iStock/Thinkstock(MONTREAL) — The Montreal Canadiens new head coach Claude Julien hit the ice for the first time with his new team on Friday in front of hundreds of fans.

When Julien returned to Quebec on Friday for his first practice he arrived to an arena filled with hudrends of fans and media representatives. Both french and english-speaking broadcasts were streaming the practice live.

Julien returns to the Montreal bench after being fired by the club in 2003. Since then, he has coached the New Jersey Devils and won the 2011 Stanley Cup as the head coach of the Boston Bruins.

According to LNH.com Senior Managing Editor Apron Basu, the coach took the attention of friday’s practice in stride, saying; “I’m back here and happy to be back here,” he said. “Is it weird? Not really.”

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ABC News(LOS ANGELES) — At least 4 people have died after a powerful storm caused flash flooding in southern California.

Two people were killed in two separate car accidents in San Diego during heavy rain and another was killed in Sherman Oaks after a power line fell.

Another person was injured after her car fell into a massive sinkhole in Studio City, according to ABC News station KABC in Los Angeles. on Friday night. A woman became trapped when the first vehicle plunged through the hole, until fire crews were able to pull her out of the vehicle. She was taken to the hospital and her condition is unknown, KABC reported.

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iStock/Thinkstock(OVERLAND PARK, Kan.) — Ten NCAA men’s hockey student-athletes were selected as finalists on Friday for the 2016-17 Senior CLASS Award.

CLASS, an acronym for Celebrating Loyalty and Achievement for Staying in School, recognizes the complete student-athlete and encourages students to use their respective platforms as positive role models in their communities.

The ten athletes were chosen from a list of candidates announced in January.

The NCAA announced the Men’s Hockey Finalists as:

Gavin Bayreuther, St. Lawrence
Will Butcher, Denver
Parker Gahagen, Army West Point
David Goodwin, Penn State
Brendan Harms, Bemidji State
Johnny Hrabovsky, Air Force
Alexander Kerfoot, Harvard
Brock Maschmeyer, Northern Michigan
Chad McDonald, Ferris State
John Stevens, Northeastern

Media representatives, Division I head coaches and nationwide fan voting will determine the winner.

The Senior CLASS Award recipient will be announced during the 2017 Men’s Frozen Four in Chicago on April 6, 2017.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WESTON, Fla.) — Fighter jets were scrambled in Florida Friday night to intercept an unresponsive plane that violated restricted airspace over President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort, creating a sonic boom that alarmed some residents, officials said.

Some residents mistook the loud sound from the F-15 jets for an explosion, but the Broward Sheriff’s office confirmed that the noise was from a military exercise.

“The intercept required the Air Force F-15s from Homestead Air National Guard Base to travel at supersonic speeds, a sound noticed by area residents, to get to the general aviation aircraft where they were able to establish communications,” NORAD said in a statement of the incident, around 7 p.m.

“The intent of military intercepts is to have the identified aircraft re-establish communications with local FAA air traffic controllers and instruct the pilot to follow air traffic controllers’ instructions to land safely for follow-on action.”

The Broward Sheriff’s office said 911 centers were flooded with phone calls about the incident.

Booming sound heard in @CityofWeston and nearby cities was from military planes headed to Palm Beach County. Please don’t tie up 9-1-1.

— Broward Sheriff (@browardsheriff) February 18, 2017

The boom was felt and heard from Weston to Boca Raton, which is located about an hour north of Miami, the sheriff’s office said.

Twitter users in multiple cities reported that they heard a loud explosion-like sound. Some users also said felt an impact that shook their windows.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WESTON, Fla.) — Military planes traveling through south Florida created a loud boom Friday night that alarmed some residents, officials said.

Some residents mistook the loud sound related to the incident for an explosion, but the Broward Sheriff’s office confirmed that the noise was from a military exercise.

The Sheriff’s office said 911 centers were flooded with phone calls about the incident.

Booming sound heard in @CityofWeston and nearby cities was from military planes headed to Palm Beach County. Please don’t tie up 9-1-1.

— Broward Sheriff (@browardsheriff) February 18, 2017

The boom was felt and heard from Weston to Boca Raton, which is located about an hour north of Miami, the sheriff’s office said.

Twitter users in multiple cities reported that they heard a loud explosion-like sound. Some users also said felt an impact that shook their windows.

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Getty/Rick Madonik (NEW YORK) – While his feud with New York Knicks owner James Dolan continues, Charles Oakley will suit up in the newly founded 3-on-3 league founded by rapper/entertainer Ice Cube as a player/coach.

Oakley, 53, will play with Chauncey Billups and Stephen Jackson in the inaugural season of the BIG3.

In a statement to ESPN, Ice Cube said, “Charles Oakley is an NBA legend, who deserves and has earned respect, and will get just that in our league.”

The league is expected to tip off this summer, and includes former NBA stars such as Allen Iverson, Jermaine O’Neal, and Rashard Lewis, among others.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The White House and Department of Homeland Security said Friday that they are not planning to use the National Guard to apprehend and arrest undocumented immigrants, despite a “preliminary draft memo” that indicated doing so was a possibility.

“The President and the White House has never had that as part of any plan to use the National Guard in any capacity for that,” White House Deputy Spokesman Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters aboard Air Force One on Friday.

But a senior official at the Department of Homeland Security told ABC News there was in fact “a very early, preliminary draft memo” that included language to utilize the Guard to, as the memo put it, “perform the functions of an immigration officer in relation to the investigation, apprehension, and detention of aliens in the United States.”

The proposal would have covered 11 states — those bordering Mexico as well as those adjacent to them.

This senior official confirmed that the memo, circulating online, appears to be an authentic version of that early draft, but that the latest version had removed any reference of using the National Guard as a law enforcement and immigration force.

DHS officials insist Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly never saw that version of the document and that his name appears on it only because he would be the person who ultimately signs off on it.

Kelly has seen the latest version and his name still appears on it, according to this official.

“The Department is not considering mobilizing the National Guard for immigration enforcement,” a spokesman for DHS said.

Using the National Guard for the purpose of border protection is by no means unprecedented. There were two major border protection efforts that employed the Guard under presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama: operations Jump Start in 2006 and Phalanx in 2010. But neither were along the scale of what this plan was proposing. The biggest difference being the proposal to allow Guardsmen to arrest people.

Operation Jump Start authorized National Guard to do border enforcement and construction of a fence, but they were there to observe and report and were not involved in law enforcement. Under Obama they were mainly doing overflight and surveillance, working with law enforcement on the ground. They weren’t arresting people.

Nevertheless, the DHS is adamant there is no longer any proposal to use the National Guard to arrest illegal immigrants and that this draft never made it to the secretary’s desk for consideration.

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iStock/Thinkstock(BLYTHE, Calif.) — Valley State Prison in Chowchilla is a men’s prison in California where inmates can get beauty school training, like everyone else in the state.

“I like doing the facial stuff,” Juan Brizuela, 36, an inmate at Valley State told ABC News. “It’s a real intimate moment that you have with your client, you trust one another.”

Brizuela was convicted of second degree murder when he was 15 years old and received a sentence of fifteen years to life in prison. Before coming to Valley State he was held for 18 years at Ironwood State Prison in Blythe, California.

“I hadn’t touched another person in 18 years, so when I had to do my first haircut I couldn’t and [the instructor] had to do it for me,” Brizuela said. It took him 9 months in the cosmetology program to feel comfortable touching other people, he said.

Inmates aren’t allowed to touch staff or other inmates, and there are a lot of rules when it comes to personal space, according to Lieutenant Ronald Ladd, Administrative Assistant and Public Information Officer at Valley State.

Lt. Ladd said that Valley State was previously a women’s prison. But because of a decrease in the female inmate population and the need for more male institutions, the institution became a male prison in 2013.

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation has identified Valley State as a “re-entry hub,” according to its website, which includes rehabilitation programs, educational and vocational training, like the cosmetology program, for its population.

“We asked the male inmates if they were interested in a cosmetology program when the prison first converted,” Ladd told ABC News, “and we were surprised at how many were interested.”

The cosmetology training consists of book work, hands on training with mannequins first, then real clients and, lastly, a written test that allows the student to obtain their California State Barbering and Cosmetology License after they’ve completed 1,600 hours of training.

They learn everything from human anatomy and psychology to the business of cosmetology to the different textures of hair and what chemicals to use for those hair types, Brizuela said.

He is the second male inmate at Valley State to receive a cosmetology license, he said, and he enjoys helping other inmates get ready for the licensing exam. When he’s not practicing his newfound trade, Brizuela is preparing for life outside of prison in a parole preparation program.

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ABC News(PUEBLO, Colo.) — Troy Griffin walked across a bridge in Colorado, searching for a body.

He brought search dogs and a team of volunteers with him, but his main set of tools are his visions.

Griffin is a self-proclaimed psychic detective. Shunning the crystal ball, tarot cards and tea leaves of his fellow intuitives, he says he uses his psychic powers to solve crimes.

“I’ve worked on … about a 100 cases overall,” Griffin said.

He says he’s built a business out of bringing the paranormal into police work, charging up to $250 an hour for his investigative work.

He recently worked a missing person’s case that gripped the nation. Kelsie Schelling, 21, was eight weeks pregnant and disappeared in February 2013 after making a late night drive from her home in Denver to see her boyfriend in Pueblo, Colorado. Her family never saw or heard from her again.

Nearly four years after her unsolved disappearance, Schelling’s mother Laura Saxton is still searching for her daughter and is grateful for Griffin’s help.

“We just want her back, and well do whatever it takes to get her back,” Saxton said. “Any time you can find anybody who sincerely wants to help it means a lot because people come and go very quickly.”

Using Griffin’s supposed psychic intuition and some anonymous tips, they searched a sparsely populated area in Pueblo, Colorado, where Griffin was trying to clue in on any sign of Schelling.

Griffin said his visions are “like watching TV, but just little clips,” and he’ll get overwhelming feelings of nervousness and anxiety.

“It’s nothing to do with the victims, it’s just how I know or how I use my directions,” he said. “When I pick up the feeling I have to go and follow that … So I have in my mind a vision of where I think her body may be that’s what I’m searching for.”

As they combed through rocks and riverbeds at two different points of interest, Griffin appeared to pick up a bunch of different energies.

“I feel nauseous, sometimes I feel like I can’t breathe,” he said.

But hours of searching led to no real clues pointing to Schilling’s whereabouts.

“I don’t feel Kelsie here at all,” he said finally.

Back at his office located outside of Denver, the walls are covered with files, maps and addresses from what he says are his cases. Griffin said he had previously made contact with Schilling when he first met her mother.

“When I contacted Kelsie, it was more just apologies -– ‘I’m sorry mom, I didn’t mean for it to happen. I didn’t know,’” Griffin said. “[Her mother] Laura is never going to have closure unless she finds something.”

In the six years he’s been in business, out of 100 cases, Griffin claims he has an 18 to 20 percent success rate, but defended those numbers.

“When you look at murder cases and unsolved missing persons, they’re very few percentage that actually get solved,” he said.

But of the roughly 100 cases Griffin claims he worked on, Griffin could not provide one example to ABC News to verify that he contributed to a police investigation. Even with the Kelsie Schilling case, when contacted, the Pueblo police department told ABC News they had “no official contact” with Griffin and were “unaware” of his investigation.

When asked how police departments typically receive his offer to help, Griffin said, “It really depends on what a detective or detectives believe in,” but that he was “lucky” if he got a “50/50” shot.

Rhonda Sheya said she is a former client turned friend of Griffin’s, and that she turned to him for help the day after her brother-in-law Danny Sheya mysteriously went missing in December 2014.

“He said, ‘I believe that he is within a few minutes of your home, a few miles, maybe five miles of your home. I see him surrounded by water and a few miles from your home,’” Sheya said. “I was like, ‘Water? There was no water on the route that we were searching.’”

Tragically, Danny Sheya’s vehicle had gone off the road on a dangerous stretch of road in Colorado and was found two days later by passerbys. Rhonda Sheya credits Griffin with helping them find closure.

“It does cross your mind that this a little bit out there,” she said. “It’s not exactly what mainstream people believe or think. It was desperation. You get desperate. At some point you’re grasping at straws. You don’t care. You just want your loved one back.”

Psychic-based crime solvers are not a new phenomenon. There was five seasons worth on the Court TV reality series called “Psychic Detectives.” There have been other hits such as “The Mentalist” and “Medium.” They were even spoofed on “South Park.”

But psychic readings, especially those in the public eye, have not been exempt from scrutiny. One example was a 2004 reading famed psychic Sylvia Browne performed on “The Montel Williams Show” for the mother of then-missing girl Amanda Berry. Browne told Berry’s mother that her daughter was dead, but nine years later, in May 2013, she was found alive.

Prior to her death in November 2013, Browne released a statement saying in part, “I have been more right than wrong. If ever there was a time to be grateful and relieved for being mistaken, this is that time.”

But still, Berry’s mother died believing her daughter was dead when she wasn’t. Critics called Browne a “grief vampire” taking advantage of a grieving parent. Griffin denied that’s what he’s doing in the Schilling case.

“I waited for her mom to tell me what she thought,” he said. “I don’t say you’re dead or you’re alive. I say I have feeling. I’m never going to tell you if you’re dead or alive. If I feel strongly, I’m still not going to tell you.”

But he did tell Schilling’s mother how she was murdered, saying that he believed strangulation was involved. If it turns out he’s wrong, Griffin said it would be time for him to “consider a different career.”

“I don’t take advantage of people that are grieving. Most are referred to me from what I did. I don’t charge them,” he said. “I’m not coming with false hope either way. I’m not here to tell you yea or nay. I’m here to help.”

Griffin said he’s not taking any money from Laura Saxton or any other grieving Schilling family members. He said he makes most of his money doing psychic readings, which he charges $140 an hour for people who come to him.

Famed skeptic Joe Nickell’s office in Buffalo, New York, is a shrine to cases he claims to have debunked over the years, including psychic detectives.

“What people should realize is psychics cannot do what they claim to do,” Nickell said. “They have been reviewed by mainstream science, and they can’t do it. If they can do it, let’s see that they do it.”

Nickell said psychics use a series of mentalist tricks often referred to as “retrofitting.”

“[It] could be defined as ‘after-the-fact matching,’” he said. “In other words, the detectives have a missing person. They assume the person might be dead, but they’re looking to find that person. In comes the psychic, often ingratiating himself or herself with the family, forcing the police, pretty much, to have to pay attention to the psychic.

“The psychic will say things like, ‘I see water. I’m getting the number 7. I see some sort of tall structure,’ and so on. They call these clues,” he added.

But Griffin said he’s isn’t bothered by critics who don’t believe in his work.

“What I say to skeptics is, if you have never been in the people’s shoes that I walk with, don’t judge or put opinion on it until you really know if it’s real or not,” he said. “The only way you’re going to know is if there’s ever a day that you need somebody like me. Then you’ll know. Before then you’ll probably never believe in me but the people that I help and walk away with closure moving forward. They’re the ones who believed in me. That’s why I continue to do what I do.”

To this day, Kelsie Schilling remains missing, and her mother’s painful search for the daughter who never came home continues.

“I have to try and keep hope to keep going because I know if I give up then it just goes away and Kelsie’s forgotten,” Saxton said. “I will just try and find my hope and my drive wherever I can find it and whoever is brought into my life to make that happen and right now [Griffin] has been brought in my life.”

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