Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) — President Obama will likely discuss the threat of foreign fighters—and their travel in and out of country—with British Prime Minister David Cameron at the upcoming NATO summit in Wales, White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said Tuesday.

“I would anticipate that these kinds of discussions will be on the agenda,” he said.

Later this month, the president is expected to convene a UN Security Council meeting when the General Assembly gathers for a meeting in New York, and will “lead a discussion” about “the threat that’s posed by foreign fighters,” Earnest said.

After Cameron announced emergency powers to seize passports and bar-reentry of U.K. citizens suspected of fighting (or going to fight) for ISIS, Earnest would not say whether Obama is contemplating changes to U.S. visa-waiver policies, which allow residents of some countries to enter the U.S. and stay for months without a visa, in light of ISIS’s heavy recruitment of foreign fighters.

Earnest referenced the occasional “tweaking [of] those policies and procedures in ways that sometimes aren’t visible to the traveling public” and said, “There are professionals on the front lines making these kinds of decisions on a regular basis” to ensure that policies already in place are being used to protect the American public.

The threat of foreign fighters has been on the White House’s radar for “months,” Earnest said.

“Over the last several months, this is an issue that the White House has been very focused on,” Earnest said.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The Department of Homeland Security has lost track of more than 6,000 foreign nationals who entered the United States on student visas, overstayed their welcome, and essentially vanished — exploiting a security gap that was supposed to be fixed after the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks.

“My greatest concern is that they could be doing anything,” said Peter Edge, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement official who oversees investigations into visa violators. “Some of them could be here to do us harm.”

Homeland Security officials disclosed the breadth of the student visa problem in response to ABC News questions submitted as part of an investigation into persistent complaints about the nation’s entry program for students.

ABC News found that immigration officials have struggled to keep track of the rapidly increasing numbers of foreign students coming to the U.S. — now in excess of one million each year. The immigration agency’s own figures show that 58,000 students overstayed their visas in the past year. Of those, 6,000 were referred to agents for follow-up because they were determined to be of heightened concern.

“They just disappear,” said Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla. “They get the visas and they disappear.”

Coburn said since the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks, 26 student visa holders have been arrested in the U.S. on terror-related charges.

Tightening up the student visa program was one of the major recommendations made by the 9/11 Commission, after it was determined that the hijacker who flew Flight 77 into the Pentagon, Hani Hanjour, had entered the U.S. on a student visa but never showed up for school.

Edge said ICE agents are trying to locate every one of the 6,000 missing students, but acknowledged that “we really have a lot more work to do” to tighten up the student visa program.

Despite repeated concerns raised by Congress, federal immigration officials have also continued to grant schools certification to accept overseas applicants even if the schools lack accreditation, state certification, or any obvious measure of academic rigor.

There are now more than 9,000 schools on the government approved list. The list includes such top flight American colleges as Harvard and Yale, but it also includes 86 beauty schools, 36 massage schools and nine schools that teach horseshoeing. Foreign students can enter the U.S. on a visa to study acupuncture, hair braiding, or join academies that focus on tennis and golf.

Once the student arrives in the U.S., it is up to the schools to keep track of the visa-holder’s whereabouts — and report to the government if they repeatedly miss class.

That is a serious concern, Coburn said, because a number of for-profit schools appear to have been operating with a primary goal of selling visas, not educating students.

“We know we have a lot of non-accredited universities that are using this system to bring people in, collect money, and not educate them at all,” said Coburn, who is part of a bi-partisan group of senators that has been trying to tighten controls on student visas. “To me, it’s a mess.”

One school on the approved list, MicroPower Career Institute, licensed by the state of New York, continues to have four campuses on the approved list, even though five of the school’s top officials — including its president — were indicted on charges of visa fraud in May. According to the indictment, 80 percent of the foreign students enrolled MicroPower had delinquent attendance, putting them out of compliance with their visas. But the school did not report them, the indictment says. All five school officials have pleaded not guilty in the case.

ABC News visited MicroPower’s small fifth floor campus in a Manhattan office suite, but the school declined to make anyone available to comment.

Edge, who is Executive Associate Director at for ICE Homeland Security Investigations, said his agency had no choice but to continue to allow MicroPower to facilitate student visas.

“I can only say that this is the United States of America and everyone has due process,” Edge said.

The MicroPower case is one of several that touch on broader questions long raised about the student visa program.

Thomas Kean 9/11 Commission Co-Chair said the government has yet to address the security gaps the program has created. He said was stunned the federal government continues to lose track of so many foreign nationals who had entered the country with student visas. He noted that, even before the 9/11 terror attacks, federal officials had been aware of the gaps in the student visa program. The man who drove the van containing explosives into the World Trade Center garage in 1993 was also a student visa holder who was a no-show at school.

“It’s been pointed out over and over and over again and the fact that nothing has been done about it yet…it’s a very dangerous thing for all of us,” Kean said. “The fact that there’s been no action on this is very bothersome.”

Janice Kephart, who was counsel to the 9/11 Commission and co-author of a separate report looking at how the hijackers entered the U.S., said the credibility of schools certified by ICE is another significant concern.

“When schools are not legitimate that enables terrorists to come here under a fraudulent basis and disappear into the fabric of society without anybody knowing that they are here for illegitimate reason,” Kephart said, “because the system itself will say they’re here legitimately when in fact they’re not.”

ICE has taken steps to address the issue, especially in the aftermath of a damning report by the Government Accountability Office in 2012, which found the agency had failed to adequately police for visa fraud. ICE officials told ABC News, for instance, that it has undertaken a new program to deploy field representatives around the country to personally inspect schools that had been approved to accept foreign students. So far, 15 field representatives have been hired, with a plan to ultimately employ 60 around the country, according to spokesperson Carissa Cutrell.

The agency has also launched a program — so far installed at one airport, but planned for others — that will immediately alert a customs inspector if a student is attempting to re-enter the country after their status has been flagged by a school official.

“We’re continually making improvements,” Cutrell said.

Edge said part of the blame for the continued trouble with the student visa program stems from a Congress that has been unwilling to impose tighter limits on schools — many of which profit from tuition paid by foreign students.

Coburn, as well as Sens. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, and Chuck Schumer, D-NY, were among those pushing for limiting ICE certification to accredited schools in 2012. But that effort stalled in the House of Representatives.

Rachel Banks, the director of public policy for NAFSA, the association of international educators, said her group has been working to promote opportunities for foreign study in the U.S. She said the group understands the need to monitor the arrival and departure of foreign nationals, but it should not come at the expense of legitimate applicants seeking to study in America.

“Students should not be scapegoated,” Banks said. “Foreign students are an asset and not a threat.”

The effort to expand options for foreign study appear to be prevailing. According to figures gathered by congressional investigators, the number of foreign nationals obtaining visas to study in the U.S. has grown from 662,966 in 2003 to more than 1.2 million in 2012.

Edge said his agency has accepted that those numbers represent a continued challenge for the Department of Homeland Security.

“Our work has only begun,” he said. “We have a lot more work to do in this space.”

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Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) — In a video released by the U.S. State Department and posted to YouTube, President Obama urged West Africans not to touch the bodies of family members who have died from Ebola.

“When burying someone who has died from this terrible disease,” Obama said, “it’s important to not directly touch their body. You can respect your traditions and honor your loved ones without risking the lives of the living.”

The World Health Organization has noted that burial practices involving physical contact with corpses may play a role in the transmission of Ebola. The disease has spread to at least four countries in West Africa and threatens to infect even more people if action isn’t taken to halt it.

Obama addressed the video to “you, the people of West Africa,” and reassured West Africans that the U.S. and other nations will continue to work with the West African governments to fight the Ebola outbreak.

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Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) — President Obama will head to Europe on Tuesday to take part in a North Atlantic Treaty Organization summit to discuss, among other things, the continued tension caused by Russia’s incursion into Ukraine.

Obama will first land in Estonia, where he is expected to reaffirm the U.S.’ stance that Russia should not get involved in the independent nations. At his second stop, the president will meet with other NATO leaders, but without Russian President Vladimir Putin, in Wales.

While Ukraine is not a NATO member, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko was invited to this week’s summit.

In a statement, NATO Deputy Secretary General Alexander Vershbow, highlighted the importance of “collective defense,” “crisis management” and “partnerships,” in handling the situation in Ukraine. The summit, initially planned to mark an end to the NATO combat mission in Afghanistan, will still touch on that subject as well, Vershbow said.

NATO is expected to form a “spearhead” force in response to Russian actions, which will be “ready to respond at short notice.”

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Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) — President Obama will head to Europe on Tuesday to take part in a North Atlantic Treaty Organization summit to discuss, among other things, the continued tension caused by Russia’s incursion into Ukraine.

Obama will first land in Estonia, where he is expected to reaffirm the U.S.’ stance that Russia should not get involved in the independent nations. At his second stop, the president will meet with other NATO leaders, but without Russian President Vladimir Putin, in Wales.

While Ukraine is not a NATO member, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko was invited to this week’s summit.

In a statement, NATO Deputy Secretary General Alexander Vershbow, highlighted the importance of “collective defense,” “crisis management” and “partnerships,” in handling the situation in Ukraine. The summit, initially planned to mark an end to the NATO combat mission in Afghanistan, will still touch on that subject as well, Vershbow said.

NATO is expected to form a “spearhead” force in response to Russian actions, which will be “ready to respond at short notice.”

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US House of Representatives(NEW YORK) — Former House Majority Leader Eric Cantor has been appointed Vice Chairman and Member of the Board of Directors of Moelis & Company, a global investment bank.

According to a release posted to Moelis & Company’s website, Cantor will “provide strategic counsel to the Firm’s corporate and institutional clients on key issues.” He will also be involved in client development.

Cantor said that when considering his post-politics career, he “wanted to join a firm with a great entrepreneurial spirit that focused on its clients.” Citing admiration of the vision of Moelis & Company, Cantor said that he felt the company was “a place where I knew my skills could help clients succeed.”

The company’s Chairman and CEO, Ken Moelis, called the former Republican Congressman “a pro-business advocate and one who will enhance our boardroom discussions with CEOs and senior management as we help them navigate their most important strategic decisions.”

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Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(MILWAUKEE) — Fired up and in campaign form, President Obama delivered what appeared to be a pre-midterm stump speech on Monday to labor activists in Wisconsin, the state that became the labor movement’s political epicenter in 2011.

“Every gray hair is worth it,” he told the crowd, of pressing for economic policies such as a higher minimum wage in the face of GOP resistance.

“The American economy and American workers are better off than when I took office,” he said.

Obama spoke at Laborfest 2014, a Labor Day rally in Henry Maier Festival Park. Supporters standing behind him and out in the audience wore green AFSCME and purple SEIU t-shirts.

It was a typical economic stump speech of the kind Obama has delivered over and over in American cities this year, with calls for higher wages, criticism of Republicans for blocking them, and pleas for a better life for working-class Americans.

But Monday, the president was more expressly political, exhorting the crowd to organize and vote Democratic in this fall’s midterm elections.

“I’d also want more Democrats looking out for me, I’m just saying,” Obama said, after telling the crowd that if he were a worker looking for better wages and safety protections, he’d join a union.

Shouting and appearing visibly riled, Obama reminded the crowd of union and Democratic-Party victories in securing a 40-hour workweek and supporting Medicare and Social Security.

Earlier on Monday, Vice President Joe Biden delivered a similarly political, and similarly populist speech to a Labor Day rally hosted by union organizers in Detroit.

The president traveled to Wisconsin for this one appearance and was to return to the White House before departing Tuesday for Estonia and this week’s NATO summit in Wales.

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Scott Olson/Getty Images(CHICAGO) — Illinois Congresswoman Tammy Duckworth has announced she’s pregnant.

In 2004, the veteran lost both of her legs and part of an arm when her helicopter was shot down in the Iraq War.

She says she became pregnant through a form of in vitro fertilization, and now she and her husband are expecting a baby girl in December.

The 46-year-old says due to her age and injuries the pregnancy is considered “high risk.”

Duckworth is the first female veteran of the Iraq war to be elected to congress. She will be seeking re-election in November.

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Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) — President Obama notified Congress of his authorization of the bombing and humanitarian airdrop campaign to help Shiite Turkmen surrounded by ISIS in the town of Amirli, Iraq, according to a letter released by the White House on Monday.

“These additional operations will be limited in their scope and duration as necessary to address this emerging humanitarian crisis and protect the civilians trapped in Amirli,” Obama wrote.

Up until this point, Obama has publicly justified military actions against ISIS as protecting U.S. personnel stationed in Erbil and to assist Yezidis trapped on Mt. Sinjar. In this new letter – which could be construed as a bit unusual because it concerns an expansion of the anti-ISIS campaign he’s already announced – Obama defines the Amirli strikes as solely a humanitarian/assistance mission, not as protecting Americans.

The letter followed Obama’s standard practice, to announce strikes (usually two days later) in a letter to Congress “consistent with” the War Powers Resolution – an act of Congress that Obama and other presidents have declined to acknowledge as binding.

The Pentagon announced on Saturday that it had extended its bombing campaign southward to help the Turkmen. Strikes and humanitarian drops began on Saturday and strikes continued Sunday.

U.S. bombs have been falling mostly around Mosul and Mosul Dam since Obama authorized the anti-ISIS campaign three weeks ago. This weekend, the Pentagon announced a handful of strikes that brought the total to 120 in Iraq since they began Aug. 8.

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Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) — President Obama notified Congress of his authorization of the bombing and humanitarian airdrop campaign to help Shiite Turkmen surrounded by ISIS in the town of Amirli, Iraq, according to a letter released by the White House on Monday.

“These additional operations will be limited in their scope and duration as necessary to address this emerging humanitarian crisis and protect the civilians trapped in Amirli,” Obama wrote.

Up until this point, Obama has publicly justified military actions against ISIS as protecting U.S. personnel stationed in Erbil and to assist Yezidis trapped on Mt. Sinjar. In this new letter – which could be construed as a bit unusual because it concerns an expansion of the anti-ISIS campaign he’s already announced – Obama defines the Amirli strikes as solely a humanitarian/assistance mission, not as protecting Americans.

The letter followed Obama’s standard practice, to announce strikes (usually two days later) in a letter to Congress “consistent with” the War Powers Resolution – an act of Congress that Obama and other presidents have declined to acknowledge as binding.

The Pentagon announced on Saturday that it had extended its bombing campaign southward to help the Turkmen. Strikes and humanitarian drops began on Saturday and strikes continued Sunday.

U.S. bombs have been falling mostly around Mosul and Mosul Dam since Obama authorized the anti-ISIS campaign three weeks ago. This weekend, the Pentagon announced a handful of strikes that brought the total to 120 in Iraq since they began Aug. 8.

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