ABC News(WASHINGTON) — More than two million Americans who enrolled in health insurance through HealthCare.gov — or 1 in 4 applicants overall — could be at risk of losing their coverage or being forced to repay part of all of their subsidy because of discrepancies with their applications, according to a government document confirmed to ABC News by an administration official.

The Department of Health and Human Services says that in many cases consumers provided identity and income information that conflicts with what the government has on record. The result: Some Americans may have received greater subsidies than merited or were allowed to purchase plans when they were ineligible. HHS says it’s now “double and triple-checking” with applicants to verify their information.

“Those consumers were still able to enroll in Marketplace coverage — as provided for in the law — but, when they enrolled, they received a notice instructing them to submit a little bit more information,” CMS spokeswoman Julie Bataille explained in a blog post.

Where a consumer fails to provide the follow-up information, or reveals that they have erred, the policy will be revoked and a request for subsidy repayment will be made, Bataille said. She said the agency is scrambling to follow up with each applicant, commonly requesting copies of paystubs as proof of income or birth certificates to verify the correct spelling of a name.

“We are working with consumers every day to make sure individuals and families get the tax credits and coverage they deserve and that no one receives a benefit they shouldn’t,” HHS spokesman Aaron Albright told ABC News. “Two million consumers are not at risk of losing coverage — they simply need to work with us in good faith to provide additional information that supports their application for coverage and we are working through these cases expeditiously.”

HHS says the average family of four was asked to electronically submit 21 different pieces of information relating to identity, age, income eligibility, etc., when applying for a plan under the Affordable Care Act.

HHS says “sometimes a name or data point didn’t match up right away” due to a recently changed or lost job, for example. Officials claim the vast majority of those with discrepancies on their applications will ultimately keep the coverage they purchased.

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) — More than two million Americans who enrolled in health insurance through HealthCare.gov — or 1 in 4 applicants overall — could be at risk of losing their coverage or being forced to repay part of all of their subsidy because of discrepancies with their applications, according to a government document confirmed to ABC News by an administration official.

The Department of Health and Human Services says that in many cases consumers provided identity and income information that conflicts with what the government has on record. The result: Some Americans may have received greater subsidies than merited or were allowed to purchase plans when they were ineligible. HHS says it’s now “double and triple-checking” with applicants to verify their information.

“Those consumers were still able to enroll in Marketplace coverage — as provided for in the law — but, when they enrolled, they received a notice instructing them to submit a little bit more information,” CMS spokeswoman Julie Bataille explained in a blog post.

Where a consumer fails to provide the follow-up information, or reveals that they have erred, the policy will be revoked and a request for subsidy repayment will be made, Bataille said. She said the agency is scrambling to follow up with each applicant, commonly requesting copies of paystubs as proof of income or birth certificates to verify the correct spelling of a name.

“We are working with consumers every day to make sure individuals and families get the tax credits and coverage they deserve and that no one receives a benefit they shouldn’t,” HHS spokesman Aaron Albright told ABC News. “Two million consumers are not at risk of losing coverage — they simply need to work with us in good faith to provide additional information that supports their application for coverage and we are working through these cases expeditiously.”

HHS says the average family of four was asked to electronically submit 21 different pieces of information relating to identity, age, income eligibility, etc., when applying for a plan under the Affordable Care Act.

HHS says “sometimes a name or data point didn’t match up right away” due to a recently changed or lost job, for example. Officials claim the vast majority of those with discrepancies on their applications will ultimately keep the coverage they purchased.

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The White House(WASHINGTON) — With the scandal at the Department of Veterans Affairs still smoldering, first lady Michelle Obama on Wednesday used her megaphone to deliver an impassioned call to action on veteran homelessness, a problem she declared a “moral outrage.”

“Even one homeless veteran is a shame,” she said at an East Room event sponsored by her Joining Forces initiative. “The fact that we have 58,000 is a moral outrage. We should all do more about it.”

Mrs. Obama was launching the Mayors Challenge to End Veteran Homelessness, an effort that has drawn commitments from 77 mayors, four governors and four county officials to more aggressively reach out to homeless vets and connect them with available resources.

“Tens of thousands of veterans who risked their lives for our country are living in a shelter or sleeping near a subway vent. We should be horrified,” the first lady said, “because that’s not who we are as Americans.”

“When a veteran comes home kissing the ground, it’s unacceptable that he should sleep on it,” she said.

The White House, which in 2009 declared a goal of ending veterans homelessness by 2016, says progress is being made but not quickly enough.

Over the past four years, homelessness has declined 24 percent among veterans, studies show. Today, less than 1 percent of all American veterans are homeless. Veterans without a home make up just 12 percent of the overall homeless population in the U.S., according to the National Coalition Against Homeless Veterans.

Chris Fuentes, a 25-year-old Iraq War veteran from Philadelphia, says she is one of the success stories.

“When I returned from active duty, my apartment and job were gone. At one point I found myself living in my car, while my daughter stayed with my mother. I was all over the place, jumping from place to place. I knew that if only I could have a roof over my head everything else would fall into place,” she said.

She applied for benefits through the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the VA, she said.

“Today thanks to these programs, we have a home again,” Fuentes said. “These programs give veterans a second chance at life and allows them not to worry about where they’ll lay their head at night.”

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) — More than two million Americans who enrolled in health insurance through HealthCare.gov — or 1 in 4 applicants overall — could be at risk of losing their coverage or being forced to repay part of all of their subsidy because of discrepancies with their applications, according to a government document confirmed to ABC News by an administration official.

The Department of Health and Human Services says that in many cases consumers provided identity and income information that conflicts with what the government has on record. The result: Some Americans may have received greater subsidies than merited or were allowed to purchase plans when they were ineligible. HHS says it’s now “double and triple-checking” with applicants to verify their information.

“Those consumers were still able to enroll in Marketplace coverage — as provided for in the law — but, when they enrolled, they received a notice instructing them to submit a little bit more information,” CMS spokeswoman Julie Bataille explained in a blog post.

Where a consumer fails to provide the follow-up information, or reveals that they have erred, the policy will be revoked and a request for subsidy repayment will be made, Bataille said. She said the agency is scrambling to follow up with each applicant, commonly requesting copies of paystubs as proof of income or birth certificates to verify the correct spelling of a name.

“We are working with consumers every day to make sure individuals and families get the tax credits and coverage they deserve and that no one receives a benefit they shouldn’t,” HHS spokesman Aaron Albright told ABC News. “Two million consumers are not at risk of losing coverage — they simply need to work with us in good faith to provide additional information that supports their application for coverage and we are working through these cases expeditiously.”

HHS says the average family of four was asked to electronically submit 21 different pieces of information relating to identity, age, income eligibility, etc., when applying for a plan under the Affordable Care Act.

HHS says “sometimes a name or data point didn’t match up right away” due to a recently changed or lost job, for example. Officials claim the vast majority of those with discrepancies on their applications will ultimately keep the coverage they purchased.

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Hillary Clinton seems to have been enjoying her downtime since leaving the State Department. She takes long walks, spends time with her dog and, according to an interview in People magazine, has even been “binge-watching” the Netflix TV series, House of Cards.

But don’t be too fooled. Amid this seemingly “leisurely” schedule, Clinton has been working hard on her fourth book, Hard Choices, which will be released next week.

Clinton first announced she was embarking on the book, a memoir about her time at the State Department, in April 2013, just two months after stepping down as secretary of state.

“It was that or eating bon-bons,” Clinton joked recently.

Clinton spent the next year working on the roughly 650-page book — a laborious and sometimes amusing process, which she has recounted in appearances and interviews over the past few months.

“[I] dragged the manuscript I was working on with me everywhere I went — including on vacation,” she recalled in a video released last week by her publisher, Simon and Schuster.

Doing so was a “godsend,” Clinton said, because on one of those trips she had the idea to begin the memoir by talking about the end of her 2008 campaign and then the “unlikely journey” that led her to accept the role of secretary of state.

Most of the book, however, was written in Clinton’s home in Chappaqua, New York — specifically, in her “cozy” study on the third floor that used to be the attic of an old farmhouse.

It was up there, Clinton has said, that she “toiled away” for months, writing “barrels and barrels” of drafts by hand.

“If you did see my study at home,” she told a group of publishers in March, “you would think it was an episode from The Hoarders. The notes, the pages, the drafts…it’s amazing.”

Carolyn Reidy, one of Clinton’s editors, echoed the sentiment at the event in Midtown Manhattan: “She revises, and then revises again.”

This is not Clinton’s first literary effort. She penned It Takes a Village: and Other Lessons Children Teach Us, about her vision for children of America, in 1996, followed by An Invitation to the White House: At Home With History in 2000 and Living History, the memoir of her years as first lady, which was published in 2003. But even with three books behind her, Clinton said writing is still the hardest part of the process.

Over the past year, Clinton sought editorial advice and encouragement from close friends and family, including former President Bill Clinton, their daughter Chelsea, her editors, Reidy and Jonathan Karp, and some former staff members.

Joking about her husband’s guidance in March, she said the biggest challenge there was deciphering his handwriting.

In a letter from the publisher released by Simon & Schuster on Tuesday, Karp said that Hillary Clinton, “through multiple drafts,” addressed “every topic I raised while working on the manuscript.”

At the end of the day, however, Clinton said what ended up inside the book was up to her.

“I had a great team that I could never have done it without,” she has said. “But ultimately, I had to take responsibility for every word. I had to be the one who decided how I wanted to describe a situation … how to connect it with people here at home.”

The memoir will touch on issues ranging from “climate change to Crimea.” It also includes a 34-page chapter, reported last week by Politico, devoted entirely to the attacks in Benghazi, Libya, where Clinton offered a rebuttal to her critics.

“A light summer read,” Clinton has often joked. “Great for the beach.”

Clinton turned in her final manuscript in April 2014 — one year after she made the initial announcement a book was coming.

She told a group of women at a leadership conference in Boston at the end of last month, “I literally have just turned in my book, so if I look even more tired than usual it’s because I am.”

After debating various options for book titles — including one her favorite submitted suggestions, The Scrunchie Chronicles: 112 Countries and It’s Still All About My Hair — Clinton finally landed on Hard Choices.

“In the end,” Clinton said recently at an event in Washington, D.C., “I felt that pretty well described my experiences on the high wire of international diplomacy and what it takes to protect America, our interests and our allies in a dangerous world.”

Before embarking on a nationwide book tour this month, Clinton will sit down with ABC News anchor Diane Sawyer for her first television interview in conjunction with the release. The interview will air during a one-hour ABC News primetime special on Monday, June 9, at 9 p.m. ET.

ABC News’ Robin Roberts will follow up with Clinton’s first live interview, on Tuesday, June 10, on Good Morning America.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — In what may be the lamest bet of all time, the governors of New York and California have wagered items including brown rice cakes and a hockey puck representing a balanced budget.

The politicians made the bet this week ahead of the Stanley Cup finals that begin Wednesday night, when the New York Rangers will face off against the Los Angeles Kings.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo promised that if the Rangers lose, he’ll send a hockey puck commemorating three on-time budgets in addition to a food basket, including Buffalo chicken wing sauce.

As if that weren’t exciting enough, California Gov. Jerry Brown reciprocated by wagering a book about California and organic brown rice cakes, lightly salted.

Brown’s spokesman called the rice cakes “puck-like” in an email to The New York Times.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Admit it: You’ve probably been tempted to check your partner’s call logs or peek in his or her email inbox. Now, widely-available apps are leveraging smartphone geotracking data to make electronic espionage even easier.

But Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., is on a mission to criminalize the more egregious cases of smartphone stalking.

His Location and Privacy Act of 2014, set for a hearing Wednesday, would ban so-called “stalking apps” that allow predators to hijack a phone’s geo-location data and track a victim’s movements.

In a video release, Franken recalled a domestic abuse victim who traveled to the courthouse to get a restraining order, only to receive a frightening text from her abuser, confronting her about her whereabouts.

The man, Franken said, had apparently installed geotracking software on her phone and was monitoring her movements in real time.

If his bill passes, not only the abuser, but the app developer would be liable.

Stalking victims aren’t the only people who would benefit from Franken’s bill.

It would also require companies that aggregate GPS tracking data including the popular dating app Tinder, which Franken calls out specifically — to obtain a user’s permission before they share that information.

“The companies that make the software on your phone, including apps, can access extremely sensitive location data that reveals…the church you attend and the doctors you visit,” Franken said in a statement. “I believe Americans have the right to control…that information. But right now, companies — some legitimate, some not — are collecting your location and giving it to whatever you choose. ”

It would also require companies that collect GPS tracking data from more than 1,000 devices to outline the kinds of data they collect online, as well as a way to stop that collection.

The bill, which specifically exempts parents tracking their children or emergency responders reacting to unfolding crises, is the second iteration of a bill that the senator first introduced in 2012.

Unlike the 2012 version, the current bill does not require companies to disclose specific purchasers of geographic information, but does mandate that they specify “categories” of companies buying that data. It also places a $1 million limit on damages for negligent violations.

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Iowa Legislature(DES MOINES, Iowa) — Joni Ernst, the hog-castrating, Harley Davidson-riding Iowa state senator who burst onto the national scene with a series of provocative television ads, clinched the Republican nomination for Iowa’s Senate seat in a decisive victory over a crowded field of opponents.

She will now challenge the de facto Democratic nominee Rep. Bruce Braley in the general election. If she were to win in November, in what’s expected to be a highly competitive race, she would become the first female senator from the Hawkeye state.

Ernst, a lieutenant colonel in the Iowa Army National Guard who served in Iraq and Kuwait during Operation Iraqi Freedom, set herself apart from her opponents in March with the release of her first TV ad, aptly titled “Squeal.”

In the ad, Ernst says through a smile, “I grew up castrating hogs on an Iowa farm. So when I get to Washington, I’ll know how to cut pork.”

The race opened up in January when five-term Democratic stalwart Sen. Tom Harkin announced he would not seek re-election, immediately presenting Republicans an opportunity to nab an otherwise noncompetitive seat. The field quickly flooded with potential candidates, but ultimately narrowed down to five — Ernst, former energy executive Mark Jacobs, Rick Perry-supported attorney Matt Whitaker, Rick Santorum-backed radio host Sam Clovis and car salesman Scott Schaben.

But after releasing her first ad, Ernst has enjoyed a wave of momentum, putting out another provocative ad, this time showing her riding a Harley Davidson motorcycle and taking aim at wasteful spending and Obamacare with her handgun.

Ernst’s momentum and broad appeal has attracted a wide coalition of disparate factions of the Republican Party. She has received the backing of GOP establishment figures like Mitt Romney and groups like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, while also collecting endorsements from former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin and the tea-party group Senate Conservatives Action.

On top of this, Sen. Marco Rubio announced he was backing Ernst in May, deciding to make his first endorsement in the early presidential voting state. Rubio traveled to Des Moines on Monday, stumping with Ernst on the eve of the primary election.

Ernst’s ascendance as the clear Republican choice for the nomination places her in a more competitive position heading into the November general election against four-term Rep. Bruce Braley. Braley, however, has been enjoying the perks of running unopposed in the primary — he will go into the general election with $2.3 million to Ernst’s $100,000.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — With the recent release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl from Taliban captivity after nearly five years — in exchange for five mid-to high-level Afghan Taliban figures — criticism immediately emerged questioning not only how the deal suddenly came about but also whether dealing with the Taliban could set a dangerous precedent for U.S. national security.

“This is a complete change of our national security strategy of not negotiating with terrorists,” Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Michigan, told ABC News on Monday. “I think it sends a terrible national security message — not just to Afghanistan, but to the rest of the world.”

But did President Obama’s White House, through the Qatari government which brokered the deal, negotiate with terrorists, as suggested by Rogers and a number of high-profile Republicans?

When asked Monday if the White House considered the Taliban terrorists, Press Secretary Jay Carney dodged.

“We don’t get to choose our enemies when we go to war,” Carney told reporters. “We regard the Taliban as an enemy combatant in a conflict that has been going on, in which the United States has been involved for more than a decade. In this case — as you know we dealt with the Qataris in order to secure [Bergdahl's] release — it was absolutely the right thing to do.”

But Tuesday, White House National Security Council spokesperson Caitlin Hayden noted that the Taliban was added to the list of Specially Designated Global Terrorists by executive order in July 2002, even if it is not listed as a Foreign Terrorist Organization (FTO) by the State Department. Either designation triggers asset freezes, according to the State Department, though they can differ on other restrictions imposed on the target organization.

The U.S. is offering $10 million for information leading to the capture of the Taliban’s leader, Mullah Omar, through the State Department’s Rewards for Justice program, an effort designed to “fight against international terrorism.” The National Counterterrorism Center also lists “Taliban Presence in Afghanistan” on its global map of “Terrorist Groups.”

Though the State Department has not designated the Afghan Taliban as an FTO, it has designated the group’s sister network, the Pakistani Taliban, as well as the Haqqani Network, a group closely associated with the Taliban that was believed to have been actually holding Bergdahl for most of his captivity. Hayden told ABC News the U.S. “did not negotiate with the Haqqanis” for Bergdahl.

Rather than arguing the status of the Taliban, however, the administration has launched a coordinated effort to characterize Bergdahl as a prisoner of war, rather than a hostage.

“Sgt. Bergdahl was not a hostage, he was a member of the military who was detained during the course of an armed conflict,” Hayden said. “The United States does not leave a soldier behind based on the identity of the party to the conflict…It was a prisoner exchange. We’ve always done that across many wars. With the Germans. The Japanese. The North Koreans.”

As President Obama put it earlier Tuesday, “This is what happens at the end of wars.”

The logic hasn’t convinced some of the president’s biggest critics across the aisle.

On Tuesday, Speaker of the House John Boehner, R-Ohio, called on the administration not only to clarify how the deal went down, without Congressional approval, but to show “what steps the president has taken to guarantee this exchange is not a signal that it is open season on our fellow citizens, both military and civilian personnel, serving our country abroad.”

“We must all be mindful that the United States has diplomatic, civilian and military personnel deployed in other countries with both challenging security environments and active terrorist networks interested in targeting not just our facilities but our people,” Boehner wrote in a statement. “One of their greatest protections — knowing that the United States does not negotiate with terrorists — has been compromised.”

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Brendan Smialowski//AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Hillary Clinton’s memoir Hard Choices isn’t even out yet and already groups on the right and left are engaged in hand-to-hand political combat between Clinton, the book, and each other.

On Monday, the conservative research group, America Rising announced the launch of an e-book to be released next week in tandem with Clinton’s Hard Choices, titled Failed Choices: A Critique of the Clinton State Department. Like Clinton’s memoir, the e-book will have an entire chapter dedicated to the events in Benghazi.

Meanwhile, the pro-Hillary Clinton Democratic opposition group, Correct the Record, has been busy disseminating talking points to surrogates based on anticipated attacks from the right.

While Clinton is not yet a presidential candidate, political opposition groups are heading in to the launch of her book about her time at the State Department acting as though she is.

An indication of how intensely — and politically — the book will be scrutinized occurred last week when Politico released Clinton’s chapter on Benghazi. The excerpt triggered days of headlines and partisan debate. “Political candidates, when they talk about their record, get challenged,” Tim Miller, the Executive Director of America Rising, the group leading the charge against Hillary Clinton, told ABC News.

With next week’s release date quickly approaching, the political opposition groups on both sides of the aisle are ready to pounce: as one group aims to bring Clinton down, another group is armed and ready to challenge with a defense.

America Rising, the conservative research group, founded roughly one year ago by former Mitt Romney campaign manager Matt Rhoades and former RNC research director Joe Pounder, has been preparing for Clinton’s book essentially since the group’s inception.

In total, America Rising has a staff of 60 people: 40 are based in their Washington, DC offices and 20 are researchers fanned out across the country. Of the 60-person staff, Miller says a “substantial team” is focused on Clinton’s book, including one researcher based in Little Rock, Arkansas devoted specifically to digging up old Clinton archives. The group also has a “war room” that serves as a media monitoring operation, where the team can take in recent Clinton appearances as well as go through old videos.

Miller, who had been reading up about Clinton’s policies in Burma the day of this interview, says America Rising will focus their attacks around Hard Choices on defining Clinton’s “failures” — something, he believes, will be “more tangible for voters.” In addition, they’ll scrutinize how she positions herself for or against the President’s foreign policies, which could have more lasting impacts should she embark on a 2016 campaign.

Led by some of Clinton’s former advisers and top donors, Correct the Record was launched over six months ago by the Democratic Super PAC American Bridge, and is geared almost entirely towards supporting and defending Hillary Clinton.

Like America Rising, the research group is prepared for the fight.

“All hands will be on deck,” Adrienne Elrod, the group’s Communications Director and former Clinton aide, told ABC News in regards to the group’s book release plan, which also includes a rapid-response war room. “But it’s not rocket science to figure out what the republicans are going to attack her on,” Elrod quipped.

According to memos shared with ABC News, the group has looked at claims already being bandied about by the Republican opposition researchers, and sent extensive counterarguments to surrogates.

“Shame on America Rising for its false attacks and politicization of a tragedy” one message says about the group’s response to Clinton’s Benghazi chapter. Correct the Record’s robust memos then lay out the “False Attack” followed by a series of “Facts,” which link to newspaper clips, government documents, and transcripts of Clinton’s Benghazi testimony.

In addition to America Rising, Correct the Record is also fielding attacks from other Republican groups, including the conservative magazine, The Weekly Standard, and the Republican National Committee, which published an anti-Hillary video last month titled, “Bad Choices.”

Not to be lost in the battle between the political operative groups is the Clinton team itself.
According to Politico, the Clinton camp has established an “Ops Center” to streamline their messaging around Hard Choices. They’ve emailed surrogates to make sure they are all “in sync” as the book is launched. And they’ve even brought on former National Security Council spokesman and longtime President Barack Obama hand Tommy Vietor to assist in the response.

In addition, Hillary Clinton, will have ample time to tell her side of the story.

Following the launch of Hard Choices next week, Clinton will embark on a nationwide book tour and media blitz, including a primetime interview with ABC News Anchor Diane Sawyer on June 9 at 9 p.m. ET, followed by a live sit-down interview the next day with ABC News’ Robin Roberts on Good Morning America.

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