Feng Li/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Hillary Clinton is going back to Iowa for the first time in six years.

The former secretary of state will headline Sen. Tom Harkin’s annual steak fry in Indianola next month, making her first visit to the state since 2008.

Bill and Hillary Clinton will be on hand for Harkin’s final steak fry, a representative for the couple confirmed. It’s a long-standing tradition that launched a young Barack Obama back in the fall of 2006. This year’s event is scheduled for Sept. 14.

Hillary Clinton’s decision to headline the steak fry, which “might promise to be the best ever,” according to Harkin’s website, could be seen as a swift political move for the former New York senator as she continues to mull a second run for president.

The former presidential candidate has not stepped foot in Iowa since she came in third in the Iowa caucuses on Jan. 4, 2008. And when she skipped the state during her nationwide book tour this summer, some in Iowa started to feel neglected.

The Gazette, an Iowa newspaper, practically begged Mrs. Clinton to visit last month.

“We’ve watched as you have flexed your muscles on the international stage and have been impressed with your ability to connect,” the Gazette editorialized. “But as Iowans, we need to see that connection in action. Our hope, if you are really considering a 2016 run, is that you have learned from your experience and come to Iowa intent on having true conversations about what matters to our state and the fine people in it.”

The Des Moines Register was first to report the news of Hillary Clinton’s upcoming Iowa appearance Monday. It has been confirmed to ABC News by a top Iowa Democrat with long ties to Harkin, who plans to retire next year at the end of his fifth term.

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ABC News/Yahoo! News(WASHINGTON) — Scott Walker is widely considered one of the GOP’s presidential hopefuls. But before the Wisconsin governor can run for president in 2016, he needs to win his bid for reelection in 2014 — and that means getting past his Democratic challenger, Mary Burke.

Burke, the first woman nominated for governor in Wisconsin by a major political party and a former executive of her family’s successful business, Trek Bicycles, is proving to be a formidable obstacle. The most recent polling shows the partisan rivals locked in a dead heat.

In the contentious campaign between Walker and Burke, job creation in the Dairy Land is ground zero.

One of Walker’s main lines of attack against Burke has been to criticize her family’s bike business for outsourcing 99 percent of its production overseas, primarily to China — a strategy that harkens back to the Obama campaign’s 2012 tactic to counter Mitt Romney’s business success.

“What surprises me about it is that a sitting governor would drag a great Wisconsin home-grown company through the mud for politics,” Burke told ABC News/Yahoo! News in a recent interview. “Trek employs nearly a thousand people in Wisconsin; in addition to that, it buys goods and services from other Wisconsin businesses, which creates more good-paying jobs in the state.”

When it comes to job creation, Burke has her own line of attack against Walker.

“Under Scott Walker, we’re dead last in the Midwest in terms of job creation,” Burke said, a point she makes frequently.

“I’m running in order to make sure that we are able to move Wisconsin forward and lead the country instead of lagging the country,” she later added.

Though Burke said she isn’t running “to carry the flag for women,” despite being the state’s first woman of a major party to be nominated for governor, she believes Walker has been waging a war on women.

“One of the first things that he did was repeal our equal pay protections, and then, throughout the years, we have now seen more attacks on women’s choice issues from mandatory ultrasounds to waiting periods,” she said. “These are all things that are messing with women’s right to make our own health care choices.”

On the topic of health care — and specifically the Affordable Care Act — Burke has a widely divergent perspective from Walker, who declined to create a state-run exchange and turned down additional Medicare and Medicaid funding from the federal government.

Burke says that by declining federal money for Medicaid expansion, Walker has put politics ahead of common sense.

“As I travel around the state it’s one of the biggest issues that I hear, and unfortunately, I hear stories of people…entrepreneurs with families, two kids, and they’re going without health insurance right now — that’s a real problem,” she said. “So, what Scott Walker has done by turning down the Medicaid expansion is actually making health care more expensive in Wisconsin and throwing people off of their health care.”

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Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Former Sen. Jim Jeffords, I-Vt., passed away Monday morning at the age of 80, a former aide to Jeffords confirmed to ABC News.

Jeffords, who once was a Republican before becoming an independent and caucusing with Democrats, was in declining health and died at the Knollwood Military Retirement Residence in Washington, D.C. around 7 a.m.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., weighed in on Jeffords’ death in a statement to ABC News.

“He was a partner in our work for Vermont, and he was a friend. He was a Vermonter through and through, drawn to political life to make a difference for our state and nation. Part of his legacy will also stand as an enduring chapter of the Senate’s history,” Leahy said.

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ABC News/Yahoo! News(WASHINGTON) — Scott Walker is widely considered one of the GOP’s presidential hopefuls. But before the Wisconsin governor can run for president in 2016, he needs to win his bid for reelection in 2014 — and that means getting past his Democratic challenger, Mary Burke.

Burke, the first woman nominated for governor in Wisconsin by a major political party and a former executive of her family’s successful business, Trek Bicycles, is proving to be a formidable obstacle. The most recent polling shows the partisan rivals locked in a dead heat.

In the contentious campaign between Walker and Burke, job creation in the Dairy Land is ground zero.

One of Walker’s main lines of attack against Burke has been to criticize her family’s bike business for outsourcing 99 percent of its production overseas, primarily to China — a strategy that harkens back to the Obama campaign’s 2012 tactic to counter Mitt Romney’s business success.

“What surprises me about it is that a sitting governor would drag a great Wisconsin home-grown company through the mud for politics,” Burke told ABC News/Yahoo! News in a recent interview. “Trek employs nearly a thousand people in Wisconsin; in addition to that, it buys goods and services from other Wisconsin businesses, which creates more good-paying jobs in the state.”

When it comes to job creation, Burke has her own line of attack against Walker.

“Under Scott Walker, we’re dead last in the Midwest in terms of job creation,” Burke said, a point she makes frequently.

“I’m running in order to make sure that we are able to move Wisconsin forward and lead the country instead of lagging the country,” she later added.

Though Burke said she isn’t running “to carry the flag for women,” despite being the state’s first woman of a major party to be nominated for governor, she believes Walker has been waging a war on women.

“One of the first things that he did was repeal our equal pay protections, and then, throughout the years, we have now seen more attacks on women’s choice issues from mandatory ultrasounds to waiting periods,” she said. “These are all things that are messing with women’s right to make our own health care choices.”

On the topic of health care — and specifically the Affordable Care Act — Burke has a widely divergent perspective from Walker, who declined to create a state-run exchange and turned down additional Medicare and Medicaid funding from the federal government.

Burke says that by declining federal money for Medicaid expansion, Walker has put politics ahead of common sense.

“As I travel around the state it’s one of the biggest issues that I hear, and unfortunately, I hear stories of people…entrepreneurs with families, two kids, and they’re going without health insurance right now — that’s a real problem,” she said. “So, what Scott Walker has done by turning down the Medicaid expansion is actually making health care more expensive in Wisconsin and throwing people off of their health care.”

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Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Former Sen. Jim Jeffords, I-Vt., passed away Monday morning at the age of 80, a former aide to Jeffords confirmed to ABC News.

Jeffords, who once was a Republican before becoming an independent and caucusing with Democrats, was in declining health and died at the Knollwood Military Retirement Residence in Washington, D.C. around 7 a.m.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., weighed in on Jeffords’ death in a statement to ABC News.

“He was a partner in our work for Vermont, and he was a friend. He was a Vermonter through and through, drawn to political life to make a difference for our state and nation. Part of his legacy will also stand as an enduring chapter of the Senate’s history,” Leahy said.

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Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) — President Obama headed back to the White House Sunday night, briefly interrupting his family vacation in Martha’s Vineyard to address unspecified matters.

Administration officials were initially tight-lipped about what the president will deal with during his two days in Washington, although late Sunday the White House released Obama’s itinerary for Monday that includes meeting Vice President Joe Biden and members of the National Security Council to receive an update on U.S. military and humanitarian action in Iraq.

Later Monday, the president and Attorney General Eric Holder will talk about the situation in Ferguson, Missouri, involving the fatal shooting of teen Michael Brown.

There is also speculation that one issue Obama might discuss is the stagnation of immigration reform, which House Republicans have said won’t be debated until after the November mid-term elections.

Although no specific action is expected during his brief White House stay, Obama might use executive orders following the congressional recess to lift the threat of deportation facing millions of undocumented immigrants, a politically risky move that could either empower the Latino base or increase anti-immigration fervor before the election.

Meanwhile, Obama’s due back with his family sometime Tuesday to spend the remainder of the week vacationing.

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http://kinzinger.house.gov(WASHINGTON) — Rep. Adam Kinzinger issued a stark warning about recent events in Iraq Sunday on This Week and called for the extremist group ISIS, which has seized large amounts of territory within the country, to be crushed.

“What we’re watching in Iraq and Syria frankly is the worst case scenario for the Middle East,” Kinzinger, R-Ill., told ABC’s Martha Raddatz.

“What we’ve begun doing is very good, but I think we have to get even bigger and realize that the crushing and pushing back of ISIS, not only in Iraq but also in Syria, is utmost priority,” he said.

His comments follow a week of targeted airstrikes by the United States near the Mosul Dam, now under ISIS control, and aid operations by international forces to combat the persecution of the Yazidi religious minority.

Kinzinger, who served in the U.S. Air Force in Iraq and is currently a reserve in the National Guard, was positive about the U.S. response but said the Obama administration could do more to push back ISIS forces in Iraq and Syria.

“The president has got to stand up in front of the American people and say, ‘Look, you may be war-weary, but in five or ten years we don’t want to look back and say we missed all the signs,’” Kinzinger said.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, who served in the National Guard in Iraq, said the U.S. needs to clarify its mission.

“What is our mission?” she asked. “What are we trying to accomplish here?”

Gabbard agreed the U.S. could do more such as arming Kurdish forces with heavy weapons, while Kinzinger suggested that U.S. Special Forces embed with the Iraqi military.

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http://kinzinger.house.gov(WASHINGTON) — Rep. Adam Kinzinger issued a stark warning about recent events in Iraq Sunday on This Week and called for the extremist group ISIS, which has seized large amounts of territory within the country, to be crushed.

“What we’re watching in Iraq and Syria frankly is the worst case scenario for the Middle East,” Kinzinger, R-Ill., told ABC’s Martha Raddatz.

“What we’ve begun doing is very good, but I think we have to get even bigger and realize that the crushing and pushing back of ISIS, not only in Iraq but also in Syria, is utmost priority,” he said.

His comments follow a week of targeted airstrikes by the United States near the Mosul Dam, now under ISIS control, and aid operations by international forces to combat the persecution of the Yazidi religious minority.

Kinzinger, who served in the U.S. Air Force in Iraq and is currently a reserve in the National Guard, was positive about the U.S. response but said the Obama administration could do more to push back ISIS forces in Iraq and Syria.

“The president has got to stand up in front of the American people and say, ‘Look, you may be war-weary, but in five or ten years we don’t want to look back and say we missed all the signs,’” Kinzinger said.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, who served in the National Guard in Iraq, said the U.S. needs to clarify its mission.

“What is our mission?” she asked. “What are we trying to accomplish here?”

Gabbard agreed the U.S. could do more such as arming Kurdish forces with heavy weapons, while Kinzinger suggested that U.S. Special Forces embed with the Iraqi military.

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http://kinzinger.house.gov(WASHINGTON) — Rep. Adam Kinzinger issued a stark warning about recent events in Iraq Sunday on This Week and called for the extremist group ISIS, which has seized large amounts of territory within the country, to be crushed.

“What we’re watching in Iraq and Syria frankly is the worst case scenario for the Middle East,” Kinzinger, R-Ill., told ABC’s Martha Raddatz.

“What we’ve begun doing is very good, but I think we have to get even bigger and realize that the crushing and pushing back of ISIS, not only in Iraq but also in Syria, is utmost priority,” he said.

His comments follow a week of targeted airstrikes by the United States near the Mosul Dam, now under ISIS control, and aid operations by international forces to combat the persecution of the Yazidi religious minority.

Kinzinger, who served in the U.S. Air Force in Iraq and is currently a reserve in the National Guard, was positive about the U.S. response but said the Obama administration could do more to push back ISIS forces in Iraq and Syria.

“The president has got to stand up in front of the American people and say, ‘Look, you may be war-weary, but in five or ten years we don’t want to look back and say we missed all the signs,’” Kinzinger said.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, who served in the National Guard in Iraq, said the U.S. needs to clarify its mission.

“What is our mission?” she asked. “What are we trying to accomplish here?”

Gabbard agreed the U.S. could do more such as arming Kurdish forces with heavy weapons, while Kinzinger suggested that U.S. Special Forces embed with the Iraqi military.

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governor.mo.gov(FERGUSON, Mo.) — Sunday on This Week, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, sitting down for an interview in Ferguson, told ABC News’ Martha Raddatz that he was astounded by some of the images that came out of Ferguson depicting what he described as an “over-militarization” of the police force.

“I, all of us were thunderstruck by the pictures we saw,” Nixon said on This Week. “I mean, the over-militarization, the MRAPs rolling in, the guns pointed at kids in the street. All of that I think instead of ratcheting down brought emotion up.”

But Nixon rejected responsibility for failing to quell the ongoing unrest in Ferguson, responding, “I’ve been here almost every day… The bottom line: we’ve been focused on meeting with groups, meeting with the parents, making sure that we were set up and then taking the unprecedented action on Wednesday to replace and to bring in the highway patrol.”

Nixon declared a state of emergency in Ferguson on Saturday and imposed a curfew following days of protests that erupted after an unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer, identified Friday as Darren Wilson.

During his interview on This Week, the governor revealed that the state was caught off-guard by the Ferguson Police Department’s decision to release surveillance video of Brown during an alleged store robbery on the same day they named the officer responsible for his death.

“We were unaware that they were going to release it and we certainly were not happy with that being released. Especially in the way that it was it appeared to you know cast dispersions on a young man that was gunned down in the street,” Nixon told Raddatz.

The security footage, apparently showing Brown committing a robbery at a convenience store just minutes before his death, reignited civil unrest in the town over the weekend. The Police Department claims that they were obligated to release the tape because of requests made by journalists under Missouri’s “Sunshine,” or freedom-of-information law, despite the Department of Justice and federal investigators opposing its release.

The attorney for the Brown family Anthony Gray, who also appeared on This Week, said the family was disturbed by the release of the surveillance video.

“Well, they first of all they were very appalled by it,” Gray said on This Week. “They saw it for the first time, at least a glimpse of it, on nationwide TV. They had requested an opportunity through the attorneys to see any video footage before it was released. That request obviously was not honored. So quite naturally, the reaction was very, on the part of the family, they were very disturbed by it. And I would just point out that no one from the family was given the opportunity to even authenticate that that was actually Mike Brown Jr. in the video.”

“There’s no reason not to believe that it’s him but much like when you identify somebody who is deceased, you have a family member that come in and make a positive ID. And they have not had an opportunity to do that,” Gray added.

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