iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The Senate advanced an emergency supplemental bill Wednesday morning that includes $2.7 billion in funding for the border crisis.

The Senate voted 63 to 33 to invoke cloture on the motion to proceed to the measure, the initial procedural vote on the bill, which also includes $225 million for the Iron Dome and $615 million for combating wildfires. (It’s unclear at this time when the next vote would be.)

The Senate’s measure is $1 billion less than what President Obama requested to address the influx of unaccompanied minors crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. The Republican-controlled House is considering a much smaller package — $659 million — for the border.

Notably, two Senate Democrats in tough midterm races this year voted against advancing the measure — Sens. Kay Hagan, D-N.C., and Mary Landrieu, D-La.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — If you’re looking for a senator or member of Congress this week, you may have better luck at The Capital Grille than the Capitol.

This final stretch of July is not just the last chance for Congress to address highway funding and the border crisis before a five-week vacation. It’s also the end of the summer fundraising circuit in one of the most expensive midterms election cycles in history — the last chance to collect checks in Washington before the fall campaign season ties down incumbents and candidates in their home districts and states.

Republicans and Democrats in Congress are holding at least 100 fundraisers in Washington, D.C. in the days leading up to the August recess, according to fundraising lists obtained by ABC News, with senators who aren’t even on the ballot in 2014 holding events.

With contributions ranging from $50 to $5,000, Washington politicos can join representatives and senators for breakfast, lunch and dinner — or all three.

The events don’t stop at meals.

Rep. Cedric Richmond, a Louisiana Democrat, is hosting a happy hour event after work Wednesday, while Rep. Jim McDermott, a Washington Democrat, is taking in a DC United soccer game with supporters later that evening.

On Monday, Indiana Democratic Sen. Joe Donnelly sailed supporters down the Potomac River on a lunchtime cruise sponsored by a boating industry PAC, according to an invitation obtained by the Sunlight Foundation.

While Republicans and Democrats blame one another for the dysfunction that has gripped the Capitol — the 113th Congress is already on track to be one of the least productive sessions ever — they share a bipartisan knack for finding sufficient time for fundraising.

Several lawmakers are holding more than one event over the course of the week, while others are cramming in multiple fundraisers a day.

Take, for example, Rep. Tammy Duckworth, an Illinois Democrat, who began her day at a fundraising breakfast at Johnny’s Half Shell, a Louisiana-inspired restaurant just off Capitol Hill, and ended her day over Italian food at Carmine’s.

Rep. Marsha Blackburn, a Tennessee Republican, hosted a noon lunch on Tuesday at Bearnaise, a French bistro on Capitol Hill, and six hours later she was in a private booth at Fiola, an Italian restaurant that sits between the Capitol and the White House.

She didn’t, however, have the restaurant to herself.

Rep. Steny Hoyer, the No. 2 Democrat in the House, held a Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee fundraising dinner of his own at Fiola on Tuesday night.

Hoyer offered a greeting to Blackburn’s table as he made his way to one of Fiola’s two private dining rooms. (The other was occupied by a party that included Rep. Mike Rogers, a Republican from Michigan.)

“We don’t discriminate. For us, it’s really about hospitality,” said Jessica Botta, the director of culinary development at Fiola, which regularly hosts Washington lawmakers but also out-of-towners like former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush. “We’re just providing a great service to Democrats and Republicans.”

The end of the legislative week is not the end of the fundraising calendar: one restaurateur expects roughly a third of his election-year business to come from fundraisers.

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Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Sen. John McCain and a leading Democratic senator are calling on American and international soccer officials to reconsider the decision to hold the 2018 World Cup in Russia, casting it as a way to leverage power against Russian President Vladimir Putin in a way he’s sure to understand.

McCain, a senior member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, told the ESPN/ABC podcast “Capital Games” that while the U.S. can play a leadership role in pressing for a new country to be chosen for hosting duties, there should be no boycott.

“It absolutely should be reconsidered, but I would hasten to add that a unilateral decision by the United States would not bode well,” said McCain, R-Ariz. “I’d like to see the United States and others — say, the British perhaps and other countries — raise the issue in ordinary meetings, periodic meetings that they have. Say, ‘We need to discuss this issue. Is it appropriate to have this venue in Russia at this particular time, and aren’t there other countries that would be far less controversial?’”

Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., who has traveled to Ukraine with McCain and worked closely with him in support of the Ukrainian government, agreed that FIFA, the governing body of World Cup soccer, needs to press Putin by holding out the possibility that Russia would lose the 2018 World Cup.

“If in the face of a downed airliner, in the face of crippling sanctions from the European Union, Putin thumbs his nose at the international community and continues to send in arms and personnel into eastern Ukraine, then I’m not sure how you reward this guy and his government with a major, international competition,” Murphy said.

“This guy is all about image and right now he’s obsessed with this image as a crusading military aggressor — a tough guy. But he also wants the ability for people to come to Russia and to see what he has done and the country that he has built. I think that this could be a real blow to him,” Murphy added. “It might in the end be even more consequential to him and his prestige than any individual sanction against his economy that the United States or Europe is contemplating.”

McCain said the value Putin sees in showcasing his country at worldwide sporting events was obvious at the Winter Olympics in Sochi earlier this year. It was also on display at the World Cup in Brazil earlier this month, where Putin was pictured receiving a ceremonial soccer ball from FIFA President Sepp Blatter to mark the fact that Russia has hosting duties next.

“Obviously, he is a man of mammoth ego. He is the closest thing to an all-out dictator that we have seen,” McCain said of Putin. “His ego is mammoth, and any blows to his ego [are] strongly resented. But also, his behavior is basically — he has gotten away with, literally, with murder.”

“Let us recognize and identify Vladimir Putin for what he is, and Russian behavior for what it is. And frankly that [losing the World Cup] will be the greatest blow to him, because he loves being on the world stage,” McCain added.

The calls from McCain and Murphy echo those of top government officials in the U.K. and Germany, among other countries, who have called on soccer’s international governing body to revoke the tournament from Russia in light of the nation’s involvement in the crisis in Ukraine.

FIFA has dismissed such calls, arguing that keeping the tournament in Russia will foster international dialog that “can achieve positive change.”

Sports Illustrated Senior Writer Grant Wahl said on the podcast that FIFA officials appear unlikely to bow to demands of political leaders, when the organization’s sponsors hold the real sway. He said it was telling that FIFA proactively has said the World Cup will take place in Russia in 2018 and Qatar in 2022, despite recent controversy about those selections.

“I don’t think anything that happens in the very near term is going to have an influence on FIFA deciding one way or the other,” Wahl said. “FIFA’s just a very insular organization and a lot of their top people don’t to me seem all that troubled by the reputation that FIFA has. They simply look at the bottom line.”

McCain noted that some countries, including the Netherlands, are hesitant to speak out against Putin more forcefully because they depend on Russia for energy resources. That puts more of an onus on the United States to use levers at its disposal, he said.

“There’s no doubt that Vladimir Putin feels that he can literally get away with murder,” McCain said. “He is responsible, in my view, for the shoot-down of that [Malaysian] airliner and the tragedy associated with it. So he’s gotten away with murder. And look at it from his viewpoint, and all things considered, he’s doing pretty well.”

Preparing a location to host the World Cup can be a lengthy process, and both Murphy and Wahl agree it’s time to prod Putin now, while there’s still time to solicit proposals for alternative sites if he refuses to cooperate.

“You have to do it by the end of the year. …You can’t take the chance that this guy is going to calm down and start behaving — because what if another Ukraine crisis erupts in the winter of 2017-2018?” said Murphy.

“If the World Cup was, say, a month from now, I don’t think we would be sending teams to the World Cup and I don’t think that Europe would either,” he added.

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John Moore/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — House Republicans are offering a relative pittance of what President Obama is asking to help shelter and deport tens of thousands of Central American children who crossed the border into Texas.

While the president said $3.7 billion is needed, the GOP is only willing to ante up $659 million, which is even less than half of what House lawmakers proposed last week.

The Republican plan also includes a provision untenable to most Democrats: it would do away with an amendment in a 2008 law that protects Central American migrants from immediate deportation if stopped by Border Patrol agents.

There is also resistance within the GOP from those on the far right who don’t want to provide any emergency funding at all.

Even if a House bill does pass, with a vote likely scheduled for Thursday, there’s virtually no chance of it getting approved by the Senate.

With Congress heading out of town after that for a five-week recess, any emergency funding package is probably dead through the end of the year with lawmakers focusing their efforts on the midterm elections.

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Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(NEW YORK) — President Barack Obama falls short of majority approval for his handling of two of the world’s prime hotspots in a new ABC News/Washington Post poll, with an especially weak rating for his work on the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.

Just 39 percent of Americans approve of Obama’s handling of the situation in Israel and the Gaza Strip, while more than half, 52 percent, disapprove. The president does better for his response to the downed Malaysian Airlines jetliner in Ukraine; 46 percent approve — but virtually as many, 43 percent, disapprove.

[See PDF with full results here.]

The United States has realized some progress in Ukraine, where European nations this week agreed to join the U.S. in imposing sanctions on Russia. The administration continues to struggle in the Middle East, where U.S. efforts to broker a cease-fire thus far have failed.

Obama’s approval rating for handling international affairs overall, at 46 percent, is up by 5 percentage points from his career low last month. But 50 percent still disapprove, unchanged. And the number who strongly approve of Obama’s work on foreign affairs has hit an all-time low, 16 percent. Thirty-six percent strongly disapprove; that gap is the largest of his presidency.

There’s a similar, 19-point gap in strong sentiment on Obama’s handling of the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians — 14 percent approve strongly, while 33 percent strongly disapprove. The division on the Ukraine incident is less sharp, but still 9 points net negative in strength of sentiment.

Partisanship is a key driver of these views: Among Democrats, 77, 72 and 65 percent approve, respectively, of Obama’s handling of international affairs, the Ukraine situation and the conflict in Gaza and Israel. Among Republicans, those numbers plummet to 13, 20 and 18 percent.

As often is the case, this poll, produced for ABC by Langer Research Associates, finds that the balance is tilted by independents: Just 37 percent approve of Obama’s work on international affairs overall, 41 percent on the Ukraine incident and 31 percent on the Israel-Gaza conflict.

Obama’s rating for handling the situation involving Israel and the Palestinians is worse than four such measures for his predecessor, George W. Bush, ranging from a high of 59 percent approval in 2002 to a low of 46 percent in 2003, amid growing doubts about the war in Iraq.

METHODOLOGY – This ABC News/Washington Post poll was conducted by landline and cell phone July 23-27, 2014, in English and Spanish, among a random national sample of 1,026 adults. Results have a margin of sampling error of 3.5 points. The survey was produced for ABC News by Langer Research Associates of New York, N.Y.

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Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(NEW YORK) — Barack Obama falls short of majority approval for his handling of two of the world’s prime hotspots in a new ABC News/Washington Post poll, with an especially weak rating for his work on the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.

Just 39 percent of Americans approve of Obama’s handling of the situation in Israel and the Gaza Strip, while more than half, 52 percent, disapprove. The president does better for his response to the downed Malaysian Airlines jetliner in Ukraine; 46 percent approve — but virtually as many, 43 percent, disapprove.

[See PDF with full results here.]

The United States has realized some progress in Ukraine, where European nations this week agreed to join the U.S. in imposing sanctions on Russia. The administration continues to struggle in the Middle East, where U.S. efforts to broker a cease-fire thus far have failed.

Obama’s approval rating for handling international affairs overall, at 46 percent, is up by 5 percentage points from his career low last month. But 50 percent still disapprove, unchanged. And the number who strongly approve of Obama’s work on foreign affairs has hit an all-time low, 16 percent. Thirty-six percent strongly disapprove; that gap is the largest of his presidency.

There’s a similar, 19-point gap in strong sentiment on Obama’s handling of the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians — 14 percent approve strongly, while 33 percent strongly disapprove. The division on the Ukraine incident is less sharp, but still 9 points net negative in strength of sentiment.

Partisanship is a key driver of these views: Among Democrats, 77, 72 and 65 percent approve, respectively, of Obama’s handling of international affairs, the Ukraine situation and the conflict in Gaza and Israel. Among Republicans, those numbers plummet to 13, 20 and 18 percent.

As often is the case, this poll, produced for ABC by Langer Research Associates, finds that the balance is tilted by independents: Just 37 percent approve of Obama’s work on international affairs overall, 41 percent on the Ukraine incident and 31 percent on the Israel-Gaza conflict.

Obama’s rating for handling the situation involving Israel and the Palestinians is worse than four such measures for his predecessor, George W. Bush, ranging from a high of 59 percent approval in 2002 to a low of 46 percent in 2003, amid growing doubts about the war in Iraq.

METHODOLOGY – This ABC News/Washington Post poll was conducted by landline and cell phone July 23-27, 2014, in English and Spanish, among a random national sample of 1,026 adults. Results have a margin of sampling error of 3.5 points. The survey was produced for ABC News by Langer Research Associates of New York, N.Y.

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iStock/Thinkstock(BOULDER COUNTY, Colo.) — Colorado’s Supreme Court is ordering Boulder County to stop issuing marriage licenses to gay couples.

Boulder began issuing the licenses in June after the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver ruled against a gay marriage ban in neighboring Utah, calling it unconstitutional. Now, Colorado’s Supreme Court says Boulder must stop while an appeal is heard.

Boulder County had been the only county in Colorado still issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Talk of impeachment has been all the rage in Washington this summer.

Democrats say Republicans are shilling for it. Republicans counter that the buzz is merely a Democratic fundraising ploy. So who really started it, and when?

Almost immediately after Obama took office, conservative commentators on the fringes began toying with the idea of impeaching the president. Slowly but surely, the talk migrated into the mainstream as Republican lawmakers began to chime in.

Back in 2010, Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, told Lou Dobbs that Obama’s actions on the border came “awfully close” to violating his “oath of office” — an impeachable offense. And about a year later, Rep. Ted Yoho, an outspoken tea party congressman from Florida, outlined six reasons the president should be impeached in a post on his campaign website. Not long after, Texas GOP Rep. Michael Burgess said explicitly that impeachment “needs to happen.”

By this spring, at least 11 Republican lawmakers – Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota, Rep. Steve Stockman of Michigan and Rep. Louie Gohmert of Texas, had floated the idea of impeachment, and several high-profile Republican candidates, including Iowa U.S. Senate hopeful Joni Ernst, put impeachment on the table. As June rolled around, and the weather warmed, impeachment talk heated up, too.

Here’s a brief history of how Republicans started the most recent outbreak of chatter, and how the Democrats have sought to use it to their advantage:

June 4: Former Congressman Allen West, R-Fla., talks impeachment, calling Obama’s handling of the Bowe Bergdahl deal “an impeachable offense.”

“Ladies and gentlemen, I submit that Barack Hussein Obama’s unilateral negotiations with terrorists and the ensuing release of their key leadership without consult — mandated by law — with the U.S. Congress represents high crimes and misdemeanors, an impeachable offense,” West wrote in his Washington Post op-ed.

June 25: House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, quashes the impeachment question. Asked whether his lawsuit against the president could be a precursor to impeachment proceedings, Boehner insists the suit “is not about impeachment.”

July 8: Sarah Palin raises the issue’s profile. In an incendiary op-ed published by Breitbert, the 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee says “it’s time to impeach” Obama.

“Enough is enough of the years of abuse from this president,” she writes. “His unsecured border crisis is the last straw that makes the president say, ‘No mas.’”

July 10: When asked about her comments, Speaker Boehner brushes off Palin’s remarks, saying simply, “I disagree.”

July 10: Palin’s running mate, 2008 Republican presidential nominee Sen. John McCain, is also asked to weigh in. He says he “respect[s] always Sarah Palin’s views” but believes that impeachment “was not a good thing to do” to President Clinton and prefers to “devote our energies to regaining the majority in the Senate.”

July 23: The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee sends the first in a veritable flood of emails warning of the threat of impeachment, and soliciting donations.

July 24: First lady Michelle Obama reportedly predicts “more” talk about impeachment if the Democrats lose the 2014 midterms. “If we lose these midterm elections, it’s going to be a whole lot harder to finish what we started, because we’ll just see more of the same out in Washington — more obstructions, more lawsuits, and talk about impeachment,” Obama said, according to the Washington Examiner.

July 25: Senior White House adviser Dan Pfeiffer tells reporters he “would not discount” the “possibility” of impeachment, noting that Boehner’s lawsuit against the president “has opened the door to Republicans possibly considering impeachment at some point in the future.”

July 25:
White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest reiterates Pfeiffer’s point, saying “there are some Republicans, including Republicans who are running for office, hoping that they can get into office so that they can impeach the president,” and rejects the notion that impeachment is a democratic fundraising ploy.

July 27:
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D- Calif., unprompted, raises the issue in an interview on CNN.

“The Republicans are … on a path to impeach the president while we’re trying to create jobs and have stability in our country and in the world. And I’m sorry that we didn’t get a chance to talk more about that,” she says.

July 27: The DCCC circulates an email claiming that “House Republicans held a closed-door meeting to discuss impeaching President Obama,” and urging Dem supporters to “throw everything we’ve got at this.”

July 29: Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., also blasts impeachment chatter. “Isn’t it good that we’re talking about this, rather than impeachment of the president?” Reid says in reference to the VA deal.

July 29:
Boehner calls talk of impeachment “a scam started by Democrats at the White House.”

“This whole talk about impeachment is coming from the president’s own staff. And coming from Democrats on Capitol Hill,” the speaker said. “Why? Because they’re trying to rally their people to give money and to show up in this year’s elections. We have no plans to impeach the president.”

July 29:
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., echoes Boehner, saying, “the only people I’ve heard mention [impeachment] are the White House and the majority leader.”

Despite all the gossip, history is on Obama’s side. Only two U.S. presidents– Andrew Johnson, in 1868, and Bill Clinton, in 1998– have been impeached. (Richard Nixon voluntarily resigned before the House could impeach him.) And not once has presidential impeachment resulted in removal from office.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Talk of impeachment has been all the rage in Washington this summer.

Democrats say Republicans are shilling for it. Republicans counter that the buzz is merely a Democratic fundraising ploy. So who really started it, and when?

Almost immediately after Obama took office, conservative commentators on the fringes began toying with the idea of impeaching the president. Slowly but surely, the talk migrated into the mainstream as Republican lawmakers began to chime in.

Back in 2010, Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, told Lou Dobbs that Obama’s actions on the border came “awfully close” to violating his “oath of office” — an impeachable offense. And about a year later, Rep. Ted Yoho, an outspoken tea party congressman from Florida, outlined six reasons the president should be impeached in a post on his campaign website. Not long after, Texas GOP Rep. Michael Burgess said explicitly that impeachment “needs to happen.”

By this spring, at least 11 Republican lawmakers – Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota, Rep. Steve Stockman of Michigan and Rep. Louie Gohmert of Texas, had floated the idea of impeachment, and several high-profile Republican candidates, including Iowa U.S. Senate hopeful Joni Ernst, put impeachment on the table. As June rolled around, and the weather warmed, impeachment talk heated up, too.

Here’s a brief history of how Republicans started the most recent outbreak of chatter, and how the Democrats have sought to use it to their advantage:

June 4: Former Congressman Allen West, R-Fla., talks impeachment, calling Obama’s handling of the Bowe Bergdahl deal “an impeachable offense.”

“Ladies and gentlemen, I submit that Barack Hussein Obama’s unilateral negotiations with terrorists and the ensuing release of their key leadership without consult — mandated by law — with the U.S. Congress represents high crimes and misdemeanors, an impeachable offense,” West wrote in his Washington Post op-ed.

June 25: House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, quashes the impeachment question. Asked whether his lawsuit against the president could be a precursor to impeachment proceedings, Boehner insists the suit “is not about impeachment.”

July 8: Sarah Palin raises the issue’s profile. In an incendiary op-ed published by Breitbert, the 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee says “it’s time to impeach” Obama.

“Enough is enough of the years of abuse from this president,” she writes. “His unsecured border crisis is the last straw that makes the president say, ‘No mas.’”

July 10: When asked about her comments, Speaker Boehner brushes off Palin’s remarks, saying simply, “I disagree.”

July 10: Palin’s running mate, 2008 Republican presidential nominee Sen. John McCain, is also asked to weigh in. He says he “respect[s] always Sarah Palin’s views” but believes that impeachment “was not a good thing to do” to President Clinton and prefers to “devote our energies to regaining the majority in the Senate.”

July 23: The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee sends the first in a veritable flood of emails warning of the threat of impeachment, and soliciting donations.

July 24: First lady Michelle Obama reportedly predicts “more” talk about impeachment if the Democrats lose the 2014 midterms. “If we lose these midterm elections, it’s going to be a whole lot harder to finish what we started, because we’ll just see more of the same out in Washington — more obstructions, more lawsuits, and talk about impeachment,” Obama said, according to the Washington Examiner.

July 25: Senior White House adviser Dan Pfeiffer tells reporters he “would not discount” the “possibility” of impeachment, noting that Boehner’s lawsuit against the president “has opened the door to Republicans possibly considering impeachment at some point in the future.”

July 25:
White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest reiterates Pfeiffer’s point, saying “there are some Republicans, including Republicans who are running for office, hoping that they can get into office so that they can impeach the president,” and rejects the notion that impeachment is a democratic fundraising ploy.

July 27:
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D- Calif., unprompted, raises the issue in an interview on CNN.

“The Republicans are … on a path to impeach the president while we’re trying to create jobs and have stability in our country and in the world. And I’m sorry that we didn’t get a chance to talk more about that,” she says.

July 27: The DCCC circulates an email claiming that “House Republicans held a closed-door meeting to discuss impeaching President Obama,” and urging Dem supporters to “throw everything we’ve got at this.”

July 29: Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., also blasts impeachment chatter. “Isn’t it good that we’re talking about this, rather than impeachment of the president?” Reid says in reference to the VA deal.

July 29:
Boehner calls talk of impeachment “a scam started by Democrats at the White House.”

“This whole talk about impeachment is coming from the president’s own staff. And coming from Democrats on Capitol Hill,” the speaker said. “Why? Because they’re trying to rally their people to give money and to show up in this year’s elections. We have no plans to impeach the president.”

July 29:
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., echoes Boehner, saying, “the only people I’ve heard mention [impeachment] are the White House and the majority leader.”

Despite all the gossip, history is on Obama’s side. Only two U.S. presidents– Andrew Johnson, in 1868, and Bill Clinton, in 1998– have been impeached. (Richard Nixon voluntarily resigned before the House could impeach him.) And not once has presidential impeachment resulted in removal from office.

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Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) — Looks like President Obama’s back swing might need a little work.

A customized golf ball was reportedly found in the woods off the first hole at Congressional Country Club in Bethesda, Maryland.

The ball had “Titleist 44″ printed on one side and “POTUS” on the other.

Instagram user “larrydoh” claimed to have found the ball while playing a round of golf at Congressional Country Club over the weekend, writing “Looks like he’s off line again” in his post Sunday.

Congressional Country Club was unable to verify whether the president plays with such a golf ball, and Titleist did not respond to a request for comment.

However, the presidential golf ball very well may belong to Obama — as he was golfing at Congressional over the weekend.

President Obama played a round of golf Saturday with Mike Wilbon and Tony Kornheiser, co-hosts of ESPN’s “Pardon the Interruption.”

And on the first hole, who wouldn’t let POTUS take a mulligan?

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