us want to tear up our city, we just want justice to be done.”

“I believe in Charlotte, 99 percent of protesters are doing the right thing … 1 percent are not,” Lewis said of the violence there.

In Tulsa, if unplanned “pop-up protests” begin, Lewis said community organizers try to diffuse them. “We want to make sure you are safe,” he said. “We’re doing a lot of our own community policing, making sure we’re accountable.”

Lewis, who said he met with the Tulsa chief of police this week, said he aims to hold elected officials accountable for officer-involved shootings in addition to initiating policy changes.

“What I would like to have happen now is justice to be served. But also, we can go back and talk about policy changes,” he said. Lewis said the changes he is working for include: mandatory psychological testing for Tulsa officers after shootings and before returning to work, blood tests for cops involved in shootings, and a requirement for medically trained officers to render care.

As for the future of Officer Shelby, Lewis said, “I would like to see her actually go through the process — a jury of her peers … and to see her being convicted of manslaughter 1. But we understand that is a long process.”

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