Review Category : Top Stories

New Cop Killing Suspect Sighting Has ‘High Credibility’

Pennsylvania Department of Transportation(POCONO SUMMIT, Pa.) – A new possible sighting of suspected cop-killer Eric Frein has Pennsylvania police re-focusing their search, more than a month after the manhunt began.

Frein, 31, is accused of ambushing state police in early September, killing one and wounding another. Since then, police say he has been hiding in the woods of the Pocono Mountains.

“Overnight we had a sighting for which we are assigning a high level of credibility,” Lt. Col. George Bivens of the Pennsylvania State Police said on Saturday. “It was reported in the area of the Pocono Mountain East High School. The individual’s description was consistent with Frein and he was observed carrying a rifle.”

The woman who saw the man said that his face was “covered with mud,” so a positive identification could not be made, but she was about 15 to 20 feet from him.

After learning of the new possible sighting, police shifted the search area, he said.

“I think we’ve kept a tremendous amount of pressure on him and I think that likely had some bearing on where he’s at now, assuming that it is him,” Bivens said.

Frein attended Pocono East High School and worked at Camp Minsi, which is also in the vicinity, Bevins said.

Investigators are also analyzing blood found on the back porch of a home near Cresco. They are not sure if the blood is related to the investigation and expect the test results to come back late this evening.

State police say the weather is working in their favor, because as leaves continue to fall, there is a better aerial view from choppers and planes.

Police have been searching the woods, focusing on the border of Pike and Monroe counties, since after the shooting at the Blooming Grove police barracks on Sept. 12.

Frein, from nearby Canadensis, has been spotted several times, but always evaded police capture because of the thick terrain. He’s a self-trained survivalist and war reenactor who focused on Eastern European militaries and weapons.

Police found Frein’s Jeep in a swamp shortly after the shooting. They have also found two pipe bombs, an AK-47, food, ammunition, clothing and other supplies in the search.

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New Cop Killing Suspect Sighting Has ‘High Credibility’

Pennsylvania Department of Transportation(POCONO SUMMIT, Pa.) – A new possible sighting of suspected cop-killer Eric Frein has Pennsylvania police re-focusing their search, more than a month after the manhunt began.

Frein, 31, is accused of ambushing state police in early September, killing one and wounding another. Since then, police say he has been hiding in the woods of the Pocono Mountains.

“Overnight we had a sighting for which we are assigning a high level of credibility,” Lt. Col. George Bivens of the Pennsylvania State Police said on Saturday. “It was reported in the area of the Pocono Mountain East High School. The individual’s description was consistent with Frein and he was observed carrying a rifle.”

The woman who saw the man said that his face was “covered with mud,” so a positive identification could not be made, but she was about 15 to 20 feet from him.

After learning of the new possible sighting, police shifted the search area, he said.

“I think we’ve kept a tremendous amount of pressure on him and I think that likely had some bearing on where he’s at now, assuming that it is him,” Bivens said.

Frein attended Pocono East High School and worked at Camp Minsi, which is also in the vicinity, Bevins said.

Investigators are also analyzing blood found on the back porch of a home near Cresco. They are not sure if the blood is related to the investigation and expect the test results to come back late this evening.

State police say the weather is working in their favor, because as leaves continue to fall, there is a better aerial view from choppers and planes.

Police have been searching the woods, focusing on the border of Pike and Monroe counties, since after the shooting at the Blooming Grove police barracks on Sept. 12.

Frein, from nearby Canadensis, has been spotted several times, but always evaded police capture because of the thick terrain. He’s a self-trained survivalist and war reenactor who focused on Eastern European militaries and weapons.

Police found Frein’s Jeep in a swamp shortly after the shooting. They have also found two pipe bombs, an AK-47, food, ammunition, clothing and other supplies in the search.

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Giants Victor Cruz Vows to Return better then ever

NFL via Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Despite suffering a a torn patellar tendon in his right knee that ended his season, New York Giants wide receiver Victor Cruz is confident this is only a setback and that he’ll be able to continue his NFL career.

Cruz suffered the injury last Sunday against the Philadelphia Ealges when he dove for a ball in the endzone and ultimately had to be helped off the field.

“They said my chances of coming back are very high,” Cruz said on a conference call. “I’m excited for the process.”

“I don’t have any doubt in my mind,” he said. “I don’t have any doubt I’ll be back. I believe I’ll be in tip-top shape when the time is right.”

Since stepping on the field his rookie season back in 2011, Cruz has been one of the most exciting and well-known players in the NFL.

Known for doing a salsa dance every time he scores a touchdown, Cruz has 264 catches and 24 touchdowns in 52 games played for the Giants after he was undrafted out of Massachusetts.

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Hurricane Gonzalo Knocks Out Power in Bermuda

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Hurricane Gonzalo made a direct hit on Bermuda Friday night, unleashing pounding rains and dangerous winds.

Though Gonzalo weakened to a Category 2 storm before landfall, the large system was still one of the largest to hit the island. Winds reached up to 105 miles per hour, taking out trees and power lines in its path.

The storm left approximately 28,850 customers without power.

On Saturday Bermuda Governor George Fergusson tweeted that there have been no deaths or serious injuries.

This is the second storm in a row to hit Bermuda, following tropical storm Fay last weekend.

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Hurricane Gonzalo Knocks Out Power in Bermuda

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Hurricane Gonzalo made a direct hit on Bermuda Friday night, unleashing pounding rains and dangerous winds.

Though Gonzalo weakened to a Category 2 storm before landfall, the large system was still one of the largest to hit the island. Winds reached up to 105 miles per hour, taking out trees and power lines in its path.

The storm left approximately 28,850 customers without power.

On Saturday Bermuda Governor George Fergusson tweeted that there have been no deaths or serious injuries.

This is the second storm in a row to hit Bermuda, following tropical storm Fay last weekend.

More ABC news videos | ABC Health News

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Hurricane Gonzalo Knocks Out Power in Bermuda

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Hurricane Gonzalo made a direct hit on Bermuda Friday night, unleashing pounding rains and dangerous winds.

Though Gonzalo weakened to a Category 2 storm before landfall, the large system was still one of the largest to hit the island. Winds reached up to 105 miles per hour, taking out trees and power lines in its path.

The storm left approximately 28,850 customers without power.

On Saturday Bermuda Governor George Fergusson tweeted that there have been no deaths or serious injuries.

This is the second storm in a row to hit Bermuda, following tropical storm Fay last weekend.

More ABC news videos | ABC Health News

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Answers to Five Simple Questions About the Midterm Elections

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — With the midterm elections less than three weeks away, Shushannah Walshe, deputy political director for ABC News, answers five simple questions.

1. So, let’s start with the basics. For those who don’t know or have been too busy watching the new season of Homeland or reading Gone Girl think pieces: what are the midterm elections and when are they? Sometime next month, right?

SW: Yes, on Tuesday, November 4. But, are you too busy? Aren’t we all? In many states there is no need to wait to vote. You can vote early–in many states you can even go today. We are less than three weeks away and according to early voting expert Michael McDonald with the United States Election Project over 1.6 million Americans have already voted. In every district, wherever you live, you can find that information easily accessible online. So, what are you waiting for? Ah maybe you like the excitement of waiting until Election Day.

Now to the big question: what are the midterm elections? Midterm elections happen halfway through the presiden’s four-year term and if you are wondering if you can vote or should, well that answer is yes, if you are registered. That’s because every member of the House of Representatives is up for re-election, yes yours! That’s not all. There are important Senate and gubernatorial races as well. What’s the most important? Well, it’s all important, but we are closely watching whether the Democrats hold on to the Senate or not (more on that below). Republicans need to gain six states in order to do that and there are several tight races–some that may not even be decided until after Election Day–making it impossible to know right now what will happen.

2. Ok, so – as much as everyone is talking about Hillary Clinton – the White House is not actually in play this year. How many seats in the Senate and House of Representatives are up for grabs? A number of governors’ races are happening as well right?

SW: Correct, the president has two more years and the next POTUS will be elected in 2016. When will that race start? Oh about a day after the midterms are over. But, let’s concentrate on this election. All 435 members in the House of Representatives are up because they are up for re-election every two years (what a grind!) and there are 36 gubernatorial and 36 Senate races. Sixteen of those Senate races are deemed competitive by ABC News ratings and of those 16, five are toss-ups. Of the governor’s races our ratings show 21 are competitive with seven toss-ups. Go to ABCNews.com’s 14 for 14 coverage to see if any of these hot races are in your state.

3. So the House is currently controlled by the Republicans AKA the GOP. The Senate is controlled by the Democrats. Any clue if either body will change hands?

SW: We don’t believe the House will change hands, meaning Republicans will stay in control of the lower chamber. Republicans are actually hoping to gain even more seats next month, while Democrats are aggressively trying to prevent that from happening. There aren’t really that many toss-ups despite every seat being up and just a relatively small number that the campaign committees pour money into and watch closely because they tend to flip back and forth between the parties.

But, the real fight to watch on November 4 is whether the Senate changes hands from the Democrats to the Republicans. You may be seeing all those nasty ads at home on your TV and this is likely why, because we are in the last weeks of a death match and Democrats are trying to hold control and the GOP wants to wrest it from them, knowing it’s only six seats that could make a difference. It all depends on just a handful of critical races; see below for more on that.

If you are interested in paying attention these final weeks those are the exciting races to watch, with all of them it could be that one race that determines control. What happens if there is a tie? A tie means that the Democrats win because Vice President Joe Biden is actually the tie breaker. Currently Nate Silver and his team at FiveThirtyEight give Republicans a 60.8 percent chance of taking control of the Senate and give Democrats a 39.2 percent chance of keeping the majority.

4. OK, so let’s say the Republicans win the Senate. What does that actually **mean** in real terms? What will change in Washington?

SW: There’s so much gridlock now, how could there be more? But, yes expect more gridlock because the president, a Democrat, will still be in the White House while Republicans will hold Congress. It’s quite likely even less could get done. It would shift, though. Instead of Congress not getting anything done, the president will likely veto more of what Congress passes.

Of course, Republicans could worry again about more primary challenges so any lawmaking may come to a grinding halt. Many Republicans and Democrats running now are promising to work across the aisle, trying to sell themselves to a public that is sick of congressional fighting. If those promises are true then maybe all these predictions will be wrong, but don’t bet on it. It’s not just voters that are sick of the inaction; there are plenty of senior legislators who are sick of it too. Maybe they will get their way and come to a truce of sorts. Again, unlikely. One other possibility is that President Obama moves toward the Republicans to try and get something–anything–done. We’ll be watching.

5. So, we established there are a lot of races happening. Can you name three races you find most compelling and why?

SW: There are a lot of races and narrowing it down to three is difficult, but let’s give it a try. The Georgia Senate race has just recently become a toss-up and it’s all because of an outsourcing controversy that has hit the Republican in the race, businessman David Perdue, pretty hard. He’s running against Michelle Nunn, daughter of former Georgia Sen. Sam Nunn, and for months it looked impossible for a Democrat in red Georgia to win, but now it’s likely to stay tight until Election Day.

Another exciting, and also somewhat unexpected battle, is the Kansas Senate race. In that fight, three-term incumbent Pat Roberts is battling it out against independent Greg Orman. Kansas is also a bright red state, a place not really accustomed to competitive elections never mind this brawl. Orman says he’s an independent choice, while Roberts and his allies are trying to label with him with the L word, liberal. Kansas also has an exciting gubernatorial race, but I won’t count that as my number three.

For my final one, let’s go with a governor’s race. The Florida governor’s race is a fascinating one pitting the Republican incumbent against the former GOP governor of the Sunshine State, Charlie Crist. Crist is back, but this time he’s a Democrat, and everywhere he goes he’s accompanied by a fan. Yes, a fan. As a Floridian, I can attest that it gets hot at home, but this fan has even impacted the race with Scott refusing to come out to their debate Wednesday because of the fan. Yes, fangate.

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Answers to Five Simple Questions About the Midterm Elections

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — With the midterm elections less than three weeks away, Shushannah Walshe, deputy political director for ABC News, answers five simple questions.

1. So, let’s start with the basics. For those who don’t know or have been too busy watching the new season of Homeland or reading Gone Girl think pieces: what are the midterm elections and when are they? Sometime next month, right?

SW: Yes, on Tuesday, November 4. But, are you too busy? Aren’t we all? In many states there is no need to wait to vote. You can vote early–in many states you can even go today. We are less than three weeks away and according to early voting expert Michael McDonald with the United States Election Project over 1.6 million Americans have already voted. In every district, wherever you live, you can find that information easily accessible online. So, what are you waiting for? Ah maybe you like the excitement of waiting until Election Day.

Now to the big question: what are the midterm elections? Midterm elections happen halfway through the presiden’s four-year term and if you are wondering if you can vote or should, well that answer is yes, if you are registered. That’s because every member of the House of Representatives is up for re-election, yes yours! That’s not all. There are important Senate and gubernatorial races as well. What’s the most important? Well, it’s all important, but we are closely watching whether the Democrats hold on to the Senate or not (more on that below). Republicans need to gain six states in order to do that and there are several tight races–some that may not even be decided until after Election Day–making it impossible to know right now what will happen.

2. Ok, so – as much as everyone is talking about Hillary Clinton – the White House is not actually in play this year. How many seats in the Senate and House of Representatives are up for grabs? A number of governors’ races are happening as well right?

SW: Correct, the president has two more years and the next POTUS will be elected in 2016. When will that race start? Oh about a day after the midterms are over. But, let’s concentrate on this election. All 435 members in the House of Representatives are up because they are up for re-election every two years (what a grind!) and there are 36 gubernatorial and 36 Senate races. Sixteen of those Senate races are deemed competitive by ABC News ratings and of those 16, five are toss-ups. Of the governor’s races our ratings show 21 are competitive with seven toss-ups. Go to ABCNews.com’s 14 for 14 coverage to see if any of these hot races are in your state.

3. So the House is currently controlled by the Republicans AKA the GOP. The Senate is controlled by the Democrats. Any clue if either body will change hands?

SW: We don’t believe the House will change hands, meaning Republicans will stay in control of the lower chamber. Republicans are actually hoping to gain even more seats next month, while Democrats are aggressively trying to prevent that from happening. There aren’t really that many toss-ups despite every seat being up and just a relatively small number that the campaign committees pour money into and watch closely because they tend to flip back and forth between the parties.

But, the real fight to watch on November 4 is whether the Senate changes hands from the Democrats to the Republicans. You may be seeing all those nasty ads at home on your TV and this is likely why, because we are in the last weeks of a death match and Democrats are trying to hold control and the GOP wants to wrest it from them, knowing it’s only six seats that could make a difference. It all depends on just a handful of critical races; see below for more on that.

If you are interested in paying attention these final weeks those are the exciting races to watch, with all of them it could be that one race that determines control. What happens if there is a tie? A tie means that the Democrats win because Vice President Joe Biden is actually the tie breaker. Currently Nate Silver and his team at FiveThirtyEight give Republicans a 60.8 percent chance of taking control of the Senate and give Democrats a 39.2 percent chance of keeping the majority.

4. OK, so let’s say the Republicans win the Senate. What does that actually **mean** in real terms? What will change in Washington?

SW: There’s so much gridlock now, how could there be more? But, yes expect more gridlock because the president, a Democrat, will still be in the White House while Republicans will hold Congress. It’s quite likely even less could get done. It would shift, though. Instead of Congress not getting anything done, the president will likely veto more of what Congress passes.

Of course, Republicans could worry again about more primary challenges so any lawmaking may come to a grinding halt. Many Republicans and Democrats running now are promising to work across the aisle, trying to sell themselves to a public that is sick of congressional fighting. If those promises are true then maybe all these predictions will be wrong, but don’t bet on it. It’s not just voters that are sick of the inaction; there are plenty of senior legislators who are sick of it too. Maybe they will get their way and come to a truce of sorts. Again, unlikely. One other possibility is that President Obama moves toward the Republicans to try and get something–anything–done. We’ll be watching.

5. So, we established there are a lot of races happening. Can you name three races you find most compelling and why?

SW: There are a lot of races and narrowing it down to three is difficult, but let’s give it a try. The Georgia Senate race has just recently become a toss-up and it’s all because of an outsourcing controversy that has hit the Republican in the race, businessman David Perdue, pretty hard. He’s running against Michelle Nunn, daughter of former Georgia Sen. Sam Nunn, and for months it looked impossible for a Democrat in red Georgia to win, but now it’s likely to stay tight until Election Day.

Another exciting, and also somewhat unexpected battle, is the Kansas Senate race. In that fight, three-term incumbent Pat Roberts is battling it out against independent Greg Orman. Kansas is also a bright red state, a place not really accustomed to competitive elections never mind this brawl. Orman says he’s an independent choice, while Roberts and his allies are trying to label with him with the L word, liberal. Kansas also has an exciting gubernatorial race, but I won’t count that as my number three.

For my final one, let’s go with a governor’s race. The Florida governor’s race is a fascinating one pitting the Republican incumbent against the former GOP governor of the Sunshine State, Charlie Crist. Crist is back, but this time he’s a Democrat, and everywhere he goes he’s accompanied by a fan. Yes, a fan. As a Floridian, I can attest that it gets hot at home, but this fan has even impacted the race with Scott refusing to come out to their debate Wednesday because of the fan. Yes, fangate.

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Michael Keaton Feels ‘Blessed’ for Starring Role in “Birdman”

Jeffrey R. Staab/CBS ©2014 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved(NEW YORK) — Twenty-five years ago, Tim Burton’s Batman, starring a then 37-year-old Michael Keaton, kickstarted the cinematic superhero era.

“I’ve done a lot of things, you know, besides wearing a big, rubber suit,” Keaton told ABC News’ Nightline.

For much of the last 20 years, Keaton’s had a low profile in Hollywood, but that is about to change thanks to his performance in the film Birdman.

The movie is the story of a down-on-his-luck actor Riggan Thompson, played by Keaton. Keaton’s character is famous for his work in a series of films as a costumed avenger, Birdman, and is desperate to redeem himself years later artistically by directing and starring in a Broadway drama. (While there are obvious parallels between Riggan’s and Keaton’s stints as superheroes, Keaton is quick to dispel any additional connection between his real-life self and his character in Birdman.)

Keaton is joined by the film’s all-star cast, gathered at Lincoln Center before Birdman‘s debut at the New York Film Festival exclusively for ABC News, including Emma Stone, Zach Galifianakis, Edward Norton, Naomi Watts, Amy Ryan, and Andrea Riseborough. The actors play characters in this film that are poised to present a personal or professional crisis for Keaton’s character.

“Just when you think he’s this kind of weak, desperate, insecure dude–he is that–but he’s also this other thing,” Keaton said.

Now 63, Keaton said he made a conscious decision to get back in the acting game.

“Specifically, in the last couple of years, [I] started saying, ‘I’ve got to start focusing more on not being so lazy and going after the things.’ I mean, I always turned a ton of things down, but it’s not like I turned really great things down necessarily,” Keaton said. “You wait for that great script to come along, or you hope it’s attached with a great director. And that’s what happened.”

The film is shot almost entirely in and around a Broadway theater. Birdman gets its adrenaline from director Alejandro Inarritu and his decision to shoot it without visible cuts.

“We were attempting two things that are very difficult to do: a comedy and a single shot,” Inarritu told Nightline. “It was extremely difficult to coordinate.”

With the able assistance of cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki, said Edward Norton, “I think he pulled off something that’s as technically audacious and astonishing and virtuoso as [the film] Gravity,”

The film was challenging for its crew and actors, who were required to be perfect for seven-minute seamless takes.

“We used to get to the twelfth hour in the day, and he felt that he had nothing in the can yet,” Naomi Watts told Nightline.

“One word, delivered a little later or earlier, or one door open wrong, even if it’s in the right time, but it’s not perfectly executed, suddenly it’s like the music, the sound,” Inarritu said. “There’s something that doesn’t match, and that was a scary but, I will say, beautiful part of doing this film.”

“And the feeling that came over you when it worked was the most satisfaction I’ve ever felt,” Emma Stone told Nightline.

For Keaton, who’d been careful about his roles for years, Birdman, and the character of Riggan Thompson, was a completely original change of pace.

“I was pulling out some of my old tricks or looking for new tricks, and I was getting lazy, so I had no real interest in watching myself for a while,” he said. “[Birdman] is different in that … there’s nothing like it. There’s no other movie that I’ve seen that’s like it, let alone been a part of.”

Now earning rapturous reviews, Birdman and Keaton’s performance seem likely to be part of the conversation through the awards season. Its themes reach beyond the rise or fall of an actor’s reputation.

“I think every character in the movie, except maybe Amy’s, whose is grounded, is fighting to get back to a version of themselves that they can respect,” Norton said. “Making the film was like a fantastic antidote to those sensations.”

“I’m unbelievably blessed. This is 100 percent original. You don’t get more original than what Tim [Burton] did with Beetlejuice and arguably what he did with the first Batman too,” Keaton said.

“And then you get this, which is like a whole other thing. I mean, come on. Somebody’s looking out for me in a large way.”

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Ebola Scare Turns Dallas Hospital Into a ‘Ghost Town’

iStock/Thinkstock(DALLAS) — The Dallas nurses who contracted Ebola while treating a patient at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital have been moved from the building, but patients are still steering clear of the once-bustling hospital.

People have called to cancel outpatient procedures, and some have even opted not to go to Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in emergency situations, ABC Dallas affiliate WFAA reports.

“It feels like a ghost town,” Rachelle Cohorn, a local health care vendor who has been to the hospital recently, told WFAA. “No one is even walking around the hospital.”

Texas Health Presbyterian’s average emergency room wait time had been 52 minutes, according to federal hospital data. But when ABC News called the hospital and asked the emergency department for the ER wait time today, the response was that there was no wait time.

The hospital has also taken public relations hits on a number of fronts. It was revealed that Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan was initially sent home from the ER even though he told staff there that he had recently come from West Africa, the epicenter of the Ebola outbreak. And this week, another health care worker who took care Duncan criticized the hospital administration for not providing proper training and equipment to nurses caring for Duncan.

To weather the storm, the hospital will need to convince people that Texas Health Presbyterian is still a safe hospital, said Dr. Dan Varga, the chief clinical officer of Texas Health Resources, which owns the Dallas hospital.

“I would tell this community that Presby is an absolutely safe hospital to come to,” Varga told ABC News chief health and medical editor Dr. Richard Besser on Thursday. “We’ve been in communication with our doctors that have their private offices in our professional buildings around the campus who are getting 40, 50, 60 percent cancellations just for fear of being somewhere in the geography of the hospital where Ebola is treated.”

Texas Health Presbyterian became the first hospital in the nation to be faced with diagnosing Ebola on American soil when Duncan, a Liberian man visiting family in Dallas, went to the emergency room on Sept. 26. He was initially sent home with antibiotics, but returned two days later in an ambulance when his symptoms worsened. The hospital put Duncan in isolation. He died on Oct. 8.

Two nurses contracted Ebola from Duncan, though how exactly they were exposed remains unknown. Nina Pham, 26, was diagnosed on Oct. 11, and Amber Vinson, 29, was diagnosed on Oct. 15, health officials said.

Texas Health Presbyterian cared for Pham in isolation for five days before requesting that she be moved to another facility. She was flown to an NIH facility in Bethesda, Maryland, on Oct. 16, and Vinson was flown to Emory University Hospital the day before.

Varga told Congress on Oct. 16 that the hospital staff was never trained to handle a patient with Ebola. He said they received guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in July but never received any face-to-face training.

About 70 staff members are being monitored after possible exposure to the Ebola virus.

“Over the long haul is the emotional toll going to be something that leaves a mark?” Varga asked. “We have a bunch of employees on surveillance now because they had contact with Mr. Duncan, with Nina, with Amber.”

Alex Normington, who works for a national firm that helps hospitals establish their reputations, told WFAA that Texas Health Presbyterian has had a “very good” reputation since it opened in 1966.

“A hospital’s reputation can take years or generations to build,” Normington said.

Federal and state hospital records also show that Texas Health Presbyterian had two violations over the last five years: one for a nurse who failed to turn a patient over every two hours and another for failing to appropriately address a patient’s complaint.

Molly Cate, a partner with the health care communication and public affairs firm Jarrard, Cate and Hancock, which works with hospitals across the country, said the violations did not appear to be out of the ordinary.

“Two in five years is not a huge amount,” said Cate. “Health care is very regulated industry. Hospitals are inspected regularly, for hundreds and thousands of things every year.”

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