National Center for Missing and Exploited Children(AUSTIN, Texas) — A Texas girl who has been missing for 12 years is back in the United States Wednesday after authorities located her in Mexico, authorities said.

The Austin Police Department confirmed to ABC News that Sabrina Allen had been located, however declined to release further information.

A news conference, which includes local police and the FBI, is scheduled for Wednesday afternoon to discuss “a significant arrest,” authorities said.

Philip Klein, a private investigator who has worked on the case, told ABC News that Allen, who was 4 years old when she went missing, was located in a small town southeast of Mexico City.

The mission was carried out by Mexican federal authorities, the U.S. Marshals and FBI, according to Klein, who said that one of the Mexican agents sustained a minor injury in the operations.

The missing girl, who is now a teenager, was taken into custody with her mother, Dara Llorens, and flown back to Houston late Tuesday, Klein said.

He said Llorens was booked into Travis County Jail, while Allen is currently undergoing a medical evaluation at an undisclosed location.

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iStock/Thinkstock(PROVIDENCE, R.I.) — A child infected with enterovirus 68 has died, the Rhode Island Department of Health said Wednesday.

The 10-year-old girl from Cumberland, Rhode Island, died last week of a rare combination of bacterial and viral infections, the department said, explaining that she died of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis “associated with” enterovirus 68.

“We are all heartbroken to hear about the death of one of Rhode Island’s children,” state Health Department Director Dr. Michael Fine said in a statement. “Many of us will have EV-D68 [enterovirus 68]. Most of us will have very mild symptoms and all but very few will recover quickly and completely.”

Enterovirus 68, which is suspected of sickening children in 45 states, starts out like the common cold but can quickly turn serious and send children to the hospital with breathing problems. And on Monday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced it was investigating whether the virus led to temporary limb paralysis in nine children in Colorado. It is related to the polio virus.

The girl’s illness began with cold-like symptoms and shortness of breath, Fine said during a press conference Wednesday. Her parents called 911 last week, but after she arrived at the hospital her condition “deteriorated very quickly.”

“Things became dire,” Fine said.

She died of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis, which he said was “associated with” her enterovirus 68 infection.

Staphylococcus aureus is a bacteria that lives in about 30 percent of people’s noses and usually doesn’t cause any problems, according to the CDC. It can be serious or fatal when it results in sepsis, which is body-wide inflammation that results from an infection, according to the CDC. Sepsis can cause blow flow problems, which leads to organ failure.

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iStock/Thinkstock(PROVIDENCE, R.I.) — The first child infected with enterovirus 68 has died, the Rhode Island Department of Health said Wednesday.

The 10-year-old girl from Cumberland, Rhode Island, died last week of a rare combination of bacterial and viral infections, the department said, explaining that she died of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis “associated with” enterovirus 68.

“We are all heartbroken to hear about the death of one of Rhode Island’s children,” state Health Department Director Dr. Michael Fine said in a statement. “Many of us will have EV-D68 [enterovirus 68]. Most of us will have very mild symptoms and all but very few will recover quickly and completely.”

Enterovirus 68, which is suspected of sickening children in 45 states, starts out like the common cold but can quickly turn serious and send children to the hospital with breathing problems. And on Monday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced it was investigating whether the virus led to temporary limb paralysis in nine children in Colorado. It is related to the polio virus.

The girl’s illness began with cold-like symptoms and shortness of breath, Fine said during a press conference Wednesday. Her parents called 911 last week, but after she arrived at the hospital her condition “deteriorated very quickly.”

“Things became dire,” Fine said.

She died of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis, which he said was “associated with” her enterovirus 68 infection.

Staphylococcus aureus is a bacteria that lives in about 30 percent of people’s noses and usually doesn’t cause any problems, according to the CDC. It can be serious or fatal when it results in sepsis, which is body-wide inflammation that results from an infection, according to the CDC. Sepsis can cause blow flow problems, which leads to organ failure.

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James Gathany/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(ATLANTA) — The flight information for the Ebola patient diagnosed in Texas will not be released by health officials because “it’s just not necessary,” a spokesperson at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told ABC News.

The CDC announced that the man has tested positive for the disease, making him the first person to have discovered he had the virus while on U.S. soil, and they made it clear that he traveled from Liberia to America to visit family in Dallas.

“If we need to contact passengers we have a way. We’d call ourselves,” the CDC spokesperson said.

Even though the CDC will not release his flight plan from Liberia to the United States, it is clear that he would have had to make at least two transfers — including one in at least one other country.

Flights from the airport in the Liberian capital of Monrovia fly to only six destinations — four in West and Central Africa, one flight to Morocco and one flight to Brussels, Belgium. There are no direct flights into the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport from any of those six destinations, meaning that the man had to make at least one more change.

The CDC said Tuesday that the passengers who unknowingly traveled with the man need not be concerned because he was not contagious while he was on the plane.

“The ill person did not exhibit symptoms of Ebola during the flights from West Africa and CDC does not recommend that people on the same commercial airline flights undergo monitoring, as Ebola is only contagious if the person is experiencing active symptoms,” the agency said in a statement Tuesday.

The man left Liberia on Sept. 19 and arrived in Texas on Sept. 20, CDC Director Tom Frieden said.

“Ebola doesn’t spread before someone gets sick and he didn’t get sick until four days after he got off the airplane,” Frieden noted during a news conference Tuesday.

On his first visit to the hospital, doctors did not immediately conclude that he had Ebola and they sent him home but he returned with much more drastic symptoms on Sept. 27, according to the CDC. He was put in a special isolation unit the following day.

Part of the problem in diagnosing Ebola comes from the fact that patients, like this man, can take up to 21 days to exhibit symptoms such as fever, muscle pain, vomiting and bleeding.

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Fuse/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — They’re often the first people you see at the doctor’s office, and the first line of defense in any emergency room — but America’s nursing population is shrinking fast.

The nursing shortage may not be caused just by lack of interest. In many ways, it’s caused by lack of capacity. Each year, 80,000 applicants are turned away from nursing schools, often because there aren’t enough teachers or resources to accommodate growing student interest.

“Suddenly, we turned around and realized we’re not attracting enough nurses to go into teaching,” said Dr. Kimberly S. Glassman, with patient care services and the chief nursing officer at NYU Langone Medical Center.

“The fear is we will have to shrink the number of nurses we can prepare for the future at a time when we need to prepare more,” she said.

Many of America’s nurses are about to reach retirement age just as the baby boomer population is growing in its health care consumption — compounding the urgency of the situation.

“In addition to not having many student placements, and the retirement issue on the part of the faculty, the slowness at which we can prepare these nurses to serve as teachers has really come together at a time when we really want to increase the numbers, but we find that we are restrained,” said American Nurses Association President Pam Cipriano.

But Glassman is quick to eschew a doomsday scenario, saying, “This is not something you’re going to feel day to day. …This is something that we and other universities are paying attention to.”

The ANA is taking note, as well, working to help fund scholarships and encouraging nursing students, as well as current registered nurses, to take advantage of doctoral and masters programs, providing them with a window to one day move into a faculty position.

“On the one hand, we think that the position is getting better,” said Cipriano. “But on the other hand, we know it can take years before we can change the equation, before we have sufficient numbers of slots for those 80,000 candidates that are being turned away.”

Glassman noted that larger institutions such as NYU Hospital and similar facilities in major cities are not the ones that are suffering the most. It’s the institutions in smaller, more rural areas that will see a more rapid change in a shorter amount of time.

To that end, the ANA will be canvassing the halls of Congress this January in an effort to double down on funding efforts for schools and scholarship programs.

In the meantime, Cipriano said, she’s focused on one basic question: “How can we redesign care? What are the care methods that will allow us to use the nurses we have in the most effective manner?”

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Wavebreak Media/Thinkstock(CARUTHERS, Calif.) — Foster Farms is offering $5,000 for information about the killing of nearly 1,000 chickens in Caruthers, California.

The Fresno Sheriff’s office said in a news release Tuesday that on Sept. 20, suspects used a golf club and “possibly another similar type instrument” to slaughter 920 chickens.

Deputy Chris Curtice told the Los Angeles Times “whoever did something like this is pretty sick.” Detectives are looking into a motive.

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iStock/Thinkstock(ORANGE COUNTY, Calif.) — Paul Curry was convicted of murder Tuesday in the 1994 nicotine-poisoning death of his wife.

Closure into the death of Linda Curry, who was 50 when she died, eluded investigators for years.

Jurors in Orange County, Calif. Superior Court reached the verdict after a day of deliberations — guilty of first-degree murder, with special circumstances for poisoning and murder for financial gain. He was also convicted of insurance fraud.

Curry stared forward as the verdict was read.

Prosecutors argued that Curry, 57, poisoned his wife in order to collect more than $500,000 in insurance money and other benefits. He injected his wife with nicotine after sedating her with the sleep drug Ambien, a prosecutor said during the trial.

Paul and Linda Curry met in 1989 while working at the San Onofre nuclear power plant in northern San Diego County. The couple was married for 21 months when Linda died mysteriously in their Orange County home.

She was a non-smoker, but tests revealed fatal levels of nicotine in her system.

Curry’s defense attorney argued that Linda Curry had battled health issues for years — even before the couple married — and that Curry was a loving husband.

Linda Curry’s relatives and friends were in court Tuesday, hopeful for justice.

“This is really about Linda and what a beautiful person she was,” her friend Bruce Brandt told KABC-TV. “We can’t bring her back, but at least some justice is here now that he has to pay and think about her for the rest of his life.”

A key witness during the trial was another of Curry’s ex-wives, Leslie Curry, who testified in court that she was frequently sick during their marriage and that Curry suggested they sign up for life insurance policies.

After the life insurance policy for Leslie Curry was denied, the couple separated. Soon after, her health problems stopped, she said.

It took 16 years for prosecutors to build their case against Curry. Curry moved to Nevada and later, Kansas, where he was remarried and working a government job when he was arrested in 2010.

Prosecutor Ebrahim Baytieh was thankful with the outcome of the trial.

“I think we had a very smart jury that went through all the evidence and kept thinking that for 16 years, he was enjoying the fact that, in his mind, he thought he got away with murder,” Baytieh said.

Curry will be sentenced Oct. 31, and could spend the rest of his life in state prison.

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David Derner/Diamond Images/Getty Images(GREEN BAY, Wis.) — Minnesota Vikings receiver Greg Jennings says he still doesn’t miss playing for the Green Bay Packers.

Jennings also said he doesn’t care if the Packers fans boo him when the Vikings play the Packers in Green Bay Thursday night.

Jennings left Green Bay in 2013 and signed a five-year, $45 million contract with the Vikings.

This is the second time Jennings will play at Lambeau Field since signing with Minnesota.

Packers Nation was upset when Jennings questioned their quarterback Aaron Rodgers’ leadership ability. “Honestly, to be honest, no,” Jennings said during a conference call when talking about whether he missed Green Bay. “It doesn’t because — and this is sincerity right here — it really has nothing to do with football. From a football standpoint, I would have loved to have finished my career out in Green Bay, but from where I am spiritually and where I am with my family and the growth that we’ve had because of what we have around us educationally — and there was some great educational systems there, as well — but this is a step up for us.”

Jennings, a two-time Pro Bowler, has played in all four games for the Vikings this season, catching 15 balls for 204 yards and a touchdown.

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Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images(BEREA, Ohio) — After missing the last two games with a knee injury, Cleveland Browns running back Ben Tate returned to the practice field Tuesday.

Browns head coach Mike Pettine said Tate will start Sunday versus the Tennessee Titans if healthy.

After playing his first three seasons in Houston, Tate joined the Browns this offseason. He played in the team’s opener against Pittsburgh, rushing for 41 yards on six carries before leaving the game with a sprained knee.

“(We’re) looking forward to getting him back,” Pettine said. “He was playing at a high level before he got hurt.”

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Rob Carr/Getty Images(INDIANAPOLIS) — Linebacker Robert Mathis may be out for the season, but that didn’t stop the Indianapolis Colts from wanting to keep the five-time Pro Bowler around longer.

The 33-year-old Mathis signed a one-year contract extension with the Colts Tuesday that will keep him with the team through the 2016 season.

According to ESPN.com, Mathis can make up to $6 million in 2016.

Mathis was suspended the first four games of this season after violating the NFL’s performance-enhancing drug policy.

During his suspension, Mathis tore his Achilles tendon while working out on his own, causing him to be placed on the season-ending injured reserve.

Last season, Mathis played in all 16 games for the Colts, recording 59 tackles and 10 forced fumbles while leading the NFL in sacks with 19.5.

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