Carole Gomez/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — People who enjoy hiking in the woods from spring through autumn in various part of the country are generally told to check themselves for ticks after their strolls.

Now, the same thing goes for anyone who enjoys a round of golf.

Although played in wide open spaces, New York Medical College researcher Gregory Owens says that golfers must also watch out for ticks that prey on small rodents because they feed at the boundaries between the woods and fairway.

Owens surveyed 29 golfers in Orange County, New Jersey, three-quarters of whom who revealed they have found at least one tick on them after golfing. Furthermore, seven people in this group were also diagnosed with Lyme disease. That’s a much higher rate than the general population in the area.

Still, most of the golfers were pretty cavalier about the ticks, saying they never spray themselves with insect repellent before teeing off. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a bug spray with between 20 and 30 percent DEET, the active ingredient in many insect repellent products.

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kzenon/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — And for our next trick, we’ll try to walk from the barista to our table without spilling this tray of coffee.

Good luck with that. As opposed to carbonated beverages like beer, coffee often spills out of the cup regardless of how careful we walk. But why?

It took some geniuses from Princeton and NYU to figure out the answer: it’s all about the bubbles in beer and the lack thereof in coffee.

Apparently, foam in a heavy stout like Guinness reduced much of the sloshing, making it a lot easier to go from counter to table with beer than coffee.

Researchers explained their interest in such a seemingly trivial study by noting that the findings are relevant to “numerous industrial applications,” including the transfer of liquids in cargoes.

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iStock/Thinkstock(MIDLAND, Texas) — The dress was perfect, the flowers were in place and the string quartet was all set up to ease the beautiful bride down the aisle.

But most important to newlywed Cathryn Copeland on her magical wedding day was the fact her mother was there.

“It’s a huge blessing,” Copeland, 26, of Midland, Texas, told ABC News.

Copeland’s mom, Janet, was battling a fight with breast cancer. Originally diagnosed 11 years ago, she had since gone into remission — but bad news came in October 2013, when the family learned it was not only back, but as of October 2014, it had spread, allowing her very little time.

The wedding was originally scheduled for November 1 in Scottsdale, Arizona. However, Copeland and her now husband, Conner Wood, didn’t want to take any chances.

“We said, ‘Mom, what do you want to do with this wedding?’” Copeland recalled of the emotional conversation. “She just broke down and said, ‘I want to see this wedding.’”

That’s all it took. Copeland made the decision to move up her wedding to October 22, a Wednesday, at her mother’s cancer treatment center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, in Houston.

“The hospital was very accommodating and it’s just a beautiful campus that they have,” she explained. “I’ve been going with my mom to some of her treatments and we would do fast walks around the campus. She was always very physically fit. So I already knew all the beautiful spots where we could hold the ceremony.”

The bride says she was able to pull off the magical wedding a week and a half early, despite changing states, dates and timing, all because of the “selfless, loving people” willing to help make it happen.

“I just had an incredible group of people surrounding me,” said Copeland. “My dress was custom made for me and we became friends with her so she rushed my dress and she made my mom’s dress, too. She looked so beautiful.”

The wedding ceremony took place at 12:30 p.m., which gave Copeland and her mom all morning to relish in their girl time — being pampered with their hair and makeup in Janet’s hospital room.

“She had an unshakable faith and that gave me so much strength,” the bride explained. “I got to see Mom have a lot of prayers answered before she went home and that was a pure joy.”

Janet Copeland died two weeks after seeing her daughter wed, but the memories they shared that day will last a lifetime.

“On the day I was just so happy, filled with happiness, the happiest day of my life,” said Copeland. “The wedding answered that wish of hers to be able to be there, and to do something small for her was great.”

And despite the unfortunate circumstances, “We had a blast and it was the perfect day,” she added. “It was different than we planned, but it was infinitely more special. Now that she’s gone I have all the gorgeous photos sharing that day with her, and I have the video. To see her talking to me is just the biggest blessing.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Do you pack lunch for your children to bring to school? A new study says it may be healthier to have them buy food at the cafeteria.

A study appearing in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics on Monday found that 9 out of 10 lunches brought from home included chips, desserts, and sweetened drinks. While lunches made at home contained fewer calories on average, they also had more sodium and fewer servings of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and milk.

The author of the study, child nutrionist Karen Cullen, says parents need to be pickier about what they pack.

“I think that this is an opportunity for parents to get their children involved in discussing what makes good choices for a school meal and how you go about planning and going to the grocery store, getting the foods and packing those items,” Cullen said. “A suggestion would be for parents to make sure that the healthier choices are also in those lunches that provide the kids with all the food groups they need.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(OMAHA, Neb.) — Melissa Groves will never forget that over Christmas 2004, her then-6-year-old daughter Autumn asked Santa Claus for a little brother.

Boy, was she in for a surprise. The little brothers kept coming and coming.

Autumn got two adopted brothers the following year, followed by their six siblings over the next 10 years, Groves said. The family officially adopted their youngest, baby Zayn, two days ago.

“I just want them all to stay together,” said Groves, of Omaha, Nebraska, adding that she often hears about adopted children who go searching for their lost siblings as adults. “I didn’t want that for my boys.”

Groves and her husband learned shortly after getting married that conceiving children naturally was “very unlikely” for them, so they decided to try foster parenting, Groves wrote in a blog post last week for the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute.

Although they were only expecting one child, they were asked to foster two of them: brothers Noah and Chase, who were then 3 and almost 2. The Groves were nervous, at first, to take home two boys, but soon decided to adopt them both.

Once the adoption was finalized, however, they got a surprising phone call: The boys’ mother had given birth to another baby boy and he needed a home immediately.

“There was no question,” Groves wrote on her blog. “How could I deny my sons and this new child the possibility of being together?”

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This happened five more times over the years, sometimes with the boys’ birth mother reaching out to Groves over Facebook to say she was pregnant again. Though their birth mother always told Groves she hoped she would be ready to be a mother each time she became pregnant, it never worked out because she had a drug problem, Groves said, becoming emotional.

“She’s not a bad person,” Groves added, noting that she’s in contact with the boys’ biological mother every few months. “I can’t even imagine the pain that she’s gone through.”

Though no two stories are exactly the same, Groves said she hoped to shed light on the plights of thousands of children across the country and the need for families like hers to take them in.

According to the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute, more than 100,000 children are available for adoption in the United States.

The institute’s executive director, Becky Weichhand, said the Groves’ story is important because it helps the public realize that “everyday people are making an impact in the life of a child, and that they can do it, too.” She said it’s important to keep siblings together where possible because their bond is a source of emotional strength after the trauma of being separated from their parents.

“These children have been through something at no fault of their own,” Weichhand said. “Their parent is not able to parent, for whatever reason.”

In Nebraska, there are 322 children available for adoption and 4,122 children who are in state wards, said the state’s deputy director of Children and Family Services, Vicki Maca. She said anyone who is curious about fostering children should call their state officials.

“Sometimes, the general public thinks you have to be perfect parents in order to be eligible for foster care,” she said. “Our kids aren’t expecting or needing perfect parents. They just want consistency. No family is perfect.”

Though the Groves’ Omaha, Nebraska, home is often hectic with eight boys, Groves said they call it “sweet chaos.” And when things calm down, she’s reminded exactly why she did adopted them all.

“When the little ones sit on bigger ones’ laps to sit down and watch cartoons, it’s like that’s exactly it,” she said. “I’m glad they’re all here.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(MIDLAND, Texas) — The dress was perfect, the flowers were in place and the string quartet was all set up to ease the beautiful bride down the aisle.

But most important to newlywed Cathryn Copeland on her magical wedding day was the fact her mother was there.

“It’s a huge blessing,” Copeland, 26, of Midland, Texas, told ABC News.

Copeland’s mom, Janet, was battling a fight with breast cancer. Originally diagnosed 11 years ago, she had since gone into remission — but bad news came in October 2013, when the family learned it was not only back, but as of October 2014, it had spread, allowing her very little time.

The wedding was originally scheduled for November 1 in Scottsdale, Arizona. However, Copeland and her now husband, Conner Wood, didn’t want to take any chances.

“We said, ‘Mom, what do you want to do with this wedding?’” Copeland recalled of the emotional conversation. “She just broke down and said, ‘I want to see this wedding.’”

That’s all it took. Copeland made the decision to move up her wedding to October 22, a Wednesday, at her mother’s cancer treatment center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, in Houston.

“The hospital was very accommodating and it’s just a beautiful campus that they have,” she explained. “I’ve been going with my mom to some of her treatments and we would do fast walks around the campus. She was always very physically fit. So I already knew all the beautiful spots where we could hold the ceremony.”

The bride says she was able to pull off the magical wedding a week and a half early, despite changing states, dates and timing, all because of the “selfless, loving people” willing to help make it happen.

“I just had an incredible group of people surrounding me,” said Copeland. “My dress was custom made for me and we became friends with her so she rushed my dress and she made my mom’s dress, too. She looked so beautiful.”

The wedding ceremony took place at 12:30 p.m., which gave Copeland and her mom all morning to relish in their girl time — being pampered with their hair and makeup in Janet’s hospital room.

“She had an unshakable faith and that gave me so much strength,” the bride explained. “I got to see Mom have a lot of prayers answered before she went home and that was a pure joy.”

Janet Copeland died two weeks after seeing her daughter wed, but the memories they shared that day will last a lifetime.

“On the day I was just so happy, filled with happiness, the happiest day of my life,” said Copeland. “The wedding answered that wish of hers to be able to be there, and to do something small for her was great.”

And despite the unfortunate circumstances, “We had a blast and it was the perfect day,” she added. “It was different than we planned, but it was infinitely more special. Now that she’s gone I have all the gorgeous photos sharing that day with her, and I have the video. To see her talking to me is just the biggest blessing.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Do you pack lunch for your children to bring to school? A new study says it may be healthier to have them buy food at the cafeteria.

A study appearing in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics on Monday found that 9 out of 10 lunches brought from home included chips, desserts, and sweetened drinks. While lunches made at home contained fewer calories on average, they also had more sodium and fewer servings of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and milk.

The author of the study, child nutrionist Karen Cullen, says parents need to be pickier about what they pack.

“I think that this is an opportunity for parents to get their children involved in discussing what makes good choices for a school meal and how you go about planning and going to the grocery store, getting the foods and packing those items,” Cullen said. “A suggestion would be for parents to make sure that the healthier choices are also in those lunches that provide the kids with all the food groups they need.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(MIDLAND, Texas) — The dress was perfect, the flowers were in place and the string quartet was all set up to ease the beautiful bride down the aisle.

But most important to newlywed Cathryn Copeland on her magical wedding day was the fact her mother was there.

“It’s a huge blessing,” Copeland, 26, of Midland, Texas, told ABC News.

Copeland’s mom, Janet, was battling a fight with breast cancer. Originally diagnosed 11 years ago, she had since gone into remission — but bad news came in October 2013, when the family learned it was not only back, but as of October 2014, it had spread, allowing her very little time.

The wedding was originally scheduled for November 1 in Scottsdale, Arizona. However, Copeland and her now husband, Conner Wood, didn’t want to take any chances.

“We said, ‘Mom, what do you want to do with this wedding?’” Copeland recalled of the emotional conversation. “She just broke down and said, ‘I want to see this wedding.’”

That’s all it took. Copeland made the decision to move up her wedding to October 22, a Wednesday, at her mother’s cancer treatment center, MD Anderson Cancer Center, in Houston.

“The hospital was very accommodating and it’s just a beautiful campus that they have,” she explained. “I’ve been going with my mom to some of her treatments and we would do fast walks around the campus. She was always very physically fit. So I already knew all the beautiful spots where we could hold the ceremony.”

The bride says she was able to pull off the magical wedding a week and a half early, despite changing states, dates and timing, all because of the “selfless, loving people” willing to help make it happen.

“I just had an incredible group of people surrounding me,” said Copeland. “My dress was custom made for me and we became friends with her so she rushed my dress and she made my mom’s dress, too. She looked so beautiful.”

The wedding ceremony took place at 12:30 p.m., which gave Copeland and her mom all morning to relish in their girl time — being pampered with their hair and makeup in Janet’s hospital room.

“She had an unshakable faith and that gave me so much strength,” the bride explained. “I got to see Mom have a lot of prayers answered before she went home and that was a pure joy.”

Janet Copeland died two weeks after seeing her daughter wed, but the memories they shared that day will last a lifetime.

“On the day I was just so happy, filled with happiness, the happiest day of my life,” said Copeland. “The wedding answered that wish of hers to be able to be there, and to do something small for her was great.”

And despite the unfortunate circumstances, “We had a blast and it was the perfect day,” she added. “It was different than we planned, but it was infinitely more special. Now that she’s gone I have all the gorgeous photos sharing that day with her, and I have the video. To see her talking to me is just the biggest blessing.”

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Jose Luis Pelaez Inc./Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Mia St. John is obsessed with getting whiter, cleaner teeth.

The five-time World Boxing Council champion in the super welterweight division said her quest for pearly whites grew so extreme she was brushing and bleaching constantly until her dentist intervened.

“He said my teeth could basically turn to mush just because I was destroying the enamel,” she said.

The obsession for megawatt smiles and using over-the-counter whiteners is now leading to what many dentists are calling “bleachorexia.”

Laurence Rifkin, a cosmetic dentist in Los Angeles, said overbleaching is common and can lead to receding gums and oversensitivity. Too much bleaching can also have a reverse effect, leaving teeth with a darker appearance, he also said.

“Too much of a good thing is really bad,” he said.

In extreme cases, Rifkin said, he’s even heard of people rubbing Clorox bleach on their teeth.

“It’s good for surfaces and cleaning, but not in the mouth or even on the skin. It’s very caustic,” he said.

The American Dental Association recommends that people who choose to use a bleaching product do so only after consultation with a dentist.

Rifkin said overbleaching can cause irreversible damage. “Once the enamel has been chemically eroded away, then it’s gone, it’s gone forever,” he said.

St. John got the message.

“To say that I’m no longer obsessed with my teeth would be a lie, but I have it under control now,” she said.

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Jose Luis Pelaez Inc./Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Mia St. John is obsessed with getting whiter, cleaner teeth.

The five-time World Boxing Council champion in the super welterweight division said her quest for pearly whites grew so extreme she was brushing and bleaching constantly until her dentist intervened.

“He said my teeth could basically turn to mush just because I was destroying the enamel,” she said.

The obsession for megawatt smiles and using over-the-counter whiteners is now leading to what many dentists are calling “bleachorexia.”

Laurence Rifkin, a cosmetic dentist in Los Angeles, said overbleaching is common and can lead to receding gums and oversensitivity. Too much bleaching can also have a reverse effect, leaving teeth with a darker appearance, he also said.

“Too much of a good thing is really bad,” he said.

In extreme cases, Rifkin said, he’s even heard of people rubbing Clorox bleach on their teeth.

“It’s good for surfaces and cleaning, but not in the mouth or even on the skin. It’s very caustic,” he said.

The American Dental Association recommends that people who choose to use a bleaching product do so only after consultation with a dentist.

Rifkin said overbleaching can cause irreversible damage. “Once the enamel has been chemically eroded away, then it’s gone, it’s gone forever,” he said.

St. John got the message.

“To say that I’m no longer obsessed with my teeth would be a lie, but I have it under control now,” she said.

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