NYPD(NEW YORK) — A World War II-era fighter plane crashed in the Hudson River Friday evening and a body was recovered, police officials said.

The NYPD said the plane, which took off from an airport in Suffolk County, went into the water around 7:30 p.m. A distress signal was issued.

The NYPD said that it had located the plane, and a body was recovered. New Jersey State Police initially said that the pilot suffered minor injuries and was en route to the hospital, but the agency said later it could not confirm that.

The exact circumstances of the crash, about two miles south of the George Washington Bridge, were not clear.

The FAA said that the World War II-era P-47 Thunderbolt aircraft was one of three that had departed from Republic Airport on Long Island. The two other aircraft returned to the airport safely, the FAA said.

The P-47 was the heaviest single-engine fighter in WWII, according to the Cradle of Aviation Museum on Long Island.

“Despite its size, the P-47 proved to be one of the best performing fighters to see combat,” the museum’s website said. “Produced in greater numbers than any other U.S. made fighter, the story of how it came to exist is at least as interesting as its many accomplishments.”

“The mighty Thunderbolt broke the back of the Luftwaffe and pounded the Wehrmacht without mercy,” the museum added.

Further details were not known.

This is a developing story. Please check back in for updates.

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NYPD(NEW YORK) — A World War II-era fighter plane crashed in the Hudson River Friday evening and the pilot remains unaccounted for, police officials said.

The NYPD said the plane, which took off from an airport in Suffolk County, went into the water around 7:30 p.m. A distress signal was issued.

The NYPD said that it has located the plane, but the search continues for the pilot. New Jersey State Police initially said that the pilot suffered minor injuries and was en route to the hospital, but the agency said later it could not confirm that.

The exact circumstances of the crash, about two miles south of the George Washington Bridge, were not clear.

The FAA said that the World War II-era P-47 Thunderbolt aircraft was one of three that had departed from Republic Airport on Long Island. The two other aircraft returned to the airport safely, the FAA said.

The P-47 was the heaviest single-engine fighter in WWII, according to the Cradle of Aviation Museum on Long Island.

“Despite its size, the P-47 proved to be one of the best performing fighters to see combat,” the museum’s website said. “Produced in greater numbers than any other U.S. made fighter, the story of how it came to exist is at least as interesting as its many accomplishments.”

“The mighty Thunderbolt broke the back of the Luftwaffe and pounded the Wehrmacht without mercy,” the museum added.

Further details were not known.

This is a developing story. Please check back in for updates.

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Courtesy of Steinle Family(SAN FRANCISCO) — The family of Kate Steinle, the woman who was allegedly shot and killed by an undocumented immigrant on a San Francisco pier last summer, has filed a lawsuit against two federal agencies and a San Francisco sheriff for not preventing her death.

The lawsuit, filed Thursday in a federal court in San Francisco, seeks to hold the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the City and County of San Francisco and Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi of the San Francisco Sheriff’s Department for providing “the means and opportunity for a repeat drug felon to secure a gun and kill” the 31-year-old, the complaint reads.

The alleged shooter, Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez, is also named in the lawsuit.

The case ignited a firestorm at the time because of the suspect’s immigration history and San Francisco’s status as a sanctuary city — notifying ICE about suspected undocumented immigrants only in the case of violent crimes.

“Kate’s death was both foreseeable and preventable had the law enforcement agencies, officials and/or officers involved simply followed the laws…which they swore to uphold,” the complaint said.

Steinle’s parents, James and Elizabeth Steinle, are seeking unspecified damages for wrongful death and deprivation of federal civil rights.

“The Steinle Family hopes that their actions today will serve to highlight the lax enforcement of gun safety regulations among the law enforcement agencies involved and bureaucratic confusion so that this will not happen to others,” said Frank Pitre of Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy, the law firm representing the Steinle family, on Friday.

The gun used to kill Steinle was stolen from an unsecured car, according to the complaint. The gun was government property and belonged to a Bureau of Land Management enforcement ranger, who was on “official government travel” at the time of the theft, June 27, the agency said at the time.

Steinle was killed on July 1 while walking with her father on Pier 14 of San Francisco’s picturesque Embarcadero waterfront when Sanchez, an undocumented immigrant and career drug felon, allegedly shot her with a .40 caliber government-issued firearm, according to the complaint. She had a “thriving career” in medical sales when she died, the complaint stated.

On March 26 of that year, Sanchez finished serving a 46-month sentence at a Los Angeles federal prison and was released to SFSD custody, the complaint said. Led by Mirkarimi at the time, the SFSD did not honor an immigration detainer for Sanchez from ICE, saying it had no “legal basis” to hold him because they did not have an active warrant for him.

That same month, ICE had issued a memo creating an official policy to eliminate all communication regarding undocumented immigrants in “direct contravention” with federal and state law, according to the complaint. Despite this memo, ICE specifically asked the SFSD to be notified of Sanchez’s release.

Sanchez was released the next month, and no notification was provided to ICE, according to the complaint.

Gonzalez, did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment.

ICE told ABC News it was unable to comment on the lawsuit due to pending litigation. The Bureau of Land Management did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment.

ABC News could not immediately reach Mirkarimi for comment.

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Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images(TORONTO) — Raptors center Bismack Biyombo has hit his fourth flagrant foul of the postseason.

In Game 6 of the Eastern Conference finals, Biyombo elbowed Cleveland Cavaliers forward Kevin Love in the face in the first quarter and after official review, received a flagrant foul 1.

According to NBA rules, a fourth flagrant foul warrants an automatic suspension, and could cause the center to be suspended for Game 7.

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NYPD(NEW YORK) — A small plane crashed in the Hudson River Friday night, police officials said.

The exact circumstances of the crash were not clear, but the New York Police Department was on the scene of the crash, which extended between New York and New Jersey.

In a statement, the Federal Aviation Administration said that it received a report that a World War II-era P-47 Thunderbolt may have gone down in the river, two miles south of the George Washington Bridge.

“Search and rescue was headed to the scene,” the statement said.

In a later statement, the FAA said that the aircraft was one of three that had departed from Republic Airport on Long Island. The two other aircraft returned to the airport safely, the FAA said.

Further details were not known. It was not clear if there were injuries.

This is a developing story. Please check back in for updates.

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NYPD(NEW YORK) — A small plane crashed in the Hudson River Friday night, police officials said.

The exact circumstances of the crash were not clear, but the New York Police Department was on the scene of the crash, which extended between New York and New Jersey.

In a statement, the Federal Aviation Administration said that it received a report that a World War II-era P-47 Thunderbolt may have gone down in the river, two miles south of the George Washington Bridge.

“Search and rescue was headed to the scene,” the statement said.

Further details were not known. It was not clear if there were injuries.

This is a developing story. Please check back in for updates.

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images(OXFORD, Miss.) — Ole Miss has acknowledged the 28 allegations of misconduct the NCAA made against the school in January by issuing self-imposed penalties Friday.

The school announced in a 154-page response to the NCAA that it had self-imposed the loss of 11 total scholarships for football starting with one last season and going into 2018, according to ESPN.

Ole Miss officials also asked the NCAA to delay the school’s hearing before the Committee on Infractions, according to ESPN, so they could investigate further allegations against Miami Dolphins rookie Laremy Tunsil who confirmed in April that he had accepted money from the university.

The 28 allegations involved violations in football, women’s basketball and track and field. Sixteen of the alleged violations issued by the NCAA were Level I, the most serious. Ole Miss’ women’s basketball team has already served a postseason ban for the violations.

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iStock/Thinkstock(CONROE, Texas) — A group banded together to rescue a trapped woman from fast-moving floodwaters in Conroe, Texas, in a dramatic moment caught on camera.

The woman was trapped in a van Thursday off of Interstate 45 in Conroe — about 40 miles north of Houston — when the group of rescuers, struggling to stay standing in the rushing waters, extended a ladder towards her.

As the rescuers held up the ladder, they also held onto each other so no one would be washed away.

The ladder successfully reached the woman, who crawled out of the van and was then carried to safety.

The Texas flooding has proved to be damaging and deadly. At least one person died from the flooding in Brenham, a city located about halfway between Austin and Houston.

And the threat is not over — flash flood warnings are in effect this afternoon in Texas counties including Harris, Liberty, Montgomery and San Jacinto.

The severe weather also extended beyond southeastern Texas, with much of the Plains and the South suffering from flash flooding.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) — U.S. meteorologists are predicting more tropical activity this year compared to recent years but expect the summer hurricane season to be near-normal levels.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said there is a 70 percent likelihood that there will be 10 to 16 named storms this season (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which four to eight could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher). In a “normal” year, there are 12 named storms, six hurricanes and two to three major hurricanes, NOAA said.

This is one of the toughest hurricane season outlooks ever made due to the abundance of atmospheric variables, said Gerry Bell, lead seasonal hurricane forecaster with NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center.

The most influential variable would be the AMO (Atlantic Multi-Decadal Oscillation). This pattern is characterized by cooling and warming of water temperatures in the Atlantic and intensity of the monsoon season over West Africa. If the Atlantic water temperature is warmer than normal and the monsoon season in West Africa is active, this pattern tends to produce more tropical systems in the Atlantic Basin. If the reverse happens, it tends to yield toward below-normal hurricane season. These patterns can last over 20 years.

Another important variable this upcoming hurricane season is the fading El Nino and forming La Nina. El Nino tends to suppress tropical activity in the Atlantic and La Nina does the opposite. This year, there is a 70 percent chance that La Nina will form by the end of this summer and early fall. Coincidentally, August, September and October happen to be the average peak of hurricane season, with 90 percent to 95 percent of tropical storms forming during this period.

Finally, even if a tropical system forms in the Atlantic Basin, small scale atmospheric conditions and patterns have to be just right for it to make landfall in the United States. Last time a major hurricane (winds 111 mph, Category 3 or higher) made landfall in the United States was in 2005. During 2003, 2004, and 2005 seasons, there was a persistent area of high pressure over the Southeastern U.S. pushing any formed storms in the western Atlantic toward the US’s East and Gulf Coasts. But in the recent years, we had a persistent area of low pressure pushing storms away from the U.S. These small scale, short term patterns can be only forecasted a couple of weeks in advance, making the entire hurricane season forecast that much more difficult.

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Hurricane season doesn’t officially start until June 1, but we are already tracking a tropical system that could affect parts of the Eastern U.S. It is likely to become the named storm “Bonnie” over the next 24 hours, if not sooner. Even though this system is forming before the official start to the Atlantic Hurricane season, it does not mean that this has never happened before or that is unusual. NOAA officials are warning anyone that lives or is traveling to Georgia or the Carolinas this Memorial Day weekend to monitor the forecast for updates.

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iStock/Thinkstock(BOSTON) — If anyone has persistence, it’s Abiola Aborishade.

Aborishade has gained national attention for standing outside the Gillette Stadium in Massachusetts almost every day for over a month now, waiting for a chance to try out for a spot on the New England Patriots’ roster.

“I’m still out there everyday,” Aborishade told ABC News Friday. “Until I try out I’ll continue to be out there.”

The Nigerian-born 23-year-old is out there roughly seven hours a day, armed with his football gear, ready to show what he’s got. And he says he’s got a lot.

In 2014, “Aborishade set a new single-season reception record for UMass Dartmouth in an offensive shootout…,” according to the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, where he played as a wide receiver for three years.

Aborishade says he lives about 20 minutes from Gillette Stadium and grew up watching the Patriots. He identifies with a lot of them whom he says have also been on the receiving end of closed doors.

“I’m not taking no,” Aborishade said. “I’m very optimistic.”

A source close to the Patriots, who wished not to be identified, told ABC News he thinks Aborishade is going about it the wrong way.

“Realistically, we love the fact that he is out there showing some initiative, but can he play football for the Patriots? That’s not how you do it,” the source said. “The best way to get noticed is to play football. Do something spectacular on the football field and you’ll be noticed.”

The source added that letting Aborishade, who has now been getting a lot of attention from the media, try out for the team, would create a frenzy they aren’t prepared to handle.

“How many people would be out there with a sign tomorrow? Now, we’re encouraging something that really is a waste of time on our end. It’s going to be a colossal waste of time.”

Aborishade said players and staff have spoken to him and encouraged him to keep pushing, and that’s exactly what he says he will do.

“Like I said, I will be out there until I get my tryout,” he said when ABC News shared with him what the source said.

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