Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images(LONDON) — Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, is urging greater awareness of and care for children’s mental health.

In a new public service announcement released on Sunday, Kate makes an appeal on behalf of Place2Be as the charity launches its first Children’s Mental Health Week in the U.K.

In the video that’s just about two minutes long, Kate talks about the challenges to children’s mental health — including bullying, bereavement, domestic violence and family problems.

Without support, she says, those challenges can become traumatic, leading to mental health problems in children such as anxiety, depression, addiction and self-harm.

“The stigma around mental health means that many children do not get the help that they so badly need. This needs to change. That is why the charity Place2Be is asking us all to talk openly this week,” Kate, 33, said. “We need to help young people and their parents understand that it’s not a sign of weakness to ask for help.”

She also said a child’s mental health was “just as important as their physical health and deserves the same quality of support,” noting that “no one would be embarrassed” to seek help for a child with a broken arm.

“We really should be equally ready to support a child coping with emotional difficulties,” Kate, wearing a long-sleeved, belted, blue print dress and with her hair down, added.

Kate also said she and her husband, Prince William, sincerely believe early action can prevent problems in childhood from becoming more serious later in life.

“That is why we’re both supporting Place2Be this Children’s Mental Health Week, and I hope you’ll join us,” she said.

Kate is pregnant with the couple’s second child, due in late April. They don’t know the child’s gender as they want it to be a surprise. Their first child, George, is 19 months.

Place2Be is a charity that provides emotional support to children more than 230 schools across the United Kingdom. Kate is the organization’s royal patron.

According to Place2Be’s website, depression and anxiety have increased among teenagers by 75 percent in the past 25 years, and three children in every classroom have a diagnosable mental health problem. The organization also said children were less likely to suffer from serious mental health difficulties later in life if they receive support at an early age.

Children’s Mental Health Week officially launches on Monday.

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Ridofranz/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — In matters of love, the conventional wisdom is to follow your heart. But you might want to consider following your brain instead this Valentine’s Day.

When you meet “The One,” your brain releases a cocktail of three chemicals that make you fall in love, said Larry Young, a psychologist who studies love at the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta. The chemicals are oxytocin, dopamine and opiates, he said.

“All of those act together in the brain’s reward system,” he said. “Our reward system now becomes wired to be especially tuned to our partner — the space, the sound, maybe the smell of our partner.”

Oxytocin, not be confused with the drug oxycodone, is sometimes called the “cuddle hormone,” and is responsible for the bonding between mother and baby and between partners.

Dopamine is involved in exhilaration and excitement, Young said. Cocaine and sex both cause the brain to release dopamine.

Opiates cause feelings of warmth and pleasure. Heroine and sex both cause the brain to release opiates.

“The next time we see the partner, our reward system is activated,” Young said, adding that love can also be like addiction. “Once the bond is formed, we stay together not only because we’re attracted to our partner but the other part because of the negative feeling when we’re away from our partner.”

Although humans rely less on pheromones to pick their mates than animals, scientists know that finding that special someone has something to do with chemicals that the person releases, said organic chemist George Preti, who works at the Monell Center in Philadelphia. But they haven’t been able to isolate the specific attraction chemical, or pheromone, he said. They have, however, determined that chemicals produced in a man’s underarms can alter a woman’s neuroendocrine levels, which alter their menstrual cycles.

Romantic, right?

“We didn’t study attraction,” Preti said. “We studied something we could measure quantitatively.”

The chemicals enter through the nose, but what happens next isn’t entirely clear, Preti said. He said he thinks they enter the hypothalamus and the amygdala, two parts of the brain that deal with emotion, mood and sex drive.

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AlexRaths/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the latest weekly data on flu activity on Friday, showing a drop in activity for the sixth consecutive week.

The CDC reports 11 pediatric flu deaths this week, bringing the seasonal total to 80. While the agency continues to say that flu figures represent an epidemic, the proportion of deaths has continued to fall.

Fifteen states reported high influenza-like illness activity this week, down from 26 the week before.

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Arctic Apples(NEW YORK) — The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Friday approved a newfangled apple with a genetically modified twist: It doesn’t turn brown when exposed to air.

The USDA approval allows trees bearing the new fruit to be sold to farmers, but safety approval by the Food and Drug Administration for consumption can’t be far behind, according to Patty Lovera, assistant director of Food and Water Watch, a consumer-rights group based in Washington, D.C. She said it will probably still be a few years before they’re sold in stores.

“The USDA is usually the big step, and that happened today,” Lovera told ABC News, explaining that GMOs — or genetically modified organisms — are already on the market with corn, soy and other crops designed to fend off insects or survive being sprayed down with weed-killers. “This is kind of the next generation, where they’re trying to promote a consumer benefit. When you cut it, it won’t turn brown.”

The scientists behind the so-called Arctic apples “turned off” the gene found in apples that caused them to turn brown — a process that differs from other GMO crops and foods, which usually add genes from other organisms. For instance, the GMO salmon from AquaBounty Technologies is an Atlantic salmon with an added Pacific salmon gene to make it grow faster and an added eel gene to make it grow year-round.

“This time, they’re going into the existing material and turning off genes, but what else did that gene do that they turned off?” Lovera asked, pointing to the concerns that some people have about the potential unintended consequences of manipulating genes.

For example, if that gene helped protect the apple from pests, and it’s no longer “on,” farmers could need more pesticides, she said. Her other concern, she said, is that now consumers won’t know how long apples have been sitting out.

Dietitian Amy Jamieson-Petonic, of University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio, said research suggests genetically modified foods don’t pose an immediate threat to people’s health. But there’s always room for more research, she said.

Apples that have turned brown, or oxidized, aren’t nutritionally different from apples that have not yet turned brown, she said, but she recommends eating apples before that happens. If you don’t want apples to turn brown, squeeze a little lemon juice on them, she said. The vitamin C keeps the fruit from oxidizing.

Okanagan Specialty Fruits, which makes the Arctic apples, said in a statement that it was excited by the USDA approval and it is “working hard to get as many trees in the ground as possible so that you’ll be able to purchase Arctic apples in stores within the next few years.”

“The supply-chain can feel confident knowing that Arctic apples are likely the most tested apples in existence,” the company said. “Rigorously reviewed by multiple regulatory bodies, all evaluations reach the same conclusion — Arctic apples present no unique risks and are just as safe and healthful as any other apple.”

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WABC-TV(STONY BROOK, N.Y.) — A group of oncology nurses has been playing cupid, putting together surprise romantic dinners for patients in their hospital rooms to help them forget their cancer — even if it’s just for just a little while.

Stony Brook University Hospital nurse Maggie Knight, who works mostly with leukemia and lymphoma patients undergoing bone marrow transplants, came up with the idea after noticing one of her favorite patients seemed depressed after spending a few months in the hospital.

“I walked out and I thought, ‘Man, we have to make him feel more at home,'” she told ABC’s New York station WABC. “So how about a date night?”

Knight and a chaplain spoke to the man’s spouse and then surprised him with food from a restaurant the couple liked, music and decorations for the perfect date night. She told ABC News that seeing him happy brought tears to her eyes.

“He’s a great person, and I couldn’t have been happier to give that to him while he’s in the hospital,” she told ABC News.

The project has since swelled to include other nurses in her department, and they’ve pulled together their own money to surprise five patients since August.

The lucky recipients only have positive reviews for the makeshift restaurants. Knight said she sees a lot of “grown men” cry.

Meg Pearse, whose husband was battling lymphoma, said the date helped them feel like they were normal, cancer-free people again.

“It was just quiet time for us to sit and talk over dinner, which we hadn’t done, and forget about what had just happened for three weeks,” she told WABC.

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WABC-TV(STONY BROOK, N.Y.) — A group of oncology nurses has been playing cupid, putting together surprise romantic dinners for patients in their hospital rooms to help them forget their cancer — even if it’s just for just a little while.

Stony Brook University Hospital nurse Maggie Knight, who works mostly with leukemia and lymphoma patients undergoing bone marrow transplants, came up with the idea after noticing one of her favorite patients seemed depressed after spending a few months in the hospital.

“I walked out and I thought, ‘Man, we have to make him feel more at home,'” she told ABC’s New York station WABC. “So how about a date night?”

Knight and a chaplain spoke to the man’s spouse and then surprised him with food from a restaurant the couple liked, music and decorations for the perfect date night. She told ABC News that seeing him happy brought tears to her eyes.

“He’s a great person, and I couldn’t have been happier to give that to him while he’s in the hospital,” she told ABC News.

The project has since swelled to include other nurses in her department, and they’ve pulled together their own money to surprise five patients since August.

The lucky recipients only have positive reviews for the makeshift restaurants. Knight said she sees a lot of “grown men” cry.

Meg Pearse, whose husband was battling lymphoma, said the date helped them feel like they were normal, cancer-free people again.

“It was just quiet time for us to sit and talk over dinner, which we hadn’t done, and forget about what had just happened for three weeks,” she told WABC.

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Getty Images(NEW YORK) — It turns out we can learn a lot about love from Twitter.

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, Twitter has sifted through its trove of billions of tweets sent in the past year to pull out some lessons about life, love and relationship milestones.

Twitter’s “Calendar of Love” reveals that people tweet most about first dates in January but have their hearts broken in March. Not surprisingly, July is the most frequent time for weddings, while the most tweets about engagements are in August.

Perhaps there’s something about having all of your friends settling down, because August is also the most popular time for people to discuss online dating on Twitter. December is when divorce is most tweeted about.

Twitter also crunched the data to find out which countries say “I love you” the most on the site. It turns out the Swedes are the most amorous with their 140-characters, followed by Slovenia and Israel. The United States came in 50th.

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Getty Images(NEW YORK) — It turns out we can learn a lot about love from Twitter.

Just in time for Valentine’s Day, Twitter has sifted through its trove of billions of tweets sent in the past year to pull out some lessons about life, love and relationship milestones.

Twitter’s “Calendar of Love” reveals that people tweet most about first dates in January but have their hearts broken in March. Not surprisingly, July is the most frequent time for weddings, while the most tweets about engagements are in August.

Perhaps there’s something about having all of your friends settling down, because August is also the most popular time for people to discuss online dating on Twitter. December is when divorce is most tweeted about.

Twitter also crunched the data to find out which countries say “I love you” the most on the site. It turns out the Swedes are the most amorous with their 140-characters, followed by Slovenia and Israel. The United States came in 50th.

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Ashley McIntyre(NEW YORK) — A year ago, Ashley McIntyre decided to donate her kidney to a total stranger. Today, she’s engaged to him, and their baby is due in June.

“As soon as we started dating — not long after that — was when we realized, this was it,” McIntyre, 25, told ABC News.

It all started January 2014 when McIntyre overheard her mother and grandmother talking about a story they heard on the radio about a 25-year-old man her age in need of a kidney transplant.

They said this man had lost his father to brain cancer in 2012 and had had his house burned down on Christmas Day 2011, and McIntire’s mother commented that if it weren’t for her health problems, she would give him a kidney. She had type-O blood, which is the universal donor.

“It was just like one thing after another for them,” McIntyre said. “I was like, ‘Well, I’m type-O and I don’t have any health problems.'”

The next day, she called to volunteer her kidney, and the testing started shortly thereafter, she said. McIntyre didn’t want to meet the man, Danny Robinson, until she knew she was a match, fearing that she would get his hopes up, she said.

When they finally did meet, in March, McIntyre was nervous, she said. And though she thought he was cute, she never dreamed they would date.

“As soon as we started talking, it was like our families had known each other forever,” McIntyre said.

Dr. Malay Shah of the University of Kentucky Transplant Center told ABC News the surgery happened in April. He explained that Robinson had a kidney disease called IgA nephropathy, which put him into full kidney failure when he was 23 because his immune system attacked his kidneys, preventing them from properly filtering blood and removing toxins.

Robinson had been on dialysis for two years, Shah said

If he waited for a kidney from a deceased donor, it could take an average of three years, Shah said. Getting on local radio changed everything for him.

“I don’t know why he did it, but I’m glad he did,” Shah said.

After the surgery, which took a few days of recovery in the hospital, McIntyre and Robinson stayed in touch. It wasn’t until Memorial Day weekend that they started dating, she said.

“On June fifth, we made it official,” she said.

And on Christmas Day, after all the presents were opened, Robinson pulled out one more gift: a small, wrapped box containing an engagement ring. He got down on one knee and asked her to marry him.

“He is truly a genuinely good person,” McIntyre said. “We have so much fun together.”

Their baby girl is due in June.

“He’s going to be a great dad,” she said.

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Ashley McIntyre(NEW YORK) — A year ago, Ashley McIntyre decided to donate her kidney to a total stranger. Today, she’s engaged to him, and their baby is due in June.

“As soon as we started dating — not long after that — was when we realized, this was it,” McIntyre, 25, told ABC News.

It all started January 2014 when McIntyre overheard her mother and grandmother talking about a story they heard on the radio about a 25-year-old man her age in need of a kidney transplant.

They said this man had lost his father to brain cancer in 2012 and had had his house burned down on Christmas Day 2011, and McIntire’s mother commented that if it weren’t for her health problems, she would give him a kidney. She had type-O blood, which is the universal donor.

“It was just like one thing after another for them,” McIntyre said. “I was like, ‘Well, I’m type-O and I don’t have any health problems.'”

The next day, she called to volunteer her kidney, and the testing started shortly thereafter, she said. McIntyre didn’t want to meet the man, Danny Robinson, until she knew she was a match, fearing that she would get his hopes up, she said.

When they finally did meet, in March, McIntyre was nervous, she said. And though she thought he was cute, she never dreamed they would date.

“As soon as we started talking, it was like our families had known each other forever,” McIntyre said.

Dr. Malay Shah of the University of Kentucky Transplant Center told ABC News the surgery happened in April. He explained that Robinson had a kidney disease called IgA nephropathy, which put him into full kidney failure when he was 23 because his immune system attacked his kidneys, preventing them from properly filtering blood and removing toxins.

Robinson had been on dialysis for two years, Shah said

If he waited for a kidney from a deceased donor, it could take an average of three years, Shah said. Getting on local radio changed everything for him.

“I don’t know why he did it, but I’m glad he did,” Shah said.

After the surgery, which took a few days of recovery in the hospital, McIntyre and Robinson stayed in touch. It wasn’t until Memorial Day weekend that they started dating, she said.

“On June fifth, we made it official,” she said.

And on Christmas Day, after all the presents were opened, Robinson pulled out one more gift: a small, wrapped box containing an engagement ring. He got down on one knee and asked her to marry him.

“He is truly a genuinely good person,” McIntyre said. “We have so much fun together.”

Their baby girl is due in June.

“He’s going to be a great dad,” she said.

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