iStock/Thinkstock(SALEM, Ore.) — A suspect is in custody after 2 people were killed and 2 others were injured in a shooting in Marion County, Oregon, about 70 miles south of Portland, the Marion County Sheriff’s Office said Monday.

Law enforcement launched a manhunt for the suspect after the shooting, and the sheriff’s office later announced that a suspect was stopped by Oregon State Police east of Portland.

Additional details were not immediately available.

This story is developing. Check back for more updates.

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Allen Kee / ESPN Images(PHOENIX) — A mid-air medical emergency took a plane full of passengers by surprise when one man collapsed of an apparent heart attack. But the surprises were just beginning.

When passengers and crew rushed to help, a familiar face appeared in the crowd: NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Tim Tebow.

Tebow moved toward the unconscious man and his family, then led a group of passengers in prayer, according to passenger Richard Gotti.

Medical staff met the flight at the gate when it landed at its destination in Phoenix. The man survived.

Delta Air Lines confirmed that the incident occurred, but said that because of privacy rules it could not confirm Tebow’s involvement.

The company said it did not know exactly when during the flight the emergency occurred, but it confirmed that the flight crew consulted with a team of doctors on the ground and decided that the safest option would be for the plane to complete its trip to Phoenix.

Flight 1772 originated in Atlanta and carried 177 passengers, two pilots and four flight attendants.

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iStock/Thinkstock(SALEM, Ore.) — Police are searching for a gunman after 2 people were killed and 2 others were injured in a shooting in Oregon, the Marion County Sheriff’s Office said.

Marion County is located about 70 miles south of Portland.

Additional details were not immediately available.

This story is developing. Check back for more updates.

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iStock/Thinkstock(PARIS) — The Tour de France will use thermal cameras this year to detect hidden motors used by cyclists to gain an unfair advantage, French officials announced Monday.

The new technology will crack down on so-called “mechanical doping,” and attempt to maintain the integrity of professional cycling, a sport that has been plagued in the past with doping scandals involving performance-enhancing drugs.

Earlier this year, the International Cycling Union (UCI) discovered that Belgian cyclist Femke Van den Driessche concealed an electric motor in her bike during the Women Under 23 race of the UCI Cyclocross World Championships, according to the UCI.

She was suspended for six years and ordered to return all medals and prize money.

Thierry Braillard, the French Secretary of State for Sports, announced the use of thermal cameras at a news conference this morning with Thierry Mandon, the French Secretary of State for Higher Education and Research; Brian Cookson, the president of the UCI; David Lappartient, president of the French Cycling Federation; and Christian Prudhomme, director of the Tour de France.

The cameras were produced by the Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission in collaboration with the French government.

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iStock/Thinkstock(KERN COUNTY, Calif.) — Many residents in Kern County, California, have lost their homes in a deadly fire still burning through the area, while others have been denied access to their houses amid the catastrophic destruction left behind.

Two people have died and at least 200 homes have been destroyed in the Erskine fire, which has spread to over 45,000 acres. Officials continue to search through the charred rubble using a team of cadaver dogs, which they expect to extend for about three more days. On Saturday, some animal remains were found.

The fast-moving fire is 40 percent contained as of this morning, according to the spokesperson for Cal Fire, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, Daniel Berlant. More than 2,000 people are helping to fight the blaze.

Chief Brian Marshall of the Kern County Fire Department described the blaze as mother nature and a spark colliding.

Brandi Pettit, an evacuee who said she learned from a neighbor that her home didn’t make it, said, “Losing a house at age 29, it’s hard,” through tears. “I don’t wish this on [anybody].”

Another woman told ABC News she feels “homeless and helpless.”

Eighty-one evacuees are in shelters; residents whose homes were not affected will be allowed to return home Monday.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A young baseball fan watching a game at the College World Series on Saturday didn’t keep his eyes on the field the entire time.

The boy spent at least some of the game engaged in an epic stare-down with a TV camera — and he won.

So this just happened… #CWS pic.twitter.com/GboCVRM4Ql

— NCAA Baseball (@NCAACWS) June 26, 2016

In a video that has quickly gone viral, the boy is seen staring at an ESPN camera that trained its lens on him during the Coastal Carolina University versus Texas Christian University game. The freckle-faced boy stares straight at the camera without blinking and while making funny faces.

The cameras also caught the moment when it the adult sitting next to the boy appears to shows him that he has become a viral star.

That moment you realize you have become an Internet sensation! #CWS pic.twitter.com/btREdUqDRE

— NCAA Baseball (@NCAACWS) June 26, 2016

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ABC News(NEW YORK) — As West Virginia residents brace for more rain Monday in the wake of the state’s historic flooding, ABC News spoke to one man who rescued his neighbors after flooding tore through their block.

At least 23 are dead from the flooding last week, and many devastated residents have been forced from their homes.

When high waters rushed through Michael Mitchem’s West Virginia home, destroying his belongings, he immediately went to save his neighbors.

“I wasn’t really thinking of myself,” he told ABC News. “After I got my family up here I waded in this water down to this woman’s house who was trapped in there, her and her daughter. And we called the National Guard, we called the fire department, we called everybody.”

He and another man then went house to house rescuing neighbors on the block, picking up the stranded in a boat.

“That’s all we did all night long, was grab people, grab people,” Mitchem said.

He said the water was sometimes chest-high and even above his head.

“Our protocol was not to worry about ourselves. Nobody left behind,” Mitchem, an army veteran, said.

“I got nine kids that have to look at me as a father figure and a hero,” he said. “My daughter thinks that I’m better than Superman.”

A cold front moving though West Virginia Monday is expected to bring more rain to the already rain-soaked state. The forecast shows an additional 1 to 3 inches of rain. Due to the record rainfall last week, any rain is likely to cause flash flooding.

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iStock/Thinkstock(KERN COUNTY, Calif.) — Many residents in Kern County, California, have lost their homes in a deadly fire still burning through the area, while others have been denied access to their houses amid the catastrophic destruction left behind.

Two people have died and at least 150 homes have been destroyed in the Erskine fire, which has reportedly spread over 45,000 acres. Officials says the death toll could climb as they continue to search for victims amongst the charred buildings with a team of cadaver dogs.

One woman who lost her home told ABC News she feels “homeless and helpless.”

Another evacuee said she learned from a neighbor that her home didn’t make it. “Losing a house at age 29, it’s hard,” Brandi Pettit said through tears. “I don’t wish this on [anybody].”

Chief Brian Marshall of the Kern County Fire Department described the blaze as mother nature and a spark colliding.

The fast-moving fire is 40 percent contained as of Monday morning, according to the spokesperson for Cal Fire, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, Daniel Berlant. More than 2,000 people are helping to fight the blaze.

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conductorjason/Twitter(DALLAS) — Passengers aboard a flight to Dallas/Ft. Worth International Airport were forced evacuate their plane after a smoky landing Monday morning, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Everything aboard American Eagle Flight 3492 from Mobile, Alabama, operated by Envoy Air, was business as usual Monday morning until the plane was already on the ground, according to the airline. Upon landing, the aircraft’s brakes became hot and began to produce smoke, according to American Airlines spokesperson Ross Feinstein.

The airport and American Airlines told ABC News the plane landed safely and no one suffered any serious injuries.

The pilots of the Embraer E145 reported some smoke in the cockpit after landing, FAA spokesperson Lynn Lunsford told ABC News, adding that a flame may have appeared out of a wheel well.

It’s the crew’s decision whether to have passengers evacuate rather than the routine exit at a gate.

The 40 passengers and three crew members on board the flight were helped down from the plane to the tarmac by those on the ground. The FAA does not allow slides on small planes like the Embraer E145 in this incident.

Photos on social media show the airport’s emergency response vehicles coming to the aid of the aircraft while the passengers watched the scene unfold on the tarmac.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The Supreme Court Monday struck down a Texas law that imposed significant restrictions on abortion clinics — a major victory for abortion rights activists and a blow to the campaign to limit the procedures.

In a 5-to-3 decision, the justices struck down a law that set strict regulations governing how abortion clinics operate. The Texas law, enacted in 2013, mainly required clinics providing abortion services to beef up their facilities to match walk-in surgical centers and mandated physicians performing abortions to have admitting privileges at local hospitals.

Hundreds of activists on both sides of the debate gathered outside the Supreme Court in anticipation of the ruling. Monday is the last day that the court will issue decisions for this term, which began in October.

Texas has defended the restrictions, and the number of clinics providing abortion services in the state has dropped since the law was enacted. The Supreme Court said Texas put an undue burden on a woman’s legal right to get an abortion.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, criticized the ruling.

“The decision erodes states’ lawmaking authority to safeguard the health and safety of women and subjects more innocent life to being lost,” he said in a statement. “Texas’ goal is to protect innocent life while ensuring the highest health and safety standards for women.”

The court is down one justice, from nine to eight, because of the death of conservative Justice Antonin Scalia in February. He routinely sided with anti-abortion advocates.

The court is now evenly divided, with four conservative justices and four liberals. The majority opinion for the court, written by Justice Stephen Breyer, held that the regulations are medically unnecessary and unconstitutionally limit a woman’s right to an abortion.

“We conclude that neither of these provisions offers medical benefits sufficient to justify the burdens upon access that each imposes,” Breyer wrote of the “admitting-privileges requirement” and the “surgical center requirement. “Each places a substantial obstacle in the path of women seeking a pre-viability abortion, each constitutes an undue burden on abortion access, and each violates the federal Constitution.”

Breyer was joined by Justices Anthony M. Kennedy, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel A. Alito Jr. dissented.

In a concurring opinion, Ginsburg wrote, “Given those realities, it is beyond rational belief that [the Texas law] could genuinely protect the health of women and certain that the law “would simply make it more difficult for them to obtain abortions.”

In his dissent, Thomas argued that the court shouldn’t have decided the case at all for technical and procedural reasons. But he also argues that the court’s abortion jurisprudence is fundamentally misguided, and the court today “radically rewrites the undue burden test” by “requiring courts to consider the burdens a law imposes on abortion access together with the benefits those laws confer.”

The last time the high court decided a major abortion case was nine years ago when they ruled to uphold a law banning late-term abortion procedures.

“Today women lost,” Kristan Hawkins, the president of Students for Life of America, said outside the court after the ruling. “Today the Supreme Court put politics over the health and safety of women in our country.”

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