JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Last week, after a dossier of unsubstantiated claims about Donald Trump was published online, the president-elect went on the offensive, calling the allegations — conveyed to him and President Obama in intelligence briefings — “fake news” and “nonsense.”

The memos, authored by a former British spy hired by Democratic operatives, included allegations that Russia had compromising information Trump, which have not been substantiated. But the intelligence community said they felt obligated to brief policymakers on the matter.

Trump, who has repeatedly assailed the media as “dishonest,” appeared to apply the fake news moniker not only to the dossier, but other reports on the matter which did not refer to the specific allegations.

“I read the information outside of that meeting. It’s all fake news. It’s phony stuff. It didn’t happen,” he said.

But Trump is no stranger to pushing untruths untruths or unsubstantiated claims. Here are some examples:

Obama Birtherism Theory

For years, Trump perpetuated the myth that President Obama was not born in the United States, often using tweets to push the claim, starting in 2011.

Made in America? @BarackObama called his ‘birthplace’ Hawaii “here in Asia.” http://t.co/dQka2PIr

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 18, 2011

Despite the president releasing his long-form birth certificate in 2001, Trump only conceded at a September 2016 news conference used to promote his new D.C. hotel that Obama was born in the United States.

“President Barack Obama was born in the United States, period,” Trump said. “Now we all want to get back to making America strong and great again.”

Born in Hawaii in 1961, Obama released his short-form birth certificate from the Hawaii Department of Health in 2008. He released his long-form birth certificate in 2011, saying he “believed the distraction over his birth certificate wasn’t good for the country.”

But that didn’t stop Trump from continuing to cast doubt, based on U.S. law that only a “natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President.”

Let’s take a closer look at that birth certificate. @BarackObama was described in 2003 as being “born in Kenya.” http://t.co/vfqJesJL

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 18, 2012

Always remember, I was the one who got Obama to release his birth certificate, or whatever that was! Hilary couldn’t, McCain couldn’t.

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 29, 2014

Attention all hackers: You are hacking everything else so please hack Obama’s college records (destroyed?) and check “place of birth”

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 6, 2014

Claims of ‘Serious Voter Fraud’ in 2016 Election

Even after he won the election, Trump continued to insist that voter fraud occurred — that he would have won the popular vote if not for “millions of people who voted illegally,” but provided no evidence to support the claim.

In addition to winning the Electoral College in a landslide, I won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 27, 2016

Clinton won the popular vote by nearly 3 million ballots.

In December, Vice President-elect Mike Pence, defended Trump, citing a Pew study as the source for the “millions” who allegedly voted illegally.

But the Pew study’s primary author, David Becker, tweeted in response to references to his research: “As primary author of the report the Trump camp cited today, I can confirm the report made no findings re: voter fraud. We found millions of out of date registration records due to people moving or dying, but found no evidence that voter fraud resulted. Voter lists are much more accurate now than when we issued that study in 2012, thanks to the 20 states sharing data through @ericstates_info.”

In another tweet, Trump named Virginia, New Hampshire and California as three states with “serious voter fraud.” There is no evidence to back up the claim, and it’s unclear why those states were singled out.

Serious voter fraud in Virginia, New Hampshire and California – so why isn’t the media reporting on this? Serious bias – big problem!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 28, 2016

ABC News reached out to election officials in all 50 states shortly before Election Day and not one had any evidence or reason to believe that widespread voter fraud has or would occur in their states.

Obama Founded ISIS

At an August rally in Florida, Trump told supporters that President Obama is the “founder of ISIS.”

“ISIS is honoring President Obama,” he said. “He is the founder of ISIS. He founded ISIS. And I would say the co-founder would be crooked Hillary Clinton.”

He pulled back on those comments two days later, saying they were “sarcasm.”

The terrorist group can trace its history back to 2000 in Iraq. The group become known as ISIL in June 2014 with its founder Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi declaring it had established an Islamic “caliphate” in Iraq and Syria.

9/11 Celebrations

During the campaign, then-Republican contender Trump claimed residents of Jersey City, N.J., celebrated the World Trade Center attacks, telling ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos that “there were people that were cheering on the other side of New Jersey where you have large Arab population.”

“They were cheering as the World Trade Center came down,” he added. “I know it might be not politically correct for you to talk about it, but there were people cheering as that building came down — as those buildings came down, and that tells you something. It was well covered at the time.”

At a campaign event the next day, he doubled down on that assertion.

“Lo and behold I start getting phone calls in my office by the hundreds, that they were there and they saw this take place on the internet,” Trump said in Ohio.

At the time, several of Trump’s fellow GOP candidates, including Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio, condemned Trump’s remarks. Trump continued to stand by the assertion for weeks, even though no media outlet uncovered any reports from the time, nor did Trump’s campaign provide any evidence to confirm that “thousands and thousands” of Muslims in New Jersey celebrated the Sept. 11 attacks.

ABC News checked all footage from the time of the attacks and the weeks after, finding no such claims or basis for the claims.

Ted Cruz’s Dad Allegedly Involved in the JFK Assassination

In May, Trump latched on to an unsubstantiated claim in a National Enquirer report that Sen. Ted Cruz’s father, Rafael Cruz, was caught on camera with Lee Harvey Oswald, President Kennedy’s killer, just three months before the assassin.

On “Fox and Friends,” Trump seized on the claim, saying, “I mean, what was he doing with Lee Harvey Oswald shortly before the death, before the shooting? … It’s horrible.”

In an interview with ABC News’ Tom Llamas, Rafael Cruz lashed out at his son’s then-GOP rival.

“That’s typical of Donald Trump — just attack and make all kinds of innuendo and attacks with no substance,” the elder Cruz said.

But Trump stood by his unsubstantiated claim, citing only the National Enquirer article as his evidence.

“All I did was refer to it. I’m just referring to an article that appeared. It has nothing to do with me,” he said on “Good Morning America.” “The National Enquirer gave you John Edwards. It gave you O.J. Simpson. It gave you many, many things. I mean, you can’t knock the National Enquirer. It’s brought many things to light.”

U.S. Intelligence Community Leaked Dossier

Trump has suggested the intelligence community was involved in leaking the unverified dossier that include salacious allegations about Trump and his connections to Russia.

Intelligence agencies should never have allowed this fake news to “leak” into the public. One last shot at me.Are we living in Nazi Germany?

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 11, 2017

He also tweeted Friday, “Probably…released by “Intelligence” even knowing there is no proof, and never will be.”

Trump pointed the finger at outgoing-CIA Director John Brennan in response to an interview Brennan gave to Fox News.

“Oh really, couldn’t do much worse – just look at Syria (red line), Crimea, Ukraine and the build-up of Russian nukes. Not good! Was this the leaker of Fake News?” Trump tweeted in response to Brennan’s assessment that Trump did not have a “full appreciation” of the threat of Russia.

In his interview on “Fox News Sunday,” Brennan said that “there is no basis for Mr. Trump to point fingers at the intelligence community for leaking information that was already available publicly.”

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper also said in a statement released last week that he believes the leaks did not come from the intelligence community.

“We also discussed the private security company document, which was widely circulated in recent months among the media, members of Congress and Congressional staff even before the IC became aware of it. I emphasized that this document is not a U.S. Intelligence Community product and that I do not believe the leaks came from within the IC,” the statement read.

Clapper said the document was created by a private security company and “widely circulated in recent months among the media, members of Congress and Congressional staff even before the IC became aware of it.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — At least 33 Democratic members of Congress have announced they will skip Donald Trump’s Friday inauguration. While some made their decision in previous weeks, several more have now come forward, citing the president-elect’s perceived insult of Rep. John Lewis as the final straw.

Trump lashed out at the civil rights icon after Lewis said he didn’t view Trump as “a legitimate president.” Lewis, a Georgia Democrat who protested alongside the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., also said he would not attend the inauguration.

“Congressman John Lewis should spend more time on fixing and helping his district, which is in horrible shape and falling apart (not to mention crime infested) rather than falsely complaining about the election results,” Trump tweeted Saturday morning. “All talk, talk, talk – no action or results. Sad!”

Trump’s comments have drawn outrage and messages of support for Lewis from both sides of the aisle. Rep. Yvette Clark, D-New York, said in a tweet that she would not attend the inauguration because of the comments, saying “when you insult [John Lewis], you insult America.”

I will NOT attend the inauguration of @realDonaldTrump. When you insult @repjohnlewis, you insult America.

— Yvette D. Clarke (@RepYvetteClarke) January 14, 2017

Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.), who is running to be the Democratic National Committee chair, announced on Twitter Monday he would not be attending. He said: “I will not celebrate a man who preaches a politics of division and hate. I won’t be attending Donald Trump’s inauguration.”

I will not celebrate a man who preaches a politics of division and hate. I won’t be attending Donald Trump’s inauguration.

— Rep. Keith Ellison (@keithellison) January 16, 2017

Democratic Reps. Mark Takano and Judy Chu, both of California, also tweeted they would be absent as a show of solidarity with Lewis.

“All talk, no action.”

I stand with @repjohnlewis and I will not be attending the inauguration. pic.twitter.com/z8Q0wA9OPK

— Mark Takano (@RepMarkTakano) January 14, 2017

After much thought, I have decided to #StandWithJohnLewis and not attend the inauguration.

— Judy Chu (@RepJudyChu) January 15, 2017

Also, Rep. Ted Lieu, D-Calif., wrote in a statement that “while [he does] not dispute that Trump won the Electoral College, [he] cannot normalize his behavior or the disparaging and un-American statements he has made.”

“Trump — who lost the popular vote — has made a series of racist, sexist and bigoted statements,” Lieu continued. “In addition, he has attacked Gold Star parents, veterans such as John McCain and now civil rights icon John Lewis.”

Democratic Rep. Mark Pocan of Wisconsin reflected such sentiments in a statement released Sunday morning.

“I was planning on attending the Inauguration on Friday out of respect for the office of President, while still making it back home on Saturday to attend the Women’s March in Madison,” he said. “However, after long consideration based on reading the Classified document on Russian hacking and the Trump candidacy on Thursday, the handling of his conflicts of interest, and this weekend’s offensive tweets about a national hero Rep. John Lewis, I am no longer attending the event.”

Reps. Mark DeSaulnier, D-Calif., and John Conyers, D-Mich., did not explicitly mention Lewis in their announcements, but did go public with their decisions on the day of Trump’s tweets.

Among those who decided not to attend the inauguration earlier in January, the most common reason was an aversion to “normalizing” what they see as Trump’s divisive rhetoric and agenda.

“When the new President denigrates Latinos or Mexicans or immigrants as drug-dealers and criminals, I want to be able to say I did not condone or allow that type of speech to go mainstream; That was not normalized on my watch,” Rep Luis Gutierrez, D-Illinois, said in part in a speech on the House floor. “Because the future President said the American-born children of immigrants were not capable of being American judges, I cannot sit there at his inauguration as if that is OK and I forgive him.”

Rep. Katherine Clark, D-Massachusetts, said on Twitter she didn’t believe she could “contribute to the normalization of the President-elect’s divisive rhetoric by participating in the inauguration.”

My statement on the upcoming inauguration: pic.twitter.com/dQXE0ztvTf

— Katherine Clark (@RepKClark) January 5, 2017

Several of the Congress members plan to attend the Women’s March on Washington; others said they will participate in community organizing in their home districts.

The Trump transition team did not respond to ABC News’ request for comment.

Below is the full running list of Congress members planning not to attend the inauguration:

  • Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-AZ
  • Rep. Mark DeSaulnier, D-CA
  • Rep. Ted Lieu, D-CA
  • Rep. Judy Chu, D-CA
  • Rep. Maxine Waters, D-CA
  • Rep. Mark Takano, D-CA
  • Rep. Jared Huffman, D-CA
  • Rep. Barbara Lee, D-CA
  • Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-CA
  • Rep. Frederica Wilson, D-FL
  • Rep. John Lewis, D-GA
  • Rep. Luis Gutierrez, D-IL
  • Rep. Katherine Clark, D-MA
  • Rep. Anthony Brown, D-MD
  • Rep. John Conyers, D-MI
  • Rep. Keith Ellison, D-MN
  • Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-MO
  • Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, D-NJ
  • Rep. Adriano Espaillat, D-NY
  • Rep. Nydia Velazquez, D-NY
  • Rep. Jose Serrano, D-NY
  • Rep. Yvette Clarke, D-NY
  • Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-NY
  • Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-OH
  • Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-OR
  • Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-OR
  • Rep. Kurt Schrader, D-OR
  • Rep. Dwight Evans, D-PA
  • Rep. Steve Cohen, D-TN
  • Rep. Don Beyer, D-VA
  • Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-WA
  • Rep. Adam Smith, D-WA
  • Rep. Mark Pocan, D-WI

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — On Friday, Donald Trump and Mike Pence will participate in a tradition that’s over 200 years old — the presidential and vice-presidential inauguration.

“We’re going to have a very, very elegant day. The 20th is going to be something that will be very, very special, very beautiful,” President-elect Trump has said of his big day.

But the festivities for Trump and Pence are set to begin even before Inauguration Day. Here’s what’s planned:

Jan. 19 – The Inauguration Concert

The day before Inauguration Day, Trump and Pence will lay wreaths at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery.

Later, there will be several marching band performances at the “Voices of the People,” held on a stage on the southwest end of the Reflecting Pool.

After “Voices of the People,” the president-elect and vice president-elect will deliver remarks at the “Make America Great Again! Welcome” concert at the Lincoln Memorial.

Country singer Toby Keith, actor Jon Voight and the band 3 Doors Down, among others, are set to appear. The concert, from 4-6 p.m., concludes with a fireworks show.

Jan. 20 – Before the Inauguration

On Friday morning, Trump, Pence and their families are scheduled to attend church services at St. John’s Episcopal near the White House.

President Barack Obama and President-elect Trump will have coffee or tea at the White House before Trump’s swearing-in, according to Tom Barrack, chairman of the inaugural committee. The two men and their wives will ride together to the Capitol.

Inauguration Ceremony at the U.S. Capitol

The Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies (JCCIC) recently released the program of Trump and Pence’s swearing-in ceremonies at the Capitol.

The 58th presidential inauguration ceremony kicks off on Friday at 11:30 a.m. The D.C. Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management is planning for 800,000 to 900,000 people to attend the inauguration festivities.

The U.S. Marine Band, which has played at every inauguration since Thomas Jefferson’s ceremony in 1801, will play the prelude. Also known as the “The President’s Own,” the Marine Band has roughly 130 musicians.

If the ceremony follows tradition, inauguration announcer Steve Ray will introduce the past presidents, the families of Trump and Pence, and the congressional leaders that are in attendance, before announcing Pence and then finally the man of the hour, Trump.

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Missouri, will conduct the “Call to Order” and deliver welcoming remarks.

Following Sen. Blunt’s remarks, Cardinal Timothy Michael Dolan, Reverend Dr. Samuel Rodriguez of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference and the New Destiny Christina Center’s Pastor Paula White-Cain will deliver the readings and invocation.

In an interview with Catholic News Service, Cardinal Dolan shared that for his reading he chose Wisdom, Chapter 9, King Solomon’s prayer for wisdom in leading Israel.

The program continues with a musical selection from the Missouri State University Chorale.

Taking the Oaths

Vice President-elect Mike Pence will take his oath of office administered to him by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.

After Pence is sworn in as the 48th vice president, the Mormon Tabernacle Choir will then perform, making it the sixth time the chorus has sung at an inauguration ceremony or parade.

Then, Donald J. Trump will take the presidential Oath of Office. Chief Justice John Roberts will administer the oath.

“I do solemnly swear that I will execute the office of the president of the United States faithfully, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, defend, and protect the Constitution of the United States. So help me God,” Trump will say.

The Marine Band will then play “Hail to the Chief” and Trump will receive a 21-gun salute.

Inauguration Speech

Trump, the 45th president of the United States by this point, will then deliver his inaugural address to the masses gathered at the Capitol. Trump’s speech, which he has been working on with his policy aide Stephen Miller, will be “short,” historian Douglas Brinkley, who met with Trump, told CNN.

Next, Rabbi Marvin Hier of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, Reverend Franklin Graham of Samaritan’s Purse and The Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, and Bishop Wayne T. Jackson of Great Faith Ministries International will wrap with readings and the benediction.

To conclude the ceremony proceedings, 16-year-old Jackie Evancho will sing the national anthem. A runner-up on the show “America’s Got Talent,” Evancho has sung at the National Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony in 2010 and at the 2015 “World Meeting of Families” held in Philadelphia, which Pope Francis attended.

After the Inauguration Ceremony

Trump and Pence are expected to attend the Congressional Lunch, a tradition since President Dwight D. Eisenhower, hosted by the JCCIC.

The day is not done — President Trump and Vice President Pence will then join the inaugural parade down Pennsylvania Avenue from the Capitol to the White House, leading the procession of over 8,000 parade participants, including veterans and active members of the military, high school and college bands, police, motorcycle and cavalry units, and the Boy Scouts of America, among others. President Jimmy Carter was the first president to walk in the inaugural parade and since then, presidents have ridden in limos and walked part of the parade route.

Steve Ray and CEO of the presidential inaugural committee Sarah Armstrong told CNN on Monday that the parade would last an hour and a half, shorter than parades of the past.

Talladega College, a historically black college in Alabama, is sending its marching band to perform in the inaugural parade, despite protests by some alumni and members of the public.

To celebrate Trump’s inauguration, there will be three official inaugural balls in Washington, D.C. The two main balls will be held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, with guests from across the country. The invitation-only Salute to Our Armed Services Ball, in honor of the military, first responders and other service personnel, takes place at the National Building Museum.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — (WASHINGTON) — At least 31 Democratic members of Congress have announced they will skip Donald Trump’s Friday inauguration. While some made their decision in previous weeks, several more have now come forward, citing the president-elect’s perceived insult of Rep. John Lewis as the final straw.

Trump lashed out at the civil rights icon after Lewis said he didn’t view Trump as “a legitimate president.” Lewis, a Georgia Democrat who protested alongside the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., also said he would not attend the inauguration.

“Congressman John Lewis should spend more time on fixing and helping his district, which is in horrible shape and falling apart (not to mention crime infested) rather than falsely complaining about the election results,” Trump tweeted Saturday morning. “All talk, talk, talk – no action or results. Sad!”

Trump’s comments have drawn outrage and messages of support for Lewis from both sides of the aisle. Rep. Yvette Clark, D-New York, said in a tweet that she would not attend the inauguration because of the comments, saying “when you insult [John Lewis], you insult America.”

I will NOT attend the inauguration of @realDonaldTrump. When you insult @repjohnlewis, you insult America.

— Yvette D. Clarke (@RepYvetteClarke) January 14, 2017

Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.), who is running to be the Democratic National Committee chair, announced on Twitter Monday he would not be attending. He said: “I will not celebrate a man who preaches a politics of division and hate. I won’t be attending Donald Trump’s inauguration.”

I will not celebrate a man who preaches a politics of division and hate. I won’t be attending Donald Trump’s inauguration.

— Rep. Keith Ellison (@keithellison) January 16, 2017

Democratic Reps. Mark Takano and Judy Chu, both of California, also tweeted they would be absent as a show of solidarity with Lewis.

“All talk, no action.”

I stand with @repjohnlewis and I will not be attending the inauguration. pic.twitter.com/z8Q0wA9OPK

— Mark Takano (@RepMarkTakano) January 14, 2017

After much thought, I have decided to #StandWithJohnLewis and not attend the inauguration.

— Judy Chu (@RepJudyChu) January 15, 2017

Also, Rep. Ted Lieu, D-Calif., wrote in a statement that “while [he does] not dispute that Trump won the Electoral College, [he] cannot normalize his behavior or the disparaging and un-American statements he has made.”

“Trump — who lost the popular vote — has made a series of racist, sexist and bigoted statements,” Lieu continued. “In addition, he has attacked Gold Star parents, veterans such as John McCain and now civil rights icon John Lewis.”

Democratic Rep. Mark Pocan of Wisconsin reflected such sentiments in a statement released Sunday morning.

“I was planning on attending the Inauguration on Friday out of respect for the office of President, while still making it back home on Saturday to attend the Women’s March in Madison,” he said. “However, after long consideration based on reading the Classified document on Russian hacking and the Trump candidacy on Thursday, the handling of his conflicts of interest, and this weekend’s offensive tweets about a national hero Rep. John Lewis, I am no longer attending the event.”

Reps. Mark DeSaulnier, D-Calif., and John Conyers, D-Mich., did not explicitly mention Lewis in their announcements, but did go public with their decisions on the day of Trump’s tweets.

Among those who decided not to attend the inauguration earlier in January, the most common reason was an aversion to “normalizing” what they see as Trump’s divisive rhetoric and agenda.

“When the new President denigrates Latinos or Mexicans or immigrants as drug-dealers and criminals, I want to be able to say I did not condone or allow that type of speech to go mainstream; That was not normalized on my watch,” Rep Luis Gutierrez, D-Illinois, said in part in a speech on the House floor. “Because the future President said the American-born children of immigrants were not capable of being American judges, I cannot sit there at his inauguration as if that is OK and I forgive him.”

Rep. Katherine Clark, D-Massachusetts, said on Twitter she didn’t believe she could “contribute to the normalization of the President-elect’s divisive rhetoric by participating in the inauguration.”

My statement on the upcoming inauguration: pic.twitter.com/dQXE0ztvTf

— Katherine Clark (@RepKClark) January 5, 2017

Several of the Congress members plan to attend the Women’s March on Washington; others said they will participate in community organizing in their home districts.

The Trump transition team did not respond to ABC News’ request for comment.

Below is the full running list of Congress members planning not to attend the inauguration:

  • Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-AZ
  • Rep. Mark DeSaulnier, D-CA
  • Rep. Ted Lieu, D-CA
  • Rep. Judy Chu, D-CA
  • Rep. Maxine Waters, D-CA
  • Rep. Mark Takano, D-CA
  • Rep. Jared Huffman, D-CA
  • Rep. Barbara Lee, D-CA
  • Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-CA
  • Rep. Frederica Wilson, D-FL
  • Rep. John Lewis, D-GA
  • Rep. Luis Gutierrez, D-IL
  • Rep. Katherine Clark, D-MA
  • Rep. John Conyers, D-MI
  • Rep. Keith Ellison, D-MN
  • Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-MO
  • Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, D-NJ
  • Rep. Adriano Espaillat, D-NY
  • Rep. Nydia Velazquez, D-NY
  • Rep. Jose Serrano, D-NY
  • Rep. Yvette Clarke, D-NY
  • Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-NY
  • Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-OH
  • Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-OR
  • Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-OR
  • Rep. Kurt Schrader, D-OR
  • Rep. Dwight Evans, D-PA
  • Rep. Steve Cohen, D-TN
  • Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-WA
  • Rep. Adam Smith, D-WA
  • Rep. Mark Pocan, D-WI

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Darren McCollester/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Donald Trump’s attack on Rep. John Lewis, a civil rights icon, this weekend has rekindled the perception among many critics that the president-elect has done little to improve his standing among black voters, who consistently gave him single-digit approval ratings during the presidential campaign.

After a Friday interview in which Lewis said Trump was not the “legitimate” president because of alleged Russian interference in the election, Trump responded on Twitter Saturday, writing that Lewis “should spend more time on fixing and helping his district, which is in horrible shape and falling apart (not to mention crime infested) rather than falsely complaining about the election results. All talk, talk, talk – no action or results. Sad!”

The Twitter posts, two days before Martin Luther King Jr. Day, prompted an outcry and renewed doubts about any Trump efforts to improve relations with African-Americans.

When asked about Trump’s appeals to black voters during the end of the campaign, for instance, civil rights activist Rev. Al Sharpton told ABC News in August that “the facts don’t speak to” Trump’s being genuine about his appeal to black voters.

“I think that the appeal is based on the assumption that black people are stupid,” Sharpton said.

Outreach as President-Elect

One of the most visible ways Trump has tried to broaden his outreach in recent weeks has been by inviting people from various communities to high-profile meetings at Trump Tower in New York City.

From international business leaders and tech giants to leading Democrats and entertainers, many of these people sat with him in private meetings before or after passing a cluster of reporters in his New York tower lobby. He has also met with a number of prominent African-Americans , including Kanye West, Steve Harvey and Martin Luther King III, whom Trump sat with this afternoon.

But after making few direct appeals to black urban voters during the campaign, Trump picked only one African-American to include in his cabinet: former foe Dr. Ben Carson, who is his selection to head the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Another high-profile staffing announcement harkens back to Trump’s reality-TV days. Omarosa Manigault, who shot to fame as part of Trump’s reality show, “The Apprentice,” was named the director of African-American outreach for the Trump campaign during the Republican National Convention in Cleveland last summer, and she will follow Trump to the White House after being offered the role of public liaison.

Talking Points From the Trail

While Trump has made some public overtures to Africa-American voters in the form of appointments and meetings, the tweets bashing Lewis appear to share a theme with some of his frequent campaign references.

Trump often equated African-American communities and “inner cities,” even though data show otherwise. From 2010 to 2014, about 39 percent of African-Americans — whether rich, middle income or poor — lived in the suburbs, and 36 percent live in cities, according to Elizabeth Kneebone, a fellow at the Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program who relied on U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey data.

The remaining 25 percent are spread across small metropolitan and rural communities, the data show.

And when Trump referenced “inner cities” in his speeches about African-Americans, he often painted a grim picture.

“We are going to rebuild our inner cities because our African-American communities are absolutely in the worst shape that they’ve ever been in before, ever, ever, ever,” Trump said at a rally in Kenansville, North Carolina, in September.

He also said, “You take a look at the inner cities, you get no education, you get no jobs, you get shot walking down the street,” which Trump echoed this weekend with references to Lewis’ congressional district, which includes both affluent and impoverished areas, as being in “horrible shape and falling apart.”

Many people took offense to the September campaign remark in particular, with President Obama out in front.

“You may have heard Hillary’s opponent in the election say that there’s never been a worse time to be a black person. He missed that whole civics lesson about slavery and Jim Crow,” Obama said in an address to the Congressional Black Caucus in September after Trump’s comment.

Trump also triggered controversy when he mentioned black youth unemployment in his stump speeches, claiming multiple times that 58 percent are out of work. His campaign has told ABC News that he based the number on 2015 Bureau of Labor Statistics data and included not only 16- to 24-year-old black Americans who were unemployed, but also those whom the federal government didn’t count in the labor force, which likely included a number of full-time students not seeking work.

Public Outreach During the Campaign

Trump made a handful of campaign stops directly aimed at African-American voters, including his first visit to a black church in Detroit in September alongside Carson where he delivered a message of unity that included a call to address economic challenges in the black community.

He then later visited another black church in Flint, Michigan, but was scolded by the pastor when he started to condemn Hillary Clinton. Trump later called the female pastor “a nervous mess.”

He declined several invitations to speak to groups such as the NAACP, the Urban League and a joint conference of the National Association of Black Journalists and National Association of Hispanic Journalists.

When asked in August about Trump’s decisions to skip those events, Manigault pointed out that the NAACP event was scheduled for the same day as the start of the RNC, so Trump “made the difficult decision” to skip the conference in favor of being in Cleveland to hear his wife, Melania Trump, address the crowd.

“Certainly he should have an opportunity to address the bodies of those organizations, but it’s not the only opportunity,” Manigault said of the declined invitations.”

Trump also held meetings with groups of African-American pastors, most of whom became part of the National Diversity Coalition for Trump.

In the end, he did get 8 percent of the African-American vote in the presidential election.

Pre-Campaign Clashes

Even before entering the political fray, Trump had public run-ins with the African-American community.

The first came in 1973, five years after he graduated from the University of Pennsylvania. Trump was deeply involved in the family’s New York City real estate business when the Justice Department filed a housing discrimination suit against Donald Trump, father Fred and their real estate management corporation.

The civil suit claimed the Trump management corporation – of which Donald Trump was president – had been “discriminating against black persons in the operation of their buildings,” according to the DOJ’s news release on the date of the filing, Oct. 15, 1973.

The Trumps “vigorously deny said allegations,” the court document states.

The agreement, which laid out the specific terms that the Trumps would have to abide by moving forward, noted that it was “in no way an admission by it of a violation of the prohibition against discrimination.”

The complaint against Fred Trump and Donald Trump was “dismissed against them in their personal capacity, with prejudice.”

Later, in 1989, Trump inserted himself in the controversial Central Park Five case, in which five minority teens were accused of brutally attacking a white woman.

Trump paid for open letters to be published in four major New York-area papers calling for the reinstatement of the death penalty in connection to the case and painting a stark picture of life in the city amid a diminished police force.

All five of the accused — four of whom are African American and one is Hispanic — made various confessions, which later came under review, and were convicted on differing combinations of charges — including rape, robbery, attempted murder, assault and riot — and served time. In 2002, the five were exonerated after an investigation by the Manhattan district attorney’s office. Another man confessed to the crime.

The Central Park Five case came up during last year’s campaign, when in October Trump reiterated his suggestion that he still believed the five were guilty.

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Monica Crowley, who was President-elect Trump’s pick for senior director of strategic communications for his National Security Council, said Monday she will not be taking a position in the Trump Administration.

“After much reflection, I have decided to remain in New York to pursue other opportunities and will not be taking a position in the incoming administration,” Crowley said in a statement provided to ABC News. “I greatly appreciate being asked to be part of President-elect Trump’s team and I will continue to enthusiastically support him and his agenda for American renewal.”

Crowley has been under intense scrutiny after reports found more than 50 instances of plagiarism in her 2012 book What The (Bleep) Just Happened, according to CNN, and her 2000 Ph.D. dissertation at Columbia University, according to Politico.

Trump announced Crowley as his pick for the post mid-December. She was previously a foreign affairs and political analyst for Fox News.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) — Americans divide evenly on whether the incoming Trump administration is complying with ethics laws. And while a bare majority in a new ABC News/Washington Post poll accepts President-elect Donald Trump’s business ownership plan, three-quarters say he should release his tax returns.

Contrary to his comment that the American public doesn’t care about the issue, four in 10 of those polled say they care “a lot” about Trump releasing his tax records.

This report is a first look at results of an extensive ABC/Post pre-inaugural poll, produced for ABC by Langer Research Associates. Results on Trump’s handling of the transition, views on his policy proposals and expectations for his presidency will be released Tuesday morning, with results Wednesday morning on President Barack Obama’s final ratings as president.

In terms of ethics, the poll finds Americans are split on whether or not Trump, his family and his advisers are complying with federal ethics laws: Forty-three percent think so, while 44 percent think not.

Partisan and ideological gaps are wide: Seventy-nine percent of Republicans say Trump is complying with ethics laws, dropping to 44 percent among independents and just 16 percent of Democrats. Similarly, it’s 72 percent among strong conservatives, slipping to 56 percent among “somewhat” conservative Americans, then plummeting to 37 percent of moderates and 25 percent of liberals.

These divisions also are evident in another measure: Among Americans who say they wanted Trump to win the presidency — 36 percent of the public — a broad 85 percent think he’s in compliance ethically. That drops to just 11 percent of those who wanted Hillary Clinton to win (39 percent of all adults) and a third of those who preferred other candidates, or none of them.

Despite criticism by some ethics officials, 52 percent overall say Trump’s plan to continue owning his businesses while placing them in a trust managed by his sons is sufficient. Forty-two percent instead say he should sell his businesses, peaking at 71 percent of Clinton supporters, vs. just 10 percent of those who favored Trump for the office.

Views on tax returns shift decidedly away from Trump’s position. Seventy-four present overall say he should release his tax returns; that includes 49 percent of his own supporters, as well as nearly all of Clinton’s (94 percent) and 83 percent of those who had another preference, or none.

The number who favor release of the documents is higher than it was in two related questions in ABC/Post polls during the election campaign. In May, 64 percent said he should release the returns, and in September, 63 percent said he was not justified in withholding them.

In one key support group for Trump, noncollege-educated white men, 58 percent say he should release the tax returns; that rises to 81 percent of college-educated white women and 88 percent of nonwhites. By another measure, 69 percent in the red states — those Trump won — say he should release these records, as do 81 percent in Clinton’s blue states.

Forty-one percent, overall, say they “care a lot” about Trump releasing the records — 47 percent in the blue states, 36 percent in the states Trump won. At a news conference last week, Trump said: “The only one that cares about my tax returns are the reporters.” As far as other Americans, he said: “I don’t think they care at all.”

Methodology

This ABC News/Washington Post poll was conducted by landline and cellular telephone Jan. 12-15, 2017, in English and Spanish, among a random national sample of 1,005 adults. Results have a margin of sampling error of 3.5 points, including the design effect. Partisan divisions are 31-23-37 percent, Democrats-Republicans-independents.

The survey was produced for ABC News by Langer Research Associates of New York, N.Y., with sampling, data collection and tabulation by Abt-SRBI of New York, N.Y. See details on the survey’s methodology here.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — At least 28 Democratic members of Congress have announced they will skip Donald Trump’s inauguration on Friday. While some made their decision in previous weeks, several have come forward Monday, citing the president-elect’s perceived insult of Rep. John Lewis as the final straw.

Trump lashed out at the civil rights icon after Lewis said he didn’t view Trump as “a legitimate president.” Lewis, a Georgia Democrat who protested alongside the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., also said he would not attend the inauguration.

“Congressman John Lewis should spend more time on fixing and helping his district, which is in horrible shape and falling apart (not to mention crime infested) rather than falsely complaining about the election results,” Trump tweeted Saturday morning. “All talk, talk, talk – no action or results. Sad!”

Trump’s comments have drawn outrage and messages of support for Lewis from both sides of the aisle. Rep. Yvette Clark, D-N.Y., said in a tweet that she would not attend the inauguration because of the comments, saying “when you insult [John Lewis], you insult America.”

Democratic Reps. Mark Takano and Judy Chu, both of California, also tweeted they would be absent as a show of solidarity with Lewis.

Also, Rep. Ted Lieu, D-Calif., wrote in a statement that “while [he does] not dispute that Trump won the Electoral College, [he] cannot normalize his behavior or the disparaging and un-American statements he has made.”

“Trump — who lost the popular vote — has made a series of racist, sexist and bigoted statements,” Lieu continued. “In addition, he has attacked Gold Star parents, veterans such as John McCain and now civil rights icon John Lewis.”

Democratic Rep. Mark Pocan of Wisconsin reflected such sentiments in a statement released Sunday morning.

“I was planning on attending the Inauguration on Friday out of respect for the office of President, while still making it back home on Saturday to attend the Women’s March in Madison,” he said. “However, after long consideration based on reading the Classified document on Russian hacking and the Trump candidacy on Thursday, the handling of his conflicts of interest, and this weekend’s offensive tweets about a national hero Rep. John Lewis, I am no longer attending the event.”

Reps. Mark DeSaulnier, D-Calif., and John Conyers, D-Mich., did not explicitly mention Lewis in their announcements, but did go public with their decisions on the day of Trump’s tweets.

Among those who made up their mind to skip earlier in January, the most common reason was an aversion to “normalizing” what they see as Trump’s divisive rhetoric and agenda.

“When the new President denigrates Latinos or Mexicans or immigrants as drug-dealers and criminals, I want to be able to say I did not condone or allow that type of speech to go mainstream; That was not normalized on my watch,” Rep Luis Gutierrez, D-Ill., said in part in a speech on the House floor. “Because the future President said the American-born children of immigrants were not capable of being American judges, I cannot sit there at his inauguration as if that is OK and I forgive him.”

Rep. Katherine Clark, D-Mass., said on Twitter she didn’t believe she could “contribute to the normalization of the President-elect’s divisive rhetoric by participating in the inauguration.”

Several of the Congress members plan to attend the Women’s March on Washington; others said they will do community organizing in their home districts.

The Trump transition team did not respond to a request for comment.

Below is the full running list of Congress members planning not to attend the inauguration:

  • Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-AZ
  • Rep. Mark DeSaulnier, D-CA
  • Rep. Ted Lieu, D-CA
  • Rep. Judy Chu, D-CA
  • Rep. Maxine Waters, D-CA
  • Rep. Mark Takano, D-CA
  • Rep. Jared Huffman, D-CA
  • Rep. Barbara Lee, D-CA
  • Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-CA
  • Rep. Frederica Wilson, D-FL
  • Rep. John Lewis, D-GA
  • Rep. Luis Gutierrez, D-IL
  • Rep. Katherine Clark, D-MA
  • Rep. John Conyers, D-MI
  • Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-MO
  • Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, D-NJ
  • Rep. Adriano Espaillat, D-NY
  • Rep. Nydia Velazquez, D-NY
  • Rep. Jose Serrano, D-NY
  • Rep. Yvette Clarke, D-NY
  • Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-NY
  • Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-OH
  • Rep. Earl Blumenauer, D-OR
  • Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-OR
  • Rep. Kurt Schrader, D-OR
  • Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-WA
  • Rep. Adam Smith, D-WA
  • Rep. Mark Pocan, D-WI

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — When you are asked to stand in for the next U.S. president, Donald Trump, it’s worth buying a new red tie.

That’s what Army Sgt. Major Greg Lowery figured when he was picked to portray the president-elect at an inauguration dress rehearsal. Lowery is a member of the Army band, as is Sara Corry who stood in for future first lady Melania Trump. The goal of the rehearsal at the U.S. Capitol is to practice the order of appearances and events so that the real inauguration goes off without a hitch.

In their roles as president and first lady, Lowery and Corry descended the U.S. Capitol steps after reviewing the troops. They then got into the “presidential limousine” — actually a silver Suburban since it’s just for practice. Then it was onto the west front of the Capitol where on Friday, the real Trump will be sworn in as the 45th President.

Although it was a little chilly during Sunday’s rehearsal, the actual inauguration on Friday is expected to be much warmer, with a high in the 50s. There is a chance of rain which would be problematic since umbrellas are not allowed at the podium during the swearing-in.

The inauguration officially begins on Thursday, Jan.19 with Vice-President-elect Mike Pence and Trump laying a wreath at Arlington National Cemetery. Later that day, there will be a concert at the Lincoln Memorial entitled “Make America Great Again! Welcome Celebration.” Gates will open at 6 a.m. on Friday for security screenings. Jackie Evancho who was a runner-up of America’s Got Talent will sing the National Anthem. The Mormon Tabernacle Choir and the Radio City Rockettes will perform as well.

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) — President-elect Donald Trump’s incoming chief of staff Reince Priebus said Rep. John Lewis’ criticism of Trump was “irresponsible” and called on President Obama to “step up” by telling Democrats to accept the election loss and stop questioning “the legitimacy of the next United States president.”

In an interview on This Week, ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos asked Priebus if the president-elect was right to pick a fight this weekend over remarks by Congressman and civil rights icon Lewis.

“John Lewis stood up in an interview and said that Donald Trump was not a ‘legitimate president,'” Priebus said, referring to an NBC interview on Friday. “That’s insanity, and it’s wrong.”

“We need folks like John Lewis and others who I think have been champions of voter rights to actually recognize the fact that Donald Trump was duly elected. He’s going to put his hand on the Bible in five days,” Priebus said.

“I think it’s incredibly disappointing — and I think it’s irresponsible — for people like [Lewis] to question the legitimacy of the next United States president,” he added. “I think putting the United States down across the world is not something a responsible person does.”

The incoming White House chief of staff added that Director of National Intelligence James Clapper has said “many, many times” there’s no evidence that Russia’s interference in the presidential election affected the outcome.

Clapper has said that the intelligence community can’t gauge how voters’ choices in the election might have been affected by the disclosure of private information stolen by hackers.

“President Obama should step up,” Priebus said. “We’ve had a great relationship with the White House, George … I think the administration can do a lot of good by telling folks that are on the Republican side of the aisle, ‘Look, we may have lost the election on the Democratic side, but it’s time to come together.'”

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