iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Countless moms confess in online message boards and blogs to feeling a nagging sense of inadequacy when it comes to balancing work and motherhood. They call it, “mommy guilt.”

“I do feel that guilt, especially when I’m trying to get away from my children to get some work done, where I feel like, ‘Gosh, I wish I could just focus on my kids,’” Allison O’Kelly, who has three sons and is also the full-time boss of her staffing company Mommy Corps, told ABC News’ Nightline.

More than 70 percent of American women with children under age 17 are working moms, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. But now, a growing number of professional women are choosing to focus on their kids instead. The share of stay-at-home mothers rose 29 percent in 2012, up from a modern era low of 23 percent in 1999, according to a Pew Research study. And this May, Harvard Business school released a survey that showed 37 percent of millennial women planned to leave the work force for family, compared with 28 percent of Gen X women and 17 percent of baby boomers.

But Laura Vanderkam, the author of I Know How She Does It, says women with “big jobs have much more balanced lives than people often think they do.”

“There’s a story out there that women just can’t have it all,” Vanderkam told Nightline. “I found that that was not the case. I wanted to show with this book that there are many women who are juggling work and life just fine, and that it can be done.”

A working mom to four kids herself, Vanderkam said she found the secret to work-life balance by analyzing hour-by-hour time logs from the lives of over 100 successful, high-powered working moms.

“Looking at how you spend the time is often the best antidote for guilt. When we see where our time actually goes, we can make better choices,” Vanderkam said.

To learn how to make best use of that time, Nightline recently enlisted O’Kelly, of Philadelphia, to keep her own detailed diary hour-by-hour of her time during a day in her life for Vanderkam to review.

While her two older sons, 12-year-old Nolan and 10-year-old Ethan, went to camp that day, a babysitter watched over her 4-year-old son Declan. O’Kelly then headed to her home office where she began work. However, throughout the day, Declan would interrupt O’Kelly in her office seeking his mom’s attention. In the evening, O’Kelly sat with her sons in front of the TV while returning work emails.

“It’s challenging. You feel bad. You would love to have them come and watch TV, but I work, so you have to get your job done so you don’t really have a choice, but it is hard,” O’Kelly said.

Since O’Kelly had no line dividing work and family time, Vanderkam suggested she set clear boundaries by employing what she called a “split shift.”

“End work at a reasonable time. Hang out with the family. Go back to work after the kids go to bed. By enforcing the 8:30 to 9 block for work you can get done what you need to get done,” said Vanderkam.

By doing so, Vanderkam said O’Kelly can keep her son out of her office with the promise of her full, undivided attention at the end of the work day.

Vanderkam also suggested that moms like O’Kelly try to be creative when scheduling quality time with their children. For example, instead of doing chores in the morning, Vanderkam said that time can be put to better use.

“If you can’t do family dinner, do family breakfast. Get creative with when you are together,” Vanderkam said. “If the kid is up at 6:00 and you leave for work at 8:00, that’s two hours, and yet, many people don’t even consider that as potential family time because they’re so focused on, ‘Well, got to get out the door.'”

Working moms, Vanderkam said, should also try to set aside some alone time to stay centered and calm.

“I think it’s common sense. And yet, people don’t do it,” said Vanderkam. “We tell ourselves all sorts of stories, that ‘I have no time.’ And once you tell yourself, ‘I have no time,’ well then what’s the point of trying to put fun things in your life?”

Vanderkam admits that her tips, pulled from moms with high-paying jobs, are geared towards women like O’Kelly who can afford childcare.

“Earning more money, having a higher-powered job, does make it easier to balance work and life,” Vanderkam said. “And yet, we often tell young women, ‘Don’t go for the high-powered job. Don’t go for that big, demanding career because something that’ll be a little lower-key will be more family friendly.'”

After following Vanderkam’s advice, O’Kelly said she had some success and that her children are demanding less of her during work hours.

And while Vanderkam’s tips might be helpful, experts said the most important thing a mom can do is have fun with her kids.

“If you’re really enjoying your child when you’re around your child, then it’s a beautiful thing. That’s a very powerful message,” said New York City psychotherapist Robi Ludwig. “We don’t have to be perfect in order to be the right enough parent for our child. We just need to enjoy the process and understand that it’s imperfect and messy, and it’s OK.”

O’Kelly said she feels optimistic now that she has some tools to make balancing her time with her children and work better.

“You know, I don’t know a single mom who doesn’t feel guilty,” she said. “But maybe we can feel a little less guilty if we really consciously make the decision to give our kids the time that they need and have them give us the time that we need.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(HOUSTON) — A star athlete from Texas is fighting for his life after the teen is suspected of contracting a deadly ameoba that infects the brain.

Michael Riley Jr., 14, remains at Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston fighting for his life after being infected by the naegleria fowleri amoeba, according to his family’s website.

The so called “brain-eating amoeba” occur naturally in fresh water and can cause irreversible damage, or even death, if they infect a person through the nose. Cases are rare, but deadly and only a handful of people are known to have survived the infection.

“When a doctor comes in teary eyes, crying you know it’s not good,” Michael’s mother, Cassandre Riley, told ABC News affiliate KTRK-TV in Houston.

The Harris County Public Health & Environmental Services reported they were notified of a suspected ameoba infection on Aug. 22, but could not confirm the teen was the patient due to privacy reasons.

Michael’s family said they believe the teen contracted the dangerous infection on Aug. 13 during a trip to the lake with his teammates. The teen, who has qualified for the Junior Olympics three times, was playing in the lake alongside his new high school track teammates.

About a week later, the teen reported a headache and fever, and within 24 hours he had become confused and disoriented, according to the family’s website. At the hospital, his doctors quickly suspected the rare naegleria fowleri amoeba.

“Coming from a lake you wouldn’t think he’s going to the doctors office and they tell you he has a couple days to live,” the teen’s father, Mike Riley, told KTRK-TV.

The ameoba can infect swimmers when water travels up the nasal cavity and the organism can then enter the brain, causing inflammation and swelling. Symptoms include nausea, fever, vomiting and hallucinations, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Mike Riley told KRTK-TV that the doctors at Texas Children’s Hospital had put Michael in an induced coma, drilled a hole in his skull to reduce pressure, and cooled his body in an attempt to preserve his body functions.

Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University Medical School, said the CDC could also provide an experimental drug called miltefosine that is approved in other countries to treat parasitic infection.

“This drug has been used to treat and has been used to treat other parasites and other pre-living amoebas,” explained Schaffner. “That’s the drug I am sure they are providing. It would be major resource available.”

Schaffner said supportive care is necessary to help relieve pressure from the brain. As the ameoba damages the brain, inflammation can put pressure on the organ, further damaging the structure.

“This is going to be a life-treating terribly serious, terribly sad infection,” explained Schaffner.

In the U.S. between 1963 and 2013, just three people out of 132 managed to survive the infection, according to the CDC.

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iStock/ThinkstockBy DR. JENNIFER ASHTON, ABC News Senior Medical Contributor

Flip flops: They’re comfortable and are great for strolling the beach or poolside. But if you wear them too much, you might be at risk for some serious foot problems.

Flip flops offer no support for your arch and they increase the chances of injuries like sprains.

Try to limit how long you wear flip flops and don’t wear them during physical activity like running or backyard sports. Wear shoes that have supportive soles while walking and moving for long periods of time.

Lastly, make sure to put sunscreen on your feet, too. Sunburnt toes aren’t safe or great for showing off a pedicure.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Are back pain injections working?

Millions of Americans suffer from back pain every year and the field of treatment options is relatively sparse. Now, a new study suggest that one of these treatments may not even be as effective as hoped.

In a study from Annals of Internal Medicine, Researchers reviewed 59 randomized trials and four observational studies from the past seven years and concluded that epidural corticosteroid injections used to treat a type of nerve pain known as radiculopathy were associated with immediate improvements in pain and function, but that benefits were small and not sustained.

Meanwhile, the analysis suggested no effectiveness of epidural corticosteroid injections for another cause of back pain known as spinal stenosis.

The authors note that use of epidural injections has increased in the past few years despite conflicting conclusions from systematic reviews, and that further research is needed to determine whether injections are more effective when given in the context of a more comprehensive pain management approach.

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iStock/Thinkstock(MAKENI, Sierra Leone) — The last known Ebola patient in Sierra Leone has been released.

According to BBC, the 35-year-old patient, Adama Sankoh, was released Monday morning from a northern Bombali district treatment center.

The release comes 15 months after the original outbreak was reported in Sierra Leone. Nearly 4,000 people have died in the country since then.

Although the patient has been released, the outbreak isn’t over yet.

Sierra Leone still has 28 people in quarantine and the outbreak cannot be declared over until 42 days, two times the incubation period of the virus, after the last known patient dies or is discharged.

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Courtesy Stefany Shaheen(PORTSMOUTH, N.H.) — Coach may look like an ordinary dog, but the yellow Labrador retriever is anything but. He’s Elle Shaheen’s guardian angel.

Coach works 24 hours every day to keep the 15-year-old Portsmouth, New Hampshire, girl alive.

Elle has Type 1 diabetes. If her blood sugar is too low, she could have a seizure. If it’s too high, she could sustain serious, permanent damage.

Elle’s parents say they first noticed a change in their daughter about seven years ago.

“She was very irritable at times for no real reason,” her mother, Stefany Shaheen, told ABC News in an interview last Tuesday. “We couldn’t really explain it. She was having trouble in her math class, which happened to fall after breakfast. And then, right before her diagnosis, she was clearly really sick.”

Added Craig Welch, Stefany Shaheen’s husband and Elle’s father: “Any parent who experiences that wants to trade places with (their child).”

Elle, a granddaughter of U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, said she had to test her blood sugar between 10 and 12 times every day.

“And I had to take insulin shots every time I ate, every time my blood sugar was high, and every time before I went to bed,” she said.

Elle had to be monitored continuously. Then, her family learned about diabetes alert dogs, which can smell changes in blood sugar and signal immediately.

It takes at least 2,000 hours to train a service dog, according to Sarah Holbert, the CEO of Cares, Inc., a Kansas organization that provides assistance dogs to people across the country.

“We’re doing scent training, ‘Can you find this?’ ‘Can you find this toy?’ ‘Can you find this ball?’ ‘Can you problem solve?'” Holbert, who is also a dog trainer, said of the work that goes into training a service dog.

Elle’s family was on a waiting list for two years to get a diabetes alert dog. When she finally met Coach, it was love at first sight.

“The immediate feeling of relief came over me,” Elle said. “Especially the first time he alerted me, just knowing that he was actually going to work.”

Even during the interview with ABC News, the 4-year-old dog alerted Elle to an increase in her blood sugar. She did an immediate test and found that her blood sugar level was 339.

“If Coach wasn’t here, I probably wouldn’t have tested, and I would’ve sort of blown it off,” Elle said. “And then I probably would’ve waited another hour or so to test my blood sugar and I would’ve been so much higher.”

Welch said Coach has taught the family “that you can find hope and you can find light in unlikely places.”

Elle agrees.

“I don’t know where I would be without him,” she said.

The family has had Coach for more than two years.

Stefany Shaheen watches her daughter and Coach make their way through the world together, saying their bond gives her a sense of relief.

Shaheen has written a book about her daughter and her dog. Elle & Coach, Diabetes, the Fight for My Daughter’s Life, and the Dog Who Changed Everything, will be released Tuesday.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Alkaline water is a new hydration trend that some say is superior to regular water.

Model Miranda Kerr drinks it, and so does actor Mark Wahlberg.

Proponents believe that maintaining a bodily pH of 7.4 is the key to perfect health. Drinking alkaline water, which is less acidic than tap water, can help the body stay better hydrated and disease-free, they say.

PH is measured on a scale from 0 to 14. A pH of 7 is considered neutral. Values below 7 are considered acidic, while those above 7 are alkaline — or basic.

Most tap water has a neutral pH. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommends that the pH of drinking water be between 6.5 and 8.5.

One brand of alkaline water was advertised as having a pH of 9.5.

Barbara Broadwater of Los Angeles drinks alkaline water and says she believes the benefits.

“I feel more hydrated. I feel more energetic, and I don’t feel tired during the day,” she said.

Broadwater said alkaline water helped her wrinkles disappear. Her joints have also stopped hurting, she said, adding that she bought an ionizer — the machine that adds the alkalinity to normal water — for her kitchen. She uses alkaline water in everything, including for cooking and making coffee.

“It has really changed my life and I feel so much better inside,” she said.

Michelle Promaulayko, editor in chief of Yahoo Health, told ABC News’ Good Morning America that there were “no studies to support that drinking alkaline water does anything to optimize your health.”

Dr. Richard Besser, ABC News’ chief health and medical editor, offered his take.

“Our bodies need water — it’s absolutely essential. But … the idea that drinking alkaline water will affect the PH of your blood is absolute nonsense,” he said.

GMA reached out to six makers of alkaline water. Some responded and said there were a number of scientific studies — including one from the World Health Organization — that supported the health benefits of high pH water.

Critics say that while alkaline water won’t help, it also probably won’t hurt.

Despite the critics, Broadwater, who is in her 50s, says she will continue to drink alkaline water.

“For the naysayers — I know that it has helped me because I know that my knees don’t hurt, my joints are very mobile and I can run and jump like much younger people,” she said.

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Mark Bowden/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — For couples, it pays to share child care duties equally.

According to a study conducted by researchers at Georgia State University and presented at a meeting of the American Sociological Association surveyed, parents who said they each took part in rule making and enforcement, showering children with praise, changing diapers, cooking and transportation were more likely to have stronger relationships. That information was all self-reported by the parents, who were largely white, heterosexual couples.

While the study may not be generalizable to the general public, researchers say that relationships where the female partner was primarily responsible for child care saw lower reported relationship quality, higher conflict rates, lower quality sexual relationships and less satisfaction with their sexual relationships.

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iStock/Thinkstock(COLUMBUS) — A toxic algae bloom has been found in the Ohio River.

According to the Columbus Dispatch, microcystis, a type of blue-green algae that has the ability to produce liver and nerve toxins that could make people sick or kill pets, has been found in the Ohio River in southeastern Ohio.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency is investigating as well as testing the water at Yorkville, where the bloom was reported, and at two public water supplies upstream, according to the Dispatch.

“I think, at this point, we need to figure out how much microcystin is in the river and how big the bloom is,” said Heidi Griesmer, an EPA spokeswoman.

This is rare for the Ohio River because it moves at a faster rate than inland lakes that are more succeptible to algae booms, said the Columbus Dispatch.

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iStock/Thinkstock(COLUMBUS) — A toxic algae bloom has been found in the Ohio River.

According to the Columbus Dispatch, microcystis, a type of blue-green algae that has the ability to produce liver and nerve toxins that could make people sick or kill pets, has been found in the Ohio River in southeastern Ohio.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency is investigating as well as testing the water at Yorkville, where the bloom was reported, and at two public water supplies upstream, according to the Dispatch.

“I think, at this point, we need to figure out how much microcystin is in the river and how big the bloom is,” said Heidi Griesmer, an EPA spokeswoman.

This is rare for the Ohio River because it moves at a faster rate than inland lakes that are more succeptible to algae booms, said the Columbus Dispatch.

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