tomloel/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(FERGUSON, Mo.) — Saint Louis County Prosecutor Robert McCulloch released a statement on Thursday that leaks involving the case of an officer-involved shooting that left 18-year-old Michael Brown dead in August are not coming from the grand jury in the case.

“No information or evidence has been released by the grand jury,” McCulloch’s statement said. While he acknowledged a tweet from “several weeks ago” which claimed that a person serving on the grand jury had discussed the case with a friend, McCulloch says bluntly, “That did not happen.”

“An investigation revealed that the account had, indeed, been hacked and the origin/author of the tweet is unknown,” according to the statement.

McCulloch also denied recent reports that testimony and documents had been leaked “by or from the grand jury.” He pointed specifically to reports in The New York Times, which said it received information from a government source briefed on the case, and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, which said the documents they obtained did not come from the grand jury.

“Whoever is releasing this information is doing great disservice to the grand jury process,” McCulloch concluded. Though he assured the public that “anyone suggesting that the ‘integrity of the entire grand jury process has been destroyed’ is wrong, irresponsible and does a great disservice to the public.”

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Monroe County Sheriffs Office(MONROE, Mich.) — A young Michigan woman, who vanished after an early Halloween party last weekend, was last seen in a parking lot with a man who has a thin black moustache and was wearing a black hooded sweatshirt, police said.

Chelsea Ellen Bruck was last seen leaving the party between 3 a.m. and 4 a.m. Sunday while dressed as the Batman character Poison Ivy.

Police in Monroe County, which is located in southeast Michigan, have issued a missing persons poster showing the normally blonde 22-year-old wearing her costume, which consisted of a top made of ivy leaves and a black wig that appeared red at the ends.

Police have also released a sketch of a man that they say was last seen with Bruck near where cars were parked outside of the party. The man was believed to have dark hair, a thin mustache and wearing a black hooded sweatshirt.

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Handout Photo(AUGUSTA, Maine) — Negotiations with nurse Kaci Hickox, who refuses to be quarantined after treating Ebola patients in West Africa, have “failed” and the governor of Maine will now “exercise the full extent of his authority,” according to a statement from the governor’s office.

Gov. Paul LePage didn’t say whether that meant getting a court order to enforce Hickox’s quarantine or forcing her to take an Ebola blood test. Earlier on Thursday, LePage indicated to ABC News that he would abandon his demand that Hickox remain under quarantine if she would agree to take a blood test for the lethal virus.

“I was ready and willing — and remain ready and willing — to reasonably address the needs of healthcare workers meeting guidelines to assure the public health is protected,” LePage said.

The governor made his comment after Hickox defiantly challenged demands that she remain quarantined by leaving her home in Fort Kent Thursday morning for a bike ride with her boyfriend. She was trailed by a police car as she rode.

While Hickox was pedaling, attorneys for the state of Maine went to Superior Court seeking a judge’s permission to give Hickox a blood test for Ebola, LePage said.

“This could be resolved today,” the governor said. “She has been exposed and she’s not cooperative, so force her to take a test. It’s so simple.”

Medical experts have said that an Ebola test would only be positive if someone were symptomatic, and could register a negative result if the amount of Ebola virus in the blood hadn’t reached a detectable level.

LePage’s office later put out a statement saying negotiations with Hickox had failed and the governor will now “exercise the full extent of his authority allowable by law.”

“Maine statutes provide robust authority to the state to use legal measures to address threats to public health,” the statement said.

It added, “Specifics of the process or steps being taken by the state at this time may not be discussed publicly due to the confidentially requirements in law.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — More than half the nation — 27 states — have now announced they are suspending further installation of a controversial guardrail system used on roads around the country following what critics said was a cover-up of a dangerous change in the guardrail’s design made nearly a decade ago.

A flood of states have announced suspension of new installation of the ET-Plus guardrail after a Texas jury found earlier this month that the guardrail maker, Trinity Industries, had defrauded the government by making modifications in 2005 and failing to tell federal or state transportation officials at the time. Trinity was ordered to pay some $175 million in damages — an amount that’s expected to triple by statutory mandate.

Twenty-seven states have said they’ll no longer install the ET-Plus system, some latest states to join being Georgia and Trinity’s home state of Texas. One state, Virginia, said last week it is making plans to remove the guardrails from its highways, but would consider leaving them in place if Trinity can prove the modified version is safe.

The ET-Plus System was the subject of an ABC News 20/20 investigation in September that looked into allegations from crash victims that the modified guardrail can malfunction when struck from the front by their vehicles. Rather than ribboning out and absorbing the impact as designed, the guardrails “locked up” and speared straight through the cars, severing the motorists’ limbs in some cases.

According to an internal email obtained by ABC News, a company official estimated one particular change — reducing a piece of metal in the guardrail end terminal from five inches to four — would save the company $2 per guardrail, or $50,000 per year.

The Federal Highway Administration has given Trinity until Oct. 31 to submit plans to crash test the guardrail or face a nationwide suspension of its eligibility for sale. Some of the 28 states have said the ET-Plus ban is in place at least until results of those crash tests are available.

Trinity has maintained the guardrails are safe, noting that the Federal Highway Administration approved the modified guardrail for use after questions about the modifications were raised in 2012. The company plans to appeal the Texas verdict and has previously told ABC News it has a “high degree of confidence in the performance and integrity” of the ET-Plus system.

States that have taken action in regard to the ET-Plus system:

  • Arizona
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Georgia
  • Louisiana
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Dakota
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • Wisconsin

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Jaison Podkanowicz(WICHITA, Kan.) — At least four people are dead after a prop plane crashed into a building Thursday morning at an airport in Wichita, Kansas, officials said.

Five others have been rushed to a local hospital, fire marshal Brad Crisp said more than three hours after the crash.

“We don’t know what may have caused the incident,” Wichita Fire Department Chief Ron Blackwell said, noting that responders faced a “horrific firefight for several minutes.”

Emergency crews are on the scene at Mid-Continent Airport, where a federal official has confirmed to ABC News that the incident is not related to terrorism.

The plane was headed to Mena, Arizona, the official said.

The plane struck the top of the Flight Safety Building shortly before 10 a.m. and approximately 100 people were inside at the time, according to airport officials.

Smoke could be seen billowing from the building from miles away.

The plane involved in the crash was a twin-engine Beechcraft that was taking off but lost power in one engine, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

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Jaison Podkanowicz(WICHITA, Kan.) — A prop plane crashed into a building Thursday morning at an airport in Wichita, Kansas, officials said.

Two people died in the crash and five people have been rushed to a local hospital to treat “serious” injuries, Wichita Fire Department Chief Ron Blackwell confirmed.

“We don’t know what may have caused the incident,” Blackwell said, noting that responders faced a “horrific firefight for several minutes.”

Emergency crews are on the scene at Mid-Continent Airport, where a federal official has confirmed to ABC News that the incident is not related to terrorism.

The plane was headed to Mena, Arizona, the official said.

The plane involved in the crash was a twin-engine Beechcraft that was taking off but lost power in one engine, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

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Jaison Podkanowicz(WICHITA, Kan.) — A prop plane reportedly hit a building at an airport in Wichita, Kansas on Thursday, officials said.

Emergency crews are on the scene at Mid-Continent Airport, according to local ABC News affiliate KAKE.

A federal official has confirmed that the incident is not related to terrorism and the plane was headed to Mena, Arizona.

There have been no reports of how many people are possibly in danger in the situation, but smoke coming from the building has been seen from miles away.

The plane involved in the crash was a twin-engine Beechcraft that was taking off but lost power in one engine, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

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ABC News(FORT KENT, Maine) — Maine’s governor indicated Thursday that he would abandon his demand that nurse Kaci Hickox remain under quarantine after treating Ebola patients if she would agree to take a blood test for the lethal virus.

Gov. Paul LePage made his comment to ABC News Thursday as Hickox defiantly challenged demands that she remain quarantined by leaving her home in the morning for a bike ride with her boyfriend.

LePage indicated to ABC News that he was willing to abandon his demands that the nurse remain quarantined if she would take a blood test for Ebola.

While Hickox was pedaling, attorneys for the state of Maine went to Superior Court seeking a judge’s permission to give Hickox a blood test for Ebola, LePage said.

“This could be resolved today,” the governor said. “She has been exposed and she’s not cooperative, so force her to take a test. It’s so simple.”

Medical experts have said that an Ebola test would only be positive if someone were symptomatic, and could register a negative result if the amount of Ebola virus in the blood hadn’t reached a detectable level.

The governor said he has a state police car stationed outside Hickox’s home and that she has the town “scared to death.”

Hickox, 33, went on the bike ride in Fort Kent, Maine, after vowing last night she wasn’t willing to “stand here and have my civil rights violated.”

While Hickox was pedaling, attorneys for the state of Maine went to Superior Court seeking a judge’s permission to give Hickox a blood test for Ebola, Maine Gov. Paul LePage told ABC News.

“This could be resolved today,” LePage said. “She has been exposed and she’s not cooperative, so force her to take a test. It’s so simple.”

Medical experts have said that an Ebola test would only be positive if someone were symptomatic.

The governor said he has a state police car stationed outside Hickox’s home and that she has the town “scared to death.”

The nurse, who had been treating Ebola patients in Sierra Leone for Doctors Without Borders, said she was fighting for her rights as well as other health care workers who will be returning from the Ebola hot zone in West Africa. She said that Doctors Without Border told her another 20 health care workers will be coming home in the next month.

“Most aid workers who come home just want to see their family and have a sort of normal life,” she told reporters Wednesday night. “I’m fighting for something other than myself. There are aid workers coming back every day.”

Hickox said she isn’t committed to a quarantine that isn’t “scientifically valid,” she told reporters standing alongside her boyfriend, Ted Wilbur, outside her home Wednesday night. The quarantine demand goes beyond guidelines put out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which indicate that she can’t spread Ebola if she isn’t sick, doesn’t have symptoms and no one is in close contact with her bodily fluids.

“You could hug me, you could shake my hand [and] I would not give you Ebola,” she said.

Hickox returned to the United States on Oct. 24, landing in Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey, where she was questioned and quarantined in an outdoor tent through the weekend despite having no symptoms of the lethal virus.

Hickox registered a fever on an infrared thermometer at the airport, but an oral thermometer at University Hospital in Newark showed that she had no fever, she said.

After twice testing negative for the Ebola, Hickox was released and returned home to Maine on Oct. 27. Maine’s health commissioner announced that Maine would join the handful of states going beyond federal guidelines and asking that returning Ebola health workers be self-quarantined for 21 days.

But Hickox vowed to break the quarantine because it wasn’t based on science.

“I will go to court to attain my freedom,” Hickox told Good Morning America Wednesday via Skype from her hometown of Fort Kent. “I have been completely asymptomatic since I’ve been here. I feel absolutely great.”

The CDC doesn’t consider health workers who treated Ebola patients in West Africa to be at “high risk” for catching Ebola if they were wearing protective gear, according to new guidelines announced this week. Since they have “some risk,” the CDC recommends that they undergo monitoring — tracking symptoms and body temperature twice a day — avoid public transportation and take other precautions. But the CDC doesn’t require home quarantines for these workers.

Someone isn’t contagious until Ebola symptoms appear, according to the CDC. And even then, transmission requires contact with bodily fluids such as blood and vomit.

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iStockphoto(FORT WORTH, Texas) — Seventh-ranked TCU (6-1) will have another tough task at hand on Saturday when they travel to No. 20 West Virginia (6-2).

Horned Frogs head coach Gary Patterson is happy to see his team bowl eligible at this point in the season, but knows there are still more games to play.

“Everything now counts as one,” Patterson said this week. “[We have] two tough games in a row [starting with] West Virginia in Morgantown. They’re playing really well on both sides of the ball. You can say the same thing about Kansas State. Then a three-week stretch with Kansas, Texas and Iowa State. We just have to take it one at a time.”

West Virginia comes into the game averaging 36.9 points per game.

“Coach [Dana] Holgorsen has really done a great job,” Patterson said. “They’re kind of in the same situation we’ve been in coming into the Big 12. We’ve had identical records the first two years. Both our games with each other have gone to overtime. We’ve beat each other at home. We have to find a way to win.”

TCU is only giving up 21.6 points per game this year.

“We’ve played really well at times,” Patterson said of his defense. “They’ve figured some things out. They didn’t play well for a quarter last week. We saw three plays that we hadn’t seen. They ran the back vertical, which is a really good play, and we missed a tackle. Then two hitch screens, but you have to get ready to play.”

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images(AUBURN, Ala.) — Third-ranked Auburn (6-1) will get one the biggest tests this season when they travel to fourth-ranked Ole Miss (7-1) on Saturday.

The Tigers are 3-1 in their SEC matchups this year and head coach Gus Malzahn is well aware of Mississippi’s defense that is only allowing 10.3 points per game.

“[They have a] great defense [and] very good on offense,” Malzahn said. “They have a senior quarterback who has a lot of experience. He’s a very nifty runner in their zone read and power [run game].”

“Overall, this is one of the better teams in their country,” he added.

Malzahn credited the work Rebels head coach Hugh Freeze has done in a short amount of time at the school.

“He’s really good at what he does,” Malzahn said. “He’s a great coach, he’s a great communicator, he’s got great vision. It doesn’t surprise me because he’s one of the best at what he does.”

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