Alex Wong/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Mitt Romney says that President Obama will give amnesty to all undocumented immigrants during the lame-duck session of Congress.

The 2012 GOP presidential nominee, who hasn’t entirely ruled out another run in 2016, told Fox News Sunday that “we all know where the president in heading after the elections” in regards to a possible executive order that would allow immigrants who crossed the border illegally to continue living in the U.S. without fear of being jailed or deported.

Romney would not predict a possible Republican takeover of the Senate but did say the midterm elections would change the dynamics of Congress.

Whatever happens Tuesday, irrespective of an executive action by Obama, will still produce comprehensive immigration legislation that the president will sign, according to Romney.

With polls across the nation showing Republicans making significant gains, Romney said the election will wind up being a referendum on Obama’s time in office.

The former Massachusetts governor said that voters will cast their votes to show their disapproval of the Affordable Care Act as well as what he termed lax security at the southern U.S. border, a still weak economy and failure to improve public education.

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Despite gloomy polling forecasts, Democratic National Committee Chair Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., maintained Sunday on This Week that her party would retain control of the Senate in Tuesday’s midterm elections, saying the Democratic Party’s ground game would make the difference.

“I think we’re going to hold the Senate. And the reason that we’re going to hold the Senate, George, is because we have a ground game that I know [Republican National Committee chair Reince Priebus] would take ours over theirs any day of the week,” Wasserman Schultz told This Week anchor George Stephanopoulos.

Many predictive models, including that of Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight, suggest that Republicans will take hold of the currently Democratic-controlled Senate, picking up the six seats they need to hold a majority in the upper chamber of Congress.

Priebus, also appearing on This Week, said he would be disappointed if the GOP was not able to gain control of the Senate, and countered that the ground game of his party is “whipping” that of Democrats.

“Well, the problem they [Democrats] have is that their message isn’t working and we’re — they’re — our ground game is whipping their ground game,” Priebus said.

“I think we have to take the Senate. Yes, I would be very disappointed,” he added when asked if the GOP not taking the Senate would be considered a failure.

The RNC chair also shrugged off comments by possible 2016 White House contender Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., who said this week that the GOP brand “sucks” when it comes to minority outreach.

“What he said is that we’re actually on the right track and actually we’re doing a lot of the things that we should be doing, which is engaging Hispanic voters, black voters, Asian voters. Talking to women across the country, not just for four months before an election, but for four years,” Priebus said. “The things I’d been talking about, and by the way, leading the way on in our party for the last two years.”

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Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) — Favorable views of Barack Obama and the sense that he understands the problems of average Americans both have dropped to career lows in the latest ABC News/Washington Post poll, two more unwelcome results for the president’s party near the eve of the midterm elections.

Just 44 percent now see the president favorably, a basic measure of personal popularity – compared with 49 percent in late January and 60 percent at the start of his second term. Half of all adults see him unfavorably, as do 53 percent of likely voters.

See PDF with full results, charts and tables here.

Additionally, a career-low 46 percent say Obama understands the problems of people like them, with similar numbers on the strength of his leadership (rated positively by 46 percent), managerial skills (45 percent) and the extent to which he can be trusted in a crisis (49 percent).

Obama’s lack of popularity has cast a shadow over his party as it tries to hang on to its majority in the Senate. His job approval rating hit a career-low 40 percent in an ABC/Post poll in mid-October, and was 43 percent last week. Historically, presidential approval correlates highly with midterm losses for an incumbent president’s party.

It could be worse for the president in this poll, produced for ABC by Langer Research Associates. While his favorability rating has slipped by five points this year, the number who see him unfavorably has held steady, at 50 percent. More instead are undecided or have no opinion.

Obama’s ratings on individual attributes are similar among likely voters – off his scores among the general public by 2 to 6 points. Just four in 10 think he’s a strong leader or good manager; 45 percent trust him in a crisis and 44 percent say he understands their problems.

Current crises from ISIS to the Ebola virus may further test views of the president’s leadership and management. And his weakness on understanding Americans’ problems may be a particular challenge not just for his party but for the remainder of his presidency; empathy is the cartilage that can give a president some cushioning in tough times. It also was an essential element of his re-election in 2012.

GROUPS – The largest decline in Obama’s overall favorability rating this year has occurred among Hispanics, down 19 points, perhaps reflecting his decision to delay executive action on immigration reform until after the midterms. Seven in 10 Hispanics viewed Obama favorably in January, compared with half now. Four in 10 saw him “strongly” favorably, vs. 15 percent now.

For comparison, Obama’s favorability rating is 85 percent among blacks – down 9 points this year – and just 34 percent among whites, essentially unchanged.

Among partisan and ideological groups, his favorability ranges from eight in 10 Democrats to half of moderates and four in 10 independents, and bottoms out at 13 percent of Republicans and strong conservatives.

The president’s rating is tied to views of the economy, the top issue for Americans in the midterms. Among those who say the economy is excellent or good, eight in 10 view Obama favorably, vs. 44 percent of those who say it’s “not so good” and just 12 percent who say it’s in poor shape.

There are similar partisan and ideological divisions on the other characteristics tested in this survey. Among others, nine in 10 or more blacks say each of the positive attributes applies to Obama, vs. about half of Hispanics and four in 10 or fewer whites. And younger adults tend to have more positive views of Obama; it declines among middle-aged adults and falls even lower among seniors.

Women – who are more apt to be Democrats – are more likely than men to say Obama understands people like them and he can be trusted in a crisis. And people with incomes less than $50,000 per year are more likely than their counterparts to see Obama as a strong leader, a good manager and trustworthy in a crisis.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The Department of Homeland Security has completed its internal probe into how a man with a small knife in his pocket was able to jump the perimeter fence and make it deep into the White House in mid-September, and many of the probe’s findings are “not good,” sources with knowledge of the probe separately told ABC News.

The probe, led by DHS Deputy Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas and the department’s general counsel, was detailed in a report delivered Saturday to DHS Secretary Johnson, who will review the report over the coming days and decide on next steps. At least one agent could lose his job.

The report lays out how multiple layers of security failed, noting in particular why a Secret Service agent assigned to the White House lawn never released a trained canine after the intruder breached the perimeter fence.

Sources wouldn’t offer any details or other information about the report, which has yet to be released publicly.

Nevertheless, to protect the White House, there is an established system incorporating foot patrols, vehicle patrols, bike patrols, surveillance systems, and canine units, and, “They all have to be working as one,” a person familiar with Secret Service procedures recently told ABC News.

On Sept. 19, 42-year-old Omar Gonzalez allegedly scaled the White House fence and ran toward the building’s front doors, which were unlocked.

Though Secret Service agents on the property could not reach him in time to stop him, no dogs were released and no agent made the decision to fire his weapon.

To use such lethal force, according to federal law, agents must “ensure” that they or others “are in imminent danger,” then-Secret Service Director Julia Pearson told lawmakers in September, the day before she stepped down from her post.

Agents “use[d] restraint in making a very difficult decision” not to fire their weapons, she insisted.

Once Gonzalez allegedly made his way to the White House doors, which were unlocked, he “knocked back the officer that was standing at the doorway and ran deep into the White House,” Pierson testified.

But the failures and missed opportunities that ultimately led to the White House breach began months earlier.

In July, Virginia State Police notified Secret Service that they had stopped a man, Gonzalez, who was carrying possible weapons and a map with a line drawn to the White House and other Washington landmarks.

The Secret Service then conducted “a very thorough” interview of him, in which he said the map was intended for sightseeing, and that he was a veteran suffering from mental illness but had no intent to harm anyone, according to Pierson’s testimony.

Interviews with his family also suggested he was not inclined toward violence.

The next month, he was allegedly found outside the White House fence carrying a hatchet. Secret Service agents interviewed him again and ran his name through a database, which flagged the incident a month earlier, but they decided he didn’t pose a threat after he told agents the hatchet was from a recent camping trip and they found camping equipment in his car.

“Mr. Gonzalez had not violated any laws, and he had to be released,” Pierson testified.

Days after the White House intrusion in September, Secretary Johnson announced he had tasked Mayorkas with conducting a review of the whole matter, and he promised a report would be completed by Nov. 1.

“The report has been submitted to Secretary Johnson,” a DHS statement said today. “More information will be forthcoming.”

Last month, only weeks after Gonzalez’s alleged intrusion, a 23-year-old Maryland man, Dominic Adesanya, allegedly jumped the White House fence. But in that nighttime incident, Secret Service agents and dogs tackled him almost immediately.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest called it a “perfect example” of how the security protocols at the White House are supposed to work.

“Everyone knew their responsibility and executed a pre-existing plan,” he said.

However, he said “it’s possible” changes could be made to the fence, depending on what the DHS internal probe finds.

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Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) — Favorable views of Barack Obama and the sense that he understands the problems of average Americans both have dropped to career lows in the latest ABC News/Washington Post poll, two more unwelcome results for the president’s party near the eve of the midterm elections.

Just 44 percent now see the president favorably, a basic measure of personal popularity – compared with 49 percent in late January and 60 percent at the start of his second term. Half of all adults see him unfavorably, as do 53 percent of likely voters.

See PDF with full results, charts and tables here.

Additionally, a career-low 46 percent say Obama understands the problems of people like them, with similar numbers on the strength of his leadership (rated positively by 46 percent), managerial skills (45 percent) and the extent to which he can be trusted in a crisis (49 percent).

Obama’s lack of popularity has cast a shadow over his party as it tries to hang on to its majority in the Senate. His job approval rating hit a career-low 40 percent in an ABC/Post poll in mid-October, and was 43 percent last week. Historically, presidential approval correlates highly with midterm losses for an incumbent president’s party.

It could be worse for the president in this poll, produced for ABC by Langer Research Associates. While his favorability rating has slipped by five points this year, the number who see him unfavorably has held steady, at 50 percent. More instead are undecided or have no opinion.

Obama’s ratings on individual attributes are similar among likely voters – off his scores among the general public by 2 to 6 points. Just four in 10 think he’s a strong leader or good manager; 45 percent trust him in a crisis and 44 percent say he understands their problems.

Current crises from ISIS to the Ebola virus may further test views of the president’s leadership and management. And his weakness on understanding Americans’ problems may be a particular challenge not just for his party but for the remainder of his presidency; empathy is the cartilage that can give a president some cushioning in tough times. It also was an essential element of his re-election in 2012.

GROUPS – The largest decline in Obama’s overall favorability rating this year has occurred among Hispanics, down 19 points, perhaps reflecting his decision to delay executive action on immigration reform until after the midterms. Seven in 10 Hispanics viewed Obama favorably in January, compared with half now. Four in 10 saw him “strongly” favorably, vs. 15 percent now.

For comparison, Obama’s favorability rating is 85 percent among blacks – down 9 points this year – and just 34 percent among whites, essentially unchanged.

Among partisan and ideological groups, his favorability ranges from eight in 10 Democrats to half of moderates and four in 10 independents, and bottoms out at 13 percent of Republicans and strong conservatives.

The president’s rating is tied to views of the economy, the top issue for Americans in the midterms. Among those who say the economy is excellent or good, eight in 10 view Obama favorably, vs. 44 percent of those who say it’s “not so good” and just 12 percent who say it’s in poor shape.

There are similar partisan and ideological divisions on the other characteristics tested in this survey. Among others, nine in 10 or more blacks say each of the positive attributes applies to Obama, vs. about half of Hispanics and four in 10 or fewer whites. And younger adults tend to have more positive views of Obama; it declines among middle-aged adults and falls even lower among seniors.

Women – who are more apt to be Democrats – are more likely than men to say Obama understands people like them and he can be trusted in a crisis. And people with incomes less than $50,000 per year are more likely than their counterparts to see Obama as a strong leader, a good manager and trustworthy in a crisis.

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ABC News(DETROIT) — Mired in low approval numbers, President Obama has shied away from campaigning for Democratic candidates before the midterms, but when he spoke at a rally Saturday evening in Michigan, the president made a forceful case for his signature health law.

“I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but Obamacare works,” the president said.

Criticized by Republicans as an overreaching law that was rolled out ineptly, the Affordable Care Act eventually supplied health coverage to 8 million Americans who signed up for 2014 plans on Obamacare-created exchanges

The law faces a critical test this month, as the 2015 open-enrollment period begins Nov. 15 for health plans on the exchanges.

Obama urged Michiganders to vote for Democratic Senate candidate Gary Peters and gubernatorial candidate Mark Schauer, telling an energetic crowd that Republicans aren’t on their side.

“They don’t have an agenda for the middle class. They don’t have an agenda for Detroit. They don’t have an agenda for Michigan,” Obama said.

Before Saturday, Obama had visited Maryland to campaign for gubernatorial candidate Anthony Brown, Illinois for Gov. Pat Quinn, Wisconsin for gubernatorial candidate Mary Burke, Maine for gubernatorial candidate Mike Michaud.

He is scheduled to head back out on the trail Sunday in Connecticut.

Saturday’s appearance was Obama’s first with a Democratic Senate candidate.

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PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Walk over to a plaza near the State Department on a Friday afternoon and you’re likely to see a group of Foggy Bottom employees dressed in an assortment of sweats and office wear, boogying down in a line dance formation while music blares through a portable PA system.

It’s a weekly workout session convened by Gary E. Bolden, a health and wellness coordinator who works in the Office of Medical Services at the State Department and who tells ABC News that his program is geared toward getting employees up and moving.

The upshot: They will be more productive once they get back to their desks, he says.

So, on Halloween Friday, Bolden was dressed in a full cowboy getup as he led about 20 employees through the steps. And there were even some officials who dressed up, one in a doctor’s outfit and another with some pink ears popping up behind her head.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — From Rick Scott’s #fangate to Mary Landrieu’s “wobble,” this campaign season has yielded some viral gems.

Here are some of Election 2014’s most memorable moments:

10. “Mark Uterus”

Democratic Sen. Mark Udall, running for reelection against Republican Rep. Cory Gardner, really, really cares about women’s issues.

On the stump, he’s discussed contraception and abortion so much that critics dubbed him “Mark Uterus.”

Denver Post
reporter Lynn Bartels even joked that “if Colorado’s U.S. Senate race were a movie, the set would be a gynecologist’s office, complete with an exam table and a set of stirrups.”

“Reproductive rights are important to millions of Coloradans,” Udall commented. “We’ve waged this campaign on a lot of other issues … immigration reform… energy… the economy … If you look at the traffic in my campaign, over half of our ads have discussed those kind of topics.”

9. Call the Lawyer

Democrat Bruce Braley, who’s competing against Republican Joni Ernst for retiring Sen. Tom Harkin’s open seat in Iowa, basically dissed farmers in a video leaked online in March.

“You might have a farmer from Iowa who never went to law school, never practiced law, serving as the next chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee,” he scoffed.

If Republicans take over the Senate, the senior senator from Iowa, Republican Chuck Grassley, could become the next Senate Judiciary Committee Chair.

Many of the state’s agricultural workers weren’t pleased.

Braley later apologized to Grassley “ and anyone I may have offended,” but not before critics had begun to draw parallels between his gaffe and Mitt Romney’s “47 percent” remark.

8. Bruce Who?

Michelle Obama may have called Braley her “friend,” but she couldn’t quite remember his name.

The first lady mistakenly referred to Braley as “Bruce Bailey” seven times.

“I’m losing it,” she quipped when supporters finally corrected her.

(Bill Clinton also got Braley’s name wrong.)

7. How to (Not) Play Nice.

When the moderators of a Kansas Senate debate asked the candidates to say something nice about their opponent, Independent Greg Orman thanked Pat Roberts for his service in the Marines and called the senator “a gentleman with a great sense of humor.”

Robert’s compliment was not quite as complimentary.

“I would say that you are a very well dressed opponent. I admire your accumulation of wealth. I have a little question about how you got there from here, but I think it’s the American dream, “ he said.

6. Where is Brown Running?

Former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown, now vying for incumbent Sen. Jeanne Shaheen’s seat in New Hampshire, has been called a carpetbagger.

He didn’t exactly help himself with this comment:

“They’re thankful that I’ve been around for a year, helping them … raise awareness as to the issues that are affecting not only people here in Massachuse—uh, in New Hampshire – but also in Massachusetts, obviously, and in Maine.”

Brown does have New Hampshire roots as he has pointed out, he was born in Kittery, N.H.

5. Swamp Romp

Sen. Mary Landrieu, fighting to hold onto her seat in Louisiana, did the wobble at a tailgate party.

4. Vote for Obama?

Mitch McConnell’s Democratic challenger Alison Lundergan Grimes respects the “sanctity of the ballot box“ – like a lot.

Citing her “constitutional right for privacy” and her responsibilities as a Kentucky’s chief elections officer, Grimes refused three times to say whether she had voted for Obama, a president who’s been pretty unpopular lately on the stump.

3. Obama on the Ballot

Republicans immediately pounced after Obama announced that his policies were on the ballot.

“I am not on the ballot this fall … Michelle’s pretty happy about that,” Obama said during a speech to business students at Northwestern University. “But make no mistake, these policies are on the ballot — every single one of them.”

Republicans repeatedly quoted Obama in ads and debates that his policies were on the ballot.

2. Fangate

Charlie Crist’s aversion to sweating in public spurred what moderators called an “extremely peculiar situation” at the Florida governor’s debate.

We’ll let moderator Eliott Rodriguez explain:

“Governor Crist has asked to have a fan, a small fan, placed underneath his podium. The rules of the debate that I was shown by the Scott campaign say that there should be no fan. Somehow there is a fan there and for that reason, I am being told that Governor Scott will not join us for this debate.”

Scott, a Republican, eventually made it on stage eight minutes later.

1. Squeal

Joni Ernst’s ad, Squeal, touts her experience “castrating hogs on an Iowa farm.”

Complete with barnyard sound effects, the $9,000 ad buy helped transform a little-known state senator lagging in the polls into a ballsy (excuse the metaphor), take-charge candidate who promised to “cut pork” in Washington.

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US Senate(WASHINGTON) — Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell gave the weekly Republican address this week, urging American voters to elect his fellow Republicans.

“A new Republican majority wouldn’t mean we’d be able to get everything you want from Washington,” McConnell admitted, “but it would mean we’d be able to bring the current legislative gridlock to a merciful end.”

Calling it “time for the President to start doing the job he was elected to do,” the Kentucky Senator criticized the Democrats for problems ranging from unemployment to stagnant wages and from Obamacare to the “War on Coal.” McConnell said he believes that the Republican party can work with President Obama to get “solid pro-middle class ideas…signed into law.”

Read the full transcript of the GOP address:

“Hello, I’m Senator Mitch McConnell from Kentucky.

“The promise of every generation is to leave a better country to the one that follows.

“Through war and strife, we’ve long kept that charge. It’s one of the most remarkable things about our country.

“And yet, this long-standing commitment has never seemed more under threat.

“Millions of our neighbors remain out of work. Those who do have jobs worry constantly about the future.

“Costs always seem to go up, but wages and opportunities never seem to keep pace. Even the President admits that wages and incomes have been stagnant during his time in the White House.

“Working moms and dads can find it almost impossible to balance the demands of work with the needs of a family.

“And events seem to keep spinning out of control, whether at home or abroad, with no one in the Administration possessing a real handle on what to do next.

“In difficult times, the American people expect real leadership from Washington. What they don’t need are more unworkable ideas that often make the problem worse.

“…they don’t need a health law that cancels policies and too often makes health care even less affordable for you and your family…

“…they don’t need a failed ‘stimulus’ that plunged us a trillion dollars deeper into debt…

“…and they don’t need an ideological War on Coal that threatens not to meaningfully improve the environment, but rather to increase the squeeze on middle-class families and struggling miners.

“It’s no wonder that nearly 7 in 10 Americans believe our country is headed seriously off track, or that so many in the middle class see a government in Washington that works for itself, and not for them.

“The fact is, President Obama and his Democratic Party have held power in Washington for almost six years now. And for a long time they were able to enact nearly anything they wanted.

“Obamacare. The stimulus. Higher taxes. More complex regulations. Record levels of debt.

“They got the chance to pass nearly everything their ideology would allow. But six years on, their policies haven’t gotten the country moving again. And it’s clear that more of the same isn’t going to work. This unfortunate reality has caused Democrats to abandon trying to fix the economy in order to focus almost exclusively on protecting their control of Congress – seemingly at any cost.

“That’s why the Democratic majority blocks nearly every common-sense idea – including reforms and jobs bills that enjoy significant, sometimes overwhelming, bipartisan support – they block it from even coming to a vote. Their aim is to protect the President from having to make politically difficult decisions about whether to sign or veto bipartisan legislation – legislation that might excite one segment of the Democratic Party but infuriate another.

“Well, we think it’s time for the President to start doing the job he was elected to do.

“He should worry less about massaging egos in his party and worry more about healing our country.

“And if the American people choose to send a Republican majority to Congress this election, we can finally help ensure that he does.

“A new Republican majority wouldn’t mean we’d be able to get everything you want from Washington. But it would mean we’d be able to bring the current legislative gridlock to a merciful end. It means we’d be able to start sending bills to the President’s desk again, just as the American people expect.

“Under a new majority, our focus would be on passing legislation that improves the economy, that makes it easier for Americans to find jobs, and that helps restore Americans’ confidence in their country and their government.

“We want to ease the squeeze on working families. We want to improve economic opportunity. We want to make it easier for families to join the Middle Class. We want to increase career prospects for college graduates.

“A new Republican majority would work toward ensuring those kinds of policies start getting a vote instead of succumbing to the current gridlock. If our friends on the other side have a common-sense idea, we want to hear that as well.

“We’re aiming for common-sense solutions, not large or complex bills no one reads and few understand. We want to engage members from both parties in the legislative process, to get our democracy working again the way it was designed.

“Already there are bills everyone knows would pass Congress with bipartisan support, if only a vote were allowed. That’s why Democrats haven’t allowed those votes to happen. But we will.

“There are other good policies that might not pass with as broad a majority, but that still deserve Congress’ attention. We’ll fight for those as well.

“I think we’ll be able to work with the President to ensure solid, pro-middle class ideas are signed into law.

“He may also veto some of what we pass.

“But that’s okay. We believe it’s better to let the representatives of the people have their say and vote, even if the President disagrees with the policy. That’s far preferable to the Democratic majority’s policy of blocking bills from both sides of the aisle and shutting down debate.

“Our view is that Congress shouldn’t be in the business of protecting the President from good ideas. We think Congress should be in the business of getting good ideas to his desk instead – ideas that can help ensure the next generation enjoys just as many opportunities as we have had.

“That’s our charge. And that’s our focus. Thank you.”

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Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) — President Obama, in his weekly address, highlighted recent improvement in the economy, but expressed concern that “the gains of a growing economy aren’t yet felt by everyone.”

Continuing his call for an increased minimum wage, Obama discussed the ways in which the government can help American women and working-class families get ahead. He notes, in his address, that women make up nearly half of the workforce, and that they deserve “fair pay.”

“Even though it’s 2014, there are women still earning less than men for doing the same work. We don’t hyave second-class citizens in this country — we shouldn’t in the workplace, either,” the president said. He highlighted the need for fair treatment for pregnant workers, increased access to family leave, and increases in minimum wage. After all, he notes, “most low-wage workers are women.”

He calls the proposed policies “common sense” and “within our reach,” and calls on American voters “to speak up and choose them.”

Read the full transcript of the president’s address:

Hi, everybody. On Friday, I had a discussion with working women in Rhode Island about the economic challenges they face in their own lives – challenges shared by many of you.

Thanks to the work we’ve all put in, our economy has come a long way these past six years. Over the past 55 months, our businesses have added 10.3 million new jobs. For the first time in six years, the unemployment rate is below 6 percent. And on Thursday, we learned that over the past six months, our economy has grown at its fastest pace since 2003.

But the gains of a growing economy aren’t yet felt by everyone. So we’ve got to harness this momentum, and make the right choices so that everyone who works hard can get ahead.

In recent weeks, I’ve talked about these choices, from raising the minimum wage to creating new jobs in construction and manufacturing. Today, I want to focus on what I discussed with those women – the choices we need to make to help more women get ahead in today’s economy.

Right now, women make up almost half of our workers. More women are their family’s main breadwinner than ever before. So the simple truth is, when women succeed, America succeeds. And we should be choosing policies that benefit women – because that benefits all of us.

Women deserve fair pay. Even though it’s 2014, there are women still earning less than men for doing the same work. We don’t have second-class citizens in this country – we shouldn’t in the workplace, either. So let’s make sure women earn equal pay for equal work, and have a fair shot at success.

Women deserve to be able to take time off to care for a new baby, an ailing parent, or take a sick day for themselves without running into hardship. So let’s make sure all Americans have access to paid family leave.

Pregnant workers deserve to be treated fairly. Even today, women can be fired for taking too many bathroom breaks, or forced on unpaid leave just for being pregnant. That’s wrong – and we have to choose policies that ensure pregnant workers are treated with dignity and respect.

New parents deserve quality, affordable childcare. There’s nothing like the peace of mind that comes with knowing that your kids are safe while you’re at work. And the benefits that children get out of early enrichment can pay off for a lifetime. But in many states, sending your kid to daycare costs more than sending them to a public university. So let’s start demanding Pre-K for our kids.

And when most low-wage workers are women, but Congress hasn’t passed a minimum wage increase in seven years, it’s long past time that women deserve a raise. About 28 million workers would benefit from an increase in the minimum wage to ten dollars and ten cents an hour. And more than half of those workers are women. The local businesses where these workers spend their money would benefit, too. So let’s do this – let’s give America a raise.

All of these policies are common sense. All of them are within our reach. We’ve just got to speak up and choose them. Because they’ll build a stronger America for all of us.

Thanks, and have a great weekend.

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