Kuzma/iStock/Thinkstock(PAINESVILLE, Ohio) — A judge from an Ohio town named “Painesville” ordered a woman to be “pepper sprayed” in court Thursday by a man she attacked with the tear-inducing substance in order to give the victim a “feeling of vengeance.”

Judge Michael Cicconetti meted out the unusual punishment, captured on video, after giving Diamond Gaston a choice between that and jail time. But unbeknownst to her, the liquid sprayed at her was just saline — the judge’s attempt to scare her straight without harming her.

“It was a family-feud type situation at a Burger King and the victim ended up losing five hours of work that day he got pepper-sprayed,” Cicconetti told ABC News Friday. “I like to give the victims a feeling of vengeance.”

Surveillance footage of the courtroom shows the man aiming for her face and spraying the substance, Cicconetti said.

Half the punishment was just intimidation since Cicconetti said it wasn’t real pepper spray. The judge had his bailiff spray him in the eyes three separate times before court to make sure the saline mixture, which the police department uses for training, didn’t hurt like real pepper spray.

“I don’t want people coming back to my courtroom so I’m not afraid to scare them straight,” he said.

Gaston told Cicconetti she learned her lesson.

This wasn’t Cicconetti’s first time dealing out an unusual sentence. In his 22 years as a judge, he told ABC News his most memorable punishment was forcing a woman to spend the night in the woods after she tried to abandon 35 kittens.

“It’s not necessarily only about an eye for an eye,” he said. “I want everyone in my courtroom, including the victims, to feel like justice was served.”

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Kuzma/iStock/Thinkstock(PAINESVILLE, Ohio) — A judge from an Ohio town named “Painesville” ordered a woman to be “pepper sprayed” in court Thursday by a man she attacked with the tear-inducing substance in order to give the victim a “feeling of vengeance.”

Judge Michael Cicconetti meted out the unusual punishment, captured on video, after giving Diamond Gaston a choice between that and jail time. But unbeknownst to her, the liquid sprayed at her was just saline — the judge’s attempt to scare her straight without harming her.

“It was a family-feud type situation at a Burger King and the victim ended up losing five hours of work that day he got pepper-sprayed,” Cicconetti told ABC News Friday. “I like to give the victims a feeling of vengeance.”

Surveillance footage of the courtroom shows the man aiming for her face and spraying the substance, Cicconetti said.

Half the punishment was just intimidation since Cicconetti said it wasn’t real pepper spray. The judge had his bailiff spray him in the eyes three separate times before court to make sure the saline mixture, which the police department uses for training, didn’t hurt like real pepper spray.

“I don’t want people coming back to my courtroom so I’m not afraid to scare them straight,” he said.

Gaston told Cicconetti she learned her lesson.

This wasn’t Cicconetti’s first time dealing out an unusual sentence. In his 22 years as a judge, he told ABC News his most memorable punishment was forcing a woman to spend the night in the woods after she tried to abandon 35 kittens.

“It’s not necessarily only about an eye for an eye,” he said. “I want everyone in my courtroom, including the victims, to feel like justice was served.”

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Kuzma/iStock/Thinkstock(PAINESVILLE, Ohio) — A judge from an Ohio town named “Painesville” ordered a woman to be “pepper sprayed” in court Thursday by a man she attacked with the tear-inducing substance in order to give the victim a “feeling of vengeance.”

Judge Michael Cicconetti meted out the unusual punishment, captured on video, after giving Diamond Gaston a choice between that and jail time. But unbeknownst to her, the liquid sprayed at her was just saline — the judge’s attempt to scare her straight without harming her.

“It was a family-feud type situation at a Burger King and the victim ended up losing five hours of work that day he got pepper-sprayed,” Cicconetti told ABC News Friday. “I like to give the victims a feeling of vengeance.”

Surveillance footage of the courtroom shows the man aiming for her face and spraying the substance, Cicconetti said.

Half the punishment was just intimidation since Cicconetti said it wasn’t real pepper spray. The judge had his bailiff spray him in the eyes three separate times before court to make sure the saline mixture, which the police department uses for training, didn’t hurt like real pepper spray.

“I don’t want people coming back to my courtroom so I’m not afraid to scare them straight,” he said.

Gaston told Cicconetti she learned her lesson.

This wasn’t Cicconetti’s first time dealing out an unusual sentence. In his 22 years as a judge, he told ABC News his most memorable punishment was forcing a woman to spend the night in the woods after she tried to abandon 35 kittens.

“It’s not necessarily only about an eye for an eye,” he said. “I want everyone in my courtroom, including the victims, to feel like justice was served.”

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Photo by Bob Chamberlin-Pool/Getty Images(NEW ORLEANS) — Former NFL star Darren Sharper pleaded guilty to drug distribution charges on Friday as part of a plea deal involving rape accusations leveled against him by multiple women.

According to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Louisiana, Sharper pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute Alprazolam, Diazepam and Zolpidem and two counts of distributing those substances with intent to commit rape. The maximum penalty for each charge is 20 years in prison, a $250,000 fine and one year of supervised release.

Sharper, a former safety for the New Orleans Saints, Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers, had been accused of drugging and assaulting women in Los Angeles, Phoenix and New Orleans.

The former pro-bowler was arrested last year on rape charges and has been jailed since February 2014.

Sharper admitted in his guilty plea that he and others had “distributed controlled substances to unsuspecting women,” the U.S. Attorney’s Office said, and then engaged in sexual relations with the women while they were incapacitated. Sharper also admitted to conspiring with other individuals in those actions.

Sharper is set to be sentenced on August 20.

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New York State Police(ORANGE COUNTY, N.Y.) — Angelika Graswald pleaded not guilty Friday to charges that she intentionally killed her fiance, Vincent Viafore, on a kayaking trip on New York’s Hudson River last month.

Graswald, 35, did not speak during her arraignment in Orange County Court in Goshen, New York; her attorney made the plea. She appeared attentive but did not portray her emotions, with her hair up, glasses on and cuffed hands in front of her.

Graswald’s being held on $3 million bail. Her next court appearance is scheduled for June 22.

Graswald has been charged with second-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of her fiance, whose body was found last weekend in the Hudson River after he disappeared on their kayaking trip last month.

The Orange County, New York, District Attorney’s office alleges Graswald tampered with Viafore’s paddle and removed a plug from his kayak so it would fill with water.

“It is also alleged that she moved the paddle away from him as he was struggling to stay afloat with water temperatures in the 40-degree range, and failed to render him assistance including timely calls for help,” the District Attorney’s office said in a news release Tuesday.

But Graswald’s attorney, Richard Portale, said the plug wasn’t in Viafore’s kayak in the first place.

“Vince knew that it wasn’t in the kayak. He had taken several kayaking trips without it,” Portale told ABC News Tuesday.

Portale said Graswald is looking forward to clearing her name.

“This is a terrible rush to judgment, and now I think that… the government’s trying to backfill the evidence,” Portale added.

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Digital Vision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Pilots on four commercial flights reported being targeted by green lasers during flights over New York Thursday, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

According to the FAA, the flights — American 185, Shuttle America 4213, Delta 2292 and Delta 2634 — were flying at an altitude of 8,000 feet approximately four miles northwest of Farmingdale on Long Island when the pilots reported that lasers were illuminating their aircraft, a federal crime.

The planes were flying out of John F. Kennedy International Airport.

The incidents all occurred between 9:30 and 10 p.m. No injuries were reported, and the flights all continued without further incident.

Authorities are investigating, but at this point no one has been taken into custody.

Pointing a laser into the cockpit of a plane carries a maximum of five years in federal prison and a quarter of a million dollars fine.

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Digital Vision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Pilots on four commercial flights reported being targeted by green lasers during flights over New York Thursday, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

According to the FAA, the flights — American 185, Shuttle America 4213, Delta 2292 and Delta 2634 — were flying at an altitude of 8,000 feet approximately four miles northwest of Farmingdale on Long Island when the pilots reported that lasers were illuminating their aircraft, a federal crime.

The planes were flying out of John F. Kennedy International Airport.

The incidents all occurred between 9:30 and 10 p.m. No injuries were reported, and the flights all continued without further incident.

Authorities are investigating, but at this point no one has been taken into custody.

Pointing a laser into the cockpit of a plane carries a maximum of five years in federal prison and a quarter of a million dollars fine.

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Focus on Sport/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — The Golden State Warriors’ defeat of the Houston Rockets Wednesday catapulted the California team to the NBA finals for the first time in 40 years.

In 1975, Golden State beat the Washington Bullets to win the title.

In a major upset that year, the Warriors swept the Bullets in four games with the help of Jamaal Wilkes and Rick Barry. Though the Warriors’ home court was Oakland Arena, their home games that week were played at the Cow Palace in Daly City due to scheduling conflicts.

Wardell Stephen “Dell” Curry, the father of Stephen “Steph” Curry, this year’s NBA MVP, wasn’t yet a Utah Jazz player. He was only 10 years old at the time.

While NBA fans were attentively following the 1975 Eastern Conference between Washington and Boston, an NBA.com retrospective summary states: “The Golden State Warriors had trudged along to an undistinguished 48 wins and the regular-season crown. Their progress wasn’t exactly silent; it just seemed that way back east.”

“I guess no one took us very seriously,” Warriors coach Al Attles said at the time.

The 1975 series was the Warriors’ first trip to the finals since 1967, when they lost to Wilt Chamberlain and the Philadelphia 76ers.

In the first two quarters of the 1975 series opener, George Johnson, Barry and the other Warriors fell behind the Bullets. But eventually they found their way. The Warriors won the first game 101-95 at Capital Centre in Landover, Maryland.

The 1975 NBA Finals was the first championship series or game of the four major professional sports leagues that featured two African-American head coaches. Al Attles led the Warriors, while K.C. Jones coached the Bullets.

When the Warriors arrived in San Francisco to celebrate their victory, more than 3,000 fans jammed the airport gate to greet the team.

The team will now have a chance to win their fourth championship when they face off with the Cleveland Cavaliers in the NBA Finals starting June 4.

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God Gazarov is seen in this undated photo posted to LinkedIn. Courtesy God Gazarov(NEW YORK) — His prayers have been answered.

A Brooklyn, New York man named God won a battle with the credit reporting agency Equifax, which finally recognized his name after years of problems getting loans and higher limits, according to a court settlement.

The 27-year-old sued the agency last year in Brooklyn Federal Court because Equifax claimed its computer systems wouldn’t allow it to issue a credit report under the name God despite several pleas that his name was real.

But now, the credit agency said it has made the “necessary alterations” so that its system recognizes the name for Gazarov and anyone else. His credit score is now near perfect, he told ABC News.

“I never claimed I’m the almighty leader of the world,” Gazarov joked. “This country is built on immigrants, and there’s nothing wrong with people carrying non-American names. It’s not like I’m trying to say I’m Mickey Mouse and my address is Disney World in Orlando.”

Equifax has also agreed to pay Gazarov an undisclosed amount of money to settle the lawsuit, said his lawyer James B. Fishman of Fishman & Mallon, LLP.

“I realized this is something American companies need to be able to deal with,” Fishman told ABC News Thursday. “There are plenty of people who come here from other countries, who have unusual names, and American companies need to understand they are real people with real names that should be recognized.”

According to court records, Gazarov, who came to the U.S. from Russia as a child, was denied a higher credit line from Capital One and a car loan from Infinity in recent years because Equifax reported he had no credit history.

“Our claim was that they were put on notice four to five times he was a real individual and that God was his real name,” Fishman said. “He gave them his driver’s license, social security card, tax return and even a letter from his landlord to prove he’s real.”

An Equifax representative even told Gazarov, a jewelry store owner, that he should consider changing his name, court documents said.

“But I’d never want to change my name,” Gazarov told ABC News. “I was named after my grandfather who’s also named God, and I’m proud to carry his name. He was a very big commander in army and well respected back home.”

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God Gazarov is seen in this undated photo posted to LinkedIn. Courtesy God Gazarov(NEW YORK) — His prayers have been answered.

A Brooklyn, New York man named God won a battle with the credit reporting agency Equifax, which finally recognized his name after years of problems getting loans and higher limits, according to a court settlement.

The 27-year-old sued the agency last year in Brooklyn Federal Court because Equifax claimed its computer systems wouldn’t allow it to issue a credit report under the name God despite several pleas that his name was real.

But now, the credit agency said it has made the “necessary alterations” so that its system recognizes the name for Gazarov and anyone else. His credit score is now near perfect, he told ABC News.

“I never claimed I’m the almighty leader of the world,” Gazarov joked. “This country is built on immigrants, and there’s nothing wrong with people carrying non-American names. It’s not like I’m trying to say I’m Mickey Mouse and my address is Disney World in Orlando.”

Equifax has also agreed to pay Gazarov an undisclosed amount of money to settle the lawsuit, said his lawyer James B. Fishman of Fishman & Mallon, LLP.

“I realized this is something American companies need to be able to deal with,” Fishman told ABC News Thursday. “There are plenty of people who come here from other countries, who have unusual names, and American companies need to understand they are real people with real names that should be recognized.”

According to court records, Gazarov, who came to the U.S. from Russia as a child, was denied a higher credit line from Capital One and a car loan from Infinity in recent years because Equifax reported he had no credit history.

“Our claim was that they were put on notice four to five times he was a real individual and that God was his real name,” Fishman said. “He gave them his driver’s license, social security card, tax return and even a letter from his landlord to prove he’s real.”

An Equifax representative even told Gazarov, a jewelry store owner, that he should consider changing his name, court documents said.

“But I’d never want to change my name,” Gazarov told ABC News. “I was named after my grandfather who’s also named God, and I’m proud to carry his name. He was a very big commander in army and well respected back home.”

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