ABC News(NEW YORK) — Amid a nationwide surge in heroin abuse, the New York Police Department announced on Tuesday that it will adopt the antidote to a heroin overdose.

So far this year, authorities in New York have seized more heroin than in any full year since 1991.

To stem the rising tide of heroin deaths, the nation’s largest police force is turning to the overdose reversal drug naloxone.

Nearly 20,000 NYPD patrol, housing and transit officers will soon start carrying the drug, which has reversed 10,000 overdoses since 2001.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) — Amid a nationwide surge in heroin abuse, the New York Police Department announced on Tuesday that it will adopt the antidote to a heroin overdose.

So far this year, authorities in New York have seized more heroin than in any full year since 1991.

To stem the rising tide of heroin deaths, the nation’s largest police force is turning to the overdose reversal drug naloxone.

Nearly 20,000 NYPD patrol, housing and transit officers will soon start carrying the drug, which has reversed 10,000 overdoses since 2001.

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iStockPhoto/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The Washington Capitals introduced their 17th head coach, Barry Trotz, and new general manager, Brian MacLellan, on Tuesday.

Trotz and MacLellan were hired on Monday and will have the task of turning around a team that has failed to bring home a Stanley Cup.

MacLellan replaces long-time general manager George McPhee, who spent 17 seasons with the team.

“I am a different person,” MacLellan said on Tuesday. “I have different experiences, different education, different playing experience. I think all of that stuff forms your attitudes and philosophies.”

Trotz coached in Nashville for 15 seasons, but was fired in April. Prior to Nashville, Trotz served as Washington’s AHL bench boss in Baltimore and Portland from 1992-97.

“I was looking for someone that had those same high standards of qualities,” Trotz said. “When I met this group, I was pretty well sold.”

Trotz is also looking forward to working with Capitals captain Alex Ovechkin, who has three league MVP’s and led the league in scoring this season with 51 goals.

“My job as a coach is to find a way to allow Alex and the other players to reach their potential as a group and be able to play together,” Trotz said.

The Capitals finished 38-30-14 this season and missed the playoffs for the first time since the 2006-07 season.

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iStockphoto/Thinkstock(PARIS) — Li Na fell to Kristina Mladenovic 7-5, 3-6, 6-1 in their first round matchup on Tuesday at the French Open.

Li, this year’s Australian Open champion and 2011′s French Open champ, had 37 unforced errors and will have to work on her game for the next Grand Slam event.

“Nobody say if you No. 2 in the world you have to win all the matches. I mean, this is tennis,” Li said. “I think doesn’t matter who plays today against me; I always lose the match today because I don’t think she … put a lot of pressure [on] me. I think today just I gave it away.”

Li’s first round exit comes a day after the reigning Australian Open champion, Stan Wawrinka, was eliminated.

“I don’t think I’m doing well,” Li said. “If I doing well, I believe I still can win the match if it’s not my best day. But I don’t think today I try a lot.

Mladenovic lost to Li in their 2010 French Open meeting.

“You don’t beat Li Na every day,” Mladenovic said. “It means really a lot, especially in Grand Slam.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Twelve years after the Supreme Court ruled that the mentally retarded cannot be put to death, the court on Tuesday clarified the standards a state can use to develop appropriate ways to enforce the ruling.

In a 5-4 ruling, the court said that Florida’s threshold requirement requiring an inmate to show an IQ test score of 70 or below before being permitted to present any additional intellectual disability evidence is unconstitutional.

Florida, along with a few other states, sets the IQ score of 70 as a rigid cut off and does not take into consideration a standard error measurement.

Writing for a 5-4 majority, Justice Anthony Kennedy said, “Florida’s law contravenes our Nation’s commitment to dignity and its duty to teach human decency as the mark of a civilized world. The States are laboratories for experimentation, but those experiments may not deny the basic dignity the Constitution protects.”

Kennedy was joined in his opinion by Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor, Stephen Breyer and Elena Kagan.

Kennedy said that when a defendant’s IQ test score falls within the test’s “acknowledged and inherent margin of error” the defendant must be able to present additional evidence of intellectual disability, including testimony regarding real-world skills and abilities.

“Intellectual disability is a condition, not a number,” Kennedy said.

By failing to take into account a standard error measurement and setting a strict cutoff at 70, Florida “goes against the unanimous professional consensus,” he said, noting “that an individual with an IQ test score between 70 and 75 or lower may show intellectual disability by presenting additional evidence regarding difficulties in adaptive functioning.”

Florida “is one of just a few States to have this rigid rule,” Kennedy noted.

Kennedy stressed that the IQ test is imprecise, but not unhelpful: “A state must afford these test scores the same studied skepticism that those who design and use the tests do, and understand that an IQ test score represents a range rather than a fixed number.”

In his opinion Tuesday, Kennedy chose to use the term “intellectual disability” — long used by clinicians and practitioners — rather than “mental retardation,” the term used in the 2002 landmark case Atkins vs. Virginia, the case that the Supreme Court revisited for Tuesday’s ruling. Daryl Atkins was convicted of murder in the August 1996 shooting death of airman Eric Nesbitt after robbing Nesbitt. Daryl was later found to have an IQ of 59.

Justice Samuel Alito dissented in Tuesday’s case, joined by Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas.

Alito criticized the majority for relying on the “standards of professional associations, which at best represent the views of a small professional elite.”

“In my view,” Alito wrote, “Florida has adopted a sensible standard that comports with the longstanding belief that IQ tests are the best measure of intellectual functioning.”

He noted that Florida took into consideration multiple test scores and that the majority “never explains why its criticisms of the uncertainty resulting from the use of a single IQ score apply when a defendant consistently scores above 70 on multiple tests.”

The ruling was a victory for Freddie Lee Hall, who is on death row for the 1978 murder of Karol Hurst, a pregnant 21-year-old newlywed. Hall’s lawyers claimed that his family recognized his disability when he was a small child and his teachers repeatedly classified him as mentally retarded. Hall asked a Florida state court to vacate his sentence presenting evidence that he had an IQ test score of 71.

Seth Waxman, a lawyer for Hall, had argued “Florida’s clinically arbitrary bright-line rule under which a person with an IQ test score of 71 may be executed notwithstanding a consistent diagnosis of mental retardation flouts the constitutional principles this Court recognized in Atkins. ”

Waxman wrote in briefs that IQ test scores are not “perfect measures of a person’s intellectual ability” and that a person who obtains a test score between 70 and 75 “may be diagnosed with mental retardation, depending on the other clinical evidence supporting the diagnosis.”

Florida’s attorney general had defended Florida’s protocol and said that Hall was simply seeking to avoid execution.

In court papers, Attorney General Pamela Jo Bondi wrote, “This case turns on whether Atkins truly left any determination to the States or whether, as Hall contends, States are constitutionally bound to vague, constantly evolving — and sometimes contradictory — diagnostic criteria established by organizations committed to expanding Atkins’ reach. ”

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ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) — Bank of America has been hired by Donald Sterling and his wife to help in the sale of the NBA’s Los Angeles Clippers, a source familiar with the situation told ABC News.

The NBA banned Sterling for life from all league events after an audio tape became public that caught him uttering racist comments to his assistant V. Stiviano. He told her not to post photos on Instagram of herself with black people — such as Magic Johnson — or to bring black people his basketball games.

Last week, Sterling signed the NBA franchise over to his wife Shelly, a source close to the team said.

ESPN reported that the NBA had charged Donald Sterling with damaging the league with his racist comments and set a hearing for June 3, after which other team owners are set to decide the future of his ownership of the Clippers.

Sterling initially planned to fight to retain ownership, but changed his mind last week, ESPN reported.

The NBA also said the banned owner has engaged in other conduct that has impaired its relationship with fans and merchandising partners.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A hacker who aided in high-profile attacks against governments and corporations, and later flipped to use his cyber skills for the FBI, will be freed from prison, a New York court ordered Tuesday.

The hacker, whose real name is Hector Xavier Monsegur but who is known online as Sabu, pleaded guilty three years ago and agreed to assist the FBI. In exchange, prosecutors requested leniency and their sentencing memo revealed, for the first time, the extent of his cooperation.

Monsegur helped the FBI “disrupt or prevent at least 300 hacks” against the military, Congress and “several private companies,” prosecutors wrote, adding that “Monsegur’s actions prevented at least millions of dollars in loss to these victims.”

The specific targets were redacted but included divisions of the federal government, the military, Congress, NASA, a television network, a security firm, a video game manufacturer and a water utility for an American city.

“The amount of loss prevented by Monsegur’s actions is difficult to fully quantify but even a conservative estimate would yield a loss prevention figure in the millions of dollars,” said James Pastore, an assistant U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York. “Moreover, Monsegur provided information about actual and purported vulnerabilities in critical infrastructure.”

Prosecutors also said Monsegur “contributed directly to the identification, prosecution and conviction of eight of his major co-conspirators,” including Jeremy Hammond who, at the time of his arrest in 2012, was the FBI’s number one cyber-criminal target.

Monsegur himself has been a target. In the last three years, the FBI relocated him and certain members of his family after he was “approached on the street and threatened or menaced.”

A one-time member of prominent hacking groups Anonymous, LulzSec and InternetFeds, Monsegur attacked the websites of Visa, MasterCard and PayPal in 2010 over their refusal to process donations to WikiLeaks. He also hacked Sony, PBS, the U.S. Senate and what prosecutors called a number of other “significant criminal computer intrusions.”

Monsegur was sentenced by Judge Loretta Preska to time already served — some seven months.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A computer hacker who aided in high profile attacks against governments and corporations faces sentencing Tuesday in New York, three years after he agreed to put his cyber skills to work for the FBI to help prevent hundreds of other attacks, prosecutors said.

The hacker, whose real name is Hector Xavier Monsegur but who is known online as Sabu, pleaded guilty three years ago and agreed to assist the FBI. In exchange, prosecutors have requested leniency and their sentencing memo reveals, for the first time, the extent of his cooperation.

Monsegur helped the FBI “disrupt or prevent at least 300 hacks” against the military, Congress and “several private companies,” prosecutors wrote, adding that “Monsegur’s actions prevented at least millions of dollars in loss to these victims.”

The specific targets were redacted but included divisions of the federal government, the military, Congress, NASA, a television network, a security firm, a video game manufacturer and a water utility for an American city.

“The amount of loss prevented by Monsegur’s actions is difficult to fully quantify but even a conservative estimate would yield a loss prevention figure in the millions of dollars,” said James Pastore, an assistant U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York. “Moreover, Monsegur provided information about actual and purported vulnerabilities in critical infrastructure.”

Prosecutors also said Monsegur “contributed directly to the identification, prosecution and conviction of eight of his major co-conspirators,” including Jeremy Hammond who, at the time of his arrest in 2012, was the FBI’s number one cyber-criminal target.

Monsegur himself has been a target. In the last three years, the FBI relocated him and certain members of his family after he was “approached on the street and threatened or menaced.”

A one-time member of prominent hacking groups Anonymous, LulzSec and InternetFeds, Monsegur attacked the websites of Visa, MasterCard and PayPal in 2010 over their refusal to process donations to WikiLeaks. He also hacked Sony, PBS, the U.S. Senate and what prosecutors called a number of other “significant criminal computer intrusions.”

He faces the possibility of decades in prison, but prosecutors have asked for time served.

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Scott Cunningham/Getty Images(ATLANTA, Ga.) — David Ortiz hadn’t homered since May 14 and was hitting just .118 with no runs batted in in his last 10 games. Coincidentally, the Boston Red Sox had not won since May 14 and lost their previous 10 contests.

In the top of the sixth inning, trailing 6-3 at Atlanta, and with two runners on base, Ortiz launched a three-run homer to left center that tied the ballgame. He later drove in the go-ahead run on a sacrifice fly in the seventh as the Red Sox (21-29) defeated the Braves, 8-6, to snap their longest skid in two decades.

“It’s been too long since we last shook hands following a win,” said Boston manager John Farrell. The Red Sox were in danger of tying the record for most consecutive losses by a defending World Series champion. The 1998 Florida Marlins dropped 11 in a row twice during their 1997 title defense. Boston had not lost 10 straight since the 1994 season.

An optimistic start for the Red Sox saw Jackie Bradley, Jr. drive in Grady Sizemore for the games first run in the third. However, starting pitcher Clay Buchholz walked a career high eight batters and did not make it out of the fourth inning. The Braves (28-22) scored three runs in both the third and fourth innings to chase the righty.

“It seems to be snowballing on me right now,” said Buchholz who allowed six runs on four hits before being lifted in the fourth without recording an out.

Boston rallied though, beginning with a two-run single by Dustin Pedroia in the sixth, which immediately preceeded Ortiz’s game-tying blast off Atlanta’s Ervin Santana. There was a near 90-minute rain delay before the inning was finally ended.

The Red Sox bats, and bullpen, finally came through when Ortiz lifted a fly ball to deep right field in the seventh that put Boston ahead, 7-6. A.J. Pierzynski then singled home another run while the bullpen held Atlanta off the boards for the final five innings.

Ian Thomas (1-2) was saddled with the loss after giving up the two runs in the seventh, while Edward Mujica (2-1) got the win for Boston. Koji Uehara earned his 10th save of the season, getting Andrelton Simmons to ground into a game-ending double play in the ninth.

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Rob Carr/Getty Images(BALTIMORE, Md.) — The Duke men’s lacrosse team captured its second consecutive national championship on Monday, holding off Notre Dame, 11-9, at Baltimore’s M&T Bank Stadium. It was the third national title in the last five seasons for the Blue Devils.

The top-seed in the tournament, Duke held the Fighting Irish scoreless in the first period and led 5-1 at halftime. Kyle Keenan added another goal 17 seconds into the third to make it a five-goal lead before Notre Dame finally got back on the board.

Two more goals from the Blue Devils made it a 7-2 contest and seemingly put the game out of reach. However, the Irish rallied to score six of the next eight goals and trailed 9-8 with five minutes to play in regulation. Keenan notched his second goal of the game to give Duke a little breathing room but Sergio Perkovic scored for Notre Dame with 49 seconds left, again making it a one-goal game.

Duke won the ensuing face-off and Jordan Wolff eventually sealed it with just 23 seconds left, scoring on an empty net. Perkovic had five goals for the Irish while four Blue Devils each scored a pair of goals.

It was a very special Memorial Day for redshirt senior Casey Carroll. The final member of the 2006 Duke lacrosse team, which was forced to give up a season due to sexual assault charges that later were proven false, Carroll graduated in 2007 and enlisted in the United States Army. He was in Afghanistan watching when the Blue Devils won their first national championship in 2010.

After serving four tours of duty as an Army Ranger, the 29-year old enrolled in Duke’s graduated program and rejoined the lacrosse team. He was granted an extra year of eligibility due to the season he was forced to give up and later given a medical redshirt when he tore his ACL, missing last year’s title run.

“It’s hard to deny that this is a pretty incredible one, for sure,” said Carroll after the win. “I’m so grateful for the men and women who’ve made the ultimate sacrifice, to my family who have supported me in this crazy adventure. For my coaches and teammates, I was just riding their coattails all season.”

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