Tulsa County Jail(TULSA, Okla.) — Tulsa Police Officer Betty Shelby turned herself in early Friday after being charged with first-degree manslaughter in the shooting death of Terence Crutcher.

Shelby was booked Friday morning at the Tulsa County Jail at around 1 a.m. local time and was released on a $50,000.00 bond about 20 minutes later.

Shelby reacted “unreasonably by escalating the situation from a confrontation” with Crutcher, according to an affidavit by an investigator with the Tulsa County District Attorney’s Office. Shelby became “emotionally involved” to the point that she overreacted, the affidavit states, adding that she was “not able to see any weapons or bulges indicating a weapon was present.”

The Tulsa Police Department said it would make a determination on her employment status after an internal affairs review.

Tulsa Police DepartmentCrutcher, 40, was killed Friday night after Shelby came across his SUV in the middle of a two-lane roadway while it was still running. Crutcher ignored dozens of commands Shelby gave him, according to Wood, and she shot him as he allegedly tried to reached his arm into the open driver’s side window.

Another officer who perceived the same threat deployed his Taser at the same time Shelby fired her weapon, Wood said.

Crutcher’s family attorneys maintain that the window was up, pointing to the blood spattered on it when he was shot.

Tulsa Police DepartmentDamario Solomon-Simmons, the attorney for Crutcher family, said it was “apparent” that Shelby had to be charged because “a crime had been committed.”

“We are happy that charges were brought,” Solomon-Simmons said in a press conference. “But, let me be clear. The family wants and deserves full justice, and full justice requires not just charges but a vigorous prosecution and a conviction to those who shot and killed Terence for no reason.”

Solomon-Simmons said it would be a “long journey to justice,” noting that neither charges nor a conviction would “bring Terence back.” He added that Crutcher’s family was at the funeral home preparing to bury him.

Crutcher’s twin sister, Tiffany Crutcher, said she was “grateful” that “the officer who senselessly killed” her brother “will face charges for her criminal act.”

“Our goal as a family is to ensure that this never happens to an innocent citizen,” she said, adding that she’s “humble” and “grateful” to the community for their support.

“We’re going to break the chain of police brutality,” she said, calling the charges against Shelby a “small victory.”

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Jeff Siner/Charlotte Observer/TNS via Getty Images(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — As hundreds of demonstrators filled the streets of Charlotte Thursday night to express their anger over Tuesday’s police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott, the mayor of North Carolina’s most populous city signed an order for a curfew slated to go into effect at midnight.

But police later said the curfew would not be enforced as long as protests are peaceful — and that was evident, as demonstrators remained in the streets well past midnight without any police intervention.

Before 1 a.m., protesters were laying down in some streets, and marching in others.

The curfew will be lifted at 6 a.m., per Mayor Jennifer Roberts’ order. The curfew is part of a proclamation of a state of emergency, that explains such a measure is necessary “in order to more effectively protect the lives and property of the people within the City of Charlotte.”

Chanting “No Justice, No Peace” and “Don’t Shoot, Hands Up,” protesters began peacefully marching down streets around 7:30 p.m. — surrounded by rifle-carrying National Guard officers — carrying signs that read “End Police Terror,” “Black Lives Matter,” “I Hope I Don’t Killed For Being Black” and “Black Power.”

At 11:31 p.m. police tweeted that there were “no reports of officer or civilian injuries during tonight’s demonstration,” but half an hour later, police tweeted that two officers were being treated by EMS workers after they were sprayed with a chemical agent by demonstrators.”

The protest began around the same time that attorneys for Scott’s family said they had watched police video of Scott’s shooting, but were unable to ascertain if Scott indeed had a gun in his hands.

“After watching the videos, the family again has more questions than answers,” a statement from the family’s attorney’s read. “When told by police to exit his vehicle, Mr. Scott did so in a very calm, non-aggressive manner. While police did give him several commands, he did not aggressively approach them or raise his hands at members of law enforcement at any time. It is impossible to discern from the videos what, if anything, Mr. Scott is holding in his hands.”

Despite demands from the family and community for police to release dashcam and body camera footage to the public, police are resisting such a move.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney said the footage of Scott’s killing could undermine the investigation. The video will be made public when he believes there is a “compelling reason” to do so, he told reporters Thursday.

“You shouldn’t expect it to be released,” he added. “I’m not going to jeopardize the investigation.”

At one point during the evening, protesters stopped to block an intersection near Bank of America’s headquarters and chanted “release the tape,” but when police and the National Guard moved in, protesters moved on.

Bank of America — along with Wells Fargo and Duke Energy — told its employees to stay out of Charlotte.

Protesters also descended upon I-277, as they did the previous two nights. Riot gear-wearing police managed to move protesters off I-277 after dispersing tear gas, according to WSOC. Pepper spray was also used.

Thursday night’s protest also kicked off shortly after Charlotte police confirmed that a man shot by another civilian during Wednesday night’s protests had died, and that a homicide investigation has been launched. Police identified the victim as Justin Carr, 26.

A candlelight vigil was set up to remember Carr.

“Detectives with the Homicide Unit canvassed the area to determine whether there were any witnesses to this incident,” Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police said in a statement of Carr’s death. “Crime Scene Search responded to the call for service to process the scene and collect physical evidence. This is an ongoing, active investigation.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Here are the latest scores and winners:

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Detroit 9, Minnesota 2
Boston 5, Baltimore 3
Tampa Bay 2, N-Y Yankees 0
Cleveland 5, Kansas City 2
Detroit 4, Minnesota 2
L.A. Angels 2, Houston 0

NATIONAL LEAGUE

N-Y Mets 9, Philadelphia 8, 11 Innings
San Francisco 2, San Diego 1
L.A. Dodgers 7, Colorado 4
Atlanta 6, Miami 3
Milwaukee 3, Pittsburgh 1

TOP-25 COLLEGE FOOTBALL

(5) Clemson 26, Georgia Tech 7

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE

New England 27, Houston 0

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Jeff Siner/Charlotte Observer/TNS via Getty Images(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — As hundreds of demonstrators filled the streets of Charlotte Thursday night to express their anger over Tuesday’s police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott, the mayor of North Carolina’s most populous city signed an order for a curfew slated to go into effect at midnight, officials have confirmed.

The curfew will be lifted at 6 a.m., per Mayor Jennifer Roberts’ order. The curfew is part of a proclamation of a state of emergency, that explains such a measure is necessary “in order to more effectively protect the lives and property of the people within the City of Charlotte.”

Chanting “No Justice, No Peace” and “Don’t Shoot, Hands Up,” protesters began peacefully marching down streets around 7:30 p.m. — surrounded by rifle-carrying National Guard officers — carrying signs that read “End Police Terror,” “Black Lives Matter,” “I Hope I Don’t Killed For Being Black” and “Black Power.”

The protest began around the same time that attorneys for Scott’s family said they had watched police video of Scott’s shooting, but were unable to ascertain if Scott indeed had a gun in his hands.

“After watching the videos, the family again has more questions than answers,” a statement from the family’s attorney’s read. “When told by police to exit his vehicle, Mr. Scott did so in a very calm, non-aggressive manner. While police did give him several commands, he did not aggressively approach them or raise his hands at members of law enforcement at any time. It is impossible to discern from the videos what, if anything, Mr. Scott is holding in his hands.”

Despite demands from the family and community for police to release dashcam and body camera footage to the public, police are resisting such a move.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney said the footage of Scott’s killing could undermine the investigation. The video will be made public when he believes there is a “compelling reason” to do so, he told reporters Thursday.

“You shouldn’t expect it to be released,” he added. “I’m not going to jeopardize the investigation.”

At one point during the evening, protesters stopped to block an intersection near Bank of America’s headquarters and chanted “release the tape,” but when police and the National Guard moved in, protesters moved on.

Bank of America — along with Wells Fargo and Duke Energy — told its employees to stay out of Charlotte.

Thursday night’s protest also kicked off shortly after Charlotte police confirmed that a man shot by another civilian during Wednesday night’s protests had died, and that a homicide investigation has been launched. Police identified the victim as Justin Carr, 26.

“Detectives with the Homicide Unit canvassed the area to determine whether there were any witnesses to this incident,” Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police said in a statement. “Crime Scene Search responded to the call for service to process the scene and collect physical evidence. This is an ongoing, active investigation.”

This is story is breaking. Please check back for updates.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Three people are dead following a workplace shooting Thursday afternoon at a factory in eastern Tennessee, police said.

One of the deceased is the shooter, an employee of the factory who died from a self-inflicted gunshot, Athens police chief Chuck Ziegler said at a press conference. Ziegler said the man was apparently using a semi-automatic pistol, but he didn’t know the caliber or brand.

The shooting occurred at the Thomas & Betts steel fabrication factory in Athens, located about 60 miles northeast of Chattanooga.

Police responded to a 911 call at 4:16 p.m. of an active shooter at the factory, Ziegeler said. As officers responded, they saw employees streaming out of the plant.

The identities of the dead have not yet been released. No one else was injured.

McMinn County sheriff Joe Guy posted a photo on Instagram of the cruiser at the plant, writing “Scene is secure.”

Ziegler said police haven’t investigated the inside of the plant, but officers will be at the crime scene through the night.

Witnesses are also being interviewed.

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ABC News(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — In his first public reaction to the violent protests in Charlotte, North Carolina, during an exclusive interview with ABC News’ Good Morning America, President Obama called for protesters to seek out peaceful means to address concerns of racial inequalities in the American policing system.

“The way we change the system requires to be able to reach out and engage the broader American community and that requires being peaceful, that requires being thoughtful about what are the specific reforms you’re looking for,” Obama told Good Morning America co-anchor Robin Roberts in an interview today at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

The president sought to make the distinction between those who have been protesting peacefully and the few who have engaged in violence during two nights of protests that have rocked the North Carolina city following the police-involved shooting of Keith Lamont Scott, an African-American. Scott was killed by an African-American police officer.

“[The] overwhelming majority of people who have been concerned about police-community relations [are] doing it the right way,” the president said. “Every once in a while you see folks doing it the wrong way.”

“I think it’s important to separate out the pervasive sense of frustration among a lot of African Americans about shootings of people and the sense that justice is not always color blind,” the president also said.

The president has spoken on the phone to both the mayor of Charlotte and the governor of North Carolina to express his condolences for those in mourning and offer federal assistance as needed, according to the White House.

Tune into Good Morning America on Friday for more of Robin Roberts’ exclusive interview with President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama.

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Steve Senegal Endeavor Air Racing(NEW YORK) — The two pilots never saw it coming.

Eight air racing airplanes were in formation for take off on Sunday in Nevada when pilot Thom Richard noticed his engine was not running properly.

He shut down his engine and signaled to officials to halt take off, but communication to the other pilots broke down and the planes began to take off around him, Richard told ABC News.

A fellow pilot’s aircraft struck Richard’s plane from behind at 60 miles per hour, shearing off the canopy.

Video from inside the aircraft shows the left wing missing Richard’s head by just inches.

Only minor injuries were reported, with both pilots walking away.

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Mother of Keith Lamont Scott(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — Vernita Walker was watching the news on Tuesday when she learned that her 43-year-old son, Keith Lamont Scott, had been shot by police outside an apartment complex in Charlotte, North Carolina. Scott was waiting for his 9-year-old son to be dropped off from school, she said.

“I will like justice for my child,” Walker told ABC News.

Police said Scott was holding a handgun, which investigators recovered from the scene, and posed a threat because he was not obeying “loud, clear, verbal commands” to not exit his vehicle and to drop the weapon. An officer subsequently fired his weapon, hitting Scott, who was later pronounced dead.

The officers were searching for a suspect who had an outstanding warrant when they encountered Scott, according to a police statement, but he was not the person the officers sought.

Walker told ABC News that Scott was ill, after suffering brain damage from a motorcycle accident a few years ago. She maintains that her son was holding a book, not a weapon. She said that he was a father of seven children, ages 9 to 24, and that he would never have a gun around his young child.

“Me, as a mother, wants to know why he would be carrying a gun to pick up a little child,” she said.

Police have identified the officer involved in the shooting as Brentley Vinson, who has been employed with the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department since July 21, 2014, and is currently assigned to the metro division. He has been placed on paid administrative leave as the investigation continues, according to Police Chief Kerr Putney.

Vinson was not wearing a body camera at the time, but the other officers who responded to the incident were.

The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department said it plans to show video of Scott’s fatal shooting to his family. But Putney said the footage he has reviewed does not provide “definitive visual evidence that would confirm that a person is pointing a gun.”

“I did not see that in the videos that I reviewed,” Putney said at a news conference today. “So what I can tell you, though, is when taken in the totality of all the other evidence, it supports what we’ve heard and the version of the truth that we gave about the circumstances that happened that led to the death of Mr. Scott.”

The shooting has sparked violent protests in Charlotte. Angry demonstrators demanding justice for Scott have looted businesses, damaged property and injured officers, police said. Law enforcement and city officials have called for peace and patience while authorities investigate the shooting.

Scott’s mother echoed those calls for calm.

“I don’t want people in there rioting and breaking up properties,” she told ABC News. “If they’re gonna have a rally, do it right.”

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Hagerstown Police Department(NEW YORK) — Maryland police Thursday defended the restraining and pepper-spraying of a 15-year-old girl they said was not cooperating after a traffic accident, saying that the actions of officers involved an appropriate amount of force.

The Hagerstown Police Department released bodycam videos that show officers attempting to restrain the girl and later, one officer pepper-spraying the teen as other officers attempt to close the door of the police car they have put her in.

On Sunday afternoon, police found the 15-year-old girl to be at fault for hitting a moving vehicle with her bicycle, according to the Hagerstown Police Department.

Police said that during the investigation, “the juvenile had to be detained” and that she began to be “assaultive” during the arrest, which is why she was pepper-sprayed.

The girl, whose identity was not released, was charged with disorderly conduct, two counts of second-degree assault, possession of marijuana and failure to obey a traffic device, police said. The matter was referred to the Department of Juvenile Services.

In the almost 15 minutes of videos released by police, firefighters and the girl are on the scene when the first officer arrives. The officer asks the firefighter to “grab” the girl’s information while he grabs the driver’s. As the teen sits on her bike, the firefighter tells the officer that she does not want to be treated because she says she’s not injured.

The driver then tells the officer he was coming down the street while the light was green when the girl came around the corner, didn’t stop and hit the side of his car. The officer then takes a picture of the damage to the driver’s side of the black sedan and asks for his license and registration.

“She didn’t want to stay,” the driver then tells the officer. “We almost had to forcibly keep her here.”

The video posted by ABC News begins at the point where the officer wearing the bodycam walking toward the girl, who is with another officer. The officer behind wearing the bodycam tells her to “come here.” The girl responds, “Nah, don’t touch me. Don’t f—ing touch me,” before she walks away and gets on her bike, saying she doesn’t want her parents to be called.

“Yeah, we are calling your parents,” an officer says.

As she bikes away, it appears that the officer wearing the bodycam stops her, grabbing her backpack and pulling her off the bike. She’s told that she’s being detained for not cooperating in an investigation.

“Get off of me,” the girl tells the officers as she tries to break free.

As the girl continues to struggle with the officers, one of them tells her: “You’re gonna get hurt. Stop.”

“Get the f— off of me,” she tells them. “I’m not going nowhere.”

One of the officers then instructs a bystander to “get back” multiple times as he tries to mediate the escalating situation.

“You let that badge go to your head, man,” the bystander tells the officer.

The officer then tells the girl to get her hands behind her back and tries to handcuff her, reminding her that she’s “being detained right now” when she asks why.

“Get that s— off of me,” she says as she wiggles away.

The officers grab her, telling her to “stop,” and she begins to scream, saying to the officers that they were hurting her.

The girl then sits on the ground and doesn’t respond as police ask for her name. The officer wearing the bodycam places his hand on her shoulder, saying that they’re “trying to help” her.

“I’m not f—ing hurt,” she screams.

The officer explains that they need her parents to come to the scene, but she responds that they can’t come because they’re watching a football game.

“Well, that’s not an excuse for them not to come down here,” he responds.

The teen then asks to “get off the ground,” but the officer tells her she’s “staying right there.” She continues to say that she doesn’t want to get in trouble.

“You need to calm down, OK?” the officer tells her. “Take a seat.”

The officers then pick her up, and the frame goes black as she kicks the bodycam off the first officer. The video, as provided by police, picks back up using the footage from the bodycam of another officer arriving at the scene, beginning with an image of two officers carrying the girl horizontally to a squad car. The car involved in the initial accident is still on the scene, and onlookers have gathered on various street corners.

As the officers put the girl in the back of the car, they tell her to “get her feet in” and to “stop resisting.” She continues to cry and struggle, and an officer asks her to calm down and inquires where her mom is.

“I just need to know where your mom’s at. That’s it,” an officer tells her. “You help me, I help you.”

The girl then says that she’s going to “tell her dad” and tells the officer to “die.”

“I’ll spray her, if you just want to step back,” one officer says.

“Put your feet in, or you’re getting sprayed,” the other officer says to her.

An officer then sprays the girl through the window, and following that, another officer closes the door. The teen begins to scream and cry, and can be heard saying: “I can’t breathe.”

The officer wearing the bodycam then radios in, “Female just got pepper sprayed,” and walks over to the driver of the car that got hit to get his account of what happened.

“Officers throughout this country and our community are often placed in very difficult situations each and every day,” said Hagerstown Police Chief Victor Brito in a press conference today. “It’s their job to act in the interest in our community.

Brito said the officers “applied their training and responded within the guidelines of the Hagerstown Police Department.”

“The officers used the appropriate amount of force to detain a juvenile who was not being cooperative,” Brito said.

The police chief said the girl refused to give her identity, which is required in a traffic accident, “whether you’re 15 or you’re 50.”

Brito said that officers used the “minimal amount of force necessary” because the outcome would have been worse if a more than 200-pound officer had used physical force to get her into the car. The officer who pepper-sprayed the girl used “one burst,” Brito said.

The officers “recognized the fact that she was a juvenile” and tried to use their “best adult tone to calm the situation down,” he said.

“Sometimes the actions that we take aren’t pretty,” Brito said. “Sometimes they can look a little ugly. But, they follow policy, pattern and procedure for the Hagerstown Police Department.”

The teen’s family plans on speaking in a press conference Thursday afternoon.

Police reported a group of protesters causing increased traffic and congestion in Hagerstown Wednesday night.

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