Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Rachel Platten, the artist inspiring thousands with her hit song “Fight Song,” has a special message for a 10-year-old Missouri girl fighting stage 4 kidney cancer that has spread to her lungs.

“Hi Camille. This is Rachel,” Platten, 34, told Camille Clark in a video shared with ABC News.

“I hear that you’re going through some pretty tough stuff but I know that you’re strong,” she said. “You have a lot of loved ones and a lot of support around you, including me now. I love you so much. Keep kicking butt.”

Platten first heard about Camille’s battle through social media, where Camille’s family and friends have rallied with the hashtag #camillemeetsrachel to get Platten to come to Missouri to sing for her biggest fan.

Camille, a rising fourth-grader, was diagnosed with cancer in April after doctors found a nine-pound tumor that was crushing her kidney, according to her mom, Jessica Trapasso.

“She was perfectly fine before then,” Trapasso told ABC News. “Out of nowhere she had a huge bulge on her left side and I thought maybe she had just gotten hurt in gym class.”

Camille had surgery last month to remove both the tumor and her kidney, according to Trapasso, and this week began the first of 15 sets of radiation, in addition to chemotherapy.

Last Mother’s Day, during a particularly tough hospital stay, Camille’s aunt played “Fight Song” for her niece, and Camille has listened to the song every single day since.

“It keeps her going,” Trapasso said of the song, whose inspiring lyrics include, “And I don’t really care if nobody else believes…’Cause I’ve still got a lot of fight left in me.”

“She sings to it and she thinks Rachel is pretty,” Trapasso said of her daughter, who has lost all of her hair from the cancer treatments.

Platten saw Camille’s hashtag on Twitter and replied Sunday, writing, “Trying so hard to see if I can get to Missouri.”

“I am so incredibly moved by Camille’s story and by the outpouring of love and support from her friends and family,” Platten told ABC News. “I so badly want to meet this little fighter. We are doing our very best to make it happen …”

Trapasso, a single mom who has had to quit her job to care for Camille full-time, says Camille finds inspiration in the song to keep fighting so she can get back to the regular kid activities she loves, like riding her bicycle, playing outside with friends and swimming.

Trapasso also knows exactly what her daughter would do if she were to meet Platten.

“She’d give her a big hug,” Trapasso said. “She sings along with it every day and she would love to hear her sing that song to her.”

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iStock/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical Contributor

Whooping cough is a very dangerous disease, especially for babies.

The disease, caused by bacteria, is intense and leads to horrible coughing fits that can last for up to 10 weeks. If a newborn catches it, it could be fatal.

The scariest fact is that whooping cough is spread through person to person contact, and babies usually catch it from someone in their own home.

Make sure you get your babies vaccinated on time, and this includes pregnant women getting vaccinated, too.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends pregnant women get vaccinated in the third trimester of each pregnancy.

Also, if you’re over 19 years of age and have any contact with newborns, you should get the T-DAP vaccine.

Talk to your healthcare provider today. A newborn’s life may literally be at stake.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — If new research is true, losing inches from your waistline could be as easy as standing up.

According to a study published in European Heart Journal, those who spent two hours walking rather than sitting had waistlines that were three inches smaller on average. The study also found that those who spent less time sitting and more time walking were healthier and had a lower risk of heart disease.

Researchers put activity monitors on 782 men and women for seven days, tracking how long each person laid down, sat, stood or walked. They also tracked the participants’ height, weight, blood pressure, waist size and even took note of their sugar, fat and cholesterol levels.

The data revealed that most people spent nine hours, on average, sitting down, which is 60 percent of the time that they’re awake. Still, those who stood more versus sitting had, on average, lower levels of sugar, fat and cholesterol in the blood, had a healthier BMI and a thinner waistline.

“We found that time spent standing rather than sitting was significantly associated with lower levels of blood sugar and blood fats,” researcher Dr. Genevieve Healy, of Queensland University, said.

She added, “However, it is important to say that not all sitting is bad — but if people can incorporate alternatives to sitting wherever possible, it may benefit their heart and metabolic health. Our message is to ‘Stand Up, Sit Less, Move More.'”

Researchers suggest that those who work in an office should walk around more during office hours and use stand-up desks rather than sitting for hours at work stations.

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ABC News(TACOMA, Wash.) — When Alicia Wheatley of Tacoma, Washington, worried about how to to pay for the ongoing medical care her toddler needs to treat an eye disorder, she found help in an unlikely place: Online crowdfunding.

Wheatley’s daughter Chayla is just 2 years old and suffers from amblyopia in her right eye. The disorder causes decreased vision, and Chayla needs multiple eye surgeries to correct it or she could risk going blind in the eye.

Chayla wears an eye patch to strengthen the muscles in her eye, but it’s only a temporary solution.

Trying to pay for Chayla’s surgeries is putting the Wheatleys in a position they never imagined.

“We’re done everything right to get where we are, and we still can’t afford good healthcare,” Wheatley said. “It breaks my heart.”

Her husband Ray Wheatley’s military job was cut due to a troop draw down and the family’s military health insurance, which did cover some of Chayla’s medical care, will run out in a matter of months. His new civilian job pays less and what his future insurance will cover is uncertain.

So friends and family recommended they going online and crowd-fund to pay Chayla’s treatment, using the same sort of online fundraisers, such as GoFundMe, Kickstarter, GiveForward and YouCaring.com, that inventors, entrepreneurs and struggling filmmakers use to launch their projects.

So Alicia Wheatley launched an online campaign through a website called GiveForward, setting a fundraising goal of $10,000 and hoped for the best.

GiveForward has about 14,000 medical fundraisers, most, the company says, are people who actually have health insurance but still need help paying for treatments that aren’t covered. Medical crowdfunding has been successful for many families, and an estimated $2.5 billion was raised in 2012, according to a report by research firm Massolution.

There have been some instances of crowdfunding fraud, where people have pretended to be sick or misuse the money, but GiveForward said those instances are rare. The company said they have stringent security systems in place to make sure those asking for money are legit. But with federal regulation still evolving, experts caution that consumers should do their research before donating.

Crowdfunding has worked for other families in the past. Patrick and Kristin Wilkinson of San Francisco raised over $20,000 on GiveForward so that their 4-month-old son Phoenix could get a bone marrow transplant.

“I think the hardest part is feeling helpless,” Kristin Wilkinson said. “As parents you’re supposed to protect your child, and in that situation you can’t.”

Phoenix was born with Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (SCID), a rare genetic disorder.

“Going undiagnosed, if a child has SCID, it’s fatal,” Wilkinson said. “As soon as they get an infection… their bodies can’t fight it.”

Wilkinson works for Airbnb, and her son’s GiveForward page was sent to the entire company and it took off from there, raising $20,000 in just 24 hours and over $50,000 total over 10 months.

Like Alicia Wheatley, the Wilkinsons have health insurance through Kristen’s job at Airbnb, but because Phoenix’s care so time-consuming, Kristin and Patrick weren’t able to work for months, so they said the crowdfunding money was much needed.

“It just gives you faith in humanity again,” Kirstin Wilkinson said. “It was really unbelievable.” But Wheatley’s online fundraising for her daughter was slow going. Heading into Chayla’s latest round of surgeries, Wheatley had only raised $610 dollars. Her online social network is small, and for the most part, not very wealthy.

“I don’t have that many friends on Facebook that’s over 30 that have…established savings accounts and all that,” Ray Wheatley said.

With help of her tech savvy cousin, Alicia Wheatley turned to Twitter and Facebook, and started the hashtag #Eyes4Chayla to try to spread the word, but it was an uphill battle.

“For us small family, small network it’s been a struggle,” she said. “Social media is not conducive for every socioeconomic walk of life.”

As of now, the Wheatleys crowdfunding campaign has ended. They only raised $1,390 over six months, a far cry from their $10,000 goal, but they are continuing to push forward. They have since started a new online campaign through YouCaring.com

“For us small family, small network it’s been a struggle,” Ray Wheatley said. “Social media is not conducive for every socioeconomic walk of life.”

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Mat Hayward/Getty Images(HARWOOD, Md.) — Hunter Hayes recorded a special performance of his song, “Invisible,” for a fan from Maryland he called “a rock star,” days before she died from terminal cancer.

Her name was Erin Catterton and she died at 22 years old on Wednesday “with her family and friends by her side at the Mandrin Chesapeake Hospice House in Harwood, Maryland,” according to her obituary on Legacy.com.

Catterton was a huge Hayes fan and her brother, Robert, reached out to the singer’s camp, asking for a video. The country star, 23, responded by sending Catterton a heartfelt performance of “Invisible” filmed in his hotel room in Los Angeles.

Catterton has battled cancer for much of her life. According to her brother, she was diagnosed with a brain tumor when she was just 4 years old. Just a few weeks ago, doctors found a tumor in Erin’s uterus.

“Erin’s happiest moments were spent every day by her mother and father’s sides enjoying anything from small shopping trips to vacations in Nashville and Savannah,” her obituary continued.

Hayes’ rep told ABC News that Erin and her entire family got to watch the video before she passed.

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Hemera/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Seven people have now died from a Legionnaires’ disease outbreak in the Bronx.

According to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, seven people have now died from the Bronx Legionnaires’ disease outbreak with 81 reported cases so far.

The seven people who died from the disease were older and had preexisting medical conditions.

A statement from New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s office said the city’s drinking water supply was safe throughout the city and was unaffected by legionella. It also said water towers were unaffected as well as home air conditioner units.

The statement also said the DOHMH would continue to monitor for new cases by conducting epidemiological investigations, interviewing individuals reported with Legionnaires’ disease, and more.

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Liquidlibrary/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The problems of “picky eating” in kids may extend beyond the dinner table — perhaps even to the psychiatrist’s couch, according to a new study published in Pediatrics Monday.

Duke University researchers looked at 917 kids between 2 and 6 years old, assessing their degree of picky or “selective” eating. They found that children with moderate to severe selective eating were more likely to also exhibit increased symptoms of anxiety, social anxiety and depression.

When they followed up later on with a subgroup of these kids, the researchers also found that selective eating in younger years may even predict psychological issues later on.

The researchers say the findings show that parents need better advice from doctors when it comes to dealing with kids who are picky eaters — and that they may even want to be on the lookout for more serious psychological issues.

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Liquidlibrary/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The problems of “picky eating” in kids may extend beyond the dinner table — perhaps even to the psychiatrist’s couch, according to a new study published in Pediatrics Monday.

Duke University researchers looked at 917 kids between 2 and 6 years old, assessing their degree of picky or “selective” eating. They found that children with moderate to severe selective eating were more likely to also exhibit increased symptoms of anxiety, social anxiety and depression.

When they followed up later on with a subgroup of these kids, the researchers also found that selective eating in younger years may even predict psychological issues later on.

The researchers say the findings show that parents need better advice from doctors when it comes to dealing with kids who are picky eaters — and that they may even want to be on the lookout for more serious psychological issues.

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Hemera/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Bronzer is the secret for getting that beach-ready glow without soaking up damaging UV rays.

The look has been perfected by A-list celebrities, including Jennifer Aniston, Jennifer Lopez and Victoria Beckham.

Makeup guru and Yahoo Beauty’s editor-in-chief, Bobbi Brown, appeared on ABC’s Good Morning America Monday as part of the Yahoo Your Day series – a collaboration between GMA and experts from Yahoo – to share the basics about bronzer.

Brown said bronzer was the quickest way to give some life to the face, adding that it can also be used to correct foundation that’s not the right color.

“Bronzer will absolutely” make your skin look healthier, she said.

Bronzer is used after foundation and concealer have been applied, Brown said. People should choose a bronzer that works with their skin tone and which doesn’t have any shine.

“And the way to put it on is to smile. You find the apple of the cheek. And then you blend it up. And then the trick is you also blend it down,” she said, adding that a wide brush should be used.

Bronzer should also be used on the forehead and nose so the sun-kissed effects appears natural. But, she added, the goal isn’t to give the user the appearance of a tan.

“You just want to tint the skin. … A lot of women just put it on the cheek. And then they walk away. But you use it, you blend it. You can put blush on top of it. You can put a little bit of shimmer on top of it,” she said.

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Hemera/Thinkstock(TUSCALOOSA, Ala.) — The longtime debate over whether men and women can be “just friends” continues. This time, science is weighing in.

Researchers from the University of Alabama conducted a study on college students and found that both men and women believe that actual platonic friendships between opposite sexes are possible, reports Vocativ.

Sounds promising, but most students also reported thinking that most men-women friendships hold secret sexual attraction. The participants estimated that about 63 percent of relationships have at least one person who secretly wants to get physical.

What’s even more interesting is that men and women showed similar levels of discomfort with their significant others forming a “friendship” with a member of the opposite sex.

Basically, men and women believe in platonic relationships…just not for their significant others.

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