Hemera/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — NBA: Cleveland Cavaliers 110 (37-22) – Golden State Warriors 99 (44-11)

Top 25 Men’s College Basketball: (7) Arizona 82 (25-3) – Colorado 54 (12-15)

(21) SMU 66 (23-5) – Memphis 57 (17-11)

NHL: Buffalo Sabres 6 (19-38-5; 43pts) – Vancouver Canucks 3 (35-23-3; 73pts)

Montreal Canadiens 5 (40-16-5; 85pts) – Columbus Blue Jackets 2 (26-30-4; 56pts)

New York Rangers 4 (38-16-6; 82pts) – Arizona Coyotes 3 (20-35-7; 47pts)

Toronto Maple Leafs 3 (25-31-5; 55pts) – Philadelphia Flyers 2 (26-25-11; 63pts)

Chicago Blackhawks 3 (37-20-5; 79pts) – Florida Panthers 0 (26-22-13; 65pts)

St. Louis Blues 2 (39-18-4; 82pts) – Winnipeg Jets 1 (31-20-12; 74pts) SO

Minnesota Wild 4 (32-22-7; 71pts) – Nashville Predators 2 (41-14-7; 89pts)

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Courtesy Michele Van Bibber(STEWARTVILLE, Minn) — Michele Van Bibber has been an educator since 2010.

One of the changes she’s noticed about her students over the past five years is their habit of over-sharing on social media.

“I think that there is quite a bit of new social media out there and it’s changed in the way students, or even the way adults, expose themselves to it,” said Van Bibber, a health and physical education teacher at Stewartville High School in Stewartville, Minnesota. “I think there has been a big boom like the explosion of Twitter, posting on Facebook, and looking at each other’s pictures on Instagram.”

After chatting with her 10th graders about the different ways they present themselves on social accounts, Van Bibber decided to conduct a social media experiment.

“I know kids are exposing such private details on the Web,” she told ABC News. “The students might also want to be friends with people and sometimes they don’t even know who they are.”

To show her students how quickly a photo could be picked up by strangers, Van Bibber had one of the kids snap a shot of her holding a sign asking people to share it.

“I asked them [the students], ‘if I post this picture on my personal Facebook page, do you think anyone can see it?'” she said. “One of the students said ‘I didn’t think it would work because she doesn’t have many friends'” she laughed.

Van Bibber posted the photo on her Facebook where she and her students monitored its sharing progress for three days straight.

The photo was eventually picked up by ABC News affiliate KAAL-TV, where it received 47,385 likes, 217,649 comments, and over 351,000 shares.

“The kids were taken aback,” Van Bibber said. “I don’t think they realized how fast the picture could get out there.”

After the post went viral, Van Bibber went over the results with her classes, stressing the one lesson she wanted to get across — social media safety.

“I just wanted them to be a little more cautious of who has access to what they post — what if it got into the wrong hands?” she said. “Also, some decisions that we might not think through now could potentially harm us in future endeavors — like the chances of getting into a specific college, or getting a job.

“I think this made them look back at who was actually following them, and I do think it had an impact.”

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Cynthia Letson(EASTON, Calif.) — “They weren’t fancy. They were just decent people that were always committed to each other, no matter the situation.”

That’s how Donna Scharton remembers her beloved parents, Floyd and Violet Hartwig, before they died on Feb. 11.

The couple, who had been married for 67 years, died in their home in a very Notebook-like situation.

As the two laid close to one another, Scharton and other immediate family members pushed their beds close together as they all knew the end was near.

“My mom had dementia for the last several years and around the holidays we noticed she was going down,” Scharton of Fresno, California said. “Then, I got a call from the doctor saying ‘your dad has kidney failure and he has two weeks to live.’ So, we decided to put them in hospice together.”

Prior to their declining health, the Hartwigs owned a ranch in Easton, California. The two met while in grammar school and had developed a relationship upon Mr. Hartwig returning home from the Navy.

They married on Aug. 16, 1947 and had two other children, Carol and Kenneth, in addition to Scharton.

“My dad was in the Navy for six years,” she told ABC News. “He worked for the J.B. Hill Company delivering eggs and then for a feed company. Mom stayed home, helped take care of the ranch, and cooked all the meals. She made breakfast for dad at 4:30 in the morning every day.”

Scharton said that although his health was deteriorating, her father’s main priority was the love of his life.

“He would tell the doctor, ‘I’m okay I just want her fixed’,” she added. “That was his concern; not how bad his pain was, but that he wanted my mom fixed.”

“We could tell my dad was in a lot more pain,” Scharton cried. “We said ‘it’s getting close,’ so we pushed the hospital beds together as far as we could. We put their hands together, and my dad died holding my mom’s hand. Mom was not coherent, but we told her that dad had passed away and that he was waiting for her. She died five hours later.”

Scharton’s daughter, Cynthia Letson, remembers her grandparents as simple people who just loved having their family beside them.

“They never, ever asked for anything,” she said. “All they ever wanted was their family and it was amazing that they got that in the end.”

In honor of their legacy, Scharton is holding onto warm memories of her mother and father.

“Mom did a lot of sewing – made our clothes and stuff,” Scharton said. “She joined the PTA at school and she loved doing her crossword puzzles. They were very devoted and when dad came home we’d always have supper together.

“I remember them kissing each other goodbye every morning. I remember mom called him Blondie because he had such pretty blonde hair and blue eyes.”

“What I want people to get out of this story is my dad’s commitment to serving his country and loving his family,” she said. “What we felt was keeping them alive was the will to live, and that they didn’t want to let go of each other.”

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Banana Stock/Getty Images(NASHVILLE, Tenn.) — Tennessee Titans left tackle Michael Roos is hanging up his helmet for good after 10 seasons in the NFL, the club announced on Thursday.

“I’m excited to begin the rest of my life, and I am grateful to do so now, while I am full healthy,” Roos said on his Instagram account.

The Titans originally selected Roos out of Eastern Washington in the second round of the 2005 NFL draft. He played in 148 career games, recording one fumble recovery.

“On behalf of the organization, I want to thank Michael for his 10 years of outstanding play for our franchise,” Titans CEO & President Tommy Smith said in a statement. “On a weekly basis, he was a player that you could count on to play his best, year after year. He was a true pro and I am thrilled that he was able to play his entire career as a Titan.”

Roos was a three-time All-Pro and was named to the Pro Bowl in 2008.

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Banana Stock/Getty Images(NASHVILLE, Tenn.) — Tennessee Titans left tackle Michael Roos is hanging up his helmet for good after 10 seasons in the NFL, the club announced on Thursday.

“I’m excited to begin the rest of my life, and I am grateful to do so now, while I am full healthy,” Roos said on his Instagram account.

The Titans originally selected Roos out of Eastern Washington in the second round of the 2005 NFL draft. He played in 148 career games, recording one fumble recovery.

“On behalf of the organization, I want to thank Michael for his 10 years of outstanding play for our franchise,” Titans CEO & President Tommy Smith said in a statement. “On a weekly basis, he was a player that you could count on to play his best, year after year. He was a true pro and I am thrilled that he was able to play his entire career as a Titan.”

Roos was a three-time All-Pro and was named to the Pro Bowl in 2008.

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KNXV(SUN CITY, Ariz.) — A pair of confused llamas wreaked havoc in Sun City, Arizona, Thursday afternoon as they ran through the streets while being chased by police.

It’s unclear where the llamas originated, or how they broke free, but little did they know that their brief dash for freedom would be enjoyed across the country.

Live streams of the chase and cable news breakouts captivated viewers, and the best responses to the stressful chase appeared on Twitter.

LIVE: Llamas get loose, run through neighborhood in Arizona: http://t.co/cAAyNO9jXi@abc15 pic.twitter.com/32ema3kXA4

— ABC News Live (@ABCNewsLive) February 26, 2015

REUNITED!!! http://t.co/wsQoRGGcfI pic.twitter.com/sacKxmXio0

— ABC15 Arizona (@abc15) February 26, 2015

LLAMA WATCH: The llamas appear to be taking a short break under a tree. Today’s high in Phoenix: 72 degrees. #abc15 pic.twitter.com/kmt6olCMSE

— ABC15 Arizona (@abc15) February 26, 2015

It was obviously a perfect time for puns.

I am recusing myself from coverage of this story. There will be no further comment. #TeamLlamas #LlamaChase #LlamaWatch

— Tom Llamas (@TomLlamasABC) February 26, 2015

And business deals.

The #AZCardinals have agreed to one-year deals with the #llamasontheloose. Each llama will earn 2,340 lbs of hay. Steve Keim does it again.

— Arizona Cardinals (@AZCardinals) February 26, 2015

If nothing else, the chase shows how ill-prepared so many U.S. cities are for such a disaster.

Seriously the city of Phoenix appears to have no plan whatsoever for catching these llamas

— Max Fisher (@Max_Fisher) February 26, 2015

LLAMA WATCH: It appears the llama is a big fan of #ABC15! Good choice my friend! GOOD CHOICE! http://t.co/wsQoRGGcfI pic.twitter.com/NfN5s1ejUW

— ABC15 Arizona (@abc15) February 26, 2015

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Barry Williams/Getty Images(DENVER) — The former Boulder police chief said mistakes were made in the initial handling of the JonBenet Ramsey murder case that transfixed a nation two decades ago.

Mark Beckner gave a lengthy interview on Reddit this week revisiting the case and plainly detailing mistakes he felt the police made in the early days of the case.

The unusual murder case drew nationwide attention, as no one was ever arrested or charged in the case. JonBenet Ramsey, 6, was found murdered in the basement of her family home on Christmas Day. The 6-year-old beauty queen was reported missing hours earlier by her parents after a ransom note was found in their home.

For years, investigators tried to unravel what happened to the young girl and whether the murderer could have been a family member or an intruder. Amid intense media speculation, the girl’s family strongly maintained their innocence, and in 2008 the Boulder County District Attorney cleared them of any wrongdoing via DNA testing.

Nearly 20 years after the murder, Beckner spoke about the case and what he wishes he could change about the early investigation and what he thinks might have happened the night the girl was killed.

Early Mistakes

Beckner said first off, the police officers should have shut down the crime scene immediately and taken statements from JonBenet’s parents. Since the crime happened on Christmas Day, Beckner said there were fewer people available to get to the scene.

Beckner also said one key mistake was not getting full statements from parents John and Patricia Ramsey the day of the crime.

The former police chief said that the girl’s parents seemed to show unusual behavior but clarified that could have been due to a number of reasons.

A spokeswoman for the Boulder Police said Thursday that the mistakes cited by Beckner have been addressed in subsequent years.

“Those problems were acknowledged early in the investigation and over the years by Mark Beckner when he was chief….That information is not new,” Public Information Officer Kim Kobel told ABC News, clarifying that the Ramsey case remains open but not active. “It’s still an open investigation….We still get tips and leads.”

Wrong Suspect

There appeared to be a major break in the case when a teacher, John Mark Karr, confessed to killing JonBenet. A subsequent investigation found that Karr could not have committed the crime.

Beckner said he was wary of Karr’s confession from the beginning.

Loose Ends

Beckner noted in the Reddit talk that there were multiple parts of the crime that appeared odd to investigators, including a lengthy two-and-a-half-page ransom note.

Beckner also said that law enforcement believed the note was written after the murder and there was never an intent to kidnap the girl. Instead, he said he believes that the case was always a murder staged to look like a botched kidnapping.

In an interview with the Daily Camera newspaper, Beckner later said he didn’t realize his comments would be open to anyone and he regretted doing the question-and-answer session.

“I talked to the organizer and my impression was that this was a members-only-type group that talked about unsolved mysteries all around the world,” Beckner told the Daily Camera.

He later deleted his comments from Reddit. Beckner did not respond to a request for comment from ABC News.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The FBI’s top counterterrorism official offered a blunt assessment Thursday of U.S. efforts to stop ISIS from spreading its merciless message online: “We are losing the battle.”

The terrorist group wreaking havoc in Syria and Iraq as it blasts videos of beheadings to the world “has proven dangerously competent like no other group before it at employing [online] tools for its nefarious strategy,” the head of the FBI’s counterterrorism division, Assistant Director Michael Steinbach, told lawmakers Thursday.

He said the FBI and other U.S. agencies have implemented “an effective counter-narrative” online, but “the sheer volume” of ISIS messaging online, particularly through social media, “eclipses our effort.”

In fact, while U.S. authorities have been warning that thousands of Westerners recruited to fight with ISIS overseas could pose a threat to the U.S. homeland, that threat “is a small problem” compared with the group’s ability to reach into the United States and radicalize someone without anyone else knowing.

Through its online campaign, ISIS is able to target radicalized Americans who are “frustrated” by an inability to leave the United States or just can’t afford it, according to Steinbach.

“So what they’re doing is…saying, ‘Hey, if you can’t come to Syria, do something in the U.S. or Western countries,'” Steinbach added.

Steinbach cited Wednesday’s arrest of three New Yorkers as “a good example” of the threat the FBI is seeing “more and more” of. Two of those arrested allegedly discussed ways they could wage jihad inside the U.S. homeland, from assassinating President Obama to bombing Coney Island.

Nineteen-year-old Akhror Saidakhmetov, a Kazakhstan citizen living in Brooklyn, N.Y., was arrested at John F. Kennedy International Airport as he was allegedly trying to leave for Syria. Twenty-four-year-old Abdurasul Hasanovich Juraboev, an Uzbekistan citizen also living in Brooklyn, was arrested at his apartment.

In August, Juraboev allegedly posed a question on an Uzbek-language site tied to ISIS: “I am in USA now….But is it possible to commit ourselves as dedicated martyrs anyway while here?”

In the same post, Juraboev suggested he could “shoot Obama and then get shot ourselves…That will strike fear in the hearts of infidels,” according to the FBI.

Over the following months, the FBI tracked their communications and sent a confidential informant to engage with them, recording many of their alleged conversations about traveling to Syria and launching attacks in the U.S. homeland.

In one November 2014 discussion, Saidakhmetov allegedly suggested he join the U.S. military so he could pass military information to ISIS – and if his plan ever fell apart, he could open fire on American soldiers, according to charging documents.

A third Brooklyn man, 30-year-old Abror Habivov, was arrested in Florida, accused of funding some of the pair’s travel and operating “a domestic support network” for travel to Syria.

All three have been charged with conspiring to provide material support to a terrorist group and each faces 15 years in prison if convicted.

Thursday, Steinbach said the type of danger they posed “is a blending of homegrown violent extremism with the foreign fighter ideology,” calling it “today’s latest adaption of the threat.”

“The West is facing the most complex and severe terrorist threat we have seen certainly since 9/11,” said John Cohen, the former counterterrorism adviser at the Department of Homeland Security who’s now an ABC News consultant. “It may even be more [severe] than the ones we faced on 9/11.”

Part of the concern, Cohen said, is that traditional counterterrorism efforts — which rely heavily on the likes of the CIA, National Security Agency and Defense Department — “were never intended to deal with an individual becoming radicalized while sitting in the basement of his home in Minneapolis.”

In fact, over the past year, the FBI has arrested several young Somali men from Minneapolis for allegedly trying to join ISIS in Syria. Many others from the Twin Cities actually made it there, though not all of them are still alive.

Countering that type of radicalization, Cohen said, requires local police working hand-in-hand with local faith organizations, mental health professionals, and others in the community there on the frontline.

At the hearing Thursday, a top law enforcement official from Minneapolis agreed, saying it all comes down to trust and an enduring, “respectful partnership” between everyone involved in a community.

But, Hennepin County Sheriff Richard Stanek said, it’s important not to mix anti-radicalization efforts with community engagement.

“You cannot, shall not mix the two,” Stanek insisted. “If members of the diaspora community think that your community engagements techniques are nothing more than a front for intelligence gathering to counter violent extremism, that is a problem.”

Stanek said his department’s efforts with communities in the Twin Cities have paid dividends in recent years. He noted Somali leaders in Minneapolis “renounced” a video posted over the weekend by the Somalia-based terrorist group al-Shabaab, calling for attacks at malls in the West.

“That would not have happened several years ago” because the Somali community did not “know how to respond” and did not feel empowered to do so, according to Stanek.

At the hearing and after Wednesday’s arrests, law enforcement officials tried to emphasize that radicalized individuals do not represent Islam or any other religion.

“[They] violated the true tenants of their faith in pursuit of their radical, violent agenda,” said the head of the FBI’s field office in New York, Diego Rodriguez, about the three men arrested Wednesday for allegedly trying to aid ISIS.

In a statement, he urged community members to flag “those who could be [similarly] radicalized” because “we cannot do this alone.”
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KNXV(SUN CITY, Ariz.) — A pair of confused llamas wreaked havoc in Sun City, Arizona, Thursday afternoon as they ran through the streets while being chased by police.

It’s unclear where the llamas originated, or how they broke free, but little did they know that their brief dash for freedom would be enjoyed across the country.

Live streams of the chase and cable news breakouts captivated viewers, and the best responses to the stressful chase appeared on Twitter.

LIVE: Llamas get loose, run through neighborhood in Arizona: http://t.co/cAAyNO9jXi@abc15 pic.twitter.com/32ema3kXA4

— ABC News Live (@ABCNewsLive) February 26, 2015

REUNITED!!! http://t.co/wsQoRGGcfI pic.twitter.com/sacKxmXio0

— ABC15 Arizona (@abc15) February 26, 2015

LLAMA WATCH: The llamas appear to be taking a short break under a tree. Today’s high in Phoenix: 72 degrees. #abc15 pic.twitter.com/kmt6olCMSE

— ABC15 Arizona (@abc15) February 26, 2015

It was obviously a perfect time for puns.

I am recusing myself from coverage of this story. There will be no further comment. #TeamLlamas #LlamaChase #LlamaWatch

— Tom Llamas (@TomLlamasABC) February 26, 2015

And business deals.

The #AZCardinals have agreed to one-year deals with the #llamasontheloose. Each llama will earn 2,340 lbs of hay. Steve Keim does it again.

— Arizona Cardinals (@AZCardinals) February 26, 2015

If nothing else, the chase shows how ill-prepared so many U.S. cities are for such a disaster.

Seriously the city of Phoenix appears to have no plan whatsoever for catching these llamas

— Max Fisher (@Max_Fisher) February 26, 2015

LLAMA WATCH: It appears the llama is a big fan of #ABC15! Good choice my friend! GOOD CHOICE! http://t.co/wsQoRGGcfI pic.twitter.com/NfN5s1ejUW

— ABC15 Arizona (@abc15) February 26, 2015

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Andy Lyons/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson is a step closer to being reinstated into the NFL.

Judge David Doty ruled on Peterson’s behalf in the NFL Player Association’s lawsuit against the NFL.

The judge stated that NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell acted outside his authority in November, after he suspended Peterson until at least April 15 for disciplining his four-year-old son by hitting him with a switch last May.

“This is a victory for the rule of law, due process and fairness. Our collective bargaining agreement has rules for implementation of the personal conduct policy and when those rules are violated, our union always stands up to protect our players’ rights,” the NFLPA said in a statement.

This is yet another example why neutral arbitration is good for our players, good for the owners and good for our game,” the statement continued.

The Vikings will have to decide what they’ll do with Peterson — whether it is a trade, restructure his contract, or release him.

Peterson told ESPN.com that he’s had some reservations about returning to Minnesota.

The NFL can appeal Peterson’s reinstatement and NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said the league will “review the decision.”

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